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The chronic-le, Fall, 2012

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Title:
The chronic-le, Fall, 2012
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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14 Critic’s Notebook
Over the past three years, I’ve visited more than 150 dispensaries, and I still love pot.
By William Breathes
26 Colorado Centers
Our updated guide to the metro area’s MMJ dispensaries.
The presidential contest isn’t Colorado’s only big vote in November. Tliere’s also Amendment 64.
By William Braalhas
be
bli
e nation is watching to see hich color Colorado will be on November 6: red or blue. Butthis state could also
go green.
If Colorado voters pass Amendment 64, possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for adults 21 and older for personal use would be legalized. So would commercial marijuanastores,whichbe regulated by the Department of Revenue and authorized to collect a voter-approved
excise tax of up to 15 percent — with the first $40 million collected going to public-school construction across the state. Although personal sales would not be legalized, cultivation of up to six plants at a time would be permitted, and growers would be able to keep their entire harvest, even if it is over an ounce; they could also give away up to an ounce to other adults over 21.
The measure was proposed by the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol cam-
paign, headed by Mason Tvert and attorney Brian Vicente. Tvert’s organization, Safer Alternatives for Enj oyable Recreation, pushed a successful decriminalization effort in Denver in 2005 and a similar statewide legalization initiative in2006, which failed. Although several other activists had looked at putting proposals to legalize pot on the November 6 ballot, only Amendment 64 actually made it there.
Along the way, supporters have gotten the backing of numerous groups, among them the Colorado Democratic Party, the Libertarian Party of Colorado (including presidential nominee and former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson), the Green Party of Colorado, the ACLU and the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar. They have also received a nod from Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, as well as retired Denver Police lieutenant Tony Ryan, who spent 36 years patrolling the city. And Amendment 64 has even been endorsed by Republican firebrand Tom Tancredo, who called marijuana prohibition a “wasteful and ineffective government program” in his official endorsement last month, pointing to a Colorado Center on Law and Policy report that shows the state could come out $60 million ahead in the first year of the measure’s passage, by cutting police continued on page 10
The Chronic-le is published byWestword, 969Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Voice Media Group. For information, e-mail marijuana@westword.com or call303-296-7744.
6 | The Chronic-le October 2012
WESTWORD.COM


YOUR GUIDE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA
Westword


18 Really Baked Goods
Create your own medicated edibles from scratch using these three key ingredients.
By William Breathes
28 Colorado Centers
Our updated guide to the metro area’s MMJ dispensaries.
Alan Shackelford found a future in the buddingfield of medical cannabis.
By William Breatkes
Alan Shackelford has been one of Colorado’s more outspoken doctors over the past few years. A physician with a nearly twenty-year-old practice in behavioral medicine, Shackelford is relatively new to medical cannabis—but over the past three years, he’s become a recognized expert in the field.
Inspired at a young age by his physician grandfather, Shackelford says that a career in medicine was always his goal in life. “Medicine fascinated me from early childhood,” he explains,
“perhaps in part because my grandfather was a physician in north Texas. I heard stories about his career. He got his medical license 111 years ago and practiced for 41 years prior to his death. He was well-regarded. I found science in general to be extremely interesting, challenging and captivating. Medicine was pretty much an extension of that. I can remember talking about wantingto study medicine and practice medicine from very early in my childhood. I never really strayed from that ideal.”
After graduating from Cornell Col-
lege in Iowa with majors in German and biology, Shackelford moved to Germany to attend medical school at the University of Heidelberg. The program there was particularly attractive because of the number of research opportunities for medical students. And for Shackelford, that was what medicine was all about: looking at problems in a new light and finding alternate means of treatment “It was expected that medical students would do research while in school,” he recalls. “I was able to do research and publish a number of different papers — mostly on immunological topics within the larger area of urology. I found that fascinating.”
After Germany, Shackelford moved to Boston for an internship at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital through Harvard Medical School, then did a residency at the New England Deaconess Hospital. “I was always interested in nutrition and its impact on the development and progression of diseases, as well as how nutrition could feature in the treatment of disease,” he says.
Shackelford came to Colorado in 1994 to start a practice in occupational and behavioral medicine, which he ran for nearly fifteen years before turning his attention to medical marijuana. Although Colorado voters had approved legalizing medi- continued on page 10
The Chronic-le is published by Westword, 969Broadway, Denver, CO80203; the contents are copyright 2012 by Village Voice Media. For information, e-mail marijuana@westword.com or call303-296-7744.
6 | The Chronic-le August 2012
WESTWORD.COM


Full Text

PAGE 2

.............. 14 CrH ic's Noteb oo k Over the past three years, I've visited more than 150 dispensa ries , and I still love pot. B y Willian1 Breathes 26 C olorado Ce nters Our updated guide to the metro area 's MMJ dispensaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . go green. he nation is watching to see which color Colorado will be on November 6: red or blue . But this state cou l d also If Col orado voters pass Amendment 64 , possession of up to an ounce of mari juana for adults 21 and older for personal use wo u ld be l egalized. So would com mercial marijuana stores, which be regu lated by the Department ofRevenue and authorized to collect a voter-approved The presidential contest isn't Colorado's only big vote in November . There's also Amendment 64. BrWillia• a .. eatlles excise tax of up to 15 percent with the first $40 million collected going to public-school construction across the state. Although personal sales woul d not be legalized , cultivation of up to six p l ants at a time would be permitted, and growers would be able to keep the i r entire harvest, even if it is over an ounce; th ey coul d also give away up to an ounce to other adults over 21. T h e measure was proposed by the Regulate Marijuan a Like Alcohol campaign, headed by Mason 1\rert and attor ney Brian Vicente. 1\rert 's organization, Safer Alternatives for Enjoyable Recre ation, pushed a successful decriminal i zation effort in Denver in 2005 and a similar statewide legalization initiative in 2006, w hich failed . Although several other activists had looked atpu ttingpro posals to legalize pot on the November 6 ballot, only Amendment 64 actually made it there. Along the way , supporters have gotten the backing of numerous groups, among them the Colorado Democratic Party , the Libertarian Party of Colo rado (incl u ding presidential nominee and former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson), the Green Party of Colorado, the ACLU and the Co l orado Cr i minal Defense Bar. They have also received a nod from Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, as well as retired Denver Police lieutenant Tony Ryan, who spent 36 years patrolling the city. And Amendment 64 has even been endorsed by Re publican firebrand Tom Tancredo , w ho called marijuana prohibition a "was teful and ineffective government program" in his official endorsement l as t month, pointing to a Colorado Center on Law and Policy report that shows the state could come out $60 million ahead in the first year of the measure's passage, hycuttingpolice continued on pa g e 10 The Chronicl e is published by Westword , 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents arecopyright2012 by Voice Media Group. For information, e-mail marijuana@westword.com or cal/303-296-7744. 6 T H E c !I R 0 I c L E 0 c T 0 B E R 2 0 1 2 I WESTWORD . COM

PAGE 4

6 Ian Shackelford has been one of Colorado's more outspoken doctors over the past few years. A physician with a nearly twenty-year-old practice in behavioral medicine, Shackelford is re l atively new to medical cannabis but over the past three years , he's become a recognized expert in the field. Inspired at a young age by his phy sician grandfather, Shackelford says that a career in medicine was always his goal in life. "Medicine fascinated me from early childhood, " he explains, .. i' ....... 18 Really Baked Goods Create your own medicated edibles from scratch usin g the se three key ingredients. By William Breathes 28 Colorado Centers Our updated guide to the metro area ' s MMJ dispensaries . Alan Shackelford found a future in the budd ing field of medical cannabis. IIJWillia• llr•atll•s "perhaps in part because my grandfather was a physician in north Texas. I heard stories about his career. He got his medical license 111 years ago and practiced for 41 years prior to his death. He was well-regarded. I found science in general to be extremely interesting, challenging and captivating. Medicine was pretty much an extension of that. I can remember talking about wanting to study medicine and practice medicine from very early in my childhood. I never really strayed from that ideal . " After graduating from Cornell College in Iowa with majors in German and biology, Shackelford moved to Germany to attend medical school at the Univer sity of Heidelberg. The program there was particularl y attractive because of the number of research opportunities for medical students. And for Shackelford , that was what medicine was all abo ut: looking at problems in a new light and finding alternate means of treatment. "It was expected that medical students would do research while in schoo l," he recalls . " I was able to do research and publish a number of different papers-mostly on immuno l ogical topics within th e larger area of urology . I found that fascinating." After Germany, Shackelford moved to Boston for an int e rnship at the Brigham and Women ' s Hospital through Harvard Medical School , then did a residenc y at the New England Deaconess Hospital. " I was alw a ys interested in nutrition and its impact on the development and progression of diseases , as well as how nutrition cou l d feature in the treatment of disease," he says. Shackelford came to Colorado in 1994 to start a practice in occupational and behavioral medicine , which he ran for nearly fifteen years before turning his attention to medical marijuana . Although Colorado voters had appro v ed legalizin g m e di-continued on page 10 T h e Chro nic-le is p u b l i s hed byWestword, 969 B roadway, D enve r , C O 80203; t he cont e nt s a r e copyright 2012 b y Village Voice Media. F o r informa ti o n , e-mail m arij u a n a@west w ord. c o m o real/ 3 03-296-7744. THE CHRONI C -LE AUGU T 2012 I WEST W ORD . COM