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The Daily doobie, June, 2013

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The Daily doobie, June, 2013
Series Title:
The Daily doobie
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s.n.
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Denver, CO
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s.n.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Recreational Cannabis Reality
auraria
U1B7Q2
by Brian Spinner
On May 28 Governor Hickenlooper signed a few bills into law and Colorado became the first state in the country with legislation regulating the legal use of recreational retail marijuana. While these bills are-historic, they do not satisfy the wish lists of marijuana proponents and do not quell the outrage of its opponents. Without a legislative precedent and just two months for debate, the state’s general assembly wrote the guidelines that, for the time being, state residents, as well as out-of-state tourists, must follow with hopes that the great pot experiment that is Colorado does not end with federal intervention.
With Washington the only other state where retail marijuana is legal, Colorado legislators tread on the side of caution in writing these bills. Many marijuana proponents feel the legislation is still too restrictive, closer to the prohibition that is still federal law and less permissive for what Colorado voters intended when passing Amendment 64 last November.
“It’s a start,” attorney Robert Corry told a gathering of marijuana business owners and advocates during a May 16 symposium on the new legislation, sponsored by Clover Leaf Consulting. Corry, an attorney who helped write Amendment 64 admitted that the legislation is not perfect but reminded the audience that prohibition of alcohol was repealed in 1933 and, even today, there are still places in this country where alcohol cannot be purchased. It’s a step closer to what society wants, said Craig Small, a Boulder based attorney and Colorado NORML board member. “The
majority of Coloradans voted for legalization and these bills push the ball forward for responsible legislation of legal marijuana,” he said.
“The world did not come to an end when Colorado legalized medical marijuana,” Small said. “Society did not collapse, as many predicted. People still go to work and raise families. There is little uproar today around medical marijuana [compared with] a few years ago. Hopefully that will be the case with recreational marijuana as well.”
What worries Small and many other marijuana advocates is not the public abuse of retail marijuana, but the abuses that could arise within the system. The system was overwhelmed after 2009, mostly because it was underfunded, and this year’s legislation calls for the same department, the Colorado
Department of Revenue and its Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED), to oversee the medical and retail marijuana industries in Colorado.
“Pay attention to the rule making,” Charles Houghton, a Colorado Springs based-attorney cautioned. “It’s the devil that’s in the details.”
The regulators are expected to have these rules finalized by July 1. The meetings will be accessible to the public and several panel members encouraged, the public to attend.
And because of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, or TABOR, funding is not guaranteed by this legislation. TABOR says taxes can only be raised by a vote of the citizens, not by votes of city, county or state governments. So the Colorado general assembly put two measures on this November’s ballot requesting voters approve a 15 percent excise tax on retail-marijuana sales that will fund school construction, and a 10 percent sales tax on retail-marijuana sales that will fund the oversight of the industries and enforcement of its laws.
It is the measure asking that part of the sales tax go towards funding marijuana enforcement that concerns Jessica LeRoux, marijuana activist and owner of Twirling Hippy Confections. “The provision in the senate’s bill calls for part of the 10 percent sales tax to go towards training police with roadside impairment,” she pointed out.
“If you vote for the sales tax then you are voting to train the police who will bust you,” LeRoux said,
Latest Important Numbers
House Bill..............1317
INSIDE
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RECREATIONAL CANNABIS REALITY LatestlmportantNumbers b y Brian Spinner On May 28 Governor Hickenlooper signed a few bills into law and Colorado became th e firsrst ate in the country with legisl ation regulating the legal use of recreational retail m arijuana. ile the se i s are historic , they do not satisfy the wish lists of marijuana proponents and do not qu ell th e ou tra ge of its opponents. Without a leg islative pr e c e dent and just two months for debate, the state's general assembly wrote the gui d e lin es th a t , for the tim e b eing, state residents, as we ll as out-o f -state t ouris ts, m u st f oll ow with hopes that the great pot experime nt that is Colorado does no t end with federal int e rvention. With Washington th e only other s tate w here retail marijuana is legal , Colo r ado legislators tread on the s ide o f caution in writing these bills. Man y marijuana proponents feel the l egis lation is still too restrictive; closer to the prohibition that is still federal law and less permissive for what Colorado voters intended when passing Amendment 64 last November. "It's a start," attorney Robert Corry told a gathe ring of marijuana business owne rs and advocates during a May 16 symposium on the newlegislation, sponsored by Clover Leaf Consulting . Corry, an attorney who helped write Amendment 64 admitted that the legislation is not perfect but reminded the audience that prohibition of alcohol was repealed in 1933 and, even today, there are still places in this country where alcohol cannot be purchased. It's a step closer to what society wants, said Craig Small, a Boulder based attorney and Colorado NORML board member . "The majority of Colorada ns voted for legalization and these bills push the ball forward for responsi bl e legislation of legal marijuana," he said . "The world did not come to an end when Colorado legalized medical mari juana," Sm all said. "Society did not collapse, as many predicted. People still go to work and raise families. There is little uproar today around m e dical marijuana [compared with] a few years ago. Hope fully that w i ll be th e c ase with recreational marijuana as well. " What worries Small and many other marijuana advocates is not t h e public abuse of retail marijuana , bu t t he abuses that could arise within th e sy s tem. The s ystem was overwhelmed afte r 2009 , mo s tl y because it was underfunded, and thi s year 's legisla tion call s for the same department , the Colorado Departmen t of Revenu e and its Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED), to oversee _ the medical and retail marijuana industries in C olorado. "Pay atten _ tion to the rule making," Charles Houghton, a Colorado Springs based-attorney caution ed. "It 's the devil that's in the details . " The regulators are expected to have these rules finalized by July 1. The meetings will be accessible to the publi c an d sev e ral p a n e l members encouraged the pub lic to a ttend. And because of the Taxpaye r B ill of Rights , or TABOR , funding is not guaranteed by tpis legislation. TABOR says taxes can only be raised by a vote of the citizens, not by votes of city, county or state go v ernments. So the Colorado general assembly put two measures on this November's ballot requesting voters approve a 15 percent excise tax on retail-marijuana sales that will fund sch ool construction , and a 10 percent sa les tax on retail marijuana sales that will fund the oversight of the industri es and enforcement of its laws. It is the measure asking that part of the sales tax go towards funding marijuana enforcement that concerns Jessica LeRoux, marijuana activist and owner of Twirling Hippy Confections. "The provision in the senate's bill calls for part of the 10 percent sales tax to go towar ds training police with roadside impairment," she pointed out. "If you vote for the sales tax then you are voting to train the police w ho will bust you," LeRoux said, House Bill .............. 1317 A Rebuttal to a Bad Idea