Citation
Spruce Corner

Material Information

Title:
Spruce Corner
Creator:
Spitzer, John B
Language:
English
Physical Description:
42, 17, [10] leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Real estate development -- Colorado -- Boulder ( lcsh )
Urban renewal -- Colorado -- Boulder ( lcsh )
Real estate development ( fast )
Urban renewal ( fast )
Colorado -- Boulder ( fast )
Genre:
Academic theses. ( lcgft )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Academic theses ( lcgft )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
John B. Spitzer, Jr.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08822089 ( OCLC )
ocm08822089
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .S67 ( lcc )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
SPRUCE
CORNER
john b. spltzer. Ir. university of Colorado master’s thesis spring '82


project description P.i
vicinty map 3
transportation corridors 4
site access 5
site analysis e
topography 7
existing vegetation 8
history 9
comprehensive plan 10
zoning 12
neighborhood input 15
economics, offices 16


economics, residential 17
soils is
floodplains is
building codes, residential 19 building codes, offices 22
heat loss 23
climate data 24
solar 25
heat gain 29
matrix 30
thesis timetable 31
views 32


project
description
The project will encompass the redevelopment of an urban site at 15th and Spruce Streets, Boulder, Colorado. The present site is 100 feet by 140 feet and is occupied by four dilapidated buildings. The existing foundation systems are inadequate and present economic utilization of the site is not viable.
It is contemplated that the existing site will be cleared (saving as much vegetation as possible) and a new mixed use office-residential project will be created. The architecture must perform the task of accomplishing a transition from dense downtown uses to the residential neighborhood lying to the east. Appropriate scale, massing, materials, landscaping, access, and colors will be critical.
1


Phil Geil has expressed the following needs for office space:
Owner's office (16x15) Accountant's office (14x12) Computer room (10x10) Conference room (18x12) Private office (12x12) Private office (12x12) Reception area (12x15) Private bath (10x8) Circulation - storage
240 sq. ft. 170 100 220 14 4 14 4 180 80 500
1,778 sq. ft.
Kirk Wickersham, as a potential tenant of Phil Geil's, has expressed the following needs for office space:
Kirk Wickersham's office (16x15) = 200 sq
Partner's office (10x15) = 150
Clerk's office (10x15) = 150
Reception (10x15) = 150
Bullpen (20x25) = 500
Circulation - storage = 500
ft.
1,650 sq. ft.
Both Mr. Geil and Mr. Wickersham have expressed a need for flexible use of space as business needs expand or contract. This may entail planning entry and reception areas for possible subleases to other tenants.
Square footages for residences will be about 900 to 1,200 for two bedroom units which shall include a living area, dining room, kitchen, two bedrooms, two baths, and storage. Limited living units shall be one bedroom units with a maximum of 400 sq. ft. of floor area.
Residential amenities shall include passive solar heating, fireplaces or wood-burning stoves, tiled entries, oak kitchen cabinets, wood windows, and a light, airy interior mood.


vicinty map


AUSTIN
HOUSE
McAllister
HOUSE
-11—' r —rtnEliz. 1J *.
4
-m IjSITE MORRISON HOUSE
MmmaH PEDESTR AN MALL =: *
SS-.SV--
0 50 100’ 150’ ZOO' 300' 400* 500'
o
i5
transportation corridors
4
SPRUCE CORNER


13 th


ST. JOHN'S CHURCH AUSTIN HOUSE McAllister house
PINE
T

k
— 1 ®SITE MORRISON HOUSE
5 3
I
SPRUCE
-j
zr
PEARL
BROKEN DRUM
site access
5
SPRUCE CORNER




topography
no

SPRUCE CORNER
\o * r _ _ ol
john b. spitzar. Jr.
university of Colorado
spring


existing vegetation

oo
sprue* straat
SPRUCE CORNER
j> * r ir u john b. spitzar. jr. university of Colorado
sprir>9


history
The site is a key transition point from the busy downtown mall loop area (primarily retail and offices) into the predominantly residential Whittier neighborhood.
The town of Boulder was reincorporated as a city in 1878 and many of the homes and offices in the area were built in the decade that followed. The town was largely supported by mining discoveries in the mountains to the west and agricultural lands to the east.
From 1940 to 1970, the Whittier neighborhood and the downtown area fell into decay. Many buildings were vacant and in disrepair. The creation of the Downtown Mall in 1975 served reinvigorate downtown real estate, as did the formation of the Whittier Street Improvement District in 1976. Today, many Victorian homes in the neighborhood sell in excess of $100,000 while the downtown enjoys a rapidly expanding retail base.
The particular buildings on the site were constructed between 1892 and 1912. The architecture varies from the Queen Anne cottages to the more severe Italianate style.
9


comprehensive
plan
The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan relates to the site both from its desire to revitalize the downtown area and to preserve older, stable residential neighborhoods:
Downtown
"The Downtown shall retain its historic role as the governmental, entertainment, office, and financial center of the Boulder Valley. It shall continue to develop as a specialty retail center. This shall be accomplished by coordinating concerted and comprehensive public policies and investments with private redevelopment and rehabilitation efforts.
"Pearl Street is the historic downtown retail avenue of Boulder. The historic character of the buildings, in terms of their richness of materials, detail, texture, and intimate pedestrian scale, are assets which will be retained through the designation of historic landmarks, and by private rehabilitation efforts which restore, where appropriate, the original character and facade of each building. In addition, the City shall encourage development which will improve the compatibility of architecture and it shall encourage a variety of retail, service, restaurant, entertainment, banking, and upper-story residential uses to provide expanded economic and social opportunities. Pearl Street itself will be devoted to, and designed primarily to accommodate pedestrian usage.
Older, Stable Neighborhoods
The remaining, predominantly residential neighborhoods situated generally between Iris Avenue and Baseline Road, the Front Range and Folsom Street, shall be considered "stable" residential environments. In these areas, the following policies will typically apply:
10


1. Private redevelopment through proper conversion of existing dwellings and in-fill of vacant or marginally developed lots shall be permitted. Compatibility of such activities with surrounding neighborhood character and underlying socio-economic structure of the community shall be encouraged.
2. Significant demolition activities, even as part of private redevelopment activities, shall be discouraged through a variety of means including the consideration of possible historic preservation or rehabilitation districts.
3. Although limited clearance to remove structures and/or non-conforming uses which are blighted or blighting influences, or to provide necessary public improvements, such as parks and open space, may be considered, no large-scale public land assemblage and/or demolition to implement redevelopment activities shall be permitted.
4. Residential rehabilitation assistance to qualified persons to enable them to meet codes and upgrade their properties shall be encouraged in these stable neighborhoods.
5. Deficiencies in public facilities and services, such as parks and recreation, coordinated street landscaping, furniture, and street improvements, etc., shall be given priority in the City's Capital Improvements Program. In addition, social programs such as day care, crime prevention activities, library services, counseling, etc., will be encouraged as the need develops.
11


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zoning
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12
SPRUCE CORNER


zoning
The site is zoned HR-E (high density, residential, established) which is defined as "areas which are primarily used for or permit multi-unit residential development at apart-densities." (Section 37-201). Offices are also permitted by "special review" (Section 37-203).
More specifically, the Boulder Land Use Code has the following zoning requirements for HR-E districts:
Minimum lot area:
Minimum lot area per d.u.: Off-street parking per d.u.: Office parking:
Front setback (SPRUCE): Sideyard setback, (15th): Sideyard (east):
Rear:
Maximum height:
6,000 sq. ft. 1,600 sq. ft.
1.5 spaces
1 per 300 sq. ft. 25 ft.
12.5 ft.
10 ft.
25 ft.
35 ft.
The above requirements were confirmed with Jim Bailey, City Planning Official, at a meeting November 8, 1981. The PUD process could alter some of the setback requirements, especially the rear setback of 25 feet (if an appropriate shadow analysis is provided).
The lot area of the site is 100 feet times 140 feet or 14,000 square feet. Thus, use by right would indicate a yield of 14,000 f 1600 = 8.75 units or eight units (since any fractional unit is always rounded downwards).
There is also allowable in an HR-E zone a "limited living unit" which is defined as follows:
Limited living Unit - an efficiency providing minimum housing accommodations for occupancy by one person, which may include a private bath and/or kitchen facilities, all of which shall not exceed a maximum interior floor area of 400 square feet.
13


Current regulations of the planning department allow two limited units for every one regular dwelling unit. Thus, the site could have 8.75 times 2 = 17.5 or 17 limited living units However, only half of these are allowed by right, so that a PUD would be required for plans to build all 17 limited living units.
Because the site is on the corner of the Boulder Mall Loop, the planning department considers office use to be appropriate for the site. Currently on site is an office building of approximately 2,000 sq. ft. Mr. Bailey indicated at the Nov. 8th meeting that this square footage might be doubled if a suitable PUD design was submitted. This office use could take place in addition to allowable residential units (8 regular or 17 limited) if all parking requirements were met for both residential and office uses.
More detailed parking requirements as set forth in 37-304 are reprinted in Appendix A.
14


neighborhood
input
The Whittier Neighborhood Association was founded in 1975 to represent a 36 block area bounded by Canyon Boulevard on the south, Bluff Street on the north, 13th Street on the west, and 24th Street to the east.
The group was active in promoting a street improvement project in 1976.
In 1977 the group was disbanded because of internal controversies and reformed as the People for the Whittier Neighborhood. The new organization has been active in reviewing various development proposals for the neighborhood and reviewing a set of Design Guidelines which were adopted in the Spring of 1981.
The site for this project falls within the Whittier neighborhood. B. J Miller, spokesperson for the neighborhood, conceptually reviewed the site on November 15, 1981 and is not opposed to partial office use as long as the scale, massing, colors, and landscaping are compatible with neighborhood architecture. There is a strong desire from the neighborhood association for the project to contain housing as well as office uses. The architecture of the new project should also attempt to create a "gateway" to the neighborhood along the Spruce Street corridor
15


