Citation
The chronic-le, October, 2016

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Title:
The chronic-le, October, 2016
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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10 Concentrate!
Keepingup with all the varieties isn’t easy. Here’s a handy guide.
By Herbert Fuego
22 A Real Education
Max Montrose learned about marijuana on the job.
By Kate McKee Simmons
26 Dispensary Listings
Our comprehensive guide to the state’s recreational and medical marijuana centers, by town.
FOR THE FIRST TIME, A MAJORITY OF AMERICANS SUPPORT LEGALIZATION.
It’s just a matter of time until the nation embraces recreational use of marijuana, according to a Gallup study released Wednesday, October 19. “As more states legalize marij uana, the question of whether the drug should be legal may become when it will be legal,” Gallup reports.
The study came fast on the heels of a Pew Research survey, released October 11, which found that 57 percent of Americans think marijuana should be made legal, while 37 percent think it should remain illegal. Just a decade ago, the country polled nearly the opposite way, with 60 percent opposed and 32 percent in favor of legalization.
Gallup found that support for legalization has reached 60 percent, the highest it’s been since Gallup started tracking data on this issue 47 years ago.
In a 1969 poll, Gallup asked, “Do you think marijuana should be made legal, or not?” Only 12 percent of respondents said yes. That percentage rose to 28 percent in the ’70s but went back down in the ’80s, a decrease Gallup attributes to the “Just Say No” campaign. Gallup reports that
support plateaued around 25 percent through 1995, increased to 31 percent in 2000, and has continued to rise since then.
The survey was conducted the first week of October with a random sample of just over 1,000 adults from all fifty states. It found that support has increased among all age groups and in each political party in the last decade. Support is up 33 percentage points among adults aged 18 to 34, and 16 points among adults aged 55 and older.
The Pew study also looked at age and political demographics in its survey conducted with 1,201 adults from August 23 to September 2. In assessingthe results, it determined that young adults have caused the switch in numbers. Respondents in the demographic group of 18- to 35-year-olds are more than twice as likely to support legalization today than they were ten years ago. Seventy-one percent of adults
in that age range support legalization, while only 34 were in favor of it in 2006.
Support from millennials and Generation Xers shouldn’t be surprising. But what might surprise some is that the majority of baby boomers now also support legalization. In 1990, only 17 percent of boomers agreed with legalization, but today that number has risen to 56 percent.
The Pew survey also looked at ideological trends and found that Democrats favor legalization by more than two to one. Meanwhile, Republicans are “internally divided,” Pew reports. Sixty-two percent of conservative Republicans oppose legalizing marijuana, while 33 percent are in favor.
After Colorado and Washington voters approved the legalization of marijuana in their states in 2012, support for legalization skyrocketed to 58 percent, according to the Gallup report. Since then, a majority of Americans have con-; tinued to support legalization. Five more
I
states are consideringlegalization in the November election.
1 Gallup theorizes that marijuana will
closely follow the gay-rights and the same-sex-marriage movement; once a handful of states legalized same-sex marriage and public opinion started shifting, the U.S. Supreme Court deemed it legal last year.
This will definitely happen if California legalizes, Gallup summarizes, because like Colorado, California often sets political trends for the rest of the country.
- Kate McKee Simmons
The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2016 by Voice Media Group.
6 | The Chronicle October 2016
WESTWORD.COM


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.. '*' ....... 10 Concentrate! Keepingupwithall the varieties i sn't easy. Here's a handy guide. By Herbert Fuego 2 2 A Real Education Max Montrose learned about marijuana on the job. By Kate McKee Simmons 26 Dispensary Ustl ngs Our comprehensive guide to the state's recreational and medical marijuana centers, by town. ..........•.......•..................••.••...•.•...•....••.............•••...•.•.•.••...••......•................• 6 •• 1.1' .. , FOR THE FIRST TIME, A MAJORITY OF AMERICANS SUPPORT LEGALIZATION. t ' s just a matter of time until the nation embraces recreational use of marijuana, according to a Gallup study released Wednesday, October 19. "As more states legalize marijuana, the question of whether the drug should be legal may become when it will be legal ," Gallup reports. The study came fast on the heels of a Pew Research survey, released Oc tober 11, which found that 57 percent of Americans think marijuana should be made legal, while 37 percent think it should remain illegal . Just a decade ago, the country polled nearl y the op posite way, with 60 percent opposed and 32 percent in favor oflegalization . Gallup found that support for le gal ization has reached 60 percent, the highest it's been since Gallup started tracking data on this issue 47years ago. In a 1969 poll, Gallup asked, ' 'Do you think marijuana should be made legal , or not?" Only12 percent of respondents said yes. That percenta ge rose to 28 percent in the '7 0s but went back down in the ' 80s , a decrease Gallup attributes to the "Just Say No" campaign . Gallup reports that support plateaued around 25 percent through 1995, increased to 31 percent in 2000 , and has continued to rise since then. The survey was cond u cted the first week of October with a random sample of just over 1,000 adults from all fifty states. It found that support has increased among all age groups and in each political party in the last decade. S upport is up 33 percentage points among adults aged 18 to 34, and 16 points among adults aged 55 and o l der. The Pew study also looked at age and political demographics in its survey con ducted with 1,201 adults from August 23 to September 2 . In assessing the results , it determined that you ng adults have caused the switch in numbers . Respondent s in the demographic gro u p of18to 35-year o l ds are more than twice as likely to sup port legalization today than they were ten years ago. Seventy-one percent of adults in that age range support legalization , whil e only 34 were in favor of it in 2006. Support from rnillennials and Gen eration Xers s h o uldn't be s u rprising. But what might s urprise some is t hat the majority ofbaby boomers now also sup port legalization . In 1990, only 17 percent ofboomers agreed with legalization, but today that number has risen to 56 percent. The Pew survey also looked at ideo l ogical trends and found that Democrats favor l egalization by more than two to one. Meanwhi le, Republicans are "internal l y divided," Pew reports . Sixty-two percent of conservative Repub l icans oppose legalizing marijuana , while 33 percent are in favor. After Colorado and Washington vot ers approved the legalization of marijuana in their states in 2012, support for legalization skyrocketed to 58 percent, according to the Gallup report. Since then, a majority of Americans have con tinued to support l egalization. Five more sta tes are considering l egalization in the November election. Gallup theorizes that marijuana will close l y follow the gay-rights and the same-sex-marriage movement; once a handful of states legalized same-se x mar riage and public opinion started s hifting, the U.S. S upreme Court deem ed it legal last year . This will definitely happen if Cal i for nia l egalizes, Gal l up summarizes, beca u se like Co l orado , California oft en sets politi cal trends for the rest of the co untry. IV.rr McKEE SIMMONS The Chronicle is published by Westward, 969 Broadway, Denver; CO 80203; th e contents ar e copyright 2016 by Voice Media Group. TilE CHRO ICLE OCTOBER 2016 I WESTWORD . COM