Citation
The chronic-le, May, 2017

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Title:
The chronic-le, May, 2017
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Dispensary Listings
Our comprehensive guide to the state’s marijuana centers, by town.
By Herbert Fuego
IN THIS ISSUEe 14 Wholesale Takeover 20
Are mercantile marijuana strains now worth our attention?
Pueblo is becoming a hub of cannabis research.
By Chlee Sommers
Pueblo County is quickly becoming a center not only for cannabis production, but for cannabis research, too. “Pueblo County has been in the forefront for marijuana,” says Joan Armstrong, director of the county’s Department of Planning and Development, which includes the division of Marijuana Licensing. “We adopted regulations when medical marijuana was first allowed in Colorado, and then realized the need for regulations. We’ve been very open with marijuana; it was the voice of the people, and we listened to the voters and what’s allowed.”
Unlike the city of Pueblo, which has medical marijuana dispensaries but no retail stores (eight are currently in the process of being licensed, however), Pueblo County allows both medical and recreational cannabis sales, as well as
indoor and outdoor grows, which account for a growing portion of the county’s economic vitality. In 2015, Pueblo County residents voted to direct $270,000 from marijuana excise-tax collections to medical marijuana research and marijuana-related community impact studies at Colorado State University-Pueblo. The Institute of Cannabis Research is a new partnership between the school and Pueblo County.
On the last weekend of April, the southern Colorado city hosted two prestigious cannabis meetings: CSU-Pueblo’s ICR 2017 conference and the third annual CBD Outlook.
This inaugural ICR conference was the nation’s first academically focused, multi-disciplinary cannabis conference, emphasizing pure and applied research and technologies, including industry developments.
Despite heavy snowfall, the three-day conference attracted representatives from ten countries and 21 states, including some of the world’s top scientists and experts in the field.
Among them was Dr. Raphael Mechoulam, known
as the “father of cannabis research.” An organic chemist by trade, Mechoulam has published hundreds of scientific articles and received dozens of patents as a result of his work with cannabinoids at Hebrew University.
CSU-PuebloPresidentLesleyDi Mare introduced Mechoulam, the keynote speaker. “His continued on page 10
The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group.
The Chronicle May 2017
| WESTWORD.COM
SHUTTERSTOCK


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6 .. i' ........ Pueblo is becoming a hub of cannabis research. •r•lllo• s. ... rs ueblo County is quickly be coming a center not only for cannabis production, but for cannabis research, too. "Pueblo County has been in the forefront for marijuana," says Joan Armstrong, director of the county's Department of Planning and Development, which includes the division of Marijuana Li censing. 'We adopted regu l ations when medical marijuana was first allowed in Colorado, and then realized the need for regulations. We've been very open with marijuana; it was the voice of the people, and we listened to the voters and what's allowed." Unlike the city of Pueblo, which has medical marijuana dispensaries but no retail stores (eight are currently in the process of being licensed, however), Pueblo County allows both medical and recreational cannabis sales, as well as 14 Wholesale Takeover Are mercantile marijuana strains now worth our attention? By Herbert Fuego indoor and outdoor grows, which account for a growing portion of the county's economic vitality. In 2015, Pueblo County residents voted to direct $270,000 from marijuana excise-tax collections to medi cal marijuana research and marijuana related comm u nity impac t studies at Colorado State University-Pueblo. The Institute of Cannabis Research is a new partnership between the school and P u eb l o County. On the last weekend of April, the southern Colo rado city hosted two prestigious cannab i s meetings: CSU Pueblo's ICR 2017 conference and the third annual CBD Outlook. ThisinauguraliCRcon ference was the nation's first academically focused, multi-disciplinary canna bis conference, emphasizing pure and applied research and technologies, includ ing industry developments. Despite heavy snowfal l , the three-day conference attracted representatives from ten countries and 21 states, including some of the world's top sc i entists and experts in the field . Among them was Dr. Raphael Mechoulam, known 20 D i spensary Ustlngs Our comprehensive guide to the state's marijuana centers, by town. as the "father of cannabis research." An organic chemist by trade, Mechoulam has published h u ndreds of scientific articles and received dozens of patents as a result ofhis work with cannabinoids at H e brew University. CSUPue blo President Lesley DiMare introduced Mechoulam, the ke ynote speaker. "His cont i n ued on page 10 The Chronicle is published by Westward, 969 Broadway, Denver; CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group. THE CHRONICLE MAY 2017 I WESTWORD . COM