economics, offices
(All figures as of Nov. , 13, 1981)
Broadway & Elder "Elder Building" 1,300 sq. ft. $1,800 per month $16.61 sq. ft
JLS Building 1871 Folsom 777 sq. ft. $775 per month $11.88 sq. ft
Riverbend Office Park 55th & Arapahoe 1371 sq. ft. $1,073 per month $ 9.40 sq. ft
2305 Canyon Blvd. 1,500 sq. ft. $1,312 per month $10.50 sq. ft
1750 30th St. 1,245 sq. ft. $726 per month $ 6.99 sq. ft


economics, residential
(All figures as of Nov. . 13, 1981)
1850 Folsom 1 bedroom 650 sq. ft. $59,000 $90.76 sq. ft.
1851 -2nd St. 1 bedroom 1,042 sq. ft. $64,950 $62.33 sq. ft
1729 Alpine 2 bedrooms 1531 sq. ft. $84,950 $55.48 sq. ft
2945 N. Broadway 3 bedrooms 1,598 sq. ft. $92,500 $57.88 sq. ft
1732 Pine 3 bedrooms 1,772 sq. ft. $125,000 $70.54 sq. ft
17


soils
A review on November 11, 1981 on soil maps with Chuck Bowman, registered professional engineer specializing in soils analysis, reveals that the bearing soils in the area consist primarily of sand and gravel. Estimated allowable design bearing pressure is estimated to be from 4,000 to 8,000 pounds per square foot with relatively little, if any, swell potential.
Mr. Bowman's maps of the area indicate that there may be a groundwater problem in some areas near downtown. However, an inspection of existing basements in the area (approximately seven feet deep) shows no evidence of groundwater. Interviews with tenants confirm these field observations.
The site is not a mine fire hazard area, a mine subsidence area, or a mass movement area (Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, Exhibit I.D.2). The site is not classified as a commercial "first class" sand and gravel deposit.
floodplains
The site is not in either the 100 year floodplain or the 100 year floodway (Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, Exhibit
l.C) .
18


building
codes,
residential
Location on Lot
Any exterior wall having windows or other openings must be at least 3 feet from lot line.
Other walls may be less than 3 feet but must be of one hour fire resistant construction:
1. exterior plaster over metal or wire lath on the outside, interior plaster over metal-lath or 3/8" perforated gypsum lath or 5/8" Type "X" gypsum wallboard on the inside.
2. 3/4" drop siding or 3/8" ext. plywood over 1/2" gypsum sheathing on 2-by-4" studs 16" o.c. on the ext. and the interior surface as stated in no. 1.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
All habitable rooms shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area of not less than 1/10 of the floor area of the room with a minimum of 10 sq. ft. All bathrooms, water closet compartments, laundry rooms, etc., shall be provided with natural ventilation by operable exterior openings with an area not less than 1/20 of the floor area with a minimum of 1 1/2 sq. ft. All habitable rooms shall have operable openings to ext. with area of not less than l/20 floor area, a min. of 5 sq. ft. In lieu of ext. openings for natural ventilation, a mechanical ventilation system may be provided.
Ceiling Heights
Habitable rooms or areas require a min. of 7'6" except:
1. if a room has a sloping ceiling, 1/2 of ceiling must be 7'-6" (no portion of the room less than 5 ft. in height shall be included in the calculation of floor area.)
2. if the room has a furred ceiling, 2/3 of ceiling must be 7'6" and no portion shall be less than 7'0".
Other rooms or areas must have a ceiling heiqht of not
less than 7'0" from the lowest projection of the ceiling.
19


Room Sizes
At least one room shall not have less than 150 sq. ft. Other rooms that are habitable shall not be less than 70 sq. ft. No habitable room other than the kitchen shall be less than 7 ft. in any dimension. A water closet compartment must be at least 30" wide and have a clear space in front of the w.c. of 24".
Sanitation
A room w/a water closet must be separated by a tight fitting door from a food preparation area.
Fire Warning System
Every dwelling unit must be provided w/an approved smoke detector.
Private Garages
A garage not over 1,000 sq. ft. in area may be attached to a dwelling if the garage side of the separating walls and ceiling is fire protected. Carports open on two or more sides do not need a fire separation. Windows between the carport and the dwelling will not be operable.
Exits
At least one door to the exterior must be no less than 3'0" wide and 6'8" high. The clear width of the exitway must not be less than 32" wide. There must be a floor or landing on each side of all doors. The landing must not be less than the length of the door. Every sleeping room must have an operable window or exterior door w/ net clear opening of 5.7 sq. ft., min. height of 24" and width of 20". The sill height must be 44" or less.
20


Stairs
Rise = 7 1/2" or less, Run = 10" or more, any variations in one flight shall not exceed 3/16".
Winder - the required tread width of 10" must be at a point not more than 12" from the narrowest part of the tread, and no part of the treads shall be less than 6".
Spiral - the area to be served must be less than 400 sq. ft. Rise - 7 1/2" or less. Tread at 12" from center post= 9 1/2" The width of the stair shall not be less than 26" from center post to handrail.
Handrail - 30-34" above the nosing of the treads. (32" best) Headroom - height of not less than 6'6" from tread nosing to soffit. 6'8" for public building.
Guardrails - 36" high and the rails must be designed so that a 9" sphere can not be passed through. 42" for commercial.
21


building
codes,
offices
Classification: UBC Class B-2
Fire Resistance: 1 hour wall required if any building is within 20 feet. Openings not permitted to a building less than five feet away (must be protected if another building less than 10 feet away). (UBC Table 5-A)
There shall be a one hour fire separation between office use (Type B-2) and residential (Type R-l) (UBC Table 5-B)
One hour fire resistant construction is required for office buildings over two stories but less than four stories (UBC Table 5-D).
All occupiable office areas shall have natural light equal to at least one tenth the floor area (UBC Sec. 705).
Enclosed parking shall be positively ventilated (UBC Sec. 705).
One bathroom required for employees; separate bathrooms for males and females shall be provided if number of employees exceeds four and both sexes are employed (UBC Sec. 705).
Open parking garages shall have a one hour fire rating if distance from property line to building is less than 20 feet (UBC Table 7-B). An open parking garage must have two sides open comprising at least 40 percent of the perimeter, and each side must be at least 50 percent open. Thus a parking garage with a nine-foot ceiling height would have to have at least 4% feet open to outside air (UBC Sec. 709b). Construction shall be of noncombustible materials (UBC Sec. 709c). Minimum clear height inside garage is 7 feet (UBC Sec. 709d). Stairs out of the parking garage shall conform to existing requirements of Chapter 33 assuming an occupant load of 200 square feet per occupant (UBC Sec. 709g).
An office building is required to have two exits if the number of occupants is over 30. "Occupants" are calculated at the rate of 100 sq. ft. per occupant (UBC Table 33-A).
22


heat loss
BTU loss/hr.
(Area) (AT) (U value)
(If I cut any one of these in half, I will use half as natural gas in the furnace.)
Area = area of wall, ceiling, etc. surface AT = difference between inside and outside temperature
U = (see McG, pp. 155-171)
U (of wall) = t
R
R = table values of each material in wall, including air film on either side of wall.
(For infiltration heat loss, use the following formula:
BTU/hr. = (CF/MIN)(.018)( T)
or BTU/hr. = (CF/HR)( T)
CR/HR = Cubic feet per foot per hout. See McG
p. 171 for chart, i.e. for 1200 cubic foot room @ 1 air change per hour equals 1200 CF/HR.
BTU!s/year = H.L. (D.D.)(24)
for building design AT
H.L. = calculated heat loss D.D. = degree days for particular city (see McG. p. 213)
"Emissivity": chrome toaster can't gain or lose easily
(as opposed to the ideal "black body")
23


climate data
Cooler degree days: 625
Higher degree days: 6500
Precipitation (average): 15.51 inches Average clear days: 115
Partly coudy days: 131
Cloudy days: 119
% of possible sunshine: 70% Prevailing winds: from NW
Temperature (average daily max. - min.)
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
43.5
46.2
50.1 61.0
75.3
80.1
87.4 85.8
77.7
66.8 53.3 46.2
16.2°
19.4
23.8
33.9
43.6
51.9
58.6
57.4
47.8 37.2
25.4
18.9
F.
24


solar
PASSIVE SOLAR RULES OF THUMB FOR SCHEMATIC DESIGN
SOLAR COLLECTION AREA - DENVER REGION
"A solar collection area of 12% to 23% of the floor area can be expected to reduce the annual heating load of a building by 27% to 43%, or, if R9 night insulation is used, by 47% to 74%."
Example:
1500 sq. ft. floor area Solar Glazing, sq. ft.
Savings
W/O NI_________W/NI
180 27% 43%
345 47% 74%
NOTE: if south facing glazing exceeds 345 sq. ft., overheating on a clear winter day can be anticipated. This includes any south glazing.
This rule of thumb does not differentiate for the type of system used but is reasonably accurate nonetheless.
An exception to this is a direct gain system w/o night insulation, in which case the performance can be significantly lower.
Another rule of thumb is:
"1 sq. ft. direct gain glazing = 2 sq. ft. thermal storage wall glazing = 3 sq. ft. sunspace glazing."
25


A J-
DHL = Design heat loss of building (BTU/hr. at specified 4 T) .
DD = Degree Days (6500 for Boulder)
T = (75° for Boulder)
One square foot of south facing glass (wheher active or passive) will collect about 75,000 BTU's per'year.
Calculate heat gain:
1) For different orientations to South, see McGuinness pp. 202-203.
2) For different roof pitches, see Anderson pp. 259-260.
Then use the following formula:
BTU/hr. gained = (SHGF) (S.C.) (C.F.)
+
SHGF = Solar Heat gain factor S.C. = Shading coefficient C.F. = Cloudiness factor
"A thermal storage mass of 0.6 x SSF (solar savings fraction) pounds of water or 3 x SSF pounds of masonry is recommended for each square foot of south glazing. This assumes that the mass is in the direct sun all day as, for example, in a water wall. In direct gain situations this is adequate thermal storage provided. 1) The mass is within the direct gain space or encloses the direct gain space, 2) the mass is not insulated from the space, and 3) the mass has an exposed surface area equal to at least 3 times the glazed area. If masonry is used it is not effective beyond a depth of 4" to 6", measured from the surface. If the mass is located completely out of the sun in back rooms, then about 4 times as much mass will be needed."
26


