Citation
Little Annie

Material Information

Title:
Little Annie architectural program
Creator:
Stryker, Wayne
Language:
English
Physical Description:
2 volumes : color illustrations, maps, color plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Ski resorts -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Aspen ( lcsh )
Ski resorts ( fast )
Colorado -- Aspen ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
Academic theses. ( lcgft )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )
Academic theses ( lcgft )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
General Note:
Contents: [v. 1] Thesis preparation.--[v.2] Thesis summary.
Statement of Responsibility:
Wayne Stryker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09459134 ( OCLC )
ocm09459134
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1979 .S778 ( lcc )

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Full Text
ENVIRONMENTAL DESO AURARIA LIBRARY
LITTLE ANNIE
ARCHITECTURAL
PROGRAM
THESIS PREPARATION WAYNE STRYKER 1979


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION..............................................PAGE 1
GOALS.....................................................PAGE 5
FACTS................................................... PAGE 6
CONCEPTS..................................................PAGE 11
NEEDS.....................................................PAGE 14
PROBLEM STATEMENTS
PAGE 21


INTRODUCTION
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
A new major ski area, named "Little Annie," is being planned near Aspen, Colorado. The development will have 9 chairlifts, cover about 3500 acres, and posess a vertical drop of 1800 feet. The area will be remotely located and will be unapproachable by automobile. Visitor access will be provided by a gondola type ski lift directly from the town of Aspen (see Little Annie Development Plan). This concept will be unique in North America. No lodging facilities will be necessary because this need will be fulfilled by existing beds in Aspen. Access to the base "gondola" will be by pedestrian or mass transit means only.
Because of these unusual circumstances of the area, the master plan calls for what might normally be thought of as the base lodge to be located at the top of the mountain (elevation* 11,300 feet). The actual base facility in town will be only a lift station, ticket office and transit station.
It is the purpose of this architectural project to study and design the "mountain-top facility. The following programatic analysis refers
exclusively to this facility.
Note* Parts of this document have been transcribed directly from the Little Annie Socio-Economic and Development Impact Analysis by Gage Davis and Associates


HISTORICAL SUMMARY
Little Annie has long been considered by Aspen residents as an area possessing excellent skiing terrain and snow conditions. As far back as 1958, ski tours for alpine powder skiing have been provided which continue to this day.
Recognizing this potential, Mr. Waddy Catchings began to purchase mining claims in 1961 in order to assemble a sufficient amount of land for ski area development.
It was also during this period when the USFS began to study the area. Concluding that the area did in fact have potential, a preliminary permit was issued in 1966 and Little Annie became recognized for recreational use potential by being incorporated within the Pitkin County Master Plan. Unfortunately, due to lack of necessary financing and the realization of the Snowmass development, the area was once again limited to powder skiing tours.
During the period from 1967 to 1975 several developers again looked at the potential with no positive results until 1975 when David Farny conceived the idea of a gondola or monocable means of access from the valley off Highway 82 to approximately 11,300 feet on the east side of Richmond Hill and proceeded to study the potential with a preliminary permit from the USFS.


Sno-engineering was retained at that time to prepare a preliminary feasibility report, climatological studies were initiated, joint meetings were conducted with the State Planning Office, the USFS, County Commissioners, and public hearings were held to review the tentative findings and recommendations.
By January 1976, the Little Annie Ski Corporation had been formed. In October 1976, however, because of questions pertaining to locational suitability of the base, concerns raised with respect to related transportation and housing issues, and because of the County Growth Management Planning studies then in process; the County Commissioners requested that Little Annie postpone further formal activity subject to completion of the Growth Management Plan and until the site could be inventoried and assessed in more detail together with other potential ski area developments within the Aspen area.
As the Growth Management Plan approached the point of being finalized and adopted, the Little Annie First Partners, Limited Partnership was formed with David Farny and Little Annie Ski Corporation as General Partners and 30 investors as Limited Partners to reactivate feasibility studies.
As a result of earlier meeting and concern expressed over the "remote" base area location east of Town, option negotiations were finalized to assure an excellent base area site near downtown Aspen off Ute Avenue.


During July 1977, the Aspen/Pitkin County Growth Management Policy Plan was ratified by the City and County and a comprehensive Preconstruction Master Plan Schedule was drafted for Little Annie. In September, the Master Plan Schedule was reviewed with the Forest Service and State Planning Office to reach agreement that all approval steps by all agencies had been included in proper sequence and with reasonable time projections allowed for each step. The Forest Service and State Planning Office agreed to budget money and manpower to perform their respective roles if the County were to enter into a Joint Review Process agreement.
On January 16, 1978, the USFS, the State of Colorado, Pitkin County and the City of Aspen entered into an agreement pursuant to Step 3 of the Colorado Review Process.
On November 7, 1978, a Pitkin County initiative was passed by a general vote of the public, permitting the Little Annie development to enter the "Site Specific Stage" of the Joint Review Process. Assuming the remaining steps of this process proceed smoothly, construction of the site facilities will most likey begin in the spring of 1980.
4


1) The mission of the fountain facility is to serve those functions normally associated with a base lodge. As the only enclosure planned for the mountain it will have the major responsibility for providing the users with a memorable experience.
2) The ski area's identity is to be compatible with Aspen's image as a first class destination resort with a unique historical heritage.
3) The activities taking place in the facility will be varied and characterized by short but intense peak periods. The facility must accomodate these peaks easily as well as provide warm atmosphere during slow periods.
4) The facility must be sensitive to the site. Minimum impact upon the environment both during construction and during use after completion is necessary. It is desirable that this be achieved in image as well as substance.
5) The facility must protect a high level of quality in form and materials.
6) The main economic goal is to provide a building with low operating and maintenance costs because of its remote location.


1) Use projection* Phase one, 3900 skiers per day; Phase two, 7500 skiers per day.
2) Staffing requirements* Phase one, 262 employees; Phase two, 503 employees. ♦Note* See table 6 for employee projections.
3) User description* There will be primarily 6 types of users; downhill skiers cross-country skiers, diners, sightseers, hikers, and employees. The downhill skiers will be by far the most predominate and will be the largest spenders. They are the primary market. The cross-country skiers are expected to be second most numerous but are in general not a particularly lucrative market. Diners can be from any of the user groups, however, it is hoped that they can be attracted from the Aspen visitor group at large. It is hoped, although not necessary, that enough hikers and sightseers can be attracted to make operation of the mono-cable feasable in the summer months.
4) No facilities exist on the site. However, there are about 6 cabins dispersed on private parcels primarily on the west side of the mountain. These will be visible to skiers and most are adjacent to planned ski runs.
5) Vicinity land use is predominately National Forest. To the North is the existing ski area of Aspen Mountain. The possibility exists for cooperation and inter-area use between Little Annie and Aspen Mountain. Richmond Hill is


dotted with many small private plots of land. Some of these are being used as cabin sites. It is very unlikely that their use will change. All development rights to the ski area excepting what is in the master plan proposal have been deeded to the Nature Conservancy Land Trust which precludes any and all further land development.
6) Views from the ski area are exceptional in all directions with many mountain peaks visible. However, there are virtually no views from the facilities' site because of its densely wooded nature. It is surrounded by 30 to 40 foot fir trees on all sides.
7) The facility will not be visible from any point on the ski area except if it extends above the high evergreen grove surrounding it.
8) The location of the facility will be close to the geometric center of the ski area, on top of the mountain and approximately 3 miles south of the town of Aspen. (See Little Annie Development map).
9) The size of the entire development is about 3500 acres. The mountain facility site, however, is not limited except in general terms. It will be located somewhere in the evergreen grove at the center of the area. The grove is approximately 6 acres in size.


10) Accessibility to the site will be by ski lift only except when it is necessary to use snow cats or jeeps in which case access will be up the west side of the mountain from Castle Creek Road. The mono-cable will be essentially the only access from town; however, skiers once on the mountain will come from any of the various local lifts and ski runs. The site is beyond reasonable walking distance from any road or community.
11) The mono-cable lift will have a carrying capacity of 2250 people per hour during Phase 1 and 4500 after Phase 2. The mountain must be able to handle service requirements at these capacities. The total area wide capacity will be 3900 skiers at Phase 1 and 7500 skiers at Phase 2.
12) The facility site is at the top of Richmond Hill on gently sloping terrain. It is on the East facing side, slightly below the crest of the mountain.
13) The site is densely tree covered with predominately 30 to 40 foot tall fir trees. This stand of conifers covers about 6 acres and is entirely on the East facing slope of Richmond Hill.
14) There are no geographical or topographical hinderences to development on the facility site with the exception of the necessity for clearing many trees.


