Citation
The chronic-le, October, 2017

Material Information

Title:
The chronic-le, October, 2017
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
OCTOBER 2017
YOUR GUIDE TO MARIJUANA IN COLORADO
- >


DV THIS ISSUE: 14 Cannablnoid Catalogue
Fall’s best new pot products. By Herbert Fuego
20 Dispensary Listings
Our comprehensive guide to the state’s marijuana centers, by town.
A visit to Colorado’s most sustainable pot grow.
ByThomas Mitchell
here’s a reason most cannabis cultivations in Colorado are in warehouses: People are scared.
Afraid of the elements, pests and the unknowns of farming under the sun, most growers prefer to stay inside, taking control of their environments and nurturingtheir delicate crops with extreme care.
Even if growers wanted to venture outdoors, many local governments in densely populated areas, like the City of Denver’s, ban outdoor operations. Travel up to the mountains, however, and you’ll find a tougher breed of both plant and grower.
Rob Trotter didn’t see the same obstacles that most hydroponic-loving cultivators do when he decided to start a commercial cannabis grow on his ranch in Eagle County, a few miles outside of the town of Gypsum. To be blunt, he
can’t see much of anything these days: Trotter is 85 percent blind, having developed retinitis pigmentosa in his twenties; the degenerative eye disease damaged his retina, changing how it responds to light. “I’m strangely aware of other things,” he says. “I have to focus on other senses. In this case, I think it’s a gift.”
His deteriorating eyesight didn’t stop Trotter from building a 27-year career in real estate, herding cattle, growing hay or raising a family — so how much harder
could growing cannabis be? As I headed to his ranch in early October, right after ten inches of snow had fallen on the grow, I wondered if Rob’s optimism might have finally begun to wane.
But as he bounded around the ranch as a handful of employees helped harvest 5,200 plants, Trotter looked as if he’d just won the Cannabis Cup. “Maybe now it’s frozen-fresh instead of fresh-frozen,” he joked, making reference to the process of freezing freshly continued on page 10
The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group.
ft | The Chronicle October 2017
WESTWORD.COM
JAKE HOLSCHUH


Full Text

PAGE 1

OCTOBER 2017 YOUR GUIDE TO MARIJUANA

PAGE 2

6 .. '* ....... A visit to Colorado's most sustainable pot grow. ., ........ ...... u here's a reason most canna b i s cultivations in Colorado are in warehouses: People are scared. Afraid of the elements, pests and the unknowns of farming under the sun, most growers prefer to stay inside, taking control of their environments and nurturing their delicate crops with extreme care . Even if growers wanted to v enture outdoors, many local governments in densely populated areas, like the City of Denver's , ban outdoor operations. Travel up to the moun tains , however , and you'll find a tougher breed of both plant and grower . Rob Trotter didn ' t see the same obstacles that most hydroponic loving cultivators do when he decided to start a commercial can nabis grow on his ranch in Eagle County, a few miles outside of the town of Gypsum . To be blunt, he 14 Canna b ln o l d Cata l ogu e Fall ' s best new pot products. By Herbert Fuego can't see much of anything these days: Trotter is 85 percent blind , having devel oped retinitis pigmentosa in his twenties; the degenerative eye disease damaged his retina, changing how it responds to light. "I'm strangely aware of other things, " he says. "I have to focus on other senses. In this case , I think it ' s a gift . " His deteriorating eyesight didn' t stop Trotter from building a 27-year career in real estate , her ding cattle , growing hay or raising a family so how much harder 20 Dispen sa ry Listings Our comprehensi ve guide to the state ' s marijuana centers , by town. • could growing cannabis be? As I headed to his ranch in early October, right after ten inches of snow had fallen on the grow , I wondered ifRob ' s optimism might ha ve finally begun to wane. But as he bounded around the ranch as a handful of employees he l ped harvest 5 , 200 plants, Trotter looked as ifhe ' d just won the Cannabis Cup . "Maybe no w it ' s frozen fresh instead of fresh-frozen," he joked , making reference to the process of freezingfreshly continued on page 10 The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broa dway, Denver; C O 80203; t he cont ents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group. THE CHRONICLE OCTOBER 2 0 1 7 I WESTWORD . COM