1) Estimate heat loss of (undesigned) building using following rule of thumb:
Well insulated building (small size) will lose about 30 BTU/hour per square foot of floor space. Super insulated will lose only 10 - 20 BTU/hour.
2) Determine the solar heating fraction desired (as
a precentage of total heating load in January) and the type of system desired. Extract the appropriate "load collector" ratio ("LC" ratio) from the Douglas Balcomb chart below (for Grand Junction, Colorado):
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% (Solar heating
WW 199 92 56 39 28 20 13 — —
WWNI 317 150 95 67 51 39 30 22 15
TW 201 97 58 38 26 17 11 6 —
TWNI 310 145 91 64 48 36 26 19 12
WW = Water wall
WWNI = Water wall with night insulation TW = Trombe wall
TWNI = Trombe wall with night insulation
.3) Determine aperture needed from the following formula:
A = 24Q LC
A = Needed aperture in square feet LC = Load collector ratio from Balcomb chart
4) Determine amount of mass needed. As a rule of thumb, one square foor thickness of rock or brock will be needed per square foot of glass aperture (six inches thick if water is used). Use 6" - 8" thickness if floor or rear wall is used.
27


ENERGY DEMAND CALCULATIONS
Calculate Q =
Q = DHL AT
DHL = Design Heat Loss (24Q =BTU's needed per degree day).
Example = at 75°^T, a particular building loses 100,000 BTU's/hour.
Q = 100,000 = 1,333
75
24Q = 32,000 BTU1s/degree day
(Boulder agerages 33 degree days in December)
Therefore, in December, on the average, this much energy will be needed:
(33) (32,000)i= 1,056,000 BTU's
ORIENTATION
"The orientation of the solar glazing should lie between 20 degrees east and 32 degrees west of true south."
Sources: Mazria & Balcomb
28


BTU/hr.
(HTM) (Area) (C.F.)
heat gain
Area = Surface Area
HTM = Heat transfer multiplier (see McG. pp. 186-189) A function of basic "U" value, and sun orientation. Can be reduced by shading coefficients (see McG. p. 192 and P. 204) "HTM" (walls) is the same as "Solar Heat Gain Factor" for windows.
C.F = Clearness factor (higher for mountains)
(Infiltration computed like heat loss, see McG. P. 208)
Consider also:
1) Heat gain from appliances (McG. p. 205)
2) Heat gain from people (McG. 207)
3) Mechanical equipment
Greenhouse effect: high frequency sun energy easily Lass, low frequency heat energy can't get out. 1
1 ton of air conditioning =12,000 BTU's.
29


matrix
KEY:
SEPARATE NEUTRAL KEEP CLOSE
2 c fc Lil o Ul cy PRIVATE OFF. (f £ Cl X o o KS) X cf 5 £ hi CsL O Ul vfi Ul o 2 hi C* Ul U- 2 o o u\ , r < or. P- U) u • it o T Y or cv ' 1 O o Cv Ci lil £0 **. 0--' V 12 2 O Ul X 0 \- v ir ii h < (£ li\ Ki < LY £ k lil or V Y or £
RECEPTION • • • 0 0 0 0 0 0
PRIVATE OFF • • • 0 0 0 0 0 0
COMPUTERS
BATH 5 • 0 0 0 0 0 0
SEC. • • • 0 0 0 0 0 0
CONFERENCE • • 0 0 0 0 0 0
STORAGE • •
PARKING, OFF •
5E PRO Of HS 0 0 0 0 • •
LIVING 0 0 0 • • •
Dining 0 0 0 0 • •
kITCH EM 0 0 0 • • •
BATHS 0 • •
STOP AGE 0
PARKING. RES. 0 0 • •



30


thesis
timetable
• Generation of Design Concepts Dec. 20 - Jan. 20
• Selection of Alternative June 20 - Feb. 20
• Preparation Feb. 20 - April 10
• Presentation April 30, 1982
31


13 th
McAllister
house
PINE
MORRISON
HOUSE
CD
r-+
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o
5 §
views
32
SPRUCE CORNER


A

33


c
34



35



36


I
37


K
38


M
39


CITY OF BOULDER
PARKING DESIGN STANDARDS CHART NO. <1
APPENDIX A(A)


f
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X
I
i
41
APPENDIX A(1)


I
K>
ro
CITY OF BOULDER
PARKING DESIGN STANDARDS CHART NO. 3
TWO-MAY TRAFFIC DOUBLE-LOADED AISLES SELF-PARKING
PARKING STANOARng DESIGN ASSOCIATES
1
42
APPENDIX A(3)


SPRUCE CORNERS STRUCTURAL DESCRIPTION
This project is a mixed-use concept located on the northeast corner of the Mall Loop, Boulder, Colorado.
The basic structural system is frame bearing wall (2h stories) set on top of a two-way concrete slab. The slab in turn is supported by 12" columns (with column capitals) on a parking grid which is either 18 feet by 18 feet (parking bays) or 18 feet by 24 feet (center circulation aisle) .
Soils in the area are excellent, according to a site survey and phone conversation with Chuck Bowman, registered soil engineer. While Mr. Bowman indicates a range in soil bearing pressure from 4,000 to 8,000 pounds per square foot, we will base all structural calculations on a conservative figure of 4,000 ponds per square foot. Cost savings may be achieved later if actual site borings confirm a higher value.
More specifically, the structural system on top of the concrete deck will be as follows. A 2 x 6 stud wall (8.5 feet) will bear directly on the plate with appropriate moisture and rot protection. The 2x6 wall will be filled with R-19 fiberglass insulation and will be sheathed with V' CDX plywood, exterior glue. The plywood will act as both shear panels for lateral loads (wind and earthquake) and will also serve as a nailing base for milled 1x6 (tongue and groove) clear cedar siding applied vertically as a tight and crisp building "skin."
The joist system will be plywood "Truss Joists" constructed of a 3/4" plywood web member and 2" x 4" Doug Fir top and bottom plates. These joists will be placed directly on top of exterior bearing walls at 16" o.c. and will
-1-


flush frame into a transverse W10 steel beam (see detail drawing for connection). Decking over the joists will be 3/4" tongue-and-groove plywood (subfloor - underlayment) and will be both glued and nailed to the wood joist system.
The second story will be built in a similar manner, except for certain conditions where the exterior wall will be balloon framed past the next floor to brace rafters from thrusting outwards. The rafters will be constructed of Douglas Fir 2 x 12's, partly for structure, but primarily to accept 12" (R-38) of fiberglass insulation within the rafter cavity. The underside of all rafters, as with all interior and exterior walls, will receive two layers of 5/8" sheet rock to achieve the required one-hour fire rating for a structure of this use and size.
-2-


FOOTING LOADS: COLUMN "A"
(See "Parking Level" for Location)
This column and attached footing accepts the maximum loading for the Spruce Corners project. The footing under this column must be able to accept the following loads:
1) Weight of the footing, plus equivalent area of 6" gravel and 6" concrete. Estimate of 5' by 5* by 2 feet thick or 50 cubic feet at 150 pounds
per cubic foot. 7,500 pounds
2) Weight of the 8 foot high by 12" column with a cross sectional area of .785 square feet or 6.3
cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 945 pounds
3) Weight of a concrete slab 8" thick with an area of 24' x 18' or a total area 432 square feet or
288 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 43,200 pounds
4) Live load on slab, both interior and plaza at
50 pounds per square foot. 432 square feet times
50 pounds (see UBC Table 23-A). 21,600 pounds
5) Weight of first floor exterior wall. 192 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot.
1,920
6) Dead load of second floor system. 216 square feet
at 10 pounds per square foot. 2,160 pounds
-3-


7) Live load on second floor at 50 pounds per square foot. 216 square feet times 50 pounds.
8) Weight of second floor exterior wall balloon framed to roof. 264 square feet at 10 pounds.
9) Dead load of attic residential floor. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot.
10) Live load of residential area. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot (see UBC Table 23A).
11) Dead load of roof system. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot.
12) Live (snow) load on roof. 216 square feet at 30 pounds per square foot.
110,000
4,000
27.6 area needed for footing.
Use footing of 5.5 feet by 5.5 feet with an area of 30
10,800 pounds
2,640 pounds
2,160 pounds
8,640 pounds
2,160 pounds
6,480 pounds
110,205 pounds
square feet.
-4-


FOOTING LOADS: COLUMN "B" (See "Parking Level" for Location)
This column and attached footing accepts the minimum loading for the Spruce Corners project.
1) Weight of footing, plus gravel and concrete on top.
Estimate 2' thick by 3' by 3' 150 pounds. 2,700 pounds
2) Weight of column. 945 pounds
3) Dead load of 9 foot by 18 foot plaza concrete,
8" thick. 108 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic
foot. 16,200 pounds
4) Live load on plaza at 50 pounds per square foot.
162 square feet times 50 pounds. 8,100 pounds
27,945 pounds
28,000
4,000
= 7 square feet of footer area needed.
Use strap footer four feet wide extending back to central column.
-5-


FOOTING LOAD: WALL FOOTING "C"
(See "Parking Level" for Location)
This wall footing supports the plaza level and the tall entry tower on the southern elevation. The footing must be able to support the following loads:
1) Weight of footing, plus equivalent area of
6" of concrete and 6" of gravel. Estimate 3 foot wide footing, 2 foot thick with concrete, etc.
at 150 pounds per square foot. 900 pounds/
linear feet
2) Weight of concrete wall 8" thick, 8 feet high
at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 790 pounds
3) Dead load of floor of tower at 10 pounds per
square foot. 90 pounds
4) Dead load of plaza area at 150 pounds per cubic
foot. 1,440 pounds
5) Live load first floor at 50 pounds per square
foot. 450 pounds
6) Weight of wall 40 feet high at 10 pounds per
square foot. 400 pounds
7) Dead load second floor. 90 pounds
8) Live load second floor at 50 pounds. 450 pounds
-6-


