Citation
The chronic-le, February, 2012

Material Information

Title:
The chronic-le, February, 2012
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
FEBRUARY • 2012
YOUR GUIDE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA


10 Money Troubles
Bank on the MMJ business growing - but how?
By William Breathes
18 Smokin’ Deals
If you’ve got the cash, they’ve got the stash. Puff, puff!
By William Breathes
28 Colorado Centers
Our updated guide to the metro area’s MMJ dispensaries.
By William Breathes
lthough we’re still more than eight months out from Election Day, pot-related political issues are starting to blaze their way to voters, with three legalization initiative groups — so far — going public with their plans:
Initiative 30 — “Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol”
http://www.regulatemarijuana.org
Initiative 30, which the creators have dubbed the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act, was the first proposal to gain approval from the title board and to collect signatures. Since then, the initiative has garnered160,000signatures—nearly double the 86,105 needed, as long as they pass the secretary of state’s inspection.
The bill would make marijuana use legal for people 21 or older, and pot would be taxed “similar to alcohol.” Storefronts would be allowed to sell marijuana, and customers would only need to show a valid state ID to get up to an ounce of herb. There would also be provisions for patients to grow their own and keep everything from a harvest, even if it is over an ounce. The proposal also explicitly legalizes industrial hemp.
Critics don’t like language in the proposal that says that “driving under the influence of marijuana shall remain il-
legal,” arguing that it would put DUI-D in our state constitution. Butbackers say such laws already exist, and the language is needed to sway middle-of-the road voters.
“Polls show Coloradans believe it’s time to regulate marijuana like alcohol, generate tax revenue and allow our state to focus on far more pressing issues,” proponent Mason TVert says. “And we’re goingto be workingto ensure that voters are comfortable with the system. We’ll be reaching out to voters on the fence, and those voters who already understand that it’s time to end marijuana prohibition.”
Initiative 40—“Relief forthe Possession of Cannabis Act"
http://relief4possession.webs.com/
With Initiative 40, Cannabis University founder Michelle LaMay says she has drafted an “elegantly simple” solution to current marijuana laws. Her plan? Eliminate all fines and jail time associated with marijuana possession: Without the punishments to back up those laws, there would be no reason for police and courts to enforce them. “Our laws have ruined so many lives and cost us so much money,” she says. “The damage to families — the physical cost — far, far, far exceeds any perceived danger of cannabis
in the communities.”
LaMay plans to start collecting signatures this month, focusing not only on the metro area, but also rural areas. “I found that in 2006, when there was a legalization initiative on the ballot, where people voted against it was where nobody went — the edges of the state,” she explains. “We’re getting out to the comers with our marketing. Our circulators won’t have to explain much; it’s just so simple. People worried about getting an MMJ card for professional reasons, this is aimed at them.”
“Cannabis Re-Legalization Act of 2012” http://legalize2012.com/
A third measure, dubbed the “Cannabis Re-Legalization Act of 2012,” is still in the planning stages. The Cannabis Therapy Institute’s Laura Kriho says the Legalize2012 proposal would offer “true legalization,” unlike the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol proposal. It would eliminate all criminal laws against marijuana, she explains, making cannabis use a fundamental right in the State of Colorado — giving people a defense against the loss of a job due to drug testing, among other things.
A draft of the bill is available online; Legalize2012 is still accepting public comment. ©
The Chronic-le is published by Westword, 969Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Village Voice Media. For information, e-mail marijuana@westword.com or call303-296-7744.
The Chronic-le February 2012
WESTWORD.COM


Full Text

PAGE 1

Westword FEBRUARY • 2012 ' YOUR GUIDE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA

PAGE 2

10 Money Troubles Bank on the MMJ business growing-but how? By William Breathes 18 Smokin' Deals If you've got the cash, they've got the stash. Puff, puff! By William Breathes 28 Colorado Centers Our updated guide to the metro area's MMJ dispensaries . ...............................•...................••.•............................•.......•............... !though we're still more than eight months out from Election Day, pot-related political issue s are starting to blaze their way to voters, with three le galization initiative groups-so far go in g public with their plans: Initiative 30 " Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol" http:jjwww.regulatemarijuana.org Initiative 30, which the creators have dubbed the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act, was the first proposal to gain approval from the title board and to col lect signatures. Since then, the initiative has garnered 160,000 signatures-nearly double the 86,105 needed, as lon g as they pass the secretary of state's inspection. The bill would make marijuana use legal for people 21 or older , and pot would be taxed "similar to alcohol." Storefronts would be allowed to sell marijuana, and customers would only need to show a valid state ID to get up to an ounce of herb. There would also be provisions for patients to grow their own and keep everythingfrom a harvest , even if it is over an ounce. The proposal also explicitly legalizes industrial hemp. Critics don't like l anguage in the pro posal that says that "driving under the influence of marijuana shall remain illegal, " arguing that it would put DUID in our state constitution. But backers say such laws already exis t , and the langu age is needed to sway middle-of-the road voters. "Polls show Coloradans believe it's time to regulate marijuana like alcohol, generate tax revenue and allow our state to focus on far more pressing i ss u es,'' proponent Mason Tvert says. "And we're going to beworkingto ensure that voters are comfortable with the system. We 'll be reaching out to voters on the fence, and those voters w ho already understand that it's time to end marijuana prohibition . " lnitiative40-"Relief for the Possession of Cannabis Act " http: / j rellef4possession.webs.com j With Initiative 40, Cannabis University founder Michelle LaMay says she has drafted an "e legantly simp l e" solution to current marijuana laws. Her plan? Eliminate all fines and jail time associ ated with marijuana possession : Without the punishments to back up those laws , there would be no reason for police and courts to enforce them. "Our laws have ruined so many lives and cost us so much money,'' she says. "The damage to families-the physical cost-far, far, far ex ceeds any perceived danger of cannabis 8JWillia• Br•••••• in the communities." LaMay plans to start collecting sig natures this month, focusing not only on the metro area, but also rural areas. "I found that in 2006, when there was a legalization initiative on the ballot, where people voted against it was where nobody went -the edges of the state,'' she explains. "We're getting out t o the comers with our marketing. Our circula tors won't have to explain much; it's just so simple. People worried about getting an MMJ card for professional reasons, this is aimed at them." " Cannabis ReLegalization Act of 2012" http://legalize2012.com / A third measure , dubbed the "Canna bis ReLegalization Act of 2012," is still in the planning stages. The Cannabis Therapy Institute's Laura Kriho says the Legalize2012 proposal would offer "true l egal ization, " unlike the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcoho l proposal. It would eliminate all criminal laws against marijuana, she expl ains, making canna bis use a fundamental right in the State of Colorado giving people a defense against the loss of a job due to drug test ing, among other things. A draft of tl1e bill is availabl e online; Legalize2012 is still accepting public comment. C) The Chronic-le is published by Westword , 969 Broadway, Denver , CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Village Voice Media. For information, e-mail marijuana @ westword.com or cal/303-296-7744. 6 T H E c H R 0 I c -L E F E 8 R u A R y 2 0 l 2 I WESTIVORD.COM