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The chronic-le, June, 2017

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Title:
The chronic-le, June, 2017
Series Title:
The chronic-le
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s.n.
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Denver, CO
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Westword
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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IN THIS ISSUE: 14 Remembering Ken Gorman
The marijuana activist inspired the 420 rally...but didn’t live to see the first one.
By Michael Roberts
20 Dispensary Listings
Our comprehensive guide to the state’s marijuana centers, by town.
rar r nr along
Looking back on legalization in Colorado.
By Herbert
Fucgo
as it already been three and a half years since the first legal recreational cannabis was sold in Colorado? Between the gravity-bong hits and ridiculous rumors to chase, we’ve barely had time to catch our breath. Remember when every week, it seemed like someone would eat too many edibles and freak out? (Or at least the media would freak out?) Or when unsuspecting attendees at the 2014 Denver County Fair consumed infused chocolates? The official announcement of California’s pot-infused anal suppositories might’ve seemed insignificant to you, but it was an important day for us—and thousands of sad Rocky Mountain sphincters without access to them.
Many of the early issues have been resolved. Edibles are now packaged in smaller servingsizes with childproofbar-riers. The Denver County Fair hasn’t had a pot pavilion since the mishap, leaving celebrations to the Cannabis Cup, 420 Rally and other events with much more experience at being disorganized and unreliable. And most important, pot-infused suppositories were soon available in Colorado for any butthole age 21 or older.
Lost amid all the stories about edibles
madness and boofingTHC, though, there have been some real trends. Unless you’ve been diligently scanningdispensary menus and devouring cannabis news since 2014, you might not have noticed some of these developments. As your dad said when the trip to Disneyland came to an end, “Time flies when you’re stoned as shit.”
Here’s some of what you may have missed:
Consolidation
There were already local dispensary chains when retail marijuana sales began in January 2014, but most of them still only sold to medical patients. Today’s big brands were amongthese chains, but there were other early contenders. The Pink House once had licenses for six dispensaries, while now-extinct iVita Wellness had three storefronts open. Flash-forward to today, and iVita has since been swallowed up by LivWell and Native Roots, and the Pink House has just two open locations. Meanwhile, Sweet Leaf (ten), the Green Solution (twelve), LivWell (fourteen) and Native Roots (nineteen) have all continued to get fetter — and all plan to open more spots soon.
Industry investors and entrepreneurs have predicted that big tobacco and pharma will invade Colo-
rado’s dispensary scene once federal banking restrictions are lifted, but for now, these are the biggest fish in our sea.
Advertising
Marijuana businesses were restricted to limited advertising-platform options from day one, and prohibitions haven’t loosened much. The State of Colorado only allows dispensaries and other cannabis businesses to advertise with publications, radio stations and television stations if reliable evidence shows that over 30 percent of the continued on page 10
The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group.
g | The Chronicle June 2017
WESTWORD.COM
BRIAN BADZMIEROWSKI


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JUNE 2017 YOUR GUIDE TO MARIJUANA IN COLORADO

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6 .. 'l'iiiS W8111 Looking back on legalization in Colorado. ., •• r .. rl ... _. as it already been three and a half years since the first legal recreational cannabis was sold in Colorado? Between the gravity-bong hits and ridiculous ru mors to chase , we've barely had time to catch our breath. Remember when ev ery week, it seemed like someone would eat too many edibles and freak out? (Or at least the media wou ld freak out?) Or when unsuspecting attendees at the 2014 Denver County Fair consumed infused chocolates? The official announcement of California's pot -infused anal suppositories might 'v e seemed insignificant to you, but itwasanimportantdayforus-and thou sands of sad Rocky Mountain sphincters without access to them. Many of the early issues have been resolved. Edibles are now packaged in smaller serving sizes with childproofbar riers. The Denver County Fair hasn ' t had a pot pavilion since the mishap , leaving celebrations to the Cannabis Cup , 420 Rally and other events with much more experience at being disorganized and un reliable. And most important, pot infused suppositories were soon available in Colo rado for any butthole age 21 or older. Lost amid all the stories about edibles 14 Remembering Ken Gorman The marijuana activist inspired the 420 rally ... but didn't live to see the first one. By Michael Roberts I madness and boofingTHC , though , there have been some real trends. Unless you've beendiligentlyscanningdispensarymenus and devouring cannabis news since 2014, you might not have noticed some of these developments. As your dad said when the trip to Disneyland came to an end, "Time flies when you're stoned as shit." Here's some of what you may have missed: Consolidation There were already local dispensary chains when retail marijuana sales began in January 2014, but most of them still only sold to medical patients. Today's big brands were among these chains , but there were other early con tenders . ThePinkHouseonce had licenses for six dispensa ries, while now-extinct iVita Wellness had three storefronts open . Flash-forward to today, and iVita has since been swallowed up by LivWell and Native Roots , and the Pink House has just two open lo cations. Meanwhile, Sweet Leaf(ten) , the Green Solu tion (twelve), LivWell (fourteen) and Native Roots (nineteen) have all continued to get fatter and all plan to open more spots soon. Industry investors and entrepreneurs have predicted that big tobacco and pharma will invade Colo20 Dispensary Ustlngs Our comprehensive guide to the state's marijuana centers, by town. rado's dispensary scene once federal banking restrictions are lifted , but for now, these are the biggest fish in our sea. Advertising Marijuana businesses were restricted to limited advertising-platform options from day one, and prohibitions haven ' t loosened much. The State of Colorado only allows dispensaries and other can nabis businesses to advertise with publica tions, radio stations and television stations if reliable evidence shows that over 30 percent of the continued on page 10 The Chronicle is published by Westward, 969 Broadway , Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 20 1 7 by Voice Media Group. THE CHRONICLE JUNE 2017 I WESTWORD.COM