9) Dead load third floor.
10) Live load third floor at 50 pounds. _
11) Dead load mechanical room at 100 pounds per square foot.
12) Live load mechanical room at 40 pounds per square foot.
13) Dead load of roof at 10 pounds per square foot.
14) Dead (snow) load on roof at 30 pounds per square foot.
90 pounds 450 pounds
900 pounds
360 pounds 90 pounds
270 pounds
6,770 pounds
6,770
4,000
= 1.69 feet
Use two foot wide footer.
-7-


DESIGN OF PARKING GARAGE COLUMN
(Figures for Maximum Loading at Column "A" on Parking Level Plan)
From footing calculations, total load on column (both dead loads and live loads) is 100,000 pounds or 100 kips.
This column, and others like it, will chiefly sustain axial compression loads, and we can use the formula:
P1u = .85 fcAc + fyAs
Assume 4 and 5 bars (40,000 p.s.i.) will be used per column with a cross-sectional area of .30 square inches per bar.
P1u = .85 (3000)(.78)(144) + (40,000)(.30)(4)
P^-u = 286,416 +,48,000 = 334 kips
This exceeds the design load of 100 kips, but it is desirable to have an overdesigned column to take into account accasional damage to the column structure from can bumpers.
Use column capitol for shear resistance.
-8-


DESIGN OF STEEL BEAM
(This steel beam will span a maximum of 24 feet between bays. It will support a maximum uniform load of 25,920 pounds or 25 kips.)
Using the ASI tables, it is found that a W8 beam will not span 24 (page 2-46). Using table at 2-45 (Fy = 36 ksi), it appears that a W10 beam with a weight of 49 pounds per foot will support a uniform load 36 kips on a 24 foot span. Therefore use a W10 beam with a depth of 10 inches and a flange width of 10 inches.
-9-


DESIGN OF STEEL COLUMN
(From First to Second Floors)
From footing calculations assume a dead load plus live load of 35 kips. Using the ASI manual (Table V at 3-51) with Fy = 46 ksi, a square section pipe with V walls will hold a load of 57 kips (table interpolated for 8% foot high steel column).
-10-


RETENTION STRUCTURE DESIGN
Area: A = 14,000 sq. ft. = .32 Acre Storm Frequency = 100 yr.
Intensity of Rainfall = I = 6.3^Vhr. (Given) Coefficient of Runoff: C =
1) Historic (Pre-Development) C = .2
2) Post Development C = .83 Asphalt, Brick, Concrete Roofs - 90% @ .9
Grasses & Vegetation = 10% @ .2
Composite C = (90 x .9) + (10 x .2)
100
Flow Line 140'
Slope 2%
Q = CIA
Q = Peak Runoff Rate in C.F.S.
Predevelopment Q = (.2)(6.3)(.32) = .40 CFS Post Development Q = ( .83)(6.3)(.32) = 1.67 CFS
-11-


RETENTION STRUCTURE
Structure designed with storage capacity to reduce the discharge
to historic rate * Source: Landscape Architecture
Construction by Landphair CPg. 148)
Predevelopment Qq = >40 CFS
Post Development = 1.67 CFS
To determine storage capacity:
Peak flow ratio = Qq^ _ Design Discharge
0i ~ Peak Runoff
Qo _ .40
Ql 1.67
See Graph p. 150 Landphair (S.C.S. Release //55) Vs
.45
.24
Vr = design storm volume in inches Vs
Vs = V_ X — s r Vr
Vs = 6.3 X .45
Vs = 2.84H/acre
Total storage capacity required in acre feet is .32 x 2.84
Vs =
12
= .075 Acre ft.
NOTE: City of Boulder has no required storage for small lots - water can be conveyed to alley.
-12-


DESIGN OF PLYWOOD TRUSS-JOISTS
Maximum clear span of the truss joists will be as follows:
or *use 17' 6" for clear span figure. From Sweet's Catalog a plywood truss joist with 2" x 4" top and bottom chords with plywood web of a total depth of 9%" will span 19' 0” with a 60 pound live load.
-13-


DESIGN OF TWO-WAY SLAB
Use initial dead weight assumption of 8" thick slab (reinforced) at 150 pounds per cubic foot, a total of 288 cubic feet or 43,200 pounds or 100 pounds per square foot dead load. Use live load of 50 pounds.
w = 1.4(100) + 1.7(50) = 140 + 85 = 225 psf
Fpr initial trial run, sum the perimeter of the proposed slab and divide by 180:
18 + 18 + 24 + 24 180
7" thickness
We will use the direct design method because there are a minimum of three spans, the ratio of long-to-short is less than 2, and the live load does not exceed three times the dead load (Concrete, Winter, P. 212).
-14-


Beam dimensions of 14 x 18 inches will be assumed. The moment
of inertia of the T-Beams will be estimated as follows: For the interior beams:
I = Yj x 14 x 18^ x 2 = 13,608 inches4 For the slab strips:
I (18 foot width) = ^ "X ^2 * ^ = 6,17b inches4
I (24 foot width) = 24-—* 73 = 8,232 inches4
For the two 24 foot long beams:
13,608
6,174
2.2
For the two 18 foot long beams:
13,608
8,232
1.65
-15-


The ratio of continuous edges to total perimeter is:
18 + 18 + 24 + 24 18 + 18 + 24 + 24
The ratio of long-to-short (clear) spans is:
23.5
17.5
1.34 =
Using equation 4.15:
(23.5)(12)(800 + .005 x 60,000)
: 36,000 + 5,000(1)(2.2 -.5x1x2)
310,200
42,000
7.38 inches of slab thickness
Thia is also the minimum thickness given by equation 4.16. The thickness need-not be greater than equation 4.17:
(23.5)(12)(800 + .005)(60,000) 36,000
8.61 inches
The 3h” depth limitation in Article 4.10 does not apply.
-16-


For the short span direction, the total static moment is:
M0 = 1/8(225)(24)(17.6)2 - 209 foot-kips
This is distributed as follows:
Negative moment = 209(.65) = 135 foot-kips Positive moment = 209(.35) = 73 foot-kips
The column strip has a width of:
2 x * 9 feet
4
- 24 = i. 33
ll 18
-L (1.33) - (1.65) (1.33) - 2.19
Graph 13 in the Appendix indicates that 68% is taken by the column strip.
-17-


east elevation
spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by john h. spider, jr. in fulfillment of requirements for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may, 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale- 1/8 ~ I.
north elevation


south elevation
.West elevation
spruce corners--a residential mixed use office concept
designed by john K spitzer. jr. io fulfillment of requirements for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scales 1/8 “ I.


spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by john b. spitter.fr. i (or the master of architecture dcgrei
• fulfillment of requirements legree. university of Colorado, denver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale 1/8 “ I.




15th street facades
spruce street facades v»»- • t
_rcorners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by john hspitzer.fr. in fulfillment of requirements for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may. I982. redevelopment site located at I5lh and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale I/8" ~ I*


spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by joha k spitMr.fr. ia fulfillment of requirements for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, dcaver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale 1/8 " I.


spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by foho hspitrer. jr. in fulfillment of requirements for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. .may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale* 1/8 “ I.


spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
*,ilH ky |ok» k spitzei.fr. in fulfillment of requirements for the mister of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale* 1/8" " L*


spruce corners-a residential mixed use office concept
designed by john h. spitier. jr. in fulfillment of requirement! for the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at I5lh and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only, scale 1/8 * I.


V'T'* ri_rwooo ruiMiNt
TWO LAYIRk n/r WITIUCK
»•<»' C8NCMTC roOTt*
spruce corners~a residential mixed use office concept
designed by |ohn lxspiiier.fr. in fulfillment of requirements (or the master of architecture degree, university of Colorado, denver. may. 1982. redevelopment site located at 15th and spruce streets, boulder. Colorado. any use of these drawings by permission only. ncale> 1/8 ~ I.
5C.AIX V*' • 1'


Full Text

PAGE 1

SPRUCE john b. ltzer,. jr. -university of colorado thesis spring '82

PAGE 2

project description p.1 vicinty map 3 transportation corridors 4 site access 5 site analysis 6 topography 1 existing vegetation a history 9 comprehensive plan 10 zoning 12 neighborhood input 15 economics, offices 16

PAGE 3

economics, residential 17 soils 18 floodplains 18 building codes, residential 19 building codes, offices 22 h .eat loss 23 climate data 24 solar 25 heat gain 29 matrix 30 thesis timetable 31 • v1ews 32

PAGE 4

project description The project will encompass the redevelopment of an urban site at 15th and Spruce Streets, Boulder, Colorado. The present site is 100 feet by 140 feet and is occupied by four dilapidated buildings. The existing foundation systems are inadequate and present economic utilization of the site is not viable. It is contemplated that the existing site will be cleared (saving as much vegetation as possible) and a new mixed use office-residential project will be created. The architecture must perform the task of accomplishing a transition from dense downtown uses to the residential neighborhood lying to the east. Appropriate scale, massing, materials, landscaping, access, and colors will be critical. 1

PAGE 5

Phil Geil has expressed the following needs for office space: OWner's office (16xl5) = 240 sq. ft. Accountant's office (14xl2) = 170 Computer room (lOxlO) = 100 Conference room (18xl2) = 220 Private office ( 12xl2) = 144 Private office (12xl2) = 144 Reception area (12xl5) = 180 Private bath (10x8) = 80 Circulation -storage = 500 --1,778 sq. ft. Kirk Wickersham, as a potential tenant of Phil Geil's, has expressed the following needs for office space: Kirk Wickersham's office (16xl5) = 200 sq. ft. Partner's office (10xl5) = 150 Clerk's office (10xl5) = 150 Reception ( 10xl5) = 150 Bullpen (20x25) = 500 Circulation -storage = 500 1,650 sq. ft. Both Mr. Geil and Mr. Wickersham have expressed a need for flexible use of space as business needs expand or contract. This may entail planning entry and reception areas for possible subleases to other tenants. Square footages for residences will be about 900 to 1,200 for two bedroom units which shall include a living area, dining room, kitchen, two bedrooms, two baths, and storage. Limited living units shall be one bedroom units with a maximum of 400 sq. ft. of floor area. Residential amenities shall include passive heating, fireplaces or wood-burning stoves, tiled entries, oak kitchen cabinets, wood windows, and a light, airy interior mood. 2

