Citation
The chronic-le, Spring, 2012

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Title:
The chronic-le, Spring, 2012
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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18 Munch Bunch
Like gettingthe munchies from your munchies? So do we. Here are the top six edibles we’ve noshed on recently.
By William Breathes
28 Colorado Centers
Our updated guide to the metro area’s MMJ dispensaries.
What it would do: Marijuana consumption, possession and limited cultivation would be legal for Colorado residents 21 or older. Tok-ers would be limited to possessing one ounce of dried herb if purchased from a retail store, or the entire weight of their harvest of six plants per person. You could also give away cannabis without any payment or trade, as long as it isn’t
In Colorado, the question isn’t if we should legalize cannabis, but how to go about doing it. Currently, there are three ballot initiatives that have been filed with the state, and a fourth that is supposedly on the way. Each one takes a different approach. One of them, Amendment 64, has already gathered enough signatures and will be on the ballot in November. Two others are collecting signatures. If
more than one makes the ballot, voters could ostensibly vote for any or all of them. To keep you up to speed as election season warms up, we’ve summarized these proposals below.
Initiative: Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act of 2012 (Amendment 64) Proponents: Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Spokesmen: Mason Tvert and Brian Vicente
More information: www. regulatemarijuana.org
A rundown of four pot bills that could hit the voting booth
By William Breathes
over one ounce per person.
Resale of cannabis would require a license with the Colorado Department of Revenue, which would regulate that industry. License costs would be capped at $5,000, adjusted annually for inflation. They could also be subject to an excise tax of up to 15 percent. The first $40 million annually would be put into a Public School Capital Construction Assistance Fund. The bill would also end all retail taxes on medical cannabis or cannabis purchased with a doctor’s consent.
As with booze, you would only have to show your Colorado ID at the time of purchase. There would be no central database, as there is with the current medical marijuana laws, and shops would not be required to record personal information about consumers.
Drivingunder the influence of marijuana would remain illegal, though the proposal doesn’t specify a degree of impairment or set limits for body toxicity.
Distributing marijuana to people under 21 and reselling marijuana without a license would also remain illegal. Packaged marijuana would be labeled and “subject to additional regulations to ensure that consumers are informed and protected.” continued on page 10
The Chronic-le is published by Westword, 969Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Village Voice Media. For information, e-mail marijuana@westword.com or call303-296-7744.
6 | The Chronic-le April 2012
WESTWORD.COM


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I DE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA

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6 .. i' ......... 18 M unch Bunch Like getting the munchies from your munchies? So do we. Here are the top six edibles we've noshed on recently. By William Breathes 28 Colo rado Centers Our updated guide to the metro area' s MMJ dispensaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . n Colorado, the question isn ' t if we should legalize cannabis, but how to go about doing it. Currently, there are three ballot initiatives that have been filed with the state, and a fourth that is s u pposedly on the way. Each one takes a different approach . One of them, Amendment 64, has already gathered enou gh signatures and will be on the ballot in November. Two others are collecting s i g n a tu res. If more than one makes the ballot , voters could oste nsibly vote for any or all of them. To keep you up to speed as election season warms up, we've summarized these proposals below. Initiative: Regulate Marijuana Like Alco hol Act of 2012 (Amendment 64) Pr oponents: Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcoho l Spokesmen : Mason Tvert and Brian Vicente Mor e information: www. regulatemarijuana .org What It would do : Marijuana consumption, possession and limited cultivation would be legal for Colorado residents 21 or older. Tok ers would be limited to possessin g one ounce of dried herb if purchased from a retail store, or the entire weight of their harvest of six plants per person. You could also give away cannabis withoutanypaymentor trade, as long as it isn ' t A rundown of four pot bills that coul d hit the voting booth . . , •....•• •r•••••• over one ounce per person. Resale of cannabis would require a license with the Colorado Department of Reven ue, which would regu l ate that industry. License costs w ould be capped at $5,000, adjusted annually for inflation . They could also be subject to an excise tax of up to 15 perc ent. The first$40 mil lion annu ally would be put into a Public School Capital Construction Assistance Fund. The bill would also end all retail taxes on medical cannabis or cannabis purchased with a doctor's consent. As with booze , you would only have to show your Colorado ID at the time of purchase . There would be no central da tabase, as there is with the current medi cal marijuana l aws , and shops would not be required to record personal informa tion about consumers. Driving under the influence of marijuana would remain illegal , though the proposal doesn't specify a degree ofim pairment or set limits for body toxicity. Distributing marijuana to people under 21 and reselling marijuana without a license would also remain ill egal. Packaged marijuana would be lab eled and "subject to addi tional regul ations to ensure that cons umers are informed and protected. " continued o n page 10 The Chronic-le is published by Westwa rd, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Village Voice Media. For informa tion, e-mail marijuana@westword .com or ca/1303-296-7744. THE CHRONI C -LE APRIL 2012 I WESTWORD.COM