Citation
The Anthenaeum : Denver Public Library addition

Material Information

Title:
The Anthenaeum : Denver Public Library addition
Creator:
Christian, Barbara A.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Barbara A. Christian. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
THE ATHENAEUM
Denver Public Library Addition
SYSTEMS SYNTHESIS by
Barbara A. Christian
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Architecture degree, University of Colorado at Denver 12 December 1984


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Drainage/Runoff Study
II. Structural System Description and Calculations
III. Lighting
IV. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning and Cut Sheets


I.
Drainage/Runoff Study
The following drainge/runoff study shows an actual decrease in the amount of water leaving the site due to runoff. Consequently, existing storm sewers are found to be adequate for any runoff that may occur during and after periods of precipitation.



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II.
Structural System Description
The structural system chosen for this four story building is a fireproofed steel frame with 30' x 40' bays, 12' floor to floor, simply connected, with regular weight concrete over steel deck which spans open web joists which are at 2' O.C. The three levels of underground parking consist of a 9" thick one-way post tensioned slab which spans concrete columns, creating a 8'-9" floor to floor height. Three foot deep post tensioned concrete ribs at 4' O.C. would be utilized to support the plaza above the underground service area. The foundation consists of grade beams spanning between concrete caissons.
The lateral loads are handled with one of two bracing options. The first option is the use of concrete cores and steel bracing (as indicated on the lateral system plan). The second option is to locate moment frames throughout the framework of the building (as indicated on the lateral system plan). If moment frames were utilized, a portal analysis and moment distribution analysis would be in order.
To reduce the beam depth, especially in the 40' direction, it would be possible to utilize a composite beam system. Although an extra 1-lV of concrete topping would be required, beam depth could still be reduced by 5"-6". (Section 2-96 Steel Manual)
Composite Beam System
All steel would be fireproofed within the new building. A sprinkler deluge system would be located around the atrium to provide a water-wall in the case of fire. A Halon or other chemical extinguishing system would be utilized throughout the reaminder of the library in order to provide fire protection without the threat of water damage to the books.


Structural System Description (cont.)
Aesthetically, round columns will be covered with 2h" of fireproofing and encased in Plasterglas column covers and painted. Square columns in stack areas will be fireproofed and encased in gypsum board.
The ten foot balconies in the new building will be cantilevered from the aforementioned structural system. The barrel vault above the atrium will be supported by the parapet wall on the south side but would require a new column/foundation system on the north side.
Mechanical ducts would be accomodated by cutting holes int the necessary beams at the 1/3 points or anywhere but the middle 1/3 of the beams, since they are simply supported.

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Beam Diagram
Following is a Column Key Plan, Structural/Mechanical Plan showing a sample framing plan in two bays, a Lateral Bracing System Plan, a wall section and calculations for the design of the bar joists, two beams and a column.


Structural System Mechanical System
• One way post tensioned slob spanning concrete columns at parsing and service areas
• For# story 30' * 40' steel frame with concrete on metal deck spuming bar |Oists 2'0" 0 c
° K - brace and concrete cores resist lateral forces
* Individually zoned woter soiree heal pumps with self cantoned hedtkig and cooling capability served by a cooling tower and boiler
* Ventilation through moke up air units on the roof
* Atrium air recircutoted to lower zones in wetter and vented m summer
Structural ° Mechanical Plan
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Lighting
There are a variety of lighting needs in libraries due to the variety of visual tasks being performed. The lighting concepts that I have employed in the library addition are as follows:
Reading Areas
Most reading will occur in the reading carrels located at the perimeter of the building. Diffused natural light is provided by high, continuous strip windows and light shelves. Additional task lighting and night lighting is provided by built-in task lights at each carrel as well as incandescent wall sconces which bounce light off the underside of the light shelf. A shielded fluorescent strip along the lowered ceiling scoop will also provide ambient lighting.
The 1981 IES Lighting Handbook recommends Illuminance Category D or E for reading areas. These categories require from 20 to 100 footcandles of illumi nance on the task, depending upon the print size of the written material.
Stack Areas
A second important library activity is browsing or searching for material within the stacks. The most even and least expensive illumination comes from the two-lamp wrap-around fluorescent luminaire. This type of lighting eliminates shadows on the bottom shelves of the bopk stacks. The luminaires should be located end to end between every range of stacks. The IES Handbook recommends category b (5-10 footcandles, general lighting) for inactive stacks and category D (20-50 footcandles, general lighting) for active stacks
Circulation Areas
To visually segregate the walkways from the reading or stack areas, the ceilings will be dropped and incandescent downlighting will be employed. This falls into Category C which requires 10 to 20 footcandles.
Atrium
The atrium would generally be lit during the day by the natural light from the barrel vault. Sun-sensitive, matt textured louvers would continuously


Lighting (cont.)
adjust themselves to block direct sun and reduce radiant heat gain while allowing for the entrance of reflected sun, sky and ground light into the interior space. Spacing of the louvers should be determined to shield the light source at normal viewing angles. The glass vault would be double glazed. With one light tinted and one clear, the transmittance value would be between 37% and 45%.
At night, HID lights would be used to light the atrium. HID lights are efficient, compact in size and have a long life with low maintenance. They would have to be chosen carefully, however to avoid introducing a luminaire into the library which hummed or buzzed.
Color
The use of color would be used to enhance the lighting in the library spaces. Light colors would be used on the walls and ceilings to conform to the following luminance ratios:
ceilings 70%-90%
walls 40%-60%
The windows would have a reflectance value of 40%-60%. The floors would be carpeted for the most part and would have a value of about 30%. Desk tops would have a reflective value of 35% in order to reduce contrast glare for the reader.
The following exerptcovers the general lighting recommendations for libraries from the 1981 IES Lighting Handbook.


irs LIGHTING HANDBOOK 1'JHI APPLICATION VOLUME.
LIBRARIES 7-25
good color rendition may be less critical, the designer should consider the more efficient and long-lived fluorescent and HID sources. When using mercury, metal halide, high or low pressure sodium, or fluorescent sources, the designer should avoid three common pitfalls: ballast hum, low ambient temperature effects and inadequacy of color rendition. Ballasts can generally be mounted remotely from critical areas if ballast noise will he objectionable. When using fluorescent sources outdoors and in unhealed spaces such as garages, only lamps and ballasts rated for low ambient temperature should be used. The designer should personally verify the appropriateness of color temperature and color rendition of each source selected.
Color of Surfaces and Light. In any hotel or restaurant space, the color of the environment will affect both patrons and workers—positively or negatively, consciously or unconsciously, according to the harmony of the scheme and the expectations of the viewers. While no hard and fast rules exist, it is generally accepted that strong colors are relatively stimulating while less intense colors are more restful and tend to expand the perceived size of a space. Whatever the colors selected, it is imperative that they he evaluated under the light source or mix of sources which will he used in the finished space, since light sources vary significantly in their color-rendering qualities. See Section 5 of the 1981 Reference Volume. See also page 2-31. The use of colored light is often overlooked as a design tool. Strong colors of light can create interesting effects when surfaces are illuminated for decorative purposes, hut should not be used to light food or people because of the inherent and undesirable color distortion which will result.
Emergency Lighting. In public facilities such as hotels, motels and food service establishments the designer must provide lighting for public safety during emergency conditions, without either disorienting or panicking the users. Kmergency systems for public facilities should be designed to provide short-duration lighting for evacuation and safety of guests and staff. See Section 2. Longer duration emergency lighting may he required at hazardous locations, for security purposes, and to assure continuity of critical operations. A common mistake to avoid is the installation of permanently-on emergency luminaires in restaurants. Since these luminaires cannot he switched off or dimmed at night they are sure to disrupt an intimate dining atmosphere. While it may he possible in a small facil-
ity to meet emergency lighting needs with independent battery-powered units, a central emergency generator or battery installation may be required in a major hotel or motel. Options, of which the designer should be aware, include double-circuiting of luminaires and the use of transfer relays to provide power to emergency-only sources during power failures.
Safety. Safe working and living conditions in hotels, motels and food service facilities are dependent on good lighting. See Section 2.
LIBRARIES8
Libraries have a variety of seeing tasks. Among them are: (1) reading matter, (2) browsing or searching through book stacks or storage areas, (3) studying at a carrel or other work surface, (4) viewing microform or computer retrieval systems, (5) meeting or conferring, (6) general office and clerical work and (7) repair and inspection work. These tasks along with general illumination for circulation spaces or audio booths, special lighting for audio-visual areas and accent lights for exhibits and displays provide a variety of lighting problems.
Seeing Tasks in Libraries
Reading is by far the visual task performed most often in a library. Reading tasks vary from children’s books printed in 10 to 14 point type on matte paper, to newspapers printed in 7 point type on low contrast off-white pulp paper, to law hooks with long paragraphs in condensed type, to rare books with unusual type faces printed on old paper. There are also handwriting tasks involving pencils and pens. Details about the general principles which must he considered to provide the quantity and quality of illumination needed for these tasks may be found in Sections 2 and 5. In addition, illuminance recommendations are found in Fig. 2-2, page 2-7.
A task that is fairly unique to the library is that of browsing and/or searching in a stack or other form of storage space. In public spaces material may he on low shelves, on tables, on racks, in bins, etc., which are very accessible and have limited quantities of items to view. However, the vast majority of books, magazines and reference materials are stored in shelving that is tightly spaced and up to 2.5 meters (8 feet) high
f