PAGE 6

vicinty map I I k \:j I . I

PAGE 7

___ I _ ...___ __ I !====I ST . JOHN ' S CHURCH METHODIST CHUR C H o so 100' 1 50' liJO' 400' transportation corridors a: w z a: 0 0 w 0 ::::> a: 0.. (/) 4

PAGE 8

I I I I I I I I L_ 8 . !! 0 "! 4 . • t I I I I =I ' c -. ST . JOHN'S CHURCH McALLISTER HOUSE PINE I I I I I c r . < ' . a: I I c w MOARISOH z METHODIST CHURCH HOUS E SPRUCE a: _., BARKER PARK 0 c.> COURTHOUSE ,. .. .. 0 ::r ::r I I I c w PEARL 0 I BROKEN ORUM I I I I ::::> a: 0.. Cf) o s o 100' o50' 211cr -'0:1' 400' site access 5

PAGE 9

site analysis " . 0 .. . u , 0. a: w z a: 0 () w () :::::> a: ()_ (/) 6

PAGE 10

I io f '\ 1 • a: .•o .. } . w . ;; z . u , a: .. 0 0 w 0 ::J a: 0.. (j) topography 7

PAGE 11

existing vegetation . u , 0. I' ' a: w z a: 0 () w () ::::> a: 0... (f) 8

PAGE 12

history The site is a key transition point from the busy downtown mall loop area (primarily retail and offices) into the predominantly residential Whittier neighborhood. The town of Boulder was reincorporated as a city in 1878 and many of the homes and offices in the area were built in the decade that followed. The town was largely supported by mining discoveries in the mountains to the west and agricultural lands to the east. From 1940 to 1970, the Whittier neighborhood and the downtown area fell into decay. Many buildings were vacant and in disrepair. The creation of the Downtown Mall in 1975 served reinvigorate downtown real estate, as did the formation of the Whittier Street Improvement District in 1976. Today, many Victorian homes in the neighborhood sell in excess of $100,000 while the downtown enjoys a rapidly expanding retail base. The particular buildings on the site were constructed between 1892 and 1912. The architecture varies from the Queen Anne cottages to the more severe Italianate style. 9

PAGE 13

comprehensive plan The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan relates to the site both from its desire to revitalize the downtown area and to preserve older, stable residential neighborhoods: Downtown "The Downtown shall retain its historic role as the governmental, entertainment, office, and financial center of the Boulder Valley. It shall continue to develop as a specialty retail center. This shall be accomplished by coordinating concerted and comprehensive public policies and investments with private redevelopment and rehabilitation efforts. "Pearl Street is the historic downtown retail avenue of Boulder. The historic character of the buildings, in terms of their richness of materials, detail, texture, and intimate pedestrian scale, are assets which will be retained through the designation of historic landmarks, and by private rehabilitation efforts which restore, where approFriate, the original character and facade of each building. In addition, the City shall encourage development which will improve the compatibility of architecture and it shall encourage a variety of retail, service, restaurant, entertainment, banking, and upper-story residential uses to provide expanded economic and social opportunities. Pearl Street itself will be devoted to, and designed primarily to accommodate pedestrian usage. Older, Stable Neighborhoods The remaining, predominantly residential neighborhoods situate d generally between Iris Avenue and Baseline Road, the Front Range and Folsom Street, shall be considered "stable " residential environments. In these areas, the following policies will typically apply: 10

PAGE 14

1. Private redevelopment through proper conversion of.existing dwellings and in-fill of vacant or marginally developed lots shall be permitted. Compatibility of such activities with surrounding neighborhood character and underlying socio-economic structure of the community shall be encouraged. 2. Significant demolition activities, even as part of private redevelopment activities, shall be discouraged through a variety of means including the consideration of possible historic preservation or rehabilitation districts. 3. Although limited clearance to remove structures and/or non-conforming uses which are blighted or blighting influences, or to provide necessary public improvements, such as parks and open space, may be considered, no largescale public land assemblage and/or demolition to implement redevelopment activities shall be permitted. 4. Residential rehabilitation assistance to qualified persons to enable them to meet codes and upgrade their properties shall be encouraged in these stable neighborhoods. 5. Deficiencies in public facilities and services, such as parks and recreation, coordinated street landscaping, furniture, and street improvements, etc., shall be given priority in the City's Capital Improvements Program. In addition, social programs such as day care, crime prevention activities, library services, counseling, etc., will be encouraged as the need develops. 11

PAGE 15

i = 0 i ,.. . ::: i j a: , !I.'! ""-u""'" I H • c zoning 0 () w () :::> a: 0... (f) 12

PAGE 16

• zontng The site is zoned HR-E {high density, residential, established) which is defined as "areas which are primarily used for or permit multi-unit residential development at apartdensities." {Section 37-201). Offices are also permitted by "special review" {Section 37-203). More specifically, the Boulder Land Use Code has the following zoning requirements for HR-E districts: Minimum lot area: Minimum lot area per d.u.: Off-street parking per d.u.: Office parking: Front setback {SPRUCE) : Sideyard setback, {15th) Sideyard {east) : Rear: Maximum height: 6,000 sq. ft. 1, 600 sq. ft. 1. 5 spaces 1 per 300 sq. ft. 25 ft. 12.5 ft. 10 ft. 25 ft. 35 ft. The above requirements were confirmed with Jim Bailey, City Planning Official, at a meeting November 8, 1981. The PUD process could alter some of the setback requirements, especially the rear setback of 25 feet {if an appropriate shadow analysis is provided) . The lot area of the site is 100 feet times 140 feet or 14,000 square feet. Thus, use by right would indicate a yield of 14,000 f 1600 = 8.75 units or eight units {since any fractional unit is always rounded downwards) . There is also allowable in an HR-E zone a "limited living unit" which is defined as follows: Limited living Unit -an efficiency providing minimum housing accommodations for occupancy by one person, which may include a private bath and/or kitchen facilities, all of which shall not exceed a maximum interior floor area of 400 square feet. 13

PAGE 17

Current regulations of the planning department allow two limited units for every one regular dwelling unit. Thus, the site could have 8.75 times 2 = 17.5 or 17 limited living units However, only half of these are allowed by right, so that a PUD would be required for plans to build all 17 limited living units. Because the site is on the corner of the Boulder Mall Loop, the planning department considers office use to be appropriate for the site. Currently on site is an office building of approximately 2,000 sq. ft. Mr. Bailey indicated at the Nov. 8th meeting that this square footage might be doubled if a suitable PUD design was submitted. This office use could take place in addition to allowable residential units (8 regular or 17 limited) if all parking requirements were met for both residential and office uses. More detailed parking requirements as set forth in 37-304 are reprinted in Appendix A. 14

PAGE 18

neighborhood input The Whittier Neighborhood Association was founded in 1975 to represent a 36 block area bounded by Canyon Boulevard on the south, Bluff Street on the north, 13th Street on the west, and 24th Street to the east. The group was active in promoting a street improvement project in 1976. In 1977 the group was disbanded because of internal controversies and reformed as the People for the Whittier Neighborhood. The new organi zation has been active in reviewing various development proposals for the neighborhood and reviewing a set of Design Guidelines which were adopted in the Spring of 1981. The site for this project falls within the Whittier neighborhood. B. J. Miller, spokesperson for the neighborhood, conceptually reviewed the site on November 15, 1981 and is not opposed to partial office use as long as the scale, massing, colors, and landscaping are compatible with neighborhood architecture. There is a strong desire from the neighborhood association for the project to contain housing as well as office uses. The architecture of the new project should also attempt to create a 11gateway11 to the neighborhood along the Spruce Street 15

PAGE 19

economics, offices {All figures as of Nov. 13, 1981) Broadway & Elder "Elder Building" 1,300 sq. ft. $1,800 per month JLS Building 1871 Folsom 777 sq. ft. $775 per month $16.61 sq. ft. $11.88 sq. ft. Riverbend Office Park $ 9.40 sq. ft. 55th & Arapahoe 1371 sq. ft. $1,073 per month 2305 Canyon Blvd. 1,500 sq. ft. $1,312 per month 1750 30th St. 1, 245 sq. ft. $726 per month $10.50 sq. ft. $ 6.99 sq. ft. 16

PAGE 20

economics, residential (All figures as of Nov. 13, 1981} 1850 Folsom 1 bedroom 650 sq. ft. $59,900 1851 -2nd St. 1 bedroom 1,042 sq. ft. $64,950 1729 Alpine 2 bedrooms 1531 sq. f t. $84,950 2945 N. Broadway 3 bedrooms 1,598 sq. ft. $92,500 1732 Pine 3 bedrooms 1 I 7 7 2 SEJ. ft. $125,000 $90.76 sq. ft. $62.33 sq. ft. $55.48 sq. ft. $57 . 8 8 sq . ft. $70.54 sq. ft. 17

PAGE 21

soils floodplains A review on November 11, 1981 on soil maps with Chuck Bowman, registered professional engineer specializing in soils analysis, reveals that the bearing soils in the area consist primarily of sand and gravel. Estimated allowable design bearing pressure is estimated to be from 4,000 to 8,000 pounds per square foot with relatively little, if any, swell pot:ential. Mr. Bowman's maps of the area indicate that there may be a groundwater problem in some areas near downtown. However, an inspection of existing basements in the area (approximately seven feet deep} shows no evidence of groundwater. Interviews with tenants confirm these field observations. The site is not a mine fire hazard area, a mine subsidence area, or a mass movement area (Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, Exhibit I.D.2}. The site is not classified as a commercial "first class" sand and gravel deposit. The site is not in e ither the 100 year floodplain or the 100 year floodway (Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, Exhibit 1. C). 18