15) Although Little Annie lies at approximately 40 degrees North Latitude its 11,300 foot top elevation places it, climatologicly, in an alpine zone. It receives about 150 inches of snowfall per year and a total of about 25 inches of precipitation. Clear skies and direct sunshine occur over 300 days per year. Winter temperatures vary from -35 degrees Fahrenheit to 30 degrees Fahrenheit in January, the coldest month. In the warmest month, July, temperatures vary between 40 degrees Fahrenheit and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. The weather extremes of rain in January and snow in July have been experienced in recent years. Snowfall characteristics can be expected to be very similar to the top half
of Aspen Mountain, although Little Annie, because of its layout will be able to provide a longer ski season. Aspen Mountain's ski season normally runs from Thanksgiving to April 15. Assuming the same weather Little Annie will be able to extend that season by 2 to 4 weeks both Spring and Fall. It is characterized by dry but very cool weather.
Snow flurries can occur frequently anytime after Labor Day.
16) All intended uses of the Little Annie Development are compatible with the Pitkin County Zoning Regulations.


17) Pitkin County prescribes use of the Uniform Building Code in construction. By occupancy the mountain top facility will have a Group A-3 classification for the restaurants. Other parts of the building may qualify for a less restrictive group depending on the design of the facility.
18) Cost parameters have not been established at this time. The added construction cost accrued by the remote location of the site will have to be considered.
19) A project delivery schedule has not been determined at this time.


1) The primary organizational concept is to include as many functions as possible into a single open plan building. This will enhance the facilities roll as "anchor" for the ski area and should result in a minimal environmental impact. Other advantages to the centralized approach will be*
a) an ability to handle extreme peaks and valleys in use.
b) an enhancement of the nature of retail establishments to be mutually supporting by virtue of location.
c) there are no incompatable uses or activities and by the nature of the weather and the site's remoteness it is anticipated that once visitors get to the facility they will want to stay indoors for a length
of time.
d) security will be easier to achieve
e) any given user will require more than one service of the facility.
f) a larger building will enhance external orientation by creating a more distinct
ti


sense of place and more balance in scale with the size of the mountain or mono-cable,
g) energy conservation will be increased by
both the minimizing of total enclosed building volume and minimizing total building envelope. This can be very important if active solar heating is used.
It must be noted that the expandibility and convertability of a centralized concept may not be as workable as in a decentralized one.
2) The building must be versatile, both seasonally and functionally. Parts must be able to open and close independently of the others.
The building must appear to be fully active even when a majority of the functions are not in use.
3) A prime objective of the facility will be to reduce peak loads on the downhill lift system. People must be encouraged to dally at the end of the day to prevent lift line delays at the mono-cable. The restaurants will be designed to achieve this.
4) Because of the vast open area of skiable terrain the building should


serve as an orientation device. The plan of the building should also serve the arriving visitors to help them orient to the outside area.
5) It is important to the developer that the mountain top facility be perceived by the user as a "village" rather than a single building. This could conflict with other concepts. Colorado has a history of mountain-top mining camps and this identity or character could be desirable.


1) The break-down and phasing of space requirements can be seen in Table 3.
a) Lounge and Observation. At this time the requirement for an observation area is not required, however the lounge should have an exterior view perhaps of the entry. The lounge should have its own restrooms and a bar with some storage area.
b) Mechanical and Locker Area. These two areas do not need to be together, nor does the mechanical space need to be in the basement. The locker space should be easily accessible, especially for skiers, probably from the main entry. Because of the nature of the plan lockers will be very important to users.
c) Ski Shop. The ski shop should possess a prominent place in the building for display. It may perhaps be combined with the Ski Repair and Rental.
<14


d) 250 Seat Restaurant. This should have a good exterior view and perhaps a view of the mono-cable. A good interior orientation to activity is also desirable.
e) Ski Patrol and First Aid. This service must have a good access to the slopes.
It must have exterior space for snowmobile parking and tobogan storage.
It must be easily accessable from the lifts and the mono-cable. An interior access is also desirable. There must be adequate space for several beds and for bandaging several people simultaneously. Space must also be given to ski storage and repair. A separate space must also be provided as a patrol lounge with comfortable furniture and food preparation.
f) Ski Repair and Rental. The ski repair must have space for work bench and tooling activities. There must be access to a cash register and storage area. The


rental area must have a large storage space. Space must be provided for fitting benches and cash register. These functions must have easy access to the outside.
g) Ski School. This function must relate strongly to the slopes. No public interior entrance is required. Office and sitting space should be provided. The space should correspond with the ski school meeting place which will be a large open area adjacent to the building.
h) Offices. Space should be provided for
5 offices and secretary space. The offices should have exterior exposure, preferrably with a view to the mono-cable terminal.
i) Restrooms. These large restrooms must serve the lobby area of the building and be convenient for skiers. This area will experience hard use and it must be designed for high volume.
j) Lobby. This space is not required but may be very useful. It would have to relate strongly to the entry and could


serve as an interior focal point.
k) Employee Housing. This is not included in this design project as it will be detached and independent of the main facility.
l) Slope Maintenance. This space need not relate to the buildings interior except perhaps to the executive offices. It must, however, relate strongly to an outside space where snowcats and snowmobiles will be parked.
2) The outside space requirements for this building will be as follows*
a) Skier access is paramount. Care must be taken in space layout to allow for convenient ski exit to the slopes and entry from the slopes. These should be possible without great effort, such as poling up ever slight grades, for the skiers. About 5000 square feet will be required for ski racks and space for skiers to put on and take off their equipment.


b) Interface between the mono-cable and the building can be either an exterior or interior one. In either case the direction of the lift is fixed by the master plan. All lift power will be from the base facility. All gondola storage will be at the base facility.
The mountain-top requirements for the lift will be a small loading and unloading area, bull-wheel area, and gondola pathway. These functions require only 1000 square feet.
c) The ski school will require 30,000 square feet of level or slightly sloping open space with direct connection to beginner skiing terrain. It is desirable for this activity to be highly visible.
d) The ski patrol requires a location by which they have easy access to all slopes and lifts. A space of 600 square feet


will be required for their tobaggan and snowmobile parking. The outside space for the ski patrol should be adjacent to that of first aid.
e) It is desirable that there be extensive exterior deck space for lounging on sunny days. This space should be South-facing and relate well to the lounge, the restaurants or both. It should also work conveniently off of the building entry and be accessible to the main ski rack area. There should be an area equal to about H the interior seatings space provided.
f) Slope maintenance is an activity which can be located to any orientation. It will probably occupy the least desirable interior and exterior spaces. It must however, be planned as to have access to the mountain. It will require about 1000 square feet of open space adjacent to the building.


g) The ultimate success of the mountain-top facility depends heavily on the way it can adapt to the two part phasing.
While it must be considered that Phase 2, which will double the size of the structure and double the number of users, may never be realized it can be projected with confidence that in the event that it does occur, it will follow the guidelines of the Master Plan. Therefore, the initial facility design must be in every way complete within the parameters of Phase 1 and yet successfully embrace a transition into Phase 2.


FUNCTION
The function of the mountain top facility is to house those supportive activities which allow a ski area to operate as a complete recreation center. The primary emphasis must be on the outdoor activities and this facility must be considered as subordinate to that use.
The primary user of the mountain and this facility will be downhill skiers and Little Annie will be predominately a wintertime destination. It will experience use demand only between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. as a general rule.
The mountain-top facility must be thought of as a thing of the mountains as opposed to an extension of the town of Aspen. It will function as a special place, a thing apart.
FORM
The mountain-top facility occupies a site of magnificent visual drama. The facility will be isolated from these views by a dense grove of


conifers. Man-made objects are to be as inconspicuous at Little Annie as possible. The sheltered nature of the site should be utilized in the design.
The natural environment of Little Annie is characteristically alpine, with delicate flora and fauna. The climate although hard on indigenous life forms, is ideal for winter recreation. The layout of the mountain is such that it will be skiable in parts when other similar mountains close by will be unusable.
Aspen has a reputation as a premier resort. The objective of Little Annie is to both capitalize on and enhance that image. The ski area posesses a natural splendor and it should not be the purpose of the facility to compete with that, but rather assent to it.
ECONOMY
Design and materials should be carefully considered for their effect on minimizing maintenance and operational costs. An interference with the


buildings ability to function during the business season vould disrupt the operation of the entire ski area.
It must be remembered that the ski area will be a speculative venture despite the expectations of lucrative operations. The balances between quality and cost must be weighed with prudence.
TIME
The Little Annie Master Plan determines a Phase 1, Phase 2 growth.
Phase 2 may or may not be implemented. It is the necessity of Phase 1 design that it accomadate either alternative. It is extremely unlikey that there will ever be a "Phase 3." It is also unlikely that there will be a change in projected use within the economic life of the development.


SUPPORTIVE DATA
I


BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Architectural Record» March, 1974, pp. 119-124.
2. Porous, September, 1978, pp. 4-5.
3. Little Annie Socio-Economic and Development Impact Analysis,
Gage Davis Associates, May 15, 1978.
4. Pitkin County Land Use Code, April 1, 1976.
5. Uniform Building Code, 1976 Edition, International Conference of
Building Officials, 1976.