7-26 INSTITUTIONS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS
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or in compact shelving with limited aisles. The task involves reading a title or author's name assisted by perhaps a numbering system applied to the material. The books or other material are often well used or old causing the title or other means of identification to be of very poor contrast.
When a library is associated with an educational institution, areas used for studying involve both reading and writing tasks. Such areas may have several work stations or individual work stations such as a study carrel. Task lighting is often provided at these locations, and veiling reflections should be minimized at these study locations.
Lighting Systems
A variety of lighting systems are used in libraries. Many libraries make use of daylight through windows or skylights. In all cases the luminance comfort recommendations should be the same as for offices and educational facilities. See Sections 5 and In areas where architectural features are dominant, design concepts may require sacrifice of efficiency for esthetics when translating the architect's concepts into practical lighting designs. In areas that do not have dominant architectural
Fig. 7-23. Two lighting techniques are combined in this high-ceiling college library. General lighting is provided by a high intensity discharge lamp downlighting system. The chandeliers, with low-wattage lamps, are used as decorative elements in keeping with the original architect s design concept
features, the lighting systems should be selected to provide comfortable seeing conditions with more emphasis placed on economics and luminaire design features. See Figs. 7-2.1 and 7-24.
For library lighting applications, there are three basic types of light sources in use today: incandescent, fluorescent and high intensity discharge. (See Section H of the I9H1 Reference Volume for light source data.) No one lighting system can be recommended exclusively. F.ach system has qualities that match the requirements for a given situation. The first consideration in choosing a lighting system should be to allow the library user to see efficiently and without distraction. The second should he the appearance of the installation within the architectural and decorative design concepts of the library. The third consideration is for the energy efficiency of the system.
In general it is desirable to provide sufficient illumination for the most common seeing task performed in an area. However, if a more difficult seeing task is being performed in a small portion of that area, additional illumination should be provided bv providing additional overhead luminaires or by supplementary lighting equipment located in relation to the specific seeing task. Higher illuminances should also he provided in areas that will be used by persons with impaired vision. When relighting existing traditional-type library reading rooms, the use of supplementary lighting equipment consistent with the decorative treatment of the room is sometimes required. It is especially important to avoid direct and reflected glare and to avoid veiling reflections when using supplementary lighting equipment.
Specific Areas
Reading Areas. Reading areas in libraries, including main reading rooms .and reference rooms, occur throughout almost the entire library. Reading is usually performed on either side of long tables, in lounge chairs, in study carrels or at the circulation desk. Care should he taken to locate the luminaires to avoid veiling reflections on the seeing tusks and to use luminaires that reduce the luminance in the direct glare zones.
Individual Study Areas (Carrels). Individual study areas or carrels may be found in almost any public area of the library building, such as main reading rooms, enclosed individual rooms


ii i Kitmrjij handiuK)K 1 MM I Am l( AIK )N VOI IJMC
LIBRARIES 7-27
Fig. 7-24. Low ceiling library, where open access slacks are lighted wilh rows ol fluorescent luminaires at right angles In the slai ks
and stack areas. One ot the most serious lighting problems lor carrels arc the shadows produced l>v dividing walls. To avoid shadows it is desirable to provide lighting from as many directions as practicable. Special care should be taken to avoid v eiling reflect ions especially from localized luminaires.
Shelving and Stack Areas. This area applies to shelving and storage units for till types of materials in addition to hooks. The visual tasks in hook stacks are very difficult; for example, it is necessary to identify the book by number and author on the lowest shelf. As a result of studies made of typical hooks at actual viewing tingles, it is recommended that, when practical, non-glossv plastic book jackets should be used rather t ban glossy; large and legible non-glossv lettering should be used for authors' names, book titles and index number. Dark book, shelf and floor surfaces reflect very little light; therefore, the use of light colored surfaces should be encouraged.
Open Access Stacks. Open access stacks are open to the public for finding their own books or for browsing. Hook stacks are usually arranged in rows with continuous rows of fluorescent luminaires located along the center of each aisle. An alternative is to locate luminaires at right angles to the stacks (see Fig. 7-24). Obtaining
maximum illumination on the lower shelves is the greatest concern.
Limited Access or Closed Stacks. These stacks are used primarily by library personnel. The aisles are usually narrower which increases the problem of obtaining illumination on the lower shelves. Compact shelves may also be used for limited access or closed stacks. Luminaires controlled bv delayed time switches may be considered for these stack areas.
Card Catalogs. Individual files of card indexes are usually located in the main reading rooms. Location of overhead general lighting lu-minaires at right angles to the file cards rather than parallel to them will provide slightly better illumination on the vertical surfaces of the cards.
Circulation Desks. Circulation desks are usually located near the entrance to the main reading room. Often the general overhead lighting system will provide sufficient illumination for the desk; however, if not, sufficient supplementary illumination should be provided, which may be from an architectural element that will identify the circulation desk.
Conference and Seminar Rooms. Conferences are frequently scheduled in libraries, and groups hold seminars on occasion. In addition to general overhead lighting, provision should be made to illuminate the speakers and their materials at the lectern and at the seminar table. Several illuminance levels should be provided for the multiple type use of this space.
Display and Exhibition Areas. Many li braries have display and exhibition areas. These may be in glass covered horizontal cases or may be mounted on vertical walls or dividers. See Museums and Art Galleries, page 7-.‘!.‘l for lighting such displays.
Audio Visual Rooms. There is an increasing use of listening areas for lectures, music and other recorded material. These areas are either small rooms with individual reproducing equipment, or large rooms where head receivers may he plugged into circuits or carrels. Small rooms have poor utilization of light because more light is absorbed bv the wall surfaces and, therefore, require a closer spacing between luminaires. Lighting similar to that required for carrels in a large room is also needed for the audio carrel system.
[fighting for CRT and Mircroform Viewing Areas. Computers and microform materials


7-28 INSTITUTIONS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS
U ' • I It .MIIN(, KAMI HR n )K ■ ' Al’M It. A IK )N J( i| IIMI
permit much larger holdings of newspaper files, rare books, special collections and technical publications. Microform materials include rolls and cartridges of microfilms on strips, aperture cards containing single frames of microfilm and microfiche cards or sheets containing a series of highly reduced micro-images. One of the most difficult seeing tasks is reading a screen filled with a printed page located under a general lighting system needed for other tasks in the area. (Reflections, diffuse and specular, tend to wash out the already poor image on the screen.) When notes must be taken over long periods of time, it is desirable to provide illumination on the note pad, but controlled to reduce reflect ions on the screen.
Higher illuminances are needed for files of microforms than are needed for viewing. Where viewers must be placed in reading areas or work areas with higher level general illumination and no controlled lighting or dimming is available, machines should be selected that are hooded and have screens which are treated to reduce reflections. A small luminaire should be provided between viewers to illuminate a fixed or sliding shelf in front of each machine for note taking. Such a luminaire should be moveable so that it may be individually located to accommodate right or left-handed operators.
Offices. Office areas in libraries should be illuminated in accordance with the recommendation for Office Lighting in Section f>.
Rare Book Rooms. Higher illuminances are recommended for rare book rooms because of the poor quality of printing often found in many rare books; however, lighting techniques such as those used in Museums and Art Galleries should be used for books displayed in glass cases. These would include means of reducing the amount of deleterious radiation.
Archives. Archives are for the storage and examination of public documents of all kinds. This would include legal documents, minutes of meeting, legislative actions and other historical papers. Pencil writing, small letters and condensed type are used in many of these documents.
Map Rooms. Map rooms have both storage and reading areas. Storage of maps involves the use of deep cabinets which, in turn, requires aisles sufficiently wide enough to open drawers for access to the maps. Maps mounted on vertical surfaces require vertical surface lighting.
Fine Arts, Picture and Print Rooms. See Museums and Art Galleries for the proper lighting of displays, paintings and art objects.
Group Study Rooms. Sometimes a group of 4 to 6 students is assigned to a project to be solved bv consulting among themselves, and isolated rooms may be provided for this purpose. Techniques used for classroom lighting are recommended for these rooms. See Section (>, Educational Facilities Lighting.
Overnight Study Halls. Sometimes students prefer to work till night when preparing for examinations, and libraries may provide a portion of the building that can be isolated for this purpose. Lighting for these areas is similar to that required for Reading Areas or Individual Study Areas.
Entrance Vestibules and Lobbies. Lighting in entrance vestibules and lobbies should create an atmosphere suitable for the particular type of library. The lighting may emphasize the architectural features and provide a smooth transition to the functional areas.
MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES
A museum is defined by a leading organization (the American Association of Museums) as "an organized and permanent non-profit institution, essentially educational or esthetic in purpose, with professional staff, which owns and utilizes tangible objects, cares for them, and exhibits them to the public on a regular schedule." For illuminances recommendations, see Fig. 2-2, page 2-8.
A museum’s highest responsibility is to the study and care of its collection and to the collection’s effective public display. Thus, lighting has been considered to be the third, or perhaps the second, most important responsibility of the curator or designer, for lacking effective lighting, the most interesting collection and tasteful displays are ineffective. Lighting, however, can cause or accelerate degradation of certain kinds of museum and art gallery objects and this should be kept ^n mind.
Damage to Museum and Gallery Objects
The principle risks associated with museum and art galley objects are due to:


IV.
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
Due to the complex nature of the heating, cooling and ventilation requirements of the old/new building combination, I chose to use individually zoned, water-source heat pumps with self contained heating and cooling capability.
The name of the system is EnerCon. I have included a brochure entitled "EnerCon, How It Works" to introduce the reader to the specifics of this highly flexible system. This system removes the problems of overheating on the southern exposure while freezing on the north. I also allows heating of one area while cooling another.
The cooling tower and boiler which provide the water to the units are located on the roof near the elevator core, with the boiler and piping being located inside a mechanical penthouse. Water is supplied and returned to heat pumps as indicatied on the Structural-Mechanical Plan (illustration). Condesate drains from the heat pumps would drain to the city sewer through the existing basement.
Fresh air ventilation is provided through two make-up air units- one on the roof of each building. Four gravity vents are also located on the roof of each building to prevent the buildings from over-pressurizing.
A special feature of this system is the ability to vent hot atrium air in the summer and to recirculate it to the lower zones in the winter. A pump would pull the air into ducts which would distribute the warm air to the lower atrium and entry foyer in winter. (See Mechanical/Structural Section)
Air would be pumped through an areaway into the parking garage for fresh air ventilation in that area . The air would be heated in winter to provide protection against freezing the fire sprinklers. Stale air would exhaust to the outside in a concealed location above the east parking exit stair.
Following is a collection of information describing in detail the various elements of the HVAC system I have employed.


Structural System
One way post tensioned Jut spurning concrete columns at parking and service areas
Foa story 50‘ * 40' steel frame with concrete on metal deck spanning bor joists 2'~ 0" o c
K trace and concrete cores resist lateral forces
Mechanical System
• Individually zoned water Smite heat pumps with sett cantoned heating and cooing capability served by a cooling tower and boiler
* Ventilotion through moke up air units on the roof
8 Atrium or recirculoted to lower zones in wnter and vented n summer
Structural
° Mechanical
Plan
© 1 i


Section
0 40
Parking ° Service






Energy-conserving cooling and heating for any multi
Heating and cooling —from a single unit.
The heart of the system is a series of EnerCon source heat pumps that have self-contained heating and cooling capability, due to a reversing valve that regulates the flow of hot and cold refrigerant gas. They are connected by a water loop of simple, uninsulated piping, through which water is continuously circulated.
Heat is rejected into the water loop when units are on cooling and is taken out of this loop when the units are heating. Therefore, heat energy is never wasted as long as it’s needed anywhere in the building. And frequently some areas of a building will require cooling, while others require some degree of heating.
What else is involved?
Obviously, there's a circulating pump, to keep water flowing through the system, and to allow it to transfer heat energy. The only requirement with regard to the water is that it be kept between approximately 60 and 90 degrees. To keep it in that range, the system has two other components: a supplementary heater such as a simple immersion water heater, and a heat rejector such as an evaporative cooler. When needed, one or the other will operate to maintain the required water loop temperature. But they never operate simultaneously.
CAPILLARY TUBE
ENERCON COOLING
Let s take a closer took at cooling.
As the thermostat calls for cooling, here's what happens: the reversing valve guides hot refrigerant gas from the compressor to the water coil. Heat is removed from the gas by the water. The gas condenses into a liquid. The liquid flows through an expansion device such as a capillary tube, and goes into the air coil as a cold liquid. The refrigerant then boils, becomes a vapor, and absorbs heat from room air as the air passes over the air coil. The vapor then flows through the reversing valve and into the compressor, completing the cycle.
70 °F
WARM
-ti UJUUC
CAPILLARY TUBE
ENERCON HEATING
And in heating...
The reversing valve now changes its position, reversing the flow of refrigerant in all parts of the system except the compressor. Hot gas from the compressor enters the tubes of the air coil, which serve as a condenser. Room air is heated as it passes over the tubes, absorbing heat from the refrigerant as it condenses. The liquid refrigerant flows through the capillary tube to the water coil. As the refrigerant vaporizes, it extracts heat from the water loop. The vapor is then conducted back through the reversing valve to the compressor, completing that cycle.
COLD WEATHER OPERATION
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EnerCon SYSTEM


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OFF
HEAT
REJECTOR
When the entire system is heating . . .
In extremely cold weather, when most units are on the heating cycle, the supplementary water heater maintains a minimum temperature of 60 degrees in the water loop.


building
When the systems cooling...
Note that the evaporative cooler comes into operation, to maintain water loop temperature at no more than 90°F
HOT WEATHER OPERATION
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EnerCon SYSTEM
REJECTOR
And when you need some of both...
The next, two diagrams show EnerCon at its highest degree of efficiency.
The first shows cold weather operation, with an interior heat load. The building s interior normally needs cooling
COLD WEATHER OPERATION WITH INTERIOR HEAT LOAD
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nerGon s
whenever occupied. No heat energy is being lost, because heat from the interior units is being utilized via the closed loop to heat perimeter rooms. Neither the water heater nor the heat rejector is operative.
The second illustration shows moderate weather operation. Some units are cooling, some are heating, and some aren't needed at all. Again, you can see the principle of energy conservation at work. The heat put into the water loop by some units is being utilized by others.
MOOERATE WEATHER OPERATION
REJECTOR
Where would you logically use EnerCon?
In any commercial multi-room building, such as hi-rise office buildings, apartment complexes, medical offices, dormitories, nursing homes and educational facilities.
And you won t find better reasons for using it than these.
Complete, flexible air conditioning and heating for every area. With push-button or wall mounted controls. Quiet in operation. Simple maintenance requirements eliminate the need for an operating engineer. Unit flexibility lets EnerCon go anywhere within your building. Reduced installation costs due to system s simplicity. You save floor space, because EnerCon doesn't require a big high-pressure boiler, or central chiller. And, the units can be ceiling mounted.
Above all, you save money.
Installation costs are low. Operating costs, we believe, are the lowest.




NOW THE BEST IS EVEN BETTER!
AAF’s EnerCon II combines optimum heating and cooling capabilities with Low Installed Cost and High Efficiency.
Long before the Oil Crisis turned “energy” and "conservation" into buzzwords, American Air Filter, recognizing the importance of lower operating costs, developed one of the first commercially successful water-source heat pumps - EnerCon.
And now, after more than a decade of successful operating experience with thousands of installations,
AAF introduces the next generation: EnerCon II. All of the knowledge and insight gained from that decade of experience have been combined with innovative engineering in a state-of-the-art unit that provides individually controlled comfort, low installed cost, superior efficiency ratings, and a wide array of options. EnerCon II ... truly an “American Tradition.”


Low Operating Costs
With EER's up to 11.6 and COP's as high as 4.1, EnerCon II helps keep energy costs under control.
Rugged Galvanized Construction
The heavy gauge galvanized steel cabinet is corrosion-resistant. Unlike painted units, it is not subject to chipping or peeling that can result in an unsightly appearance.
Wiring Accessibility
EnerCon II control wiring connections are conveniently located on a terminal strip on the outside of the units.
iase of Installation
lorizontal EnerCon II units up through 9,000 BTU/hr cooling capacity are available nth either a straight-through or90degreeair ischarge, which can be repositioned in the eld if so desired.
luiet Operation
Jnits are heavily insulated to minimize ompressor and reversing valve noise.
hoose From a Wide Range of ontrol Options
actory-mounted control packages provide ptimum control flexibility. Up to three op-onal relays can be included to handle a umber of control or energy management jnctions.

Optimum Protection Against Water Freeze-up
AAF's patented Freezestat provides the most accurate means in the industry for directly sensing low water temperatures in the unit’s water coil. This isfarsuperiorto lessaccurate wells, strap-on devices, or pressure type sensing means used by others.
Protection Against Condensate and Water Damage
With its die-formed construction, the EnerCon II drain pan is seamless. Others' units contain welded seams which could cause problems. An optional drain pan sensorshuts down the compressor automatically in the unlikely event that the pan becomes full. And an optional annunciator light alerts the user to the possibility of a clogged drain pan.
Lower Pumping Costs
Larger water connections result in significantly lower pressure drop which reduces system pumping costs.
Short Lead Times
Most standard EnerCon II units are produced for stock, and can usually be shipped from inventory to meet rush requirements.
Filter Change-Out A Snap
Routine maintenance on the horizontal models is made simpler, since the filter can now be removed from eitherthesideor the bottom of the unit. For simplified filter maintenance. AAF's manually advanced roll filter is also available as an option.
HWQ7
HW19
HW49
VW23
VW41 ....... MLJ1A
HW30 VWiU VW49 VW1J) VW56
VW30 HW07 HW12
IIW09 HW30 HW36 VWQ9 vwi2 HW41
More Models to Select From
The EnerCon II line includes horizontal units ranging from 7000 BTU/hr to 90.000 BTU/hr cooling capacity, and vertical units from 9000 BTU/hrto 180,000 BTU/hr cooling capacity.