PAGE 22

building codes, residential Location on Lot Any exterior wall having windows or other openings must be at least 3 feet from lot line. Other walls may be less than 3 feet but must be of one hour fire resistant construction: 1. exterior plaster over metal or wire lath on the outside, interior plaster over metal-lath or 3/8" perforated gypsum lath or 5/8" Type "X" gypsum wallboard on the inside. 2. 3/4" drop siding or 3/8" ext. plywood over 1/2" gypsum sheathing on 2-by-4" studs 16" o.c. on the ext. and the interior surface as stated in no. 1. Light, Ventilation and Sanitation All habitable rooms shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area of not less than 1/10 of the floor area of the room with a minimum of 10 sq. ft. All bathrooms, water closet compartments, laundry rooms, etc., shall be provided with natural ventilation by operable exterior openings with an area not less than 1/20 of the floor area with a minimum of 1 1/2 sq. ft. All habitable rooms shall have operable openings to ext. with area of not less than 1/20 floor area, a min. of 5 sq. ft. In lieu of ext. openings for natural ventilation, a mechanical ventilation system may be provided. Ceiling Heights Habitable rooms or areas require a min. of 7'6" except: 1. if a room has a sloping ceiling, 1/2 of ceiling must be 7'-6" (no portion of the room less than 5 ft. in height shall be included in the calculation of floor area.) 2. if the room be 7'6" and Other rooms or less than 7'0" has a furred ceilinq, 2/3 of ceiling must no portion shall be less than 7'0". areas must have a ceiling of not from the lowest projection of the ceiling. 19

PAGE 23

Room Sizes At least one room shall not have less than 150 sq. ft. Other rooms that are habitable shall not be less than 70 sq. No habitable room other than the kitchen shall be less than 7 ft. in any dimension. A water closet com partment must be at least 30" wide and have a clear space in front of the w.c. of 24". Sanitation A room w/a water closet must be separated by a tight fitting door from a food preparation area. Fire Warning System Every dwelling unit must be provided w/an approved smoke detector. Private Garages A garage not over 1,000 sq. ft. in area may be attached to a dwelling if the garage side of the separating walls and ceiling is fire protected. Carports open on two or more sides do not need a fire separation. Windows between the carport and the dwelling will not be operable. Exits At least one door to the exterior must be no less than 3 1 0" wide and 6 1 8" high. The clear \vidth of the exi tway must not be less than 32" wide. There must be a floor or landing on each side of all doors. The landing must not be less than the length of the door. Every sleeping room must have an operable window or exterior door w/ net clear opening of 5. 7 sq. ft., min. height of' 24" and width of 20". The sill height must be 44" or less. 20

PAGE 24

Stairs Rise = 7 1/2" or less, Run = 10" or more, any variations in one flight shall not exceed 3/16". Winder -the required tread width of 10" must be at a point not more than 12" from the narrowest part of the tread, and no part of the treads shall be less than 6". Spiral -the area to be served must be less than 400 sq. ft. Rise -7 1/2" or less. Tread at 12" from center post= 9 1/2" The width of the stair shall not be less than 26" from center post to handrail. Handrail 30-34" above the nosing of the treads. (32" best) Headroom-height of not less than 6'6" from tread nosing to soffit. 6'8" for public building. Guardrails 36" high and the rails must be designed so that a 9" sphere can not be passed through. 42" for commercial. 21

PAGE 25

building codes, offices Classification: UBC Class B-2 Fire Resistance : 1 hour wall required if any butlding is within 20 feet. Openings not permitted to a building less than five feet away (must be protected if another building less than 10 feet away). (UBC Table 5-A) There shall be a one hour fire separation between office use (Type B-2) and residential {Type R -1) (UBC Table 5 -B) One hour fire resistant construction is required for office buildings over two stories but less than four stories (UBC Table 5-D). All occupiable office areas shall have natural light equal to at least one tenth the floor area (UBC Sec. 705). Enclosed parking shall be positively ventilated (UBC Sec. 705). One bathroom required for employees; separate bathroom s for males and females shall be provided if number of employees exceeds four and both sexes are employed (UBC Sec. 705). Open parking garages shall have a one hour fire rating if distance from property line to building is less than 20 feet (UBC Table 7-B). An open parking garage must have two sides open comprising at least 40 percent of the perimeter, and each side must be at least 50 percent open. Thus a parking garage with a nine-foot ceiling height would have to have at least feet open to outside air (UBC Sec. 709b). Construction shall be of noncombustible materials (UBC Sec. 709c). Minimum clear height inside garage is 7 feet (UBC Sec. 709d). Stairs out of the parking garage shall conform to existing requirements of Chapter 33 assuming an occupant load of 200 square feet per occupant (UBC Sec. 709g). An office building is required to have two exits if the number of occu pants is over 30. "Occupants" are calculated at the rate of 100 sq. ft. per occupant (UBC Table 33-A). 22

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heat loss BTU loss/hr. = (Area) (AT) (U value) (If I cut any one of these in half, I will use half as natural gas in the furnace.) Area AT u = area ofwall, ceiling, etc. surface = difference be'tween inside and outside temperature = (see MeG, pp. 155-171) U (of wall) = 1 ......-:.=RR = table values of each material in wall, including air film on either side of wall. (For infiltration heat loss, use the following formula: BTU/hr. = (CF/MIN) (.018) ( T) or.BTU/hr. = ( CF /HR) ( T) CR/HR = Cubic feet per foot per hout. See MeG p. 171 for chart, i.e. for 1200 cubic foot room @ 1 air change per hour equals 1200 CF/HR. for building = .H.L. (D.D.) (24) design H.L. = calculated heat loss D.D. = degree days for particular city (see MeG. p. 213) "Emissivity": chrome toaster can't gain or lose easily (as opposed to the ideal "black body") 23

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climate data Cooler degree days: Higher degree days: Precipitation (average): Average clear days: Partly coudy days: Cloudy days: % of possible sunshine: Prevailing winds: 625 6500 15.51 inches 115 131 119 70% from NW Temperature (average daily max. -min.) Jan. 43.5 16.2 F. Feb. 46.2 19.4 Mar. 50.1 23.8 Apr. 61.0 33.9 May 75.3 43.6 Jun. 80.1 51.9 July 87.4 58.6 Aug. 85.8 57.4 Sept. 77.7 47.8 Oct. 66.8 37.2 Nov. 53.3 25.4 Dec. 46.2 18.9 24

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solar PASSIVE SOLAR RULES OF THUMB FOR SCHEMATIC DESIGN SOLAR COLLECTION AREA -DENVER REGION "A solar collection area of 12% to 23% of the floor area can be expected to reduce the annual heating load of a building by 27% to 43% , or, if R9 night insulation is used, by 47% to 74%." Example: 1500 sq. ft. floor area Solar Glazing, sq. ft. 180 345 W/0 NI 27% 47% Savings W/NI 43% 74 % NOTE: if south facing glazing exceeds 345 sq. ft., overheating on a clear winter day can be anticipated. This includes any south glazing. This rule of thumb does not differentiate for the type of system used but is reasonably accurate nonetheless. An exception to this is a direct gain system w/o night insulation, in which case the performance can be significantly lower. Another rule of thumb is: "1 sq. ft. direct gain glazing = 2 sq. ft. thermal storage wall glazing= 3 sq. ft. sunspace glazing." 25

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DHL = Design heat loss of building (BTU/hr. at specified 4 T) . DD = Degree Days (6500 for Boulder) T = (75o for Boulder) One square foot of south facing glass (wheher active or passive) will collect about 75,000 BTU's peryear. Calculate heat gain: 1) For different orientations to South, see McGuinness pp. 202-203. 2) For different roof pitches, see Anderson pp. 259-260. Then use the following formula: BTU/hr. gained= (SHGF) (S.C.) (C.F.) + SHGF = Solar Heat gain factor S.C. = Shading coefficient C.F. = Cloudiness factor "A thermal storage mass of 0.6 x SSF (solar savings fraction) pounds of water or 3 x SSF pounds of masonry is recommended for each square foot of south glazinq. This assumes that the mass is in the direct sun all day as, for example, in a wate r wall. In direct gain situations this is adequate thermal storage provided. 1) The mass is within the direct gain space or encloses the direct gain space, 2) the mass is not insulated from the space, and 3) the mass has an exposed surface area equal to at least 3 times the glazed area. If masonry is used it is not effective beyond a depth of 4" to 6", measured from the surface. If the mass is located completely out of the sun in back rooms, then about 4 times as much mass will be needed." 26

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ww WWNI TW TWNI 1) Estimate heat loss of (undesigned) building using following rule of thumb: Well insulated building (small size) will lose about 30 BTU/hour per square foot of floor space. Super insulated will.lose only 10-20 BTU/hour. 2) Determine the solar heating fraction desired (as a precentage of total heating load in January) and the type of system desired. Extract the appropriate 11load collector .. ratio (11LC11 ratio) from the Douglas Balcomb chart below (for Grand Junction, Colorado): 10% 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1 h % % % % % % % % So ar 199 92 56 39 317 150 95 67 !201 97 58 38 310 145 91 64 ww = WWNI = TW = 28 20 13 ---51 39 30 22 15 26 17 11 6 --48 36 26 19 12 Water wall Water wall with night insulation Trombe wall TWNI = Trombe wall with night insulation .3) ,Determine aperture n.eeded from the following formula: A = 24Q LC A = Needed aperture in square feet LC = Load collector ratio from Balcomb chart 4) Determine amount of mass needed. As a rule of thumb, one square foor thickness of rock or brock will be needed per square foot of glass aperture (six inches thick if water is used). Use 611 thickness if floor or rear wall is used. 27

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Calculate Q = Q = DHL AT ENERGY DEMAND CALCULATIONS DHL = Design Heat Loss (24Q =BTU's needed per degree day). Example= at a particular building loses 100,000 BTU's/hour. Q = 100,000 = 1,333 75 24Q = 32,000 BTU's/degree day (Boulder agerages 33 degree days in December) Therefore, in December, on the average, this much energy will be needed: ( 3 3) ( 3 2 I 0 0 0) I = 1 I 0 56 I 0 0 0 BTU I s ORIENTATION "The orientation of the solar glazing should lie between 20 degrees east and 32 degrees west of true south." Sources: Mazria & Balcomb 28