PROJECT DIARY
Sept. 20, 1978. Telephone conversation with Stacy Stanley (Snow Engineering)
Sept. 24, 1978 Telephone conversation with Gage Davis (Gage Davis Associates)
Sept. 26, 1978 Telephone conversation with Dave Farny (Developer)
Sept. 28, 1978 Telephone conversation with Dave Farny
Oct. 5, 1978 Consultation with Terry Barnhart (Gage Davis Associates)
Oct. 10, 1978 Consultation and site tour with Dave Farny at Little Annie site
Dec. 5, 1978 Telephone conversation with Terry Barnhart




LITTLE ANNIE DEVELOPMENT


LITTLE ANNIE
TABLE 2 TRAIL CLASSIFICATION BY ABILITY LEVEL PHASE PHASE Acreage I (3900 Skiers) % Ideal Capacity PHASE Acreage II % (1) (7500 Skiers) Ideal Capacity
Beginner 2.8 1 3% 100 2.8 1 3% 100
Novice 29.1 8 12% 550 29.1 9 12% 705
Low Intermediate 69.0 18 20% 630 76.4 18 20% 1325
Intermediate 176.2 47 35% 1850 359.6 48 35% 3600
Advanced Intermediate 55.8 15 20% 370 100.7 10 20 710
Expert 39.3 11 10% 400 121.1 14 10% 1060
TOTALS: 372.2 100% 100% 3900 690.0 100% 100% 7500
1. Note: 7500 skiers is a total of Phase 1 and 2
Source: Sno-engineering, Gage Davis and Associates


LITTLE ANNIE
TABLE 3
MOUNTAIN FACILITIES SUMMARY BY USE AND AREA
USE (3900 skiers) PHASE I AREA (7500 skiers)' ' PHASE II AREA TOTAL
1. Lounge and Observation 2,000 sq. ft. 4,000 sq. ft. 6,000 sq. fl
2. Basement Mechanical and Locker Area 20,000 0 20,000
3. Ski Shop 2,000 4,000 6,000
4. 250 Seat Restaurant 3,000 2,000 5,000
5. 150 Seat Restaurant 0 2,500 2,500
6. 100 Seat Restaurant 0 1,500 1,500
7. Pastry Shop 0 1,800 1 ,800
8. Delicatessen 0 1 ,500 1 ,500
9. Ski Patrol and First Aid 500 2,000 2,500
10. Ski Repair and Rental 2,000 3,000 5,000
11. Ski School 500 500 1 ,000
12. Offices 500 1,000 1 ,500
13. Restrooms 2,000 4,000 6,000
32,500 27,800 60,300
14. Circulation 0 25% 8,125 / o \ 6,950 15,075
40,625 (40,000)uy 34,750 (36,000) 75,375 (76,0
15. Employee Housing 10,000 10,000 20,000
16. Slope Maintenance 4,000 2,400 6,400
TOTAL: 54,625 sq. ft. 47,150 sq. ft. 101 ,775 Sq. fl
1. fiote: 7500 skiers is a total of Phase 1 and Phase 2
2. Figures in parenthesis is Sno- -engineering estimate
Source: Sno-engineering Inc., Gage Davis and Associates


LITTLE ANNIE
TABLE 6
EMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS OPERATION PHASE
PHASE I PHASE 2
CATEGORY CONSTRUCTION (3900 Skiers) (7500 Skiers)
__________________ASPTT* ASPTT
General Construction:
Monocable 15
Mountain and Related facilities 40
Tickets 1 4 4 9 1 7 8 16
Lift Operations 3 25 12 40 6 40 25 71
Lift Maintenance 3 1 4 6 3 9
Ski Patrol 1 18 19 2 30 32
Slope Maintenance 2 6 3 11 4 12 6 22
Vehicle Maintenance 2 1 3 5 2 7
Elect. Maintenance 2 2 o 0 1 4
Base Area Services 6 6 5 17 12 15 10 27
Transportation 1 1 1 1
Mountain Management 4 3 7 7 6 13
Ski School 23 30 53 42 65 107
Race Program 8 5 13 15 10 25
Skier Services 1 3 4 6 9
Repair/Rental 3 2 5 8 3 11
Touring Program 1 4 5 3 14 17
Shop 1 3 4 1 2 10 13
Nursery 1 2 3 1 3 2 6
Mountain Food 2 24 26 52 3 45 50 98
Locker Attendants 1 1 2 1 2 3
Marketing 1 3 4 1 4 5
Security 1 2 1 4 1 4 2 7
30 134 98 262 57 249 197 503
* A = Annual; S = Seasonal; PT = Part Time; T= Total
(1) Note: It is assumed that this labor force already exists in Aspen.
Source: Sno-engineering; Gage Davis and Associates


LITTLE ANNIE
TABLE 7
STATISTICAL SUMMARY
(3900 skiers) (7500 skiers)
PHASE I PHASE II TOTAL
Total Mountain Acreage: Vertical:
Lifts:
Trail Acreage:
Skier Capacity:
Mountain Facility:
Slope Maintenance Facility Base Facility
Total Estimated Employment
1 gondola (monocable) 6 double chairlifts 1 J-Bar Lift
2125 acres skiable (375 groomed)
3900 skiers 40000 sq. ft.
4000 sq. ft.
40100 sq. ft.
42 annual 134 seasonal 98 part time
274
1 gondola (monocable) 5 double chairlifts
1375 acres skiable (315 groomed) 3600 skiers 36000 sq. ft.
2400 sq. ft.
2000 sq. ft.
27 annual 115 seasonal 99 part time
~~24~r
2 gondolas (monocabl 9 double chairlifts 1 dbl dbl chairlifts 1 J-Bar Lift 3500 acres total skiable 7500 skiers 76000 sq. ft.
6400 sq. ft.
42100 sq. ft.
69 annual 249 seasonal 197 part time
515 ~t0ta1
Total Employee Housing Units 25 units 25 units
Parking no automobiles no automobiles
50 units no automobiles 20 taxi, 1imosine, lodge shuttle unload/load space 6 bus unload/load stal1s
10 bus storage bays
Total Estimated Bus Requirements
5-7 , 40 Passenger buse
Source: Sno-engineering Inc., Gage Davis and Associates


PITKIN COUNTY LAND USE CODE
The Pitkin County Land Use Code was adopted on April 1, 1976 by the Board of County Commissioners and County Planning and Zoning Commission. Comprised of 12 sections, the most relevant sections with regard to Little Annie are Section 2 entitled Policies and Sections 5 entitled General Regulations.
Section 2, Policies, is intended to insure that the use and development of land will be consistent with the goals and objectives of the Aspen General Plan and in that regard, any contemplated action must address concerns related to; natural and manmade hazard and resource areas, soil and surficial geologic characteristics, drainage, adequate provision for water, sewage treatment, impacts on road systems, road design and construction, extension of utilities, erosion of soil, compatibility of historic and archeological resources, compatibility with agricultural lands, impacts on taxes, management of necessary services, housing, scenic qualities, air quality, energy conservation, transportation, development or expansion of ski areas compatibility with existing adjacent neighborhoods, water resource impacts, noise, compatibility with adjacent and nearby public lands, and a growth rate consistant with phasing of public services and facilities.
All of these elements of the land use code policy section will need to be implemented at some time into the final proposal for developing Little Annie.
Section 5 of the Land Use Code, more extensive and detailed than the Policies section, sets forth general regulations which are the specific requirements for any proposal to be


submitted to Pitkin County. The general regulations include; resource and environment, fiscal and services/facilities impact and design, social, areas and activities of local and state interest, and other regulations.
Again, all of these requirements will need to be addressed during the Little Annie proposal review at some point in time. Many of the regulations are already under consideration at this time and as this phase of planning and evaluation progresses those items which are deemed deficient or warrant additional study should be identified and specific documentation should be provided to address those concerns


TABLE NO. 5-A—WALL AND OPENING PROTECTION OF OCCUPANCIES BASED ON LOCATION ON PROPERTY TYPES II, ONE-HOUR, ll-N AND V CONSTRUCTION: For exterior wall and opening protection ot Types II, one hour, ll-N and V buildings see table below. Type V Construction is not permitted within Fire Zone No. 1. Exceptions to limitation for Types II, one-hour, ll-N and Type V Construction, as provided in Sections 1109, 2003 and 2203 apply. For Types I, II F.R. and III and IV Construction see Sections 1803,1903, and 2103.
GROUP DESCRIPTION OF OCCUPANCY FIRE ZONE FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALLS OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS
1—Any assembly building with a stage and an occupant load of 1000 or more in the building 1 Not applicable [See Section 602 (a)]
2—Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 1000 and a stage 2.1—Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room 1 2 hour less than 20 feet 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet Protected less than 20 feet
with an occupant load of 300 or more without a stage, including such buildings used for educational purposes and not classed as a Group E or Group B, Division 2 Occupancy 2 and 3 2 hour less than 10 feet 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet Protected less than 10 feet
A See also Section 702 3—Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 300 without a stage, includ-ing such buildings used for educational purposes and not classed as a Group E or Group B, Division 2 Occupancy i 2 hour less than 20 feet 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet Protected less than 20 feet
2 2 hour less than 5 feet 1 hour elsewhere Not permitted less than 5 feet
3 2 hour less than 5 feet 1 hour less than 10 feet Protected less than 10 feet
4—Stadiums, reviewing stands, and amusement park structures not 1 2 hour less than 20 feet 1 hour elsewhere Protected less than 20 feet
included within Group A-l nor Divisions 2, 2.1 and 3, Group A Occupancies 2 1 hour Protected less than 10
3 1 hour less than 10 feet feet
NOTES: (1) See Section 504 for type of walls affected and requirements covering percentage of openings permitted in exterior walls.
(2) For additional restrictions see Chapters under Occupancy, Fire Zones, and Types of Construction.
(3) For walls facing streets, yards and public ways, see Part V.
(4) Openings shall be protected by a fire assembly having a three-fourths-hour fire-protection rating.


1976 EDITION
701-702
Chapter 7
REQUIREMENTS FOR GROUP A DIVISIONS 2, 2.1, 3 AND 4 OCCUPANCIES
Group A, Divisions 2,2.1, 3 and 4 Occupancies Defined
Sec. 701. Group A, Divisions 2, 2.1, 3 and 4 Occupancies shall be:
Division 2. Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load ofless than 1000 and a stage.
Division 2.1. Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of 300 or more without a stage, including such buildings used for educational purposes and not classed as a Group E or Group B, Division 2 Occupancy.
Division 3. Any building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupant load of less than 300 without a stage, including such buildings used for educational purposes and not classed as a Group E or Group B, Division 2 Occupancy.
Division 4. Stadiums, reviewing stands, and amusement park structures not included within other Group A Occupancies. Specific and general requirements for grandstands, bleachers and reviewing stands are to be found in Chapter 33.
For occupancy separations see Table No. 5-B.
For occupant load see Section 3301.
Construction, Height, and Allowable Area
Sec. 702. (a) General. Buildings or parts of buildings classed in Group A, Divisions 2, 2.1,3 and 4 because of the use or character of the occupancy shall be limited to the types of construction set forth in Tables No. 5-C and No. 5-D and shall not exceed, in area or height, the limits specified in Sections 505, 506 and 507.
EXCEPTION: Division 4 structures of open skeleton frame type without roof, cover or enclosed usable spaces, shall not be limited in area or height.
(b) Special Provisions. Stages and enclosed platforms as defined in Sections 417 and 420 shall be constructed in accordance with Chapter 39.
A fire-resistive ceiling shall not be required in one-story buildings of Type II, One-hour, II-N, III, IV or V construction having an open frame roof.
Division 2.1 Occupancies with an occupant load of 1000 or more shall beof Type I, II-F.R., II, One-hour, III, One-hour, or IV construction.
Division 3 Occupancies located in a basement or above the first story shall be of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
Group A assembly rooms having an occupant load of 1000 or more shall not be located in the basement.
Division 3 Occupancies with an occupant load of 50 or more, which are located over usable space, shall be separated from such space by not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
702-706
UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
For attic space partitions and draft stops see Section 3205.
(c) Division 4 Provisions. Erection and structural maintenance of structures housing Division 4 Occupancies shall conform to the requirements of this Code.
Structures housing Division 4 Occupancies, other than those of open skeleton frame type, when more than one story in height or 400 square feet in area, shall beof not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
When the space under a Division 4 Occupancy is used for any purpose, including exits, it shall be separated from all parts of such Division 4 Occupancy, including exits, by walls, floor and ceiling of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
EXCEPTIONS: I. Exits under temporary grandstands need not be separated.
2. The underside of continuous steel deck grandstands when erected outdoors need not be fireprotecled when occupied Tor public toilets.
The Building Official may cause all Division 4 structures to be reinspected at least once every six months.
Location on.Property
Sec. 703. All buildings housing Group A, Divisions 2, 2.1, 3 and 4 Occupancies shall front directly upon or have access to a public street not less than 20 feet in width. The access to the public street shall be a minimum 20-foot wide right-of-way unobstructed and maintained only as access to the public street. The main entrance to the building shall be located on the public street or on the access way.
For fire-resistive protection of exterior walls and openings, as determined by location on property, see Section 504 and Part V.
Exit Facilities
Sec. 704. (a) General. Stairs, exits, and smokeproof enclosures shall be provided as specified in Chapter 33. (See also Section 3316.)
(b) Amusement Structures. Exits and exit signs for Division 4, Amusement Structures, shall be approved by the Building Official and, where practicable, shall comply with the requirements specified in Chapter 33.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
Sec. 705. All portions of Group A Occupancies customarily used by human beings and all dressing rooms shall be provided with natural or artificial light, ventilation and sanitary facilities as specified in Sections 605 and 1711.
Shaft Enclosures
Sec. 706. Exits shall be enclosed as specified in Chapter 33. (For specific requirements see Section 3316.)
Elevator shafts, vent shafts and other vertical openings shall be enclosed, and the enclosure shall be as specified in Section 1706.


1976 EDITION
707-709
Fire-extinguishing Systems
Sec. 707. When required by other provisions of this Code, automatic fire-extinguishing systems and standpipes shall be installed as specified in Chapter 38.
Special Hazards
Sec. 708. Chimneys and heating apparatus shall conform to the requirements of Chapter 37 of this Code and the Mechanical Code.
Motion picture machine rooms shall conform to the requirements of Chapter 40.
Proscenium curtains shall conform to the requirements set forth in U.B.C. Standard No. 6-1.
Flammable liquids shall not be placed or stored in a Group A Occupancy.
All exterior openings in a boiler room or rooms containing central heating equipment if located below openings in another story or if less than 10 feet from other doors or windows of the same building shall be protected by a fire assembly having a three-fourths-hour fire-protection rating. Such fire assemblies shall be fixed, automatic or self-closing.
Every room containing a boiler or central heating plant shall be separated from the rest of the building by not less than a One-hour Fire-resistive Occupancy Separation.
EXCEPTION: Boilers or central heating plants where the largest piece of fuel equipment does not exceed 400,000 Btu per hour input.
Modifications
Sec. 709. Gymnasiums and similar occupancies may have running tracks constructed of wood or unprotected steel or iron.
In gymnasiums or in multipurpose schoolrooms having an area not greater than 3200 square feet, I-inch nominal tight tongue-and-groovcd or %-inch plywood wall covering may be used on the inner side in lieu of fire-resistive plaster.


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN AURARIA LIBRARY
THESIS SUMMARY WAYIME STRYKER


CONTENTS
ORIGINAL LOGO
COVER
TORN OF ASPIN WITH PROF03RD GONDOLA (FROM LITTLE PROPOSED GONDOLA AT TOP OF RICHMOND HILL (A3PLN 1
ANNIL PASTOR PLAN) OUNTAIN)..........
.PAGE 1 .PAGE 2
VEif OF SITE AT TOP OF RICHMOND HILL LOCKING NORTH.
BUILDING SITE AT CENTER RIGHT BELOW RIDGE TOP..................
»
VIEW FROM SITE TO WEST PAID MOUNT 30PRI3.........................
VIEW FROM SITE TO SOUTH WEST AND MOUNT HAYDEN....................
VIEW FROM SITE TO EAST AND INDEPENDENCE PASS.....................
PRIMARY DESIGN DETERMINANTS......................................
HORIZONTAL GONDOLA- BUILDING RELATIONSHIP CHOICES................
VERTICAL GONDOLA- BUILDING RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM..................
SITE RELATED FORM DETERMINANTS (SLOPE, SUN, VIEW, GONDOLA, TREES
PAGE 3 PAGE 4
.PAG*
5
PAGE 6 PAGE
PAGE 8 PAGE 9
ARID
SKIER MOVEMENT).PAGE 10
LEVEL 1 PLAN..........................................................PAGE 11
LEVEL 2 PLAN
PAGE 12


LEVEL 3 PLAN...........................................................PAGE 13
LEVEL 4 PLAN...........................................................PAGE 14
LEVEL 5 PLAN...........................................................PAGE 15
BUILDING SECTIONS......................................................PAGE 16
VIEG OF BUILDING LOCKING 3017111....................................PAGE 17
VIEN OF BUILDING LOOKING SOUTH.....................................PAGE 18
VISIT OF BUILDING LOOKING NEST......................................PAGE 19
VIEW OF GONDOLA ENTRY..................................................PAGE 20
VIEW LOOKING NORTH.....................................................PAGE 21
VIEW OF SOLAR COLLECTORS LOOKING NORTH.................................PAGE 22
VIEW LOOKING EAST......................................................PAGE 23
PLAN VIEW..............................................................PAGE 24
VIEW OF LOBBY LOOKING NORTHWEST........................................PAGE 25




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Full Text

PAGE 1

ENVlRONMENTAL DESIG AURARIA LIBRAi\Y LITTLE ANNIE I ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAIVI THESIS PREPARATION WAYNE STRYKER 1979 .

PAGE 2

CONTENTS INTROOOCTION ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• PAGE 1 GOAI.S • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• PAGE 5 FACTS ••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• PAGE 6 CONCEPTS ••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• PAGE 11 NEEDS •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• PAGE 14 PROBLEM STATEMENTS ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• PAGE 21

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INTRODUCTION PROJECT DESCRIPTION A new major ski area, named "Little Annie," is being planned near Aspen, Colorado. The development have 9 chairlifts, cover about 3500 acres, and posess a vertical drop of 1800 feet. The will be remotely located and will be unapproachable by automobile. Visitor access will be provided by a gondola type ski lift directly from the town of Aspen (see Little Annie Development Plan). This concept will be unique in North America. No lodging facilities will be-necessary because this need will be by existing beds in Aspen. Access to the base "gondola" will be by pedestrian or mass transit means only. Because of these unusual circumstances of the area, the master plan calls for what might normally be thought of as the base lodge to be located at the top of the mountain (elevation• 11,300 feet). The actual base facility in town will be only a lift station, ticket office and transit station. It is the purpose of this architectural project to study and design the . . . " . . "mounta1n-top fac111ty. The follow1ng programat1c analysis refers exclusively to this facility. Notea Parts of this document have been transcribed directly from the Little Annie Socio-Economic and Development Impact Analysis by Gage Davis and Associates

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HISTORICAL SUMMARY Little Annie has long been considered by Aspen residents as an area possessing excellent skiing terrain and snow conditions. As far back as 1958, ski tours for alpine powder skiing have been provided which continue to this day. Recognizing this potential, Mr. Waddy Catchings began to purchase mining claims in 1961 in order to assemble a sufficient amount of land for ski area development. It was also during this period when the USFS began to study the area. Concluding that the area did in fact have potential, a preliminary permit was issued in 1966 and Little Annie became recognized for recreational use potential by being incorporated within the Pitkin County Master Plan. Unfortunately, due to lack of necessary financing and the real.ization of the Snowmass development, the area: was once again limited powder skiing tours. During the period from 1967 to 1975 several developers again looked at the potential with no positive results until 1975 when David Farny conceived the idea of a gondola or monocable means of access from the valley off Highway 82 to approximately 11,300 feet on the east side of Richmond Hill and proceeded to study the potential with a preliminary permit from the USFS. 2

PAGE 5

Sno-engineering was retained at that time to prepare a preliminary feasibility report, climatological studies were initiated, joint meetings were conducted with the State Planning Office, the USFS, County Commissioners, and public hearings were held to review the tentative findings and recommendations. By January 1976, the Little Annie Ski Corporation had been formed. In October 1976, however, because of questions pertaining to locational suitability of the base, concerns raised with respect to related transportation and housing issues, and because of the County Growth Management Planning studies then in processJ the County Commissioners requested that Little Annie postpone further formal activity subject to completion of the Growth Management Plan and until the site could be inventoried and assessed in more detail together with other potential ski area developments within the Aspen area. As the Growth Management Plan approached the point of being finalized and adopted, the Little Annie First Partners, Limited Partnership was formed with David Farny and Little Annie Ski Corporation as General Partners and 30 investors as Limited Partners to reactivate feasibility studies. As a result of earlier meeting and concern expressed over the "remote" base area location east of Town, option negotiations were finalized to assure an excellent base area site near downtown Aspen off Ute Avenue. 3

PAGE 6

During July 1977, the Aspen/Pitkin County Growth Management Policy Plan was ratified by the City and County and a comprehensive Preconstruction Master Plan Schedule was drafted for Little Annie. In September, the Master Plan Schedule was reviewed with the Forest Service and Planning Office to reach agreement that all approval steps by all .agencies had been included in proper sequence and with reasonable time projections allowed for each step. The Forest Service and State Planning Office agreed to budget money and manpower to perform their respective roles if the County were to enter into a Joint Review Process agreement. On January 16, 1978, the USFS, the State of Colorado, Pitkin County and the City of Aspen entered into an agreement pursuant to Step 3 of the Colorado Review Process. On November 7, 1978, a Pitkin County initiative was passed by a general vote of the public, permitting the Little Annie development to enter the "Site Specific Stage" of the Joint Review Process. Assuming the remaining steps of this process proceed smoothly, construction of the site facilities will most likey begin in the spring of 1980. 4

PAGE 7

GOALS 1) The mission of the mountain facility is to serve those functions normally associated with a base As the only enclosure planned for the mountain it will have the major responsibility for providing the users with a memorable experience. 2) The ski area's identity is to be compatible with Aspen.'s image as a first class destination resort with a unique historical heritage. 3) The activities taking place in the facility will be varied and characterized -by'' short but intense peak periods. The facility must accomodate these peaks easily as well as provide warm atmosphere during slow periods. 4) The facility must be sensitive to the site. Minimum impact upon the environment both during construction and during use after completion is necessary. It is desirable that this be achieved in image as well as substance. 5) The facility must protect a high level of quality in form and materials. 6) The main economic goal is to provide a building with low operating and maintenance costs because of its remote location. 5

PAGE 8

FACTS 1) Use projection& Phase one, 3900 skiers per dayJ Phase two, 7500 skiers per day. 2) Staffing requirements& Phase one, 262 employeesJ Phase two, 503 employees. *Notea See table 6 for employee projections. 3) User description& There will be primarily 6 types of usersJ downhill skiers cross-country skiers, diners, sightseers, hikers, and employees. The downhill skiers will be by far the most predominate and will be the largest spenders. They are the primary market. The cross-country skiers are expected to be second most numerous but are in general not a particularly lucrative market. Diners can be from any of the user groups, however, it is hoped that they can be attracted from the Aspen visitor group at large. It is hoped, although not necessary, that enough hikers and sightseers can be attracted to make operation of the mono-cable feasable in the summer months. 4) No facilities exist on the site. However, there are about 6 cabins dispersed on private parcels primarily on the west side of the mountain. These will be visible to skiers and most are adjacent to planned ski runs. 5) Vicinity land use is predominately National Forest. To the North is the existing ski area of Aspen Mountain. The possibility exists for cooperation and inter-area use between Little Annie and Aspen Mountain. Richmond Hill is B

PAGE 9

dotted with many small private plots of land. Some of these are being used as cabin sites. It is very unlikely that their use will change. All development rights to the ski area excepting what is in the master plan proposal have been deeded to the Nature Conservancy Land Trust which precludes any and all further land development. 6) Views from the ski area are exceptional in all directions with many mountain peaks visible. However, there are virtually no views from the facilities' site because of its densely wooded nature. It 'is surrounded by 30 to 40 foot fir trees on all sides. 7) The facility will not be visible from any point on the ski area except if it extends above the nigh evergreen grove surrounding it. 8) The location of the facility will be close to the geometric center of the ski area, on top of the mountain and approximately 3 miles south of the town of Aspen. (See Little Annie Development map). 9) The size of the entire development is about 3500 acres. The mountain facility site, however, is not limited except in general terms. It will be located somewhere in the evergreen grove at the center of the area. The grove is a .pproximately 6 acres in size. 7

PAGE 10

10) Accessibility to the site will be by ski lift only except when it is necessary to use snow cats or jeeps in which case access will be up the west side of the mountain from Castle Creek Road. The mono-cable will be essentially the only access from townJ however, skiers once on the mountain will come from any of the various local lifts and ski runs. The site is beyond reasonable walking distance from any road or community. 11) The mono-cable lift will have a carrying capacity of 2250 people per hour during Phase 1 and 4500 after Phase 2. The mountain must be able to handle service requirements at these capacities. The total area wide capacity will be 3900 skiers at Phase 1 and 7500 skiers at Phase 2. 12) The facility site is at the top of Richmond Hill on gently sloping terrain. It is on the East facing side, slightly below the crest of the mountain. 13) The site is densely tree covered with predominately 30 to 40 foot tall fir trees. This stand of conifers covers about 6 acres and is entirely on the East facing slope of Richmond Hill. 14) There are no geographical or topographical hinderences to development on the facility site with the exception of the necessity for clearing many trees. B

PAGE 11

15) Although Little Annie lies at approximately 40 degrees North Latitude its 11,300 foot top elevation places it, climatologicly, in an alpine zone. It receives about 150 inches of snowfall per year and a total of about 25 inches of precipitation. Clear skies and direct sunshine occur over 300 days per year. Winter temperatures vary from -35 degrees Fahrenheit to 30 degrees Fahrenheit in January, the coldest month. In the warmest month, July, temperatures vary between 40 degrees Fahren heit and 70 degrees Rahrenheit. The weather extremes of rain in January and snow in July have been experienced in recent years. Snowfall characteristics can be expected to be very similar to the top half of Aspen Mountain, although Little Annie, because of its layout will be able to provide a longer ski season. Aspen Mountain's ski season normally runs from Thanksgiving to April 15. Assuming the same weather Little Annie will be able to extendthat season by 2 to 4 weeks both Spring and Fall. It is characterized by dry but very cool weather. Snow flurries can occur frequently anytime after Labor Day. 16) All intended uses of the Little Annie Development are compatible with the Pitkin County Zoning Regulations. 9

PAGE 12

17) Pitkin County prescribes use of the Uniform Building Code in construction. By occupancy the mountain top facility will have a Group A-3 classification for the restaurants. Other parts of the building may qualify for a less restrictive group depending on the design of the facility. 18) Cost parameters have not been established at this time. The added construction cost accrued by the remote location of the site will have to be considered. 19) A project delivery schedule has not been determined at this time.

PAGE 13

CONCEPTS 1) The primary organizational concept is to include as many functions as possible into a single open plan building. This will enhance the facilities roll as "anchor" for the ski area and should result in a minimal environmental impact. Other advantages to the centralized approach will bes a) an abiiity to handle extreme peaks and valleys in use. b) an enhancement of the nature of retail establishments to be mutually supporting by virtue of location. c) there are no incompatable uses or activities and by the nature of the weather and the site's remoteness it is anticipated that once visitors get to the facility they will want to stay indoors for a length of time. d) secUrity will be easier to achieve e) any given user will require more than one service of the facility. f) a larger building will enhance external orientation by creating a more distinct

PAGE 14

sense of place and more balance in scale with the size of the mountain or mono-cable. g) energy conservation will be increased by both the minimizing of total enclosed building volume and minimizing total building envelope. This can be very important if active solar heating is used. It must be noted that the expandibility and convertability of a centralized concept may not be as workable as in a decentralized one • . 2) The building must be versatile, both seasonally and functionally. Parts must be able to open and close independently of the others. The building must appear to be fully active even when a majority of the functions are not in use. 3) A prime objective of the facility will be to reduce peak loads on the downhill lift system. People must be encouraged to dally at the end of the day to prevent lift line delays at the mono-cable. The restaurants will be designed to achieve this. 4) Because of the vast open area of skiable terrain the building should

PAGE 15

serve as an orientation device. The plan of the building should also serve the arriving visitors to help them orient to the outside area. 5) It is important to the developer that the mountain top facility be perceived by the user as a "village" rather than a single building. This could conflict with other concepts. Colorado has a history of mountain-top mining camps and this identity or character could be desirable.

PAGE 16

NEEDS 1) The break-down and phasing of space requirements can be seen in Table 3. a) Lounge and Observation. At this time the requirement for an observation area is not required, however the lounge should have an exterior view perhaps of the entry. The lounge should have its own restrooms and a bar with some storage area. b) Mechanical and Locker Area. These two areas do not need to be together, nor does the mechanical space need to be in the basement. The locker space should be easily accessible, especially for skiers, probably from the main entry. Because of the nature of the plan lockers will be very important to users. c) Ski Shop. The ski shop should possess a prominent place in the building for display. It may perhaps be combined with the Ski Repair and Rental.

PAGE 17

d) 250 Seat Restaurant. This should have a good exterior view and perhaps a view of the mono-cable. A good interior orientation to activity is also desirable. e) Ski Patrol and First Aid. This service must have a good access to the slopes. It must have exterior space for snowmobile parking and tobogan storage. It must be easily accessable from the lifts and the mono-cable. An . interior access is also desirabl0 . There must be adequate space for several beds and for bandaging several people simul Space must also be given to ski storage and repair. A separate space must also be provided as a patrol lounge with comfortable furniture and food preparation. f) Ski Repair and Rental. The ski repair must have space for work bench and tooling activities. There must be access to a cash register and storage area. The

PAGE 18

rental area must have a large storage space. Space must be provided for fitting benches and cash register. These functions must have easy access to the outside. g) Ski School. This function must relate strongly to the slopes. No public interior entrance is required. Office and sitting space should be provided. The space should correspond with the ski school meeting place which will be a large open area adjacent to the building. h) Offices. Space should be provided for 5 offices and secretary space. The offices should have exterior exposure, preferrably with a view to the mono-cable terminal. i) Restrooms. These large restrooms must serve the lobby area of the building and be convenient for skiers. This area will experience hard use and it must be designed for high volume. j) Lobby. This space is not required but may be very useful. It would have to relate strongly to the entry and could

PAGE 19

serve as an interior focal point. k) Employee Housing. This is not included in this design project as it will be detached and independent of the main facility. 1) Slope Maintenance. This space need not relate to the buildings interior except perhaps to the executive offices. It must, however, relate strongly to an outside space where snowcats and snowmobiles will be parked. 2) The outside space requirements for this building will be as followsa a) Skier access is paramount. Care must be taken in space layout to allow for convenient ski exit to the slopes and entry from the slopes. These should be possible without great effort, such as poling up ' ever slight grades, for the skiers. About 5000 square feet will be required for ski racks and space for skiers to put on and take off their equipment.

PAGE 20

b) Interface between the mono-cable and the building can be either an exterior or interior one. In either case the direction of the lift is fixed by the master plan. All lift power will be from the base facility. All gondola storage will be at the base facility. The mountain-top for the lift will be a small loading and unloading area, bull-wheel area, and gondola pathway. These functions require only 1000 square feet. c) The ski school will require 30,000 square feet of level or slightly sloping open space with direct connection to beginner skiing terrain. It is desirable for this activity to be highly visible. d) The ski patrol requires a location by which they haveeasy access to all slopes and lifts. A space of 600 square feet

PAGE 21

will be required for their tobaggan and snowmobile parking. The outside space for the ski patrol should be adjacent to that of first aid. e) It is desirable that there be extensive exterior deck space for lounging on days. This space should be South-facing and relate well to the lounge, the restaurants or both. It should also work conveniently off of the building entry and be accessible to the main ski rack area. There should be an area equal to about the interior seatings space provided. f) Slope maintenance is an activity which can be located to any orientation. It will probably occupy the least desirable interior and exterior spaces. It must however, be planned as to have access to the mountain. It will require about 1000 square feet of open space adjacent to the building.

PAGE 22

g) The ultimate success of the mountain-top facility depends heavily on the way it can adapt to the two part phasing. While it must be considered that Phase 2, which will double the size of the structure and double the number of users, may never be realized it can be projected with confidence that in the event that it does occur, it will follow the guidelines of the Master Plan. Therefore, the initial facility design must be in every way complete within the parameters of Phase 1 and yet successfully embrace a transition into Phase 2. 20

PAGE 23

PRDBLEI\f1 FUNCTION The function of the mountain top facility is to house those supportive activities which allow a ski area to operate as a complete recreation center. The primary emphasis must be on the outdoor activities and this facility must be considered as subordinate to that use. The primary user of .the mountain and this facility will be downhill skiers and Little Annie will be predominately a wintertime destination. It will experience use demand only between the hours of 8s00 a.m. and lOsOO p.m. as a general rule. The mountain-top facility must be thought of as a thing of the mountains as opposed to an extension of the town of Aspen. It will function as a special place, a thing apart. FORM The mountain-top facility occupies a site of magnificent visual drama. The facility will be isolated from these views by a dense grove of

PAGE 24

conifers. Man-made objects are to be as inconspicuous at Little Annie as possible. The sheltered nature of the site should be utilized in the design. The natural environment of Little Annie is characteristically alpine, with delicate flora and fauna. The climate although hard on indigenous life forms, is ideal for winter recreation. The layout of the mountain is such that it will be skiable in parts when other similar mountains close by will be unusable. Aspen has a reputation as a premier resort. The objective of Little Annie is to both capitalize on and enhance that image. The ski area posesses a natural splendor and it should not be the purpose of the facility to compete with that, but rather assent to it. ECONOMY Design and materials should be carefully considered for their effect on minimizing maintenance and operational costs. An interference with the 22

PAGE 25

buildings ability to function during the business season would disrupt the operation of the entire ski area. It must be remembered that the ski area will be a speculative venture despite the expectations of lucrative operations. The balances between quality and cost must be weighed with prudence. TIME The Little Annie Master Plan determines a Phase 1, Phase 2 growth. Phase 2 may or may not be implemented. It is the necessity of Phase 1 qesign that it accomadate either alternative. It is extremely unlikey that there will ever be a "Phase 3." It is also unlikely that there will be a change in projected use within the economic life of the development. 23

PAGE 26

SUPPORTIVE DATA

PAGE 27

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Architectural Record, March, 1974, pp. 119-124. 2. Domus, September, 1978, pp. 4-5. 3. Little Annie Socio-Economic and Development Impact Analysis, Gage Davis Associates, May 15, 1978. 4. Pitkin County Land Use Code, April 1, 1976. 5. Uniform Building Code, 1976 Edition, International Conference of Building Officials, 1976.

PAGE 28

PROJECT DIARY Sept. 20, 1978. Telephone conversation with Stacy Stanley (Snow Engineering) Sept. 24, 1978 Telephone conversation with Gage Davis (Gage Davis Associates) Sept. 26, 1978 Telephone conversation with Dave Farny (Developer) Sept. 28, 1978 Telephone conversation with Dave Farny Oct. 5, 1978 Consultation with Terry Barnhart (Gage Davis Associates) Oct. 10, 1978 Consultation and site tour with Dave Farny at Little Annie site Dec. 5, 1978 Telephone conversation with Terry Barnhart

PAGE 29

\ :::::, . .. ... ' '\. ( ,• ! ' ,, \,._ ,_.•, ' .;... -:.:. LOCATION LITTLE ANNIE IUOOFUT CD 2000 ..... ............ 5-:--':1::-"=

PAGE 30

LITTLE ANNIE . DEVELOPMENT liTTLE AN*" 0 -ou• .................. IE-:.""r-

PAGE 31

LITTLE ANNIE TABLE 2 TRAIL CLASSIFICATION BY PHASE ( 1 ) PHASE I (3900 Skiers) PHASE II (7500 Skiers) ABILITY LEVEL Acreage % Ideal Capacity Acreage % Ideal Capacity Beginner 2.8 1 3 % 100 2.8 1 3 % 100 Novice 29.1 8 12% 550 29.1 9 705 Low Intermediate 69.0 18 20% 630 76.4 18 20% 1325 Intermediate 176.2 47 35% 1850 359.6 48 35% 3600 Advanced Intermediate 55.8 15 20% 370 100.7 10 20 710 Expert 39.3 11 10% 400 121 . 1 14 10% 1060 TOTALS: 372.2 100% 100% 3900 690.0 100% 100% 7500 l. Note: 7500 skiers is a total of Phase 1 and 2 Source: Sno-engineering, Gage Davis and Aisociates

PAGE 32

LITTLE ANNIE TABLE 3 MOUNTAIN FACILITIES SUMMARY BY USE AND AREA (7500 skiers)(l) (3900 skiers) USE PHASE I AREA PHASE II AREA .TOTAL 1. Lounge and Observation 2,000 sq. ft. 4,000 sq. ft. 6,000 sq. f1 2. Basement Mechanical and Locker Area 20,000 0 20,000 3. Ski Shop 2,000 4,000 6,000 4. 250 Seat Restaurant 3,000 2,000 5,000 5. 150 Seat Restaurant 0 2,500 2,500 6. 100 Seat Restaurant 0 1,500 1 '500 7. Pastry Shop 0 1 ,800 ' 1 ,800 8. Delicatessen 0 1,500 1 '500 9. Ski Patrol and First Aid 500 2,000 2,500 10. Ski R epair and Rental 2 , 000 3,000 5,000 11 . . Ski School 500 500 1 ,000 12. Offices 500 1 , 000 1 , 500 13. Restrooms 2,000 4,000 6,000 32,500 27,800 60, 300 14. Circulation @ 25% 8 '125 6,950 1 5 '07 5 W,625 (40,000)( 2 ) 34,750 (36,000) 75, 3 7 5 (76,0 15. Employee Housing 10' 000 1 0 '000 20,000 16. Slope Maintenance 4,000 2,400 6,400 TOTAL: 54,625 sq. ft. 47,150 sq. ft. 101,775sq. f1 1. 7500 skiers is a total of Phase 1 and Pha se 2 2. Figures in parenthesis is Sno-engineering estimate Source: Sno-engineering Inc., Gage Davis and Associates

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LITTLE ANNIE TABLE 6 EMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS OPERATION PHASE CATEGORY General Construction: 1 e Mountain and Related facilities Tickets Lift Operations Lift Maintenance Ski Patrol Slope Maintenance Vehicle Maintenance Elect. Maintenance Base Area Services Transportation Mountain Management Ski School Race Program Skier Services Repa i r/Renta 1 Touring Program Shop Nursery Mountain Food Locker Attendants Marketing Security CONSTRUCTION 1 5 ( 1 ) 40 * A = Annual; S = Seasonal; PT = Part Time; T= Total PHASE I (3900 Skiers) A S PT T 1 4 3 25 3 1 1 18 2 6 2 1 . 2 6 6 1 4 3 23 8 1 3 3 1 1 1 2 24 1 4 9 12 40 4 19 3 11 3 2 5 17 1 7 30 53 5 13 4 2 5 4 5 3 4 2 3 26 52 1 2 1 3 4 1 2 1 4 30134 98 262 (1) It is assumed that this labor force already exists in Aspen. Source: Sno-engineering; Gaqe Davis and A ssociate s * PHASE 2 (7500 Skiers) A S PT T 1 7 6 40 6 3 2 30 4 12 5 2 .., 1 .) 12 15 1 7 6 42 15 3 6 8 3 1 2 1 3 3 45 1 8 16 25 71 9 32 6 22 7 4 10 27 1 13 65 107 10 25 9 3 11 14 17 10 13 2 6 50 98 2 3 4 5 1 4 2 7 57 249 197 503

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LITTLE ANNIE TABLE 7 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Total Mountain Acreage: Vertical: Lifts: Trail Acreage: Skier Capacity: Mountain Facility: Slope Maintenance Facility Base Facility Total Estimated Employment Total Employee Housing Units Parking (3900 skiers) PHASE I 1 gondola (rnonocable) 6 double chairlifts 1 J-Bar Lift 2125 acres skiable (375 groomed) 3900 skiers 40000 sq. ft. 4000 sq. ft. 40100 sq. ft. 42 annual 134 se a sonal 98 part time 274 25 units no automobiles Total Estimated Bus Requirements (7500 skiers) PHASE II 1 gondola (monocable) 5 double chairlifts 1375 acres skiable (315 groomed) 3600 skiers 36000 sq. ft. 240 0 sq. ft. 2000 sq. ft. 27 annual 115 seasona l 99 p a r t time 241 25 units no automobiles TOT.A. L 2 gondolas (monocabl 9 double chairlifts 1 dbl dbl chairlifts 1 J B a r Lift 3500 acres total skiable 7500 skiers 76000 sq. ft. 6 400 sq. ft. 42100 sq. ft. 69 a nnual 249 seasona l 1 9 7 p a r t tim e 515 -total 50 units no automobiles 20 taxi, limosine, lod g e shuttle unload/load space 6 bus unload/load sta 11 s 10 bus storage bays 5-7 , 40 Passenger buse Source: Sno-engineering Inc., Gage Davis and Associates

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PITKIN COUNTY LAND USE CODE The Pitkin County Land Use Code was adopted on April 1, 1976 by the Board of County Commissioners and County Planning and Zoning Commission. Comprised of 12 sections, the most relevant sections with regard to Little Annie are Section 2 entitled Policies and Sections 5 entitled General Regulations. Section 2, Policies, is intended to insure that the use and development .of land will be consistent with the goals and objectives of the Aspen General Plan and in that regard, any contemplated action must address concerns related to; natural and manmade hazard and resource areas, soil and surficial geologic characteristics, drainage, adequate provision for water, sewage treatment, impacts on road systems, road design and construction, extension of utilities, erosion of soil, compatibility of historic and archeological resources, compatibility with agricultural lands, impacts on taxes, management of necessary services, housing, scenic qualities, air quality, energy conservation, transportation, development or expansion of ski areas compatibility with existing adjacent neighborhoods, water resource impacts, noise, compatibility with adjacent and nearby public lands, and a growth rate consistant with phasing of public services and facilities. All of these elements of the land use code policy section will need to be implemented at some time into the final proposal for developing Little Annie. Section 5 of the Land Use Code, more extensive and detailed than the Policies section, sets forth general regulations which are the specific requirements for any proposal to be

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submitted to Pitkin County. The general regulations include; resource and environment, fiscal and services/facilities impact and design, social, areas and activities of local and state interest, _and other regulations. Again, all of these requirements will need to be addressed during the Little Annie proposal review at some point in time. Many of the regulations are already under consideration at this time and as this phase of planning and those items which are deemed deficient or warrant additional study should be and specific documentation should be provided to address those concerns.

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TABLE NO. S A-WALL AND OPENING PROTECTION OF OCCUPANCIES BASED ON LOCATION ON PROPERTY TYPES II, ONE-HOUR, IIN AND V CONSTRUCTION: For exterior wall and opening protection of Types II, one hour, IIN and V buildings see table below. Type V Construction Is not permitted within Fire Zone No.1. Exceptions to limitation for Types II, one-hour, 11-N and Type V Construction, as provided In Sections 1109, 2003 and 2203 apply. For Types I, II F.R. and Ill and IV Construction see Sections 1803, 1903, and 2103. , GROUP A See also Section 702 NOTES: FIRE FIRE RESISTANCE OF OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR DESCRIPTION OF OCCUPANCY ZONE EXTERIOR WALLS WALLS 1-Any assembly building with a stage and an occupant load o f Not applicabl e [See Section 602 (a) I 1000 or more i n the building ... . ... .. . . . . ... . . . .. ..... . . . .. . ................. . . . .... Not permitted l ess than 2-Any building o r portion o f a building having an assembly room 1 2 hour l e ss than 20 fe e t 5 feet with an occupant load of less than 1000 and a s tage .......... .. .... .. 1 hour el sewhere Protected l ess thun 20 2 . 1 Any building or portion of a building having an assembl y room feet with a n occupant load of 300 or more with o ut a including Not permitted l ess than such buHdings u sed for educ a t iona l purpose s and not classed a s a Group E or Group B., Division 2 O ccupancy ................ .. .. .... ...... 2 and 2 hour l ess than 10 feet 5 feet 3 1 hour e 1 sewhcre Protected l ess tha n 10 feet N o t permitted l ess than I 2 h our less than 20 fe e t 5 feet 1 hour el sewhe r e Prote c t e d l ess than 20 3-An y building or portion of a building h aving an assembly room feet with an occupant load o f less th a n 300 without a stage, includ-ing such buildings used for educational purposes and n o t classed 2 2 hour l ess than 5 feet Not l ess than as a Group E or Group B , Division 2 Occupancy .. ................ .. .... 1 h our e lsew h ere 5 ee t 2 hour l ess than 5 feet Protected l ess than 10 3 1 h our l es s than 10 f e e t feet 1 2 . h our l es s than 20 feet l'rotected less thnn 20 4-Stadiums, reviewing stands, and amusement park s tru c tur es n o t 1 hour e lsewhere feet included within Group A-1 nor Divisions 2, 2 . 1 and 3, Group A 2 1 hour Occupancies -Protected le ss than I 0 3 1 h our l ess than 10 feet feet ( 1) (2) (3) (4) See Section 504 for type of walls aOected and requirements coveri n g percentage of opening s penmtted m ex t erio r walls. For additirma l restrictions see Chapters under Occupancy, Fire Zo n es. and Types o f Con structio n. For walls facing stree t s, yards and public w a ys, see Part V. Openings s h a ll b e protected by a fire as sembl y a three-fomths h our fir e-proteclion r ati n g .

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1976 EDITION Chapter 7 REQUIREMENTS FOR GROUP A . DIVISIONS 2, 2.1, 3 AND 4 OCCUPANCIES Group A, Divisions 2, 2.1, 3 and 4 Occupancies Defined 701-702 Sec. 701. Group A, Divi s ions 2 , 2 .1, 3 a nd 4 O cc upancie s shall be : Division 2. Any building or portion of a buildin g h aving an a ssembly room with an occupant load of le ss than I 000 and a s tage . Divi s ion 2.1. Any building or portion of a buildin g having an a sse mbly room with an occupant load of 300 or more without a stage, including s uch buildings u s e d for educational purpos es a nd not classed as a Group E or Group B, Divi s ion 2 O ccupancy. . Divi s ion 3. Any building or portion of a building h avi n g an assembl y room with an occupant load of l ess th a n 300 without a s t age, including s u c h building s u se d for educational purposes a nd not cl asse d a s a Group E or Group B, Divi ion 2 Occupancy. Divi s ion 4. St adiums , reviewin g t a nd s , and amusement park structures not included within other Group A Occupancies. Specific and genera l r e quirements for grandstands, bleac her s a nd r ev iewin g stands are to be found in Chapter 33. For occupancy separations see Table No. 5-B . For occupant load see Section 330 I. Construction, Height, and Allowable Area Sec. 702. (a) General. Buildin gs or parts o f buildings classed in Group A, Divi s ions 2, 2. 1 , 3 and 4 be ca u se of th e u se or charac ter of th e o ccupan cy s hall be limit e d to the types of const ru ctio n se t forth in Tables No . 5 -C and No. 5 D and s hall not exceed, in area or hei ght, the limit s s pecified in Sections 505 , 506 and 507. EXC .. Divis ion 4 Mructures of open s ke l e t o n frame t ype wit hout roof, cove r o r e nclo s e d u sabl e spaces. s hall n o t be limit ed in area o r h eigh t . (b) Special Provisions. Stages a nd e nclo s e d platforms as defined in Sec tion s 417 and 420 s h all b e constru c ted in accordance with Chapter 39 . A fire resistive ce ilin g s hall not be r equired in one-story building s of Type II, One-hour, 11N, Ill, IV or V co n struction having an open frame roof. Divi s ion 2 . I Occ upanci e s with an occupant load of 1000 or more s hall be of Type I , 11F. R., II , One-hour, I II, One-hour, or IV construction. Divi s ion 3 O ccupancies locat e d in a ba sement or above the fir s t s tory s h all be of not l ess than one-hour fire r es i s tive construction. Group A a ssembly rooms h aving a n occupa nt load of 1000 or more s h all not b e located in th e base m ent. Divi s ion 3 O ccupanc ie s with a n occupant lo ad of 50 or more, whi c h a r e locat e d over u sable space, s hall be separated from s u c h s pace by not l es than one-hour fire re s istive construction. 702 706 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE For atti c space partitions and draft stops see Section 3205. (c) Divis ion 4 Provisions. Erection and s tru ctura l maintenance of s truc tures h o u s in g Divi s ion 4 O ccupa n c i es s hall conform t o th e r equire ment s of thi s Cod e. Structures hous ing Divisio n 4 Occupanc ie s, other than those of open s keleton frame t ype, when more than o ne s t o ry in h e ight o r 400 square feet in area, s hall be of not less than one-hour fire re s i stive co n structio n . When the s pace under a Div i sio n 4 Occupancy i s u se d for any purpose, includin g exits, it s hall be se p a r ated from all p arts of s u c h Div i s ion 4 Oc cupancy, including exits, by walls, n o or and cei lin g of not l ess than one hour fire r esistive construction. EXCEPTIO S: I . E x it s u nd er t emporary n eed n o t be separat ed . 2. The unders id e o f co ntinu o u s s t eel deck w h e n erec t e d out doors need not be fir e p r o t ec t ed w h en o c cupied for public t oi l e t s . The Buildin g Official may ca u se all Divis ion 4 struc ture s to be r e in spec t ed a t l ea s t once every s i x months. location on. Property Sec. 703. All building s hous in g Group A, Divi s ion s 2, 2 .1, 3 and 4 Oc cupa n cies s h all front directly upo n or h ave access t o a public s tr ee t not l ess th an 20 feet in width . The acces s to th e publi c s treet s hall be a minimum 20-foot wide rig ht -o f -way unobs tru c t ed and maintained on l y as access to the publi c s tr ee t. The m a in entrance to th e building s h all be located o n the public s tre e t or on the access way. For fire r es i stive protec tion of exterior walls and openin gs , as deter mined by location on property, se e Section 504 an d Part V. Exit Facilities Sec. 704. ( a ) General. S t airs, exits, and smokeproof e ncl osures s hall be provid e d as s pecified in C hapt e r 33. ( See also Sect ion 3316 . ) (b) Amusement Slruclures. Exi t s and exi t s i g n s for Div ision 4, Amus e m e nt Structures, s h all be approved by th e Building Offic ial and, where practicable, s h all co mply with th e r equire m en t s s pecified in Chapter 33. light, Ventilation and Sanitation Sec. 705. All portions of Group A O ccupancies c u stomarily used by human beings and all dress in g rooms s hall b e provided wit h natural or ar tificial light, venti lation and sanitary fa c iliti es a s s pecified in Sections 605 and 1 7 11. Shaft Enclosures Sec. 706. Exi t s s hall be e ncl osed a s s pe c ified in Chapter 33. (For s p ecific requirem e nt s sec Section 331 6 . ) E levator s h afts, vent s haft s and o ther vertical openings s h all be e nclo sed, and the enclo s ure s h all be a s s pe c ified in Section 170 6. f ,

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1976 EDITION 707 Fire-extinguishing Systems Sec. 707. When r eq uir e d by o ther provision s of this Code, automa tic fire extingui s hing sys tem s and standpipes s hall be installed as s pe c ified in Chapter 38. Special Hazards Sec. 708. C himney s a nd h eat in g appara tu s s hall conform to the re quirements of Chapter 37 of thi s Code and the Mechanical Code. Motion picture machine rooms shall conform to the requirements of Chapter 40. • Prosce nium curtains s h all conform to th e requirements se t forth in U . B . C. Standa rd No. 6 1 . Flammable liqui ds s h all not be pla ce d or stored in a Group A Occupan cy. All exterior openings in a boiler room or rooms containing central heating equipment if lo ca t e d below openings in another s tory or if less than 10 fee t from other doors or windows of the same building s hall be protected by a fir e as se mbly having a three fourths -hour fire protection rating . Su c h f ir e assemblies shall b e fixed, automatic or selfclo sing. Every room contain in g a boiler or central heating plant s hall be separated from the re s t of th e building by not less than a One-hour Fire re s istive Oc c up a ncy Separation. I::XCEPTION: Boilers or centra l h ea tin g plants where th e l argest pic..:e o f fuel equipment does n o t exceed 400,000 Btu per h o ur input. Modifications Sec. 709. Gymnasiums and s imilar occupancies may have running trac ks constructed of wood or unprotec ted s teel o r iron. In gy mn asi um s or in multipurpose schoolrooms h aving an area not greater than 3200 square f ee t, l -inc h nominal tig ht tongue and-grooved or .Y..-inch plywood wall covering may be used on the inner side in lie u of lire-resistive pla s ter.

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THESIS SUMMARY WAYNE STRYKER 1979 ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGrt AURARIA LIBRARY

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