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HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS SIZE 30 — Capacities, Dimensions,
and Electrical Data
CAPACITY RATINGS— SINGLE PHASE, 60 HZ. 230 THREE PHASE, 60 HZ. 200. 230 & 460
VOLTS
VOLTS
ARI j Rating 1 Total BTUH Input Watta EER/ COP Nominal CFM ESP - In. WG 1 EAT EWT LWT
HW : VW °F j °F GPM
Cooling 29.800 2.620 11.4 1,090 0.25 0.35 80/67 85 95
Heating 34.000 2.620 n8 ! ?0 70 63
Units rated in accordance with ARI Standard 320.
COOLING PERFORMANCE - EAT 80/87’F HEATING PERFORMANCE - EAT 70°F
EWT GPM Total BTUH Saneibt# BTUH Sanaibla Heat Ratio I Ht. Raj. BTUH Power Input Watta Total BTUH Ht. Aba. BTUH Power Input Watta
3.8 31,759 22.297 0.702 40.074 2.436 29.532 21.279 2.418
60T 7.7 33,763 22.986 0.681 41.427 2,245 31.300 22177 2.497
10.0 34,023 23.068 0.678 41.606 2,221 31.570 23.003 2.510
3.8 31,026 22.041 0.710 39.590 2.509 30.648 22.224 2.463
65’F 7.7 32.958 22.712 0.689 40.875 2,319 32.648 23.914 2 559
10.0 33,227 22.775 0.685 41 060 2.294 32 946 24,164 2 573
3 8 30.252 21,771 0.720 39.053 2.573 31.836 23.27' 2 524
70 F 7 7 32.197 22.426 0.697 40.374 2.396 34 024 25 07i 2 523
10.0 32.474 22.529 0.694 40.564 2 370 34 35i 25 347 2 6 33
3.8 29.478 21.487 0.729 38.512 2.547 33 1 73 24 326 k 532
75 F 7.7 31.392 22.156 0.706 39.822 2.470 35 4-6 35 284 2 in
'0.0 31.678 22.240 0.702 40.019 2.44 3 35 3 38 2 2 *' 5 5 3 "11
33 28.704 21,241 0.740 37 °57 2.714 34 453 ' - -1 ; 2 .. 0—J
80 F 7 7 30.587 21 870 0.715 39 266 2.5-2 3- .61 3 * ~s 77
10 0 30.882 21.967 0 711 39 4'0 2.5'6 37 321 j n:
3.3 27.969 21.008 0.751 37 466 2.732 35.683 26 623 2.713
85 F 7.7 29,825 21.629 0 725 38.755 2 616 38.655 23 910 2 355
10.0 30,128 21.738 0.722 33.967 2 589 39.081 29.253 2.878
3.8 27,194 20.727 0.762 36.912 2 847 37.321 27.812 2.786
90 F 7.7 29,019 21.340 0.735 38,190 2.637 40.309 30.267 2.942
10.0 29,331 21.461 0.732 38.410 2.659 40.822 30.688 2.969
Interpolation is perm.ssibie.
.s cc
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i
FAN PERFORMANCE (CFM vs. ESP)
EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (In. WG) BASED ON COOLING (Wet Coil) & CLEAN FILTER
—-------,------------,----1------1------1-----1----------— r~ —
Modal Tap I -j — — —
0.05 0.10 0.1s 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 | 0.40 0.45 0.50 0 55 0.60
Red 1.160 1,130 1.090 1,050 1.010 980 940 900 655 800 — —
HW30 Yellow* 1.230 1,200 1,160 1,125 1.090 1,050 1.010 970 930 880 — —
Blue 1.300 1,270 1,230 1,200 1.170 1.130 1 090 1.055 1 015 970 920 —
Black 1,380 1,350 1,315 1,290 1,250 1,220 1.180 1.140 1.100 1.055 1 010 960
Red 1.210 1,180 1,150 1,110 1,070 1,040 1.000 960 915 870 — —
VW30 Yellow* 1.290 1,260 1,230 1,200 1,160 1.130 1 090 1,050 1,010 970 — —
Blue 1.370 1,340 1,310 1,280 1.250 1 210 , 1.170 1,130 1,090 1.060 1.010 —
I Black 1,490 1,460 1,420 L 1,390 1.355 I 1.320 1,285 i 1,250 1.215 1.175 i i L 1,140 1.095 _ i I
•Factory connected tap. Field connection required for other taps. 460 Volt units have red & black taps only. Do not extrapolate.


CAPACITY RATINGS — SINGLE PHASE, 60 HZ, 208 VOLTS
— AM Ratings Total BTUH Input Watts EER/ COP CP* EAT *P EWT •F LWT •F GPM
HIP vw
Cooling 29,400 2,580 11.4 910 0.25 0.39 80/67 85 95 7.7
Heating 34,600 2,670 3.8 70 70 63
Units rated in accordance with ARI Standard 320.
’ '*s»* • COOLING PERFORMANCE — EAT aO/S7*P HEATING PERFORMANCE-EAT 70”F
Total Sansibta Poarar Input Total HL Aba. Powar Input
a- EWT GPM BTUH BTUH Watts BTUH BTUH Watts
3.8 31.393 20,443 0.651 39,578 2,397 30,150 21,757 2,459
60° F 7.7 33,354 21,134 0.634 40,900 2.211 31,912 23,236 2,542
10.0 33,621 21.241 0.632 41,082 2,186 32,180 23,459 2,555
3.8 30,625 20,170 0.659 39,051 2,468 31.278 22,704 2.512
65° F 7.7 32,555 20,869 0.641 40,354 2,285 33,222 24.331 2,605
10.0 32,873 20,981 0.638 40,591 2,261 33,519 24.580 2.619
3.8 29,856 19,884 0.666 38.521 2.538 32.477 23.709 2.569
70°F 7.7 31,798 20.589 0.648 39,854 2,360 34,612 25,489 2.673
10.0 32.083 20.685 0.645 40,049 2.334 34.941 25.760 2.690
3.8 29.087 19.614 0.674 37.986 2.607 33.742 24.765 2.630
75F 7.7 30,999 20.301 0.655 39,308 2.434 36.089 26.699 2.751
10.0 31,292 20.406 0.652 39,508 2.407 36.449 26.994 2,770
3.8 28,317 19.357 0.684 37,447 2,675 35.074 25.869 2.697
80 °F 7.7 30,199 20.000 0.662 38,758 2.507 37.634 27.964 2.833
10.0 30,501 20,116 0.660 38,966 2.480 38,027 28.286 2.854
3.8 27,547 19.085 0.693 36.904 2,741 36.471 27,013 2,771
85 °F 7.7 29.399 19,716 0.671 38.203 2.579 39,243 29.277 2,920
10.0 29.709 19,841 0.668 38,419 2,551 39,668 29,623 2,943
3.8 26.818 18.828 0.702 36,404 2,808 37,921 28 200 2,848
90° F 7.7 28,598 19.443 0.680 37,644 2.650 40,911 30.631 3,012
10.0 28.918 19.554 0.676 37,868 2.622 41.371 31,005 3,037
Interpolation is permissible. Continuous operation in shaded
area is not recommended.
FAN PERFORMANCE (CFM vs. ESP)
EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (In. WG) BASED ON COOLING (Wet Coil) & CLEAN FILTER
MOOVI Tap 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 I. 0.40 0.45 1 0.50 0.55 0.60
Red 970 940 900 865 830 795 760 725 590 655
HW30 Yellow' 1 050 1,020 985 950 910 880 340 800 -65 730 — —
Blue • 165 1.130 1.100 1.090 1,030 995 960 920 330 845 310 —
Black 1.310 1.280 1,250 1.210 1.175 1.140 1.100 1.060 1.015 970 920 3 "0
Red *.045 1.010 980 940 910 880 340 800 770 74C
VW30 Yellow" 1 155 1.125 1 095 1.060 1,025 990 960 920 870 330 — --
Blue 1 310 1.275 1,240 1.210 1.170 1,140 1.100 1 060 1.015 o-n 9'0 —
Black 1 415 1 390 1.360 1 320 1.290 1.255 ' 1.220 1.180 1 '50 1 ’1 j 5 1 065 i -30
’Factory connected *ao. F e d c:n->ec‘ required for oi^e' taps. 460 Volt units have red A b ack ’aps only.
HEATING CORRECTION FACTORS
Entering Air (°F) 60” 65’ 70” 75’ oo o o
Heating Capacity* 1.04 1.02 1.00 0 98 0.97
CFM CORRECTION FACTORS
% Rated CFM 80% 90% 100% 110% 120%
Total Cooling*
or Heating Cap. 0.96 0.98 1.00 1.02 1.03
Sensible Cooling*
Capacity 090 0 95 1.00 1.06 1.10
•Multiplier
WATER PRESSURE DROP
COOLING CORRECTION FACTORS
Ent. Air Wet Bulb CF Total Cap. — Sensible Capacity Entering Air F Dry Bulb Heat Rei Power Input
75 80 85 90 95
is I 61 0.898 1.058 1.149 1 149 1149 ! ! 49 0 913 0 965
>•- 2 O OP 64 0 939 0 908 1.142 1 202 1 202 1 202 0 948 0 978
c ? o E 67 1.000 0.767 1.000 1.234 1.280 1 280 1 000 1 000
.2 1 70 1.082 0.631 0 865 1.099 1.333 1 385 1.070 1 029
5< 73 1.188 0.502 0 736 0.970 1.204 1.438 1.161 1 067
76 1.316 — 0 511 0 S46 1.079 1 313 1 270 1 114
79 ! 1.467 — 0.490 0.724 0.958 1192 1.399 1 - L. 1.169
(FT.)
Water Flow (GPM) ! 3.8 r 4.8 6.7 7.7 8.7 10.0 To insure that equipment operates at
Unit Pressure Drop w/o Hose Kits i 4.0 6.3 8.7 11.8 15.4 19.4 25.3 minimum noise levels, refer to ASHRAE Systems Book 1980, Chap-
Unit Pressure Drop w/Hose Kits j 4.2 6.6 9.1 12.3 16.1 20.3 26.4 ter 35.