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heat gain BTU/hr. = (HTM) (Area) (C.F.) Area = Surface Area HTM = Heat transfer multiplier (see MeG. pp. 186-189) A function. of basic "U" sun orientation. Can be 'reduced by shading coefficients (see MeG. p. 192 and P. 204) "HTM" (walls) is the same as "Solar Heat Gain Factor" for windows. C.F = Clearness factor (higher for mountains) (Infiltration computed like heat loss, see MeG. P. 208) Consider also: 1) Heat gain from appliances (MeG. p. 205) 2) Heat gain from people 207) 3) Mechanical equipment Greenhouse effect: high frequency sun energy easily Lass, low frequency heat energy get out. 1 ton of air = 12,000 BTU's. 29

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matrix PRIVATE OFf. • e e COMPUTERS B A TH S • • • • C O NFREN f.E e e e e l?ARKIN(, OFF e •• I • • • D I NII\.1( ? •• kiT(.H r; kl •• • •• 5 TD!< /' . . • • KEY= SEPARATE: NEUTRAL. o CLOS( 30

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thesis timetable • Generation of Design Concepts • Selection of Alternative • Preparation • Presentation Dec. 20 Jan. 20 June 20 -Feb. 20 Feb. 20 April 10 April 30, 1982 31

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. I L 0 I I I I 8 I I I 0 ! !: " .. t! c -, I I A USTI N McALLISTER ST . JOHN 'S CHURC H HOUs E H O USE PINE I c TiL I [ I 0: I c w I I z M ET H OD I ST C HUR C H D a: SPRUCE 0 .... BARKER P ARK () .... 01 w -=r =r c =r I I I I w 0 PEARL BROKE N DRUM I I I I ::J I a: CL (f) views 32

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A B 33

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c D 34

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E F 35

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G H 36

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I J 37

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K L 38

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M , 39

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I "' w I CrTY OF BOULDER PARKING DESIGN STANDARDS CHART NO. 'I TWO-WAY TUFFIC SINGLf•lOAOED AISllS SllfPAIIIliiiCi .. , ...... "•'• 00 "• .. 1-t-t--t--t--t--t--t--t--t-t-t-t-lHf-1-t-t-t--t--t--t--t--t--1 •-t-t--t--t--t--t--t--t--t-t-t-t-l-ll-1-t-t-t--t--t--t--t--t--1 i c : J e ; .... a .......... .. ............... ,. na .. ....... Ill eo PARKING ANGlE DEORUI """HKINO BTANOAROB OESIGN AGSODATES ;. -. 40

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I N 0 I CITY Of BOULDER PARKING DESIGII STNIOARDS CHART 110. 1 011(-MAY TIIAFF IC DOUBLE-LOADED AISLES SELF,ARttiNO ... "' •• .. • ' 10 " .. " .. "' .. ... .. .. .. OM i .. • •• ;;( ., II: : .. j .. 0 .. ... ju ... )t •• •• 00 v v v v v I/ v v ...... .. v v v v ...... ..... lL .. / v v v / / v v v l/ / v v / / . 7 / ' .<>/ 7 / .. .;/ J J / / 1/ '/ / r; v vj i/ v v Y.! v I rt vr"). f-7 iV oo:a ••• , ... , ., .,. 10 ., IS I oo .,1 u" "' n ,. " 10 &J) •• , •• PARKING ANGLE DEGREES -R>
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• N N I CITY OF BOULDER PARKING DSIGit STANDARDS Cit ART 110. J TWO-WAY TRAFFIC DOUILE-LOADED AISLES SElf-PAIIItiiiG •• ., ea •• .. " .. ., v .. .. 1/ ... ... •• ... !/'). .. v , .l/ u 1-.. +J -!" l1 <1 .. IV z ... OM i ..... "" • •• " z " ., a: "" A. •• j 41 ; j ; •• .. M 11 Jf 40 42 ,., H nl u "I 10 aaJ•• ••I JIO nJ ,. "I 10 uJ • trl •• PARKING ANGlE DEGREES PA.RK""'-'0 OEStGN ASSlX:tAT ... ' . I , , t " . : 42

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SPRUCE CORNERS STRUCTURAL DESCRIPTION This project is a mixed-use concept located on the northeast corner of the Mall Loop, Boulder, Colorado. The basic structural system is frame bearing wall stories) set on top of a two-way concrete slab. The slab in turn is supported by 12" columns (with column capitals) on a parking grid which is either 18 feet by 18 feet (parking bays) or 18 feet by 24 feet (center circulation aisle) . Soils in the area are excellent, according to a site survey and phone conversation with Chuck Bowman, registered soil engineer. While Mr. Bowman indicates a range in soil bearing pressure from 4,000 to 8,000 pounds per square foot, we will base all structural calculations on a conservative figure of 4,000 ponds per square foot. Cost savings may be achieved later if actual site borings confirm a higher value. More specifically, the structural system on top of the concrete deck will be as follows. A 2 x 6 stud wall (8.5 feet) will bear directly on the plate with appropriate moisture and rot protection. The 2 x 6 wall will be filled with R-19 fiberglass insulation and will be sheathed with CDX plywood, exterior glue. The plywood will act as both shear panels for lateral loads (wind and earthquake) and will also serve as a nailing base for milled 1 x 6 (tongue and groove) clear cedar siding applied vertically as a tight and crisp building "skin:" The joist system will be plywood "Truss Joists" constructed of a 3/4" plywood web member and 2" x 4" Doug Fir top and bottom plates. These joists will be placed directly on top of exterior bearing walls at 16" o.c. and will -1-

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flush frame into a transverse WlO steel beam (see detail drawing for connection). Decking over the joists will be 3/4" tongue-and-groove ply wood (subfloor -underlayment) and will be both glued and nailed to the wood joist system. The second story will be built in a similar manner, except for certain conditions where the exterior wall will be balloon framed past the next floor to brace rafters from thrusting outwards. The rafters will be constructed of Douglas Fir 2 x 12's, partly for structure, but primarily to accept 12" (R-38) of fiberglass insulation within the rafter cavity. The underside of all rafters, as with all interior and exterior walls, will receive two layers of 5/8" sheet rock to achieve the required one-hour fire rating for a structure of this use and size. -2-

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FOOTING LOADS: COLUMN "A" (See "Parking Level" for Location) This column and attached footing accepts the maximum loading for the Spruce Corners project. The footing under this column must be able to accept the following loads: 1) Weight of the footing, plus equivalent area of 6"_gravel and 6" concrete. Estimate of 5' by 5' by 2 feet thick or 50 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 2) Weight of the 8 foot high by 12" column with a cross sectional area of .785 square feet or 6.3 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 3) Weight of a concrete slab 8" thick with an area of 24' x 18' or a total area 432 square feet or 288 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 4) Live load on slab, both interior and plaza at SO pounds per square foot. 432 square feet times SO pounds (see UBC Table 23-A). S) Weight of first floor exterior wall. 192 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot. 6) Dead load of second floor system. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot. -37,500 pounds 945 pounds 43,200 pounds 21,600 pounds 1,920 2,160 pounds

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7) Live load on second floor at 50 pounds per square foot. 216 square feet times 50 pounds. 8) Weight of second floor exterior wall balloon framed to roof. 264 square feet at 10 pounds. 9) Dead load of attic residential floor. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot. 10) Live load of residential area. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot (see UBC Table 23A) . 11) Dead load of roof system. 216 square feet at 10 pounds per square foot. 12) Live (snow) load on roof. 216 square feet at 30 pounds per square foot. llO,OOO 4,000 27.6 area needed for footing. 10,800 pounds 2,640 pounds 2,160 pounds 8,640 pounds 2,160 pounds 6,480 pounds 110,205 pounds Use footing of 5.5 feet by 5.5 feet with an area of 30 square feet. -4-

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FOOTING LOADS: COLUMN "B" (See "Parking Level" for Location) This column and attached f ooting accepts the minimum loading for the Spruce Corners project. 1) Weight of footing, plus gravel and concrete on top. 2) 3) 4) Estimate 2' thick by 3' by 3' 150 pounds. Weight of column. Dead load of 9 foot by 18 foot plaza concrete, 8" thick. 108 cubic feet at 150 pounds per cubic foot. Live load on plaza at 50 pounds per square foot. 162 square feet times 50 pounds. 28,000 4,000 7 square feet of footer area needed. 2,700 pounds 945 pounds 16,200 pounds 8,100 pounds 27,945 pounds Use strap footer four feet wide extending back to central column . -5-

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FOOTING LOAD: WALL FOOTING "C" (See "Parking Level" for Location) This wall footing supports the plaza level and the tall entry tower on the southern elevation. The footing must be able to support the following loads: 1) Weight of footing, plus equivalent area of 6" of concrete and 6" of gravel. Estimate 3 foot wide footing, 2 foot thick with concrete, etc. at 150 pounds per square foot. 2) Weight of concrete wall 8" thick, 8 feet high at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 3) Dead load of floor of tower at 10 pounds per square foot. 4) Dead load of plaza area at 150 pounds per cubic foot. 5) Live load first floor at 50 pounds per square foot. 6) Weight of wall 40 feet high at 10 pounds per square foot. 7) Dead load second floor. 8) Live load second floor at 50 pounds. -6900 pounds/ linear feet 790 pounds 90 pounds 1,440 pounds 450 pounds 400 pounds 90 pounds 450 pounds

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9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) Dead load third floor. Live load third floor at 50 pounds. Dead load mechanical room at 100 pounds per square foot. Live load mechanical room at 40 pounds per square foot. Dead load of roof Dead (snow) load square foot. 6, 770 4,000 1.69 feet at 10 pounds per square on roof at 30 pounds per Use two foot wide footer. -790 pounds 450 pounds 900 pounds 360 pounds foot. 90 pounds 270 pounds 6, 770 pounds

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DESIGN OF PARKING GARAGE COLUMN (Figures for Maximum Loading at Column "A" on Parking Level Plan) From footing calculations, total load on column (both dead loads and live loads) is 100,000 pounds or 100 kips. This column, and others like it, will chiefly sustain axial compression loads, and we can use the formula: plu = .85 fcAc + fyAs Assume 4 and 5 bars (40,000 p.s.i.) will be used per column with a cross-sec tional area of • 30 square inches per bar. plu = .85 (3000)(.78)(144) + (40,000)(.30)(4) plu = 286,416 +.48,000 = 334 kips This exceeds the design load of 100 kips, but it is desirable to have an overdesigned column to take into account accasional damage to the column structure from can bumpers. Use column capitol for shear resistance. -8-

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DESIGN OF STEEL BEAM (This steel beam will span a maximum of 24 feet between bays. It will support a maximum uniform load of 25,920 pounds or 25 kips.) Using the ASI tables, it is found that a W8 beam will not span 24 (page 2-46). Using table at 2-45 (Fy = 36 ksi), it appears that a WlO beam with a weight of 49 pounds per foot will support a uniform load 36 kips on a 24 foot span. Therefore use a WlO beam with a depth of 10 inches and a flange width of 10 inches. -9-

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DESIGN OF STEEL COLUMN (From First to Second Floors) From footing calculations assume a dead load plus live load of 35 kips. Using the ASI manual (Table V at 3-51) with F7 = 46 ksi, a square section pipe with walls will hold a load of 57 kips (table interpolated for foot high steel column) . -10-

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RETENTION STRUCTURE DESIGN Aiea: A = 14,000 sq. ft. = .32 Acre Storm Frequency = 100 yr. Intensity of Rainfall = I = 6. 311 /hr. (Given) Coefficient of Runoff: C = 1) Historic (Pre-Development) C = .2 2) Post Development C = .83 Asphalt, Brick, Concrete Roofs • 90% @ .9 Grasses & Vegetation = 10% @ .2 Composite C = (90 x .9) + (10 x .2) 100 Flow Line 140' Slope 2% Q = CIA Q Peak Runoff Rate in C.F.S. Predevelopment Q = (.2) (.6 .3) ( .32) = .40 CFS Post Development Q = (.83)(6.3)(.32) = 1.67 CFS -11-= .83

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RETENTION STRUCTURE St.ructure designed with storage capacity to reduce the discharge to historic rate * Source: Landscape Architecture Construction by Landphair (Pg. 148) Predevelopment Q 0 = .40 CFS Post Development Ql = 1.67 CFS To determine storage capacity: Peqk flow ratio = Qo Ql = Design Discharge Peak Runoff .40 = .24 =--1.67 See Graph p. 150 Landphair (S.C.S. Release #55) = .45 vr = design storm volume in inches Vs = 6.3 X .45 Total storage capacity required in acre feet is V9 = •32 2 84 = .075 Acre ft. NOTE: City of Boulder has no required storage for small lots -water can be conveyed to alley. -12-

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DESIGN OF PLYWOOD TRUSS-JOISTS Maximum clear span of the truss joists will be as follows: or .use 17' 6" for clear span figure. From Sweet's Catalog a plywood truss joist with 2" x 4" top and bottom chords with plywood web of a total depth of will span 19' O" with a 60 pound live load. -13-

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DESIGN OF TWO-WAY SLAB 2.4-'. o _ • _ • -----r-Use initial dead weight assumption of 8" thick slab (reinforced) at 150 pounds per cubic foot, a total of 288 cubic feet or 43,200 pounds or 100 pounds per square foot dead load. Use live load of 50 pounds. w = 1.4(100) + 1.7(50) = 140 + 85 = 225 psf initial trial run, sum the perimeter of the proposed slab and divide by 180: 18 + 18 + 24 + 24 180 = 7" thickness We will use the direct design method because there are a minimum of three spans, the ratio of long-to-short is less than 2, and the live load does not exceed three times the dead load (Concrete, Winter, P. 212). -14-

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Beam dimensions of 14 x 18 inches will be assumed. The moment of inertia of the T-Beams will be estimated as follows: For the interior beams: I = x 14 x 18 3 x 2 = 13,608 inches4 For the slab strips: 18 X 12 X 7 3 4 I (18 foot width) = = 6,174 inches 12 24 X 12 X 73 I (24 foot width) = 12 = 8,232 inches4 For the two 24 foot long beams: = 13,608 = 6,174 For the two 18 foot long beams: = 13,608 = 8,232 -15-2.2 1.65

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The ratio of continuous edges to total perimeter is: s = 18 + 18 + 24 + 24 18 + 18 + 24 + 24 = 1 The ratio of long-to-short (clear) spans is: 23.5 17.5 = 1.34 = Using equation 4.15: h: (23.5)(12)(800 + .005 X 60,000) 36,000 + 5,000(1)(2.2-.5 X 1 X 2) 310,200 = 42,000 7.38 inches of slab thickness also the minimum thickness given by equation 4.16. The thickness not be greater than equation 4.17: h = (23.5)(12)(800 + .005)(60,000) 36,000 = 8.61 inches The depth limitation in Article 4.10 does not apply. -16-

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For the short span direction, the total static moment is: = 1/8(225)(24)(17.6)2 = 209 foot-kips This is distributed as follows: Negative moment = 209(.65) = 135 foot-kips Positive moment = 209(.35) = 73 foot-kips The column _strip has a width of: 18 2 x = 9 feet .. 24 18 = 1.33 1 (1.33) = (1.65)(1.33) = 2.19 Graph 13 in the Appendix indicates that 68% is taken by the column strip. -17-

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east elevation north elevation spruce cor,ncrsa residential mixed usc office concept duianc:d by joll• b. spinu, jr. ie fvllillmut of rcquircmu u for the. mutu ol m.hi t c t lurc dcam:, •aivcuity ol colorado. dc•vu , m•y. 1982 . rc:dudopmc.DI site: lontcd at 15th aDd spru c e Jlrtc:ts, boulder . coloud a. a•y •sc of tOOt dnwiaa s by pc:rmis.sic;. oely. tc• k • 1181:

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_JIOUth elevatlo" jwest elevation --------------spruce cornersa residential mixed usc office concept hy joha b. s pitm , jr. i o fulfillmut o f n:quirtmutt { or the muter of arc hittcturc dcarcc , uivcr si t y of co loud o , dcnct, 1982. r cdcvtlopmut tile loc1tcd 1 i 1 5th aod spru< c st.rce.ls. bouldu, color ado. Ulf \IK of thuc drawiop by pcrmit!io. 011ly. .suk• 1/8.. 1:

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aouth elevation, court north elevation, court spruce; corners-a residential mixed usc office concept dcsisncd by h.s:piuu.jr . lulfillmut o f requirunuts fOJ the muter ol dcarcc. u11ivc:uity ol colo udo . ckeYCJ, may. 1982. rcdcwlopmcnf site l outed at 15th tod spruce s lrctt s. boul der. co Iondo. any usc. of thc:u du•inas by pcrmiuian Oftly. suk• 1/8t:

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east west northsouth cornersa residential mixed usc office concept by ;oil• h. spirzcr, ;r. i• f.Jiillmut of f or rhc muter o( ud1.itcchlft tksrcc, ol colou d o , duvtr, may, 1982. redtvdoprmnt silt located at 15th aacl spntc.c stre ets . bouldu.coloudo. aay •• ol rhuc dnwi•gt by pumis.sto. a.ly . su.k• 1/8• [

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• l I 1!1 ==1 or:qi[Jirnol ! . j 15th etreet f•cedel 0 0 : i spruce corners-a residential mixed usc office concept duiaecd by ;oh• h. s p iur:r.;r. i • flllfi llmut o f rt quircmutt {or the mutu ol uchitt•rc dcarct. 111ivusity ol colorado. deaver , nuy . 1982. redc.w::lopmut si t e located at 15th 1!td sp r lltc strcets. hollldcr . coloudo. 1111 UR of thes e d uwiaa s hy pcrmissioe 011ly. scak • [

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• 1 I ,, 8!l1l • • • • l OJj r---lmJ--I --} corners . a residential usc offtcc concept du lkd by ;oh• •• f11lfrllmut of rcqvircmuts fOf the mutu o( dc:en:c:. uivtuity o( coloudo. deaver , m • y . 1982 . rcclcvdopmc:at site: loUic:d a t 1 5th a td spruce ''. '.'' boulder . coloudo. aay uu ol these drawi•1 • by pcrmiUIOft 011:fy. Klft • 1/8[

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0 ---+ ----spruce cornersa residential mixed usc office concept dui1111ed by ioh• h. spitur . ;z_;. l•lrillmut of r apircmc.••• 1 M the muter of u c hitcctiNl: dcarcc. , ••iYcflity of colotado, dunr . .rnay, 1982. rcdcW:Ioptncat site. located a t 15th l.d spr•cc struts. boulckr.colorado. •r IM of thc:K du..taat by pumissio. a.ly . suka 1/8. .. (

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0 cornersa residential mixed usc: office: concept duitltd by ;oh• b.spi uer.jr . • r.t lillmc•t of for the muter ol mflitcc:tuc dc:1ftt. 11•in:uity d c o l o nclo . dc .. u . rnay, 1982. rcdc.:lop-:•t site located 11 1.5th ..d spnl t c mutt. llo.ldc:r . c.olondo . •• ol theM: duYi .. 1 hr pcuniuto. -.Jy . K alco J/8(

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0 cornersa residential mixed usc office concept d ui11kd hy ioh• h.tpiucr.jr . ia (ltlfillmut of rcquittmcnlt for the muter ol uc.lr.ilctllrc dcarcc, ••ivcuity o( colofado, dcanr. m a y , 1982. ft'dtw:l opcnu t titc located at I.Srh ud tprutt ruccts. &o.ld u . co l oudo. ... ,. uc: ol these drnriap by pumiuto. .c a k • [

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--"---aTlUIMHl$'1 'LtwoiiO cornersa res idential mixed usc office concept by ioh• b. spiuer. jr. ia (ulfiUmut ol rtqu iremcnu l ot the muter o f arc.hittc.ture dcartc, •nivcniry of c.oJoudo , duvu. may, 1982. n:dc:Yclopmtnt site l outed at 15th aad spruce stmu. boulder. coloudo. uy usc ol fhut dnwinas by pcrminioo oely. .calc• 1/8. .. 1: