Citation
The chronic-le, December, 2017

Material Information

Title:
The chronic-le, December, 2017
Series Title:
The chronic-le
Creator:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Westword
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
YOUR GUIDE TO MARIJUANA l IN COLORADO 1


10
Hurding Together
How one machine could change the future of hemp farming in Colorado.
20 Dispensary Listings
Our comprehensive guide to the state’s marijuana centers, by town.
STILL BLSSMIMO
Despite more states embracing cannabis, Colorado’s pot industry continues to grow.
By Thomas Mitchell
The legal-marijuana industry in the United States is projected to reach nearly $10 billion in sales in 2017, a33 percent rise over 2016, according to Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics.
While much of that growth can be attributed to a new retail market in Nevada and more states legalizing medical marijuana, Colorado is still the biggest player in the industry. We generated more retail cannabis sales through the first half of 2017 than any other legalized state. The $512 million in recreational pot business that Colorado did during that span was more than 17 percent higher than Washington’s retail sales ($436 million) and over 190 percent higher than Oregon’s ($175 million). Figures are not available for Nevada, which opened retail dispensaries in July (and saw$27millioninsales that month).
According to Westword calculations based on Colorado Department of Revenue tax data, this state’s pot businesses sold $1.16 billion in product from January to September 2017, up from $974.3 million during the same span in 2016.
Although California, slated to start recreational sales on January 1, 2018, is expected to quickly overtake Colorado as the biggest retail pot market in the country — its medical market already dwarfs our medical and retail markets combined, according to Arcview—Colorado has enjoyed a four-year run as the world’s capital of retail pot. And even as the Golden State retakes its place as the epicenter of cannabis, Colorado will still be huffing and puffing along, having already dealt with the regulatory issues and legal spats that California will soon face on a much grander scale, thanks to its vastly larger population and geographical diversity.
BDS analyst Michael Arrington says that Colorado is the “model state” for cannabis legalization.
“They did a very good job — notwith-out hiccups, of course, but Oregon and Washington have run into bigger problems,” he says. “Washington has a large excise-tax burden, and that creates a lot of issues. There’s also cross-border problems, because Oregon doesn’t have sales tax and Washington does.”
AlthoughnoteveryColorado town was on board when retail sales began in 2014 (Amendment 64 gave each municipality the right to decide whether to allow pot businesses in their jurisdiction), the Marijuana Enforcement Division’s efforts to streamline the licensing process for new businesses and the industry’s increasing earning power have made some county boards and city councils rethink their original positions on pot. In January 2014, 25 Colorado towns and counties issued licenses for 147 recreational dispensaries, according to the MED. By December 2017, nearly 75 towns and counties had issued licenses for 505 retail dispensaries. Manyjurisdictions that have changed their stance, such as Commerce City, Longmont and Thornton, are close to Denver and have seen the positive effects the industry has had on the Mile High City.
And that may not change anytime soon: Arrington doesn’t think that new marijuana industries in other states will impact Colorado’s growth.
“The states are fairly independent of each other, because no legal cross-state traffic happens,” he says. “Surely people buy it and transport across states, but in general, I’d say that states have very little impact on each other unless they directly border each other with different rules, like Oregon and Washington.” ©
The Chronicle is published by Westword, 969 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203; the contents are copyright 2017 by Voice Media Group.
ft | The Chronicle December 2017
WESTWORD.COM


Full Text

PAGE 1

Westwonl

PAGE 2

.. " ........ 10 Hurd l ng Together How one machine could change the future of hemp farming in Colorado . 20 D i spensary Listings Our comprehensive guide to the state ' s marijuana centers , b y town. ••..•..•..•......•...••••.•••.••.•..••.•••••....•••........•..........•.••.•••.•.....•••••.•.•.••.•.....•......... Despite more states embracing cannabis, Colorado's pot i ndustry continues to grow. ., ......... .... u helegal-marijuanaindustryin the United States is projected to reach nearl y $10 billion in sales in2017, a33 percent rise over 2016, accor ding to Arcview Market Research and BDS Analytics. While much of that growth can be at tributed to a new retail market in Nevada and more states legalizing medical mari juana, Colorado is still the biggest player in the industry. We generated more retail cannabis sales through the first halfof2017 than any other legalized state . The $512 million in recreational pot business that Colorado did during that span was more than 17 percent higher than Washington ' s retail sales ($436 million) and over 190 percent higher than Oregon's ($175 mil lion ). Figures are not available for Nevada, w hich opened retail dispensaries in July ( and s aw $ 27 million in sales that month). According to W e stword calcul a tions based on Colorado Department of Revenu e tax data, this state ' s pot businesses sold $1.16 billion in product from January to September 2017, up from $974 . 3 million during the same span in 2016 . Although California, slated to start recreational sales on January 1 , 2018 , is expected to quickl y overtake Colorado as the biggest retail pot market in the coun try its medical market already dwarfs our medical and retail markets combined , according to Arcview-Colorado has en joyed a four-year run as the worl d ' s capi tal of retail pot. And even as the Golden State retakes its place as the epicenter of cannabis , Co l o r ado will still be huffing and puffing along , having already dealt with the regulatory issues and legal spats that California will soon face on a much grander scale , thanks to its vastly larger population and geographical diversity. BDS analyst Michael Arrington says that Colorado is the " model state" for cannabis legalization. "They did a very good job-not without hiccups , of course, but Oregon and Washington have run into bigger prob lems, " he says . " Washington has a large excise tax burden, and that creates a lot of issues . There's also cross-border problems , because Oregon doesn ' t have s ales tax and Washington doe s . " Altho ughnoteveryColorado town was on board w hen retail sales began in 2014 (Amendment 64 gave each municipal i ty the r ight to decide whether to allow po t b u sinesses in their jurisdiction) , the Marijuana Enforcement Division's efforts to streamline the licensing process for new businesses and the industry's increasing earning power have made some county boards and city councils rethink their original positions on pot. In Jan u ary 2014, 25 Colorado towns and counties issued licenses for 147 recreational dispensa ries, according to the MED. By December 2017, nearly 75 towns and counties had issued licenses for 505 retail dispensaries . Many jurisdictions that have changed th eir stance, such as Commerce City , Longmont and Thornton, are close to Denver and have seen the positive effects the industry has had on the Mile High City. And that may not change anytime soon : Arrington doe s n ' t think that new marijuana industries in other states will impact Colorado ' s growth. "The states are fairly independent of each other, because no legal cross-state traffic happens ," he says . "Surel y people b u y it and transport across states, but in general, I'd say that states have very little impact on each other unless the y directly border each other with different rules , like Ore g on and Washington." 0 The Chronicl e is publish ed b y Westword, 969 B r oadway, D e nver, CO 80203; the contents are copyrigh t 20 1 7 b y Voice Media Group. 6 T H E c H R 0 N I c L E D E c E M 8 E R 2 0 1 7 I WESTWORD.COM