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The Daily doobie, March, 2013

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Title:
The Daily doobie, March, 2013
Series Title:
The Daily doobie
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
s.n.
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Parenting in the Stoned Age
by R.T. CARRIERO Doobie Staff
In July 2012 a three-year-old boy in Murietta, California ate one his grandma’s cookies. Unfortunately, it was infused with marijuana; the boy’s grandmother is a cancer patient and had a prescription. By the time family members discovered what he had done, the boy was unconscious and could not be awakened. They rushed him to the hospital where he was admitted to the intensive care unit. He recovered with no lasting effects, but the experience was no less a harrowing ordeal for him and his family. Personally, as an MMJ patient, I know how strong edibles can be and I shudder at the thought of the discomfort and panic that the
is that medicine usually comes in pill form in easily recognizable brown, plastic, child-proof bottles. Edible pot, on the other hand, looks and tastes like food or candy. Thus a child confronted with a pot brownie will not know that he or she is handling something meant for adults, particularly if he or she is too young to read the warning label.
To combat this danger, some states that allow medical marijuana have passed laws specifying packaging and labeling requirements for edibles. San Francisco, for example, requires that edibles be sold in opaque packages with
is, no doubt, one of the many concerns that must be addressed by the Amendment 64 task force. The passage of the amendment raises
the stakes on this issue. Those over 21 are now able to legally exchange marijuana products with one another. Thus, edibles sold as medicine at a dispensary can legally be given to non-patients. Furthermore, within a year, recreational products will be legally sold in Colorado. These products, which are patently not medicine, will have to be labeled in a manner similar to that of alcohol and tobacco products. For the people of Colorado, 64 means that edibles
“edibles are less dangerous than alcohol, tobacco or aspirin"
boy must have felt from a dose of marijuana that would incapacitate most adults.
The Colorado Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics reports that between October 2009 and December 2011, 14 children were admitted to Children’s Hospital for accidental ingestion of marijuana. In January of this year a junior high school student in Loveland brought weed brownies into school to share with classmates. Even veterinarians are reporting a rise in accidental marijuana ingestion among pets. These stories and statistics highlight the unique dangers posed by edibles. Most children are taught at a very young age to never take medicine not given to them by parents or doctors. What makes a parent’s life a little easier
boring and generic food names, like “Medical Cannabis Brownie.” The phrase, “medical cannabis,” is required on all such packages, as is a warning to keep the product away from children. Arizona Senator Kimberly Yee, believing that edibles in her state are being marketed toward children, has introduced legislation that would require similar warning labels. In 2011, Republican Cindy Acree, citing her concern for Colorado’s children, proposed a ban on edible marijuana products. The bill was abandoned after strong opposition from marijuana advocates, but later Colorado passed a law requiring the use of child-proof packaging and child safety warning labels.
How existing labeling and packaging laws should be amended
will be more widely available; thus, the time for a discussion on child safety is now.
Now that edibles are legal, the debate is now being reframed as a question of who bears the burden of responsibility for child safety; manufacturers or parents. Michele M. Clark, a family and business lawyer in Boulder, believes it should be balanced; “I think it’s the responsibility of both parents and manufacturers, to the extent that the packaging needs to be at least something that is child-resistant when it leaves the store. That’s very important. It’s also important for the parent to know how to store the edible safely in their home. Ideally, keep the packaging on it that says ‘this is a medicinal product for adult use only.’” Susan Squibb, on
Latest Ridiculous Numbers
House Bill.............1114
Nanograms.................5
INSIDE
Let’s Grow Some Trees!
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Full Text

PAGE 1

. Parentin by R. T. CARRIERO Doobie Staff In July 2012 a three-year-old boy in Murietta , California ate one his grandma's cookies. Unfortunately, it was infused with marijuana; the boy ' s grandmother is a canc er pa t i ent and had a prescription. By the time family me mbers discovered w hat he had don e, the boy was unconscious and could not be awak e ned. They ru s h e d him to the hospital where be was a dmitted to the intens i ve care unit. He recove r e d with no lasting effects, b ut the ex p erience was no less a harrowing ord ea l f o r him and h i s fa mily. Personally , as a n MMJ pat i e nt, I know how strong edibles can be and I s hudd e r at the t h ought o f the disc omfort and pa ni c that the in the Stoned Age is that medicine usually comes in is, no doubt, one of the many pill form in easily recognizable concerns that must be addressed by plastic, child-proof bottles. the Amendment 64 task force. The Edible pot, . on the other hand, passage of the amendment raises looks and tastes l ike f ood or c andy. th e sta k es o n this iss ue. Thos e o ve r Thus a chil d con fron ted wi _ th a pot 21 are now able to legally exchange brownie will not know that he or marijuanaproducts w ithoneanother . she is handling somethiz{g meant Thus , e di b les s old as me dicine at a for adults , particul a rly if he or she is di spens ary can l e gally be gi v en to too youn g to read the w a rning label. non patients . Furthermore, within a year, recreational pro d u cts will T o combat th i s dang er, so m e s tat es be leg a lly sold in Co lor ado. T hes e that a llo w me dical marijua na have prod u cts , w hic h ar e pate ntly no t passed law s s pecifying pa . c k ag in g m ed icine, w ill h ave to b e l a bel e d in and l ab e ling r e quireme n t s for a manner similar t o that of alcohol e d i bl es. S a n Fra n c i sco, for and tobacco prod u cts . For the example, require s that e d i b les b e people of Colorado, 64 means that sold in opaque pa c k a g e s with edib l es are less dangerous than alcohol. tobacco or bo y must have felt fro m a dose of boring and generic food names, marij uana that would incapacitate lik e "Medi cal Cannabis Brownie." most a du lts. T he phra se, " medical cannabis , " is The Colorado Ch a pter of the American Academy of P e diatrics reports that between Octob e r 2009 and December 2011, 14 ch i ldr en w ere admitted to Ch i ldr en ' s for accidental ingestion of m arijuana. In January of this yea r a junior high school student in Loveland brought weed brownies into school to share with classmates . Even vet e rinarians are reporting a rise in accidental marijuana ingestion among pets. These stories and statistics highlight the unique dangers posed by edibles. Most children are taught at a very young age to never take medicine not given to them by parents or doctors. What makes a parent's life a little easier required o n all such packages, as is a warning to keep the product a way from children. Arizona Senator Kimberly Yee , b e l ie v ing that edibles in her s t a t e ar e bein g marketed toward children, has introduced l e gislation that would require similar warning labels. In 2011 , R e publican Cindy Acree , citing her c o n cern for Colorado 's children, propos ed a ban on edible marijuana products. The bill was abandoned after strong opposition from marijuana advocates, but later Colorado passed a law requiring the use of child -proo f packaging and child safety warning labels. Ho w e x1stmg labeling and packaging laws should be amended will b e more widely availa bl e; t hus , th e time f or a dis cussi on o n child safety i s now . Now that ed i b les are legal , the d e b ate is now b ein g refram e d as a qu est i on of wh o be ars t h e burde n of res p onsibility for chil d s a fety; manufactur ers o r pare n ts . Michele M. Cla rk, a family and busine ss lawyer in Boulder, believes it should b e balan ce d ; "I t hink it's the r e spons i bility of both parents and m an ufacturers , to the extent that the packaging needs to be at least something that is child-resistant when it leaves the store. That's very important. It ' s also important for the parent to know how to store the edible safely in their home. Ideally , keep the pack ag ing on it that s ay s 'this is a med ic inal product for adult use only . ' " Susan Squibb, on Latest Ridiculous Numbers House Bill ............... 1114 Nanograms . . ..... . ........ 5