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DIMENSIONS
11S,
6%11S,
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Control
Wiring

7/a Power v Wiring / (%” Conduit)
MODEL HW30
©
Standard Air I Outlet i
FRONT VIEW
LEFT SIDE VIEW
29
Optional
Discharge
For % 0 D Rods
ACCESS PANELS
___ Access Panel Electrical
and Refrigeration
®_ Access Panel Fan
(Standard Discharge)
cc) -
Access Panel Fan (Optional Discharge)
Access soace must be provided to perform service
Control
Box
. ! Optional Outlet l I ! li -6% ■*—12%—• - f-. ir%. | | 6 ® * 1
d> i ! i 11 ' 1 '4 6% Standard Discharge | r Mounting -4 1
’-3— - v—1 Bracket nJ
11%
RIGHT SIDE VIEW
1.
Flow
1V»
27
TOP VIEW
- — 14Vi -
1 FPT Water Out
1958

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Hi
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REAR VIEW
MODEL VW30
TOP VIEW
rscharge
t
ACCESS
PANEL
- AIR FLOW 44
Model HW30
Blower Motor H P. >/3
Nominal Rated CFM 208 230 Volts 910 1090
Air Coil Face Area (ft1) 3.25
Coil Rows
Filter Height x Width (in.) - 1" Thick 18 x 28
Operating Weight (lbs.) 245
Shipping Weight (lbs.) 255
•See Note on Page 4
FINISH — GALVANIZED STEEL
ALL DIMENSIONS IN INCHES >
Model VW30 !
Blower Motor H P. : !
Nominal Rated CFM 208 230 Voits M0 1090
Air Coil Face Area (ft2) 3 25
Coil Rows 4
Filter Height x Width (in.) - 1" Thick 20 < 30
Operating Weight (lbs.) 250
Shipping Weight (lbs.) 260
See Note on Page 4.
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3
AL Conti Wiri
trol* Wiring
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1 FPT Water in FRONT VIEW
LEFT SIDE VIEW
n


WIRING DIAGRAMS
U/N
LEGEND
Ml — R.A. FAN MOTOR M2 — COMPRESSOR R2 — COMP RELAY R4 — FAN RELAY RR — RESET RELAY V1 — VALVE - REVERSING HP — HIGH PRESS. SWITCH T2 — LOW WATER TEMP.
PROTECTION THERMOSTAT XI — TRANSFORMER - CLASS 2
VOLTAGES
Nameplate Voltage Nominal Voltage
208 V 10 208 V 10
230 V 10 240 V 10
265 V 10 277 V 10
200 V 30 208 V 30
230 V 30 240 V 30
460 V 30 480 V 30 j
208/230 UNITS ARE FACTORY WIRED FOR 230 WHEN POWER SUPPLIED IS 208 VOLTS. CHANGE TRANSFORMER CONNECTIONS AS SHOWN ON THE UNIT WIRING DIAGRAM.
Not#: When factory installed night setback control options are ordered, factory supplied 2x4 junction box must be field-installed over power wiring opening.
When Energy Management System is used, the system must provide for a 5-minute delay between compressor starts to prevent compressor damage due to short cycling
UNIT OPERATION
HEATING/COOLINQ —THERMOSTAT CYCLES COMPRESSOR TO MAINTAIN THERMOSTAT SETTING REVERSING VALVE IS ENERGIZED IN HEATING MODE.
ROOM FAN—WITH FAN SWITCH IN ON" POSITION. FAN RUNS CONTINUOUSLY IN "AUTO" POSITION. FAN CYCLES ON DEMAND FOR HEAT OR COOL.
RESET RELAY —OPENS CIRCUIT UPON HIGH REFRIGERANT PRESSURE OR LOW WATER TEMPERATURE. TO RESET, UNIT POWER CAN BE SHUT OFF AT THERMOSTAT OR MAIN POWER SOURCE AND THEN TURNED BACK ON.
CHANGEOVER — AUTOMATIC OR MANUAL CHANGEOVER IS DEPENDENT UPON THE TYPE OF THERMOSTAT PURCHASED.
Compressor s protected against voitage var at on and phase loss only to the extent ccvered by U L Standard 559
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SIZE 30 THREE PHASE
ELECTRICAL DATA
Power Compressor Min. CkL Ampacity
Volta Phase FLA RLA LAA Max. Fuss Stzs
HW/VW30 208/230 1 2.5 10.0 59.0 17.6 25 I
HW/VW30 265 1 2.0 8.3 46.0 15.9 25
HW/VW30 200/230 3 2.5 6.5 50.0 12.4 20
HW/VW30 460 3 1.2 3.4 23.0 6.1 15
American Air Filter Company has a policy of continuous product research and improvement and reserves the right to change design and specifications without notice
American Air Filter
AN ALLIS-CHALMERS COMPANY
Better Air is Our Business®
ER-1-186 - SZP-83
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL DIVISION • P O RO* W*n i nmcvn i c *v rr«




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BRIEF THEORY
The Evaporative Condenser has proved to be one of the most modern means of conserving water in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. It was designed to alleviate the problems arising from the use of water cooled condensers which waste the cooling water to the sewer.
Throughout the United States there has been a continual lowering of the water table creating a severe water shortage. This, coupled with overburdened drainage facilities has resulted in city codes prohibiting or penalizing the use of equipment which wastes large quantities of water. Where codes have not been enacted, the cost of water often has risen so sharply that it is uneconomical to use it in large quantities for air conditioning and refrigeration applications.
In water cooled condensers, the heat extraction depends entirely on the water sensible heat gain. With an average water temperature rise of 20% there is an equivalent "pick-up” of approximately 20 BTU/lb. of water. In the evaporative condenser, however, the heat extraction depends on the evaporation of water. Since it takes approximately 1,000 BTU’s to evaporate one pound of water, the "pick-up” is 1,000 BTU’s per pound instead of 20.
Thus, one pound of water in an evaporative condenser theoretically does the equivalent work of 50 pounds of water in a water cooled condenser, or the evaporative condenser requires only 2% of the water required in a water cooled condenser. In actual practice, however, this theoretical saving cannot be attained. Through both evaporation and "bleed-off” the water used in evaporative condensers approaches 5% of that used in water cooled condensers.
As water evaporates it leaves behind its impurities. Also, the air washing of fumes that pass through the unit will leave impurities in the water. This causes a continual build-up of chemicals that can be either alkaline or acidic. Scaling or corrosion may occur at a rapid rate if the impurities are allowed to become too concentrated. Normally, it is good engineering practice to bleed off as much water as is evaporated, thus causing a constant change to fresh water and preventing the build-up of impurities.
DESIGN OF EVAPORATIVE CONDENSERS
Basically, the evaporative condenser is a cooling tower in which a condensing coil is incorporated. Figure 1 shows the basic components. The circulating pump draws water from the pan and forces it through the water distribution system. This consists either of a series of distribtuion troughs or a spray header with nozzles. The water is discharged from the troughs or nozzles in a specially designed pattern to fully wet
ing water and through the coil surface. The air evaporates the small quantity of water required for cooling but carries along with it some unevaporated water. This entrained water is removed from the air in the eliminator section and eventually drips down into the pan. Make-up water is introduced through the float valve as the water is evaporated.
B.A.C. Evaporative Condensers are of either the centrifugal fan or tubeaxial fan type. The units are designed on the "Blow-Thru” principle with their moving parts (fans, shafts, bearings) in the dry entering air rather than in the saturated discharge air. This greatly extends the life of these parts and makes
I
Air Discharge I
• l
Figure 1 — Centrifugal Fan Evaporative Condenser
l
Air Discharge
Figure 2 —Tubeaxial Fan Evaporative Condenser
PART I-THEORY AND

-X â–  :-v%
“•3
•v ■Z'-'i-V.
i* m
the coil surface. The fan forces air through the fail-
3


hem more accessible for maintenance because they re conveniently located near the base of the unit.
Discharge cowls, used on centrifugal and tubeaxial an units, increase fan efficiency and provide better ir distribution through the unit. The Blow-Thru esign using fans with discharge cowls is an exclusive altimore Aircoil development and is patented under J.S. Patent No. 3,132,190.
Since centrifugal fans are quieter than tubeaxial ans, the centrifugal fan "Blow-Thru” (Fig. 1) units re recommended for most applications.
The tubeaxial fan units (Fig. 2) require consider-bly lower fan horsepower than the centrifugal fan nits and are recommended for industrial applications -"here low sound levels are not as important. These nits are constructed only in larger sizes where the orsepower savings is of consequence.
ASIC THERMODYNAMICS
Without going too deeply into theory, Figure 3 traces he condition of the air as it passes through the evap-rative condenser. It is assumed that the air enters
igure 3 — Psychrometic Analysis of Air Path hrough an Evaporative Condenser
he condenser at some unsaturated condition, Point 'A.” Before seeching the coil surface, it is washed vith falling water; and by the time it enters the coil t can be assumed for convenience that it is saturated tdiabaticaliy, Point "B.” Then as it passes through
the coil, it absorbs heat from the coil and the surrounding water. This increases the total heat content of the air, and since it is continually being washed with falling water, the process follows the saturation line. The final temperature of the air leaving the condenser, Point "C,” depends on the quantity of air used which is dependent upon the design of the condenser.
From this discussion, it is seen that the performance of an evaporative condenser depends entirely on the load imposed upon it and the wet bulb temperature of the entering air. The air dry bulb temperature or relative humidity has no effect on the capacity of the unit.
REFRIGERATION CYCLE
Figure 4 shows a typical refrigeration cycle on a Temperatur&-Entropy diagram. The refrigerant
Figure 4 — Temperature-Entropy Diagram Showing Theoretical Refrigeration Cycle (Solid Line Shows Path of Refrigerant Through Condenser)
enters the condensing coil at a superheated condition, Point "A.” The superheat is removed, and the saturated vapor condition, Point "B,” is quickly reached. As it progresses farther through the coil, it begins to condense along a constant temperature line "B-C” until reaching a completely liquid state at Point “G.”
Theoretically, the function of the condenser iff now complete but actually, in most condensers, there is a small degree of liquid subcooling, as indicated by the line "C-D” in the diagram.


16


VLC-130A 7340 8770 5110 150 29000 4 8220 io- 15 15 15 15 1 350 320 165 58% 41% 124%
VLC-150A 8550 10040 6320 150 28000 4 9490 10 15 15 15 15 l 410 370 195 69’/4 52% 136%
VLC-175A 8800 10370 6520 150 33000 4 9820 15 20 20 20 20 1 480 430 220 69y4 52% 136%
VLC-200A 11140 13400 7770 225 44000 6 12560 (2) 7 V2 (2) 10 (2) 10 (2)10 (2)10 lVi 580 520 270 58% 41% 124%
VLC-225A 12610 14900 9240 225 45000 6 14060 (2) 7 Vi (2) 10 (2)10 (2)10 (2)10 lVi 720 650 340 69% 52% 136%
VLC-250A 12990 15380 9570 225 48000 6 14540 (2)10 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 1V4 620 560 290 69% 52% 136%
VLC-275A 14520 17670 9930 300 55000 6 16570 (2) 10 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 3 830 750 390 58% 41% 124%
VLC-300A 16700 19960 12100 300 57000 6 18860 (2) 10 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 (2)15 3 940 850 440 69% 52% 136%
VLC-350A 17200 20620 12510 300 66000 6 19520 (2)15 (2) 20 (2)20 (2)20 (2) 20 3 1100 1000 520 69% 52% 136%
VLC-400A 20850 25300 14850 450 88000 6 23620 (4) 7 Vi (4) 10 (4)10 (4) 10 (4) 10 5 1170 1060 550 58% 41% 124%
VIC-450A 23790 28560 17790 450 90000 6 26880 (4) 7 Vi (4) 10 (4)10 (4) 10 (4) 10 5 1490 1350 700 69% 52% 136%
VLC-500A 24500 29480 18400 450 95000 6 27800 (4) 10 (4) 15 (4)15 (4)15 (4)15 5 1700 1540 800 69% 52% 136%
VLC-550A 28310 34780 9930 600 110000 8 32580 (4) 10 (4) 15 (4) 15 (4) 15 (4) 15 (2)3 1660 1500 780 58% 41% 124%
VLC-600A 32660 39350 12100 600 114000 8 37150 (4) 10 (4)15 (4)15 (4) 15 (4) 15 (2)3 1800 1690 800 69% 52% 136%
VLC-700A 33660 40670 12510 600 132000 8 38470 (4) 15 (4) 20 (4)20 (4)20 (4)20 (2)3 2200 2000 1040 69% 52% 136%
VLC-800A 41060 50080 14850 900 176000 10 46780 (8) 7 Vi (8) 10 (8)10 (8) 10 (8)10 (2)5 2340 2120 1100 58% 41% 124%
VLC-900A 46940 56600 17790 900 180000 10 53300 (8) 7 Vi (8) 10 (8)10 (8) 10 (8)10 (2)5 2980 2700 1400 69% 52% 136%
VLC-1000A 48360 58440 18400 900 190000 10 55140 (8) 10 (8) 15 (8) 15 (8) 15 (8)15 (2)5 3400 3080 1600 69% 52% 136%
NOTES:
1. The standard arrangement for Model Nos. VLC-130A through VLC-175A is with the connections located on the left end when facing the fan section. Connections can be furnished on the right end by special order. Water connections and refrigerant connections are always located on the same end of the unit.
2. Refrigerant connection sizes shown are standard sizes furnished on B.A.C. condensers. Other connection sizes are available on special order.
3. Unit sizes 550A through 1000A have identical refrigerant connections and pump assemblies on both ends.
4. For indoor applications of VLC evaporative condensers, the room is normally used as a plenum with ductwork attached to the discharge only. Inlet ductwork can be attached to unit sizes 130A through 175A but an enclosed fan section must be provided. Consult your B.A.C. representative for details.
5. The fans on either side of unit sizes 200A through 500A can be cycled to give 50% capacity control. Unit sizes 550A through 1000A are constructed in two cells with a common pan. The fans on each side of each cell can be cycled to give 25, 50, 75, and 100% capacity.
6. Unit sizes 550A through 1000A have two 2" MPT water makeup connections, both located on one end of the unit.
17


â– )
VLC Evaporative Condensers are factory assembled, centrifugal fan blow-through type, available in 18 standard models. They offer many installation and engineering advantages, some of which are:
Designed with air entry on both sides of the unit, VLC evaporative condensers provide a low silhouette and require minimum space in the large capacity range.
On multiple coil units, each coil is served by a separate fan section, permitting the maximum number of steps of capacity control when cycling fans to maintain condensing pressure.
All moving parts are located at the base of the unit in the dry entering air stream, making them readily accessible for routine maintenance and inspection.
L - - \ ."I S
Slow speed centrifugal fans provide quiet operation, making the VLC evaporative condenser particularly suitable for noise sensitive installations.
>


DESCRIPTION
For Hooting and Cooling Make-Up Air. Supplies heated outside air to
space where exhausters are pulling air from building. Air volumes range from 1542 CFM to 5556 CFM A full curb cap is furnished for mounting unit to a full roof curb. Return air and supply air openings in unit bottom are flanged for connection to duct systems. Return air opening Is capped unless damper system Is specified. Reznpr Thermocore® RXC Series 4 forced air furnaces are gravity vented. Appropriate size vent caps are
shipped separately for attachment to the unit by the Installer. Standard heat exchanger is patented venturi design constructed of aluminized steel. If inlet air temperature will be below 40'F, specify either E3 stainless steel or 321 stainless steel heat exchanger. Burners are die formed aluminized steel but may be specified stainless when extreme condensation of flue products is expected. All units contain an A.G.A. certified duct furnace with factory installed components.
COOLS, CLEANS. FILTERS, 100% FRESH AIR
STANDARD EQUIPMENT
•Aluminized steel heat exchanger.
•Gravity vent cap.
•24 volt controls.
•120 volt supply line voltage.
• Motor contactor.
•Capped base for curb mounting.
•Spark ignited safety pilot system with electronic flame supervision.
Natural gas, auto, relight (non-100%). Propane gas, auto, recycling (interrupted).
• Limit control and safety fan control. •Reverse flow limit switch (manual reset). •Centrifugal blowers.
•Natural or propane gas.
•Lift eyes for rigging.
•Capped bottom air opening.
• Duct flanges.
•DPST switch for remote field installation. •Baked-on enamel — tawny color,_____________
•Zinc grip steel cabinet.
• Terminal block wiring.
•Roto latch panel fasteners.
• Insulated blower cabinet and downturn
plenum.
•Weathertight construction.
•Burner air shutters on propane gas only.
• Two-stage with discharge ductstat 350 and 400 sizes (40/100% firing rate).
• Mechanical modulation 50 through 300 sizes (40/100% firing rate).
• Gas pressures — natural gas supply pressure must not exceed 1 /2 PSI (8 oz. — 14" W.C.). Propane gas supply must not exceed 11" (6.4 oz.).
•Evaporative cooling module.
•115 volt pump and float system.
• Aluminum mesh filters in cooling section.
maximum velocity 650 FPM.________________
OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT Opt.
[For explanation of Options See No.
Option Guide Form 007]^
â–¡ Motor â–¡ Drive
â–¡ Motor Starter 97
G Filter Rack (Less Filters) 4
G Stainless Steel Heat Exch. E-3 (409) 286
G Stainless Steel Heat Exch. (321) 287
G Stainless Steel Burners 72
â– _j Burner Air Shutters 111
G Auto. Recycling Interrupted Pilot
System — Natural Gas 6K
G Auto. Recycling Interrupted 100%
Shut-Off Pilot System — Propane 6P
Alternate Control Transformer 41
. Alternate 208'230V Pump Motor 276
480V KVA Transformer to Operate 115V Pump Motor 114G-1
G Fill and Drain Kit, Field Installed 296 G Electronic Modulation (Natural Gas
Only) 9
G Two-Stage Firing 40/100% with
Ductstat (50 through 300) 10
G Room Override Thermostat
(Two-Stage Only) 13
G Two-Stage Heat/One-Stage Cool Thermostat (Two-Stage Gas Units Only) 28
G Thermostat Guard 153
G Roof Curb. Insul. Pre-Fab 165.166,167
_ Horizontal Discharge — (Dimensions same as outside air opening.) 113
Disconnect Switch — Field Mounted 228
_ Convenience Outlet 269
Drip Pan E-3 Stainless Steel 68
Manual Shut-Off Valve and Union 60
â–¡ Blower Cabinet Insulation 54
G Service Regulator, 5 PSI to 7" 74
C 1/2” O.D.BX Cable 120
Damper Systems:
â–¡ Intermittent 100% Outside Air 18 & 21
â–¡ Two Step, Outside Air Only 18, 22 & 23 C Intermittent Outside or Return
Air 19 & 21
•_ Outside and Return Air Mixed—
Manual Adjustment 19 4 20
Outside and Return Air Mixed—
Auto Adjustment 19,22 4 25
G Outside and Return Air Mixed with
Minimum Outside Air 19,22 23 4 25 _. High and Low Air Flow System with Remote Control Center (See Page 2 for Explanation) 98W3 through 6 Remote Control Console 98
Install following components in console:
ALUMINUM MESH
FILTERS 'STANDARD: OPTIONAL FILTER RACK
B = Duct Width of Supply
and Return Air Openings SPECIFICATION DATA
DIMENSIONS [Accurate within plus or minus 1 / 8 ’ ’. I_____________
SIZE 200/225 250/300 400
A 36-15/16 45-3/16 56-3/16
8 28-5/16 36-9/16 47-9/16
C 39-3/16 39-3/16 39-3/16
F 10 10/12 12
APPROXIMATE WEIGHTS
S7C
Size Ship Net
200/225 901 772
250/300 1109 918
400 1350 1148
SIZE 200 225 250 300 400
BTUH Input 200 000 225.000 250.000 300.000 400 000
0TUH Output 150.000 168.750 187.500 225.000 300 000
•Gas Connections (Not Supply Lme Size! Nat 1/2" 3/4 3/4 3M" 3/4
Nat M2" 3 M‘ 3/4 3/4" 1”
Prop M2 1/2 1/2 3/4" 3/4
Prop 1/2" 1/2" 3/4 â–  3/4" 3/4
••Filter Sues i or 2 (2) 16x20 12) 16x20 (2) 20x20 (2)20x20 3)16x25
(2)16x25 (2)16x25 (2)20x25 (2)20x25 •2)20x25
Inherent VA Load Standard Unit 20 V A 20 V A 20 V A 20 V A 20 V A
•Gas connections — shaded area indicates pipe size for Option 8 ••Filters not furnished — number in parenthesis is number required
CLEARANCES
Furnace bottom — 2 from combustibles, zero from non-combustibles. Top to overhang — 36". Control side
MOT Averac OR FULL LOAO AMPS e Values — Single Speed]
115V 208V 230V 208V 230V 460V
i 1 1 3 i 3
1 / 4 5 8 3 2 2 9 1 3 1 2 6
1 / 3 7 2 4 0 3 6 1 6 « 5 75
1 2 9 8 5 3 4 9 2 2 2 0 1 0
3 4 13 8 7 6 6 9 3 1 2 8 1 4
1 16 0 8 8 8 0 3.9 3 5 1 6
1-1 2 N A 11 1 10 5 5 5 5 0 2 5
2 N! A N/A N/A 7 2 6 5 3 3
3 N/A N/A N/A 10 0 9 0 4 5
*i/i5 3 2 1 5
♦Pump Motor
— 56". Side opposite controls — 6
3R7 Pano 1


OPTIONAL HIQH/LOW AIR FLOW SYSTEM WITH REMOTE CONTROL CENTER FOR EVAPORATIVE COOLING - OPTION NO. MW3 THROUGH 6: This tystam provides high and low air flow to match
the requirements of a two-speed system without the use ot multi-speed motors Dimensions: 15-1/8 long, 4-5/8 high, 2-5/8" wide Note: If recessed, deduct 1/4" trom width to permit removal of cover. Includes outside air damper, 24 volt 40VA damper transformer, 24 volt spring return modulating damper motor, damper controller (Potentiometer), remote console, with six-position switch for high or low ventilation, high or low evaporative cooling, high or low heating, plus on-off switch and relays where required Operation: Low and high air flow accomplished by positioning outside air damper. Low flow with damper in partially open position through potentiometer circuit to modulating damper motor. High flow with outside air damper fully open. VENT = No atomizing
pump running, no heat.
Option Use With No. Furnace Sizes
98W-3 400
•98W-4 200/225 If
•98W-5 250/300 IT ■ „ JC-
•98W-6 400 He | . w4«i
Remote Control Center shipped separately. Outside damper, modulating, damper motor, damper transformer, relay, damper controller, factory installed in heater. *Less two-stage thermostat.
PSYCHOMETRIC CHART: To determine leaving dry bulb temperature
1. Find entering dry bulb temperature = ) or summer
Thermometer \ design
2. Find entering wet bulb temperature = I conditions Sling Psychrometer
3. Find the wet bulb depression (WBO) = ENT. DB minus ENT. WB
4. Correct wet bulb depression = WBD x .80 (Evaporative Effectiveness)
5 Determine leaving dry bulb = ENT. DB minus (WBD x .80)
Example
1 Entering dry bulb = 95'F
2 Entering wet bulb = 75*F
3 Wet bulb depression = 95°F minus 75’F = 20°F
4 Correct WBD = 20 x 80 = 16°F
5 Leaving dry bulb = 95°F ENT. DB minus 16°F = 79°F
DRY BULB TEMPERATURE — DEGREES F: Note —For best results, a full air change should occur each 1 to 2 minutes. A consistent wet bulb depression iWBDl of 16 degrees or more (when cooling is required) is usually sufficient to determine if evaporative cooling is practical for a given locale To Size Cooler —(1) Select Zone from Map (2) Determine type of heat load Hi Loss - Hi Load —Un-msulated buildings with areas which produce high interior heat ioad such as Restaurant Kitchens. Bakeries Laundries. Ory Cleaning Establishments, etc Areas where neat is generated by people such as indoor tennis courts, bowling alleys, etc Protected ■ Hi Load —Insulated buildings for same areas as above. Hi Loss - Normal Load —Un-insulated buildings for areas with normal interior heat load Protected - Normal Load —Insulated buildings for areas with normal interior heat load. (3) Air Changes—This table provides the approximate number of minutes required per air change.
Allowances must be made for any unusual heat load or other conditions that may exist Determine total cubic feet of space to be cooled and divide by number of minutes required per air change. Example—Width 24 ft x length 28 ft. x height 12 ft = 8064 cubic feet of space to be cooled. 8064 divided by 1.5 minutes required per air change = 5378 CFM. Refer to motor and drive table and select cooler, motor and drive which will deliver 5376 CFM at desired external static pressure.
50 F TEMPERATURE RfSE 80 F TEMPERA’ URE Si SE
25 E S P S E 5 p 7 5 S P 1 0E S P FJk* 25 E S P 5 E S P 75 S P 1 0 S p
Modal CFM HP l°",VE RPM HP ORiVE RPM HP ORiVE RPM ORiVE RPM CFM HP ORIVE RPM HP DR‘VE RPM HP OR.VE' RPM “■
2 7.'3 • am 625 “7TT-] rc- ■995. • ’ 2 • 960- 022 ,'Vc ■’20i x X r •64 9" j OM
::s 1’26 i J 2 915: . • : ■960 1 f 2 ;ir •-•65. : • •6 104- 2600 •F '90 *64 860. 4'.J 9*x f ’ 2 ■OM, <*'
;xc }4’0 *65 '320- j i ? .'4 980 J ’ 2 • • 4 2 • ’3 •"5 022 2890 3 4 •66 ' ’®c • • •86 990 •A} 990' i l 2 *'4 364-
>00 4’67 • 1 4 ’QOCi 2 ’085 •A 2 rox 1472 •9 •67 5. •-• : 980- , • ■4 ■06‘. n 2 »' 9 . m
JOG '55e ■ .V^ 950 i ,-,5 LU •nr i 70 F TEMPERATURE R SE HO F ’EMPERATURE R' SE
25 SP 5 E S P 75 E S P i 0E S P »»» 25 E S P 5 E S P I 75 S P i OE S P
Mod«i CFM HP DRIVE RPM HP .drive RPM hp drive RPM hp 0RIVE RPM CFM HP ORIVE RPM HP ORiVEi rpm : HP DRIVE RPM' HP OR.VE RPM'
•92 • »*6 6-JC ’SO- 14 • £ : “ i 040 eon. i ' J •44 I '•>* 1 * ! 4 *’,1 , ?30
— ■6 ‘ i •64 053 • 950 • 44 1 ’ • } j. • 64 860 *4J 040
r-7 " ,7 11 •hrj ; —r.— ' .6 - 6 039 . 4 r' ■ ' '5 ,r: *V 33 2
I—• • »Rr ' zzi—1—_ • •4 • ■ * I*™ ! **"’ ” * : * J
* ’ * 187 •X". ' ! »*' « ■ ■ 1 1 '&I
! ■' f ' c. M a E a a r ft £ a1 b fc . r r -EMPFRA ’LSE RfSE
-11 S p -ESP . •‘ESP 1 0E S p F 5.P .9 E 5 P 5 E 5 P 1 *5 ESP 'OF S P
Mode) CFM nP DRIVE Hp RPM CR^VE p RPM CRi'.'E RPM HP °n,VE RPM CFM „„ o».ve M0 pmvei RPM RPM DRIVE RPM HP ’55?"'
' 025
i »n— . 1 'r; 010 C'S
•- • 4 ■ ■ 90.' • • i 028 £6-i 7 >8 1 ■>Zi
r-6- - dOO. •65 925 ' ’€<: 0« 208' .6 3 i 4 -6 ; ,/9'J. | i 1-6 ,* ■
i J" i ‘ b': , 4 — '65 • •64 665 ’ ' - - 037 i ' '5 • 'ft ■585. ) 4 i • 64 i >«•
F S P = Aluminum Mesh Filter Static Pressure Loss
MOTOR AND DRIVE SELECTION TABLE: Add
to base price of unit. Add total system external static pressure (E.S.P ) to select motor horse power (HP) and drive (DR) For more detailed fan performance data refer to Reznor Form No. 604. Inlet temperature plus temperature rise from chart = discharge temperature Shaded arsa = static pressure of aluminum filters in cooling section (F.S.P.) which must be added to external static pressure when selecting motor and drive.
MOTORS: 1 '4 through 2 HP - 1725: 3 HP - 3450 (1) Standard motors through 3 HP are equipped with built-in thermal protections and are actuated through contactors. (2) Optional starters can be supplied if specified l3i When special motors are requested, use of contacior or starter will be determined by Reznor Engineering. i4t Two speed motors limited to 3/4 HP - 1 phase. (5) All motors limited to No. 56 frame size. (6) Motors 1 HP, 208/1 /60 and 1 '4, 1 3 HP, 208/3/60 are special and not stocked at Mercer.
CONTROLS: All Models: 24 volt controls include: Fan and limit control. 120/24 volt 40VA control transformer, size 200 through 300. automatic electric gas valve, mecnanical modulating valve, pressure regulator 112 PSI to 3.5" W.C. (omitted on propane gas) Pilot shut-off, manual shut-off shipped with unit. Size 400 equipped with two-stage combination valve, does not include pilot and manual shut-off, a separate pilot and manual shut-off valve is shipped with size 400 only.
SELECTOR GUIDE
GAS. TYPE SP GR BTUH VOLTS PHASE HZ
Basic Heater Aluminized Heat Exchanger
TAG NO. HTRS. RXC MODEL SIZE CFM ESP. HP MOTOR OPT. DRIVE OPT. HEAT EXCH. OPT OPT OPT. OPT. OPT. OPT. OPT.



.SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
ITT REZNOR
357, Page 2
MERCER. PA 16137 5M 6/78 M
© 1976 International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation Printed in U S A.
MANUFACTURERS OF GAS. OIL. ELECTRIC HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS


FAN ROOF DETAIL


Directional diffusers
with removable cores series 95
anodized frames and removable


TT
Directional diffusers
â– with removable cores series 95


Full Text

PAGE 1

!_HE ATHENAEf!!:! Denver PUblic Library Addition SYSTEMs SYNTHESIS b y Barbara A . Christian I I r--I " r--"!1 Date Due ---.. -I In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the blaster of Architecture degree, University of Colorado at Denve r 12 December 1984 .. I ; I I 1 '

PAGE 2

TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Drainage/Runoff Study II. Structural System Description and Calculations III. Lighting IV. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning and Cut Sheets . r

PAGE 3

I. Drainage/Runoff Study The following drainge/runoff study shows an actual decrease in the amount of water leaving the site due to runoff. Consequently, existing storm sewers are found to be adequate for any runoff that may occur during and after periods of precipitation.

PAGE 4

' ' : i L.a::;,.r--n ot4 ' 1 l' rru o e:, l..oH-bfllUDE. : z'f -He. = W To-r;;b.L .:?rtl::. = Z'?l I Cl:?O t :::. 6 4 • q H; L::-!H-..... T I 1:;.t,::. L tt. 4 L, 144); -'W c;. j q::: 041 l.od t .26 ::c. .:. • =35 1:. .,o

PAGE 5

q t+ ; (_2 ,; '0 x • f, s K. '5 . \ , oo = 1 ? . oct '1 ( I "! ?& )(. I :X. c; ' '1) I I 00 cg -= I I '5 ( Z,?g }( . x. 'j ,q) }, Doi": '14 G'tt= '"'I....,'? G( 0 I B? j.. c; I 1 ) I . ::. ) ? ' 17 HE:uJ

PAGE 6

II. Structural System Description The structural system chosen for this four story building is a fireproofed steel frame with 30' x 40' bays, 12' floor to floor, simply connected, with regular weight concrete over steel deck which spans open web joists which are at 2' O.C. The three levels of underground parking consist of a 9" thick one-way post tensioned slab which spans concrete columns, creating a 8'-9" floor to floor height. Three foot deep post tensioned concrete ribs at 4' O.C. would be utilized to support the plaza above the underground service area. The foundation consists of grade beams spanning between concrete caissons. The lateral loads are handled with one of two bracing options. The first option is the use of concrete cores and steel bracing (as indicated on the lateral system plan) . The second option is to locate moment frames. throughout the framework of the building (as indicated on the lateral system plan). If moment frames were utilized, a portal analysis and moment distribution analysis would be in order. To reduce the beam depth, especially in the 40' direction, it would be possible to utilize a composite beam system. Although an extra 1-ll.:!" of concrete topping would be required, beam depth could still be reduced by 5"-6". (Section 2-96 Steel Manual) Composite Beam System All steel would be fireproofed within the new building. A sprinkler deluge system would be located around the atrium to provide a water-wall in the case of fire. A Halon or other chemical extinguishing system would be utilized throughout the reaminder of the library in order to provide fire protection without the threat of water damage to the books.

PAGE 7

Structural System Description (cont.) Aesthetically, round columns will be covered with of fireproofing and encased in Plasterglas column covers and painted. Square columns in stack areas will be fireproofed and encased in gypsum board. ten foot balconies in the new building will be cantilevered from the aforementioned structural system. The barrel vault above the atrium will be supported by the parapet wall on the south side but would require a new column/foundation system on the north side. Mechanical ducts would be accomodated by cutting holes int the necessary beams at the 1 / 3 points or anywhere but the middle 1/3 of the beams, since they are simply supported. r r 0 0 I I Beam Diagram Following is a Column Key Plan, Structural/Mechanical Plan showing a sample framing plan in two bays, a Lateral Bracing System Plan, a wall section and calculations for the design of the bar joists, two beams and a column.

PAGE 8

S tru c tural S ystem One .... oy "'o5 1 tefll>loned Wb SPQI'lfllfl9 Loncttt e COI\tnYli o t "'C. lolly ood s•vtee cweos f o.6 SIOr) )()' J 40' SIMI home W IIR COOCrele on metal dedi SPCilOiflQ bar jOIS1S 2'0., 0 C: K -tlface and c.oncr•te c orea re11ll tot.,-01 IOfCft Mechanical System lndlv!CLolly lont:d wot• SOU'"C t heal w t ftl Mit . contcw.H heotr'IQ CO
PAGE 9

\l' r-----J T I I • 4o' ' NA,;nfVAI.. 1 ....... . Lto' 4o' 1o' 4o' 1

PAGE 10

.LjO I _,-. (0r---+----/ 2 I I I \ I \ 4o' / / ' "" • • ;;, N ... L ................ .. 4o' L/o' L/o' --r 1 I

PAGE 11

. . ------...tn,.., __.----I"L '{ Fet.-'1'" ' --H..,-L. oPeH-411 114---------6{!-A'Z.-\J, t'' t?rt 611 LH::tftr t-tl, . 9'-fr--? u --;---Kn.. i-t+rt,.. Mt:/

PAGE 12

'? PLY II !e II;:) I t_.... ""II G714 ' "-('2o pu-ba...t) {;, o (;, o '2 .t; ? , o z;,t? rs.f , =-::?01-o ;c.4o'-o x v-'l' -z..o•Jo ON {...()(;,u 0\ . l Cj 0 I 0 I yY='f-= x 4o1-o x -200 . : or-24"o

PAGE 13

. . ; . . ; Z:;. C?jlt., I . I ?;;17) "!. :; ,. j,O c.-= I ----l..--1 0 Vt \ --'----= , I v l 0:: IS .Ill ,o'?x &7?1 YIZOI .2'-\(. I I 1' N = 1?.1-.) -:-2f>,p x. :. 0(::;'0 I 1:::>7 = .. , _,.......__ '"""

PAGE 14

,J4? f;O c6?1 ) go .mfk 'b = L C . o J:L ) ; I, ?o (, o .(2,? "' IOD 1001 I. l='tp = -?1 X I ' 3 = 41.3 HI t-l 0 pC$2.?-; ?01 X l lo? , t:?O ::; 41, o Y... 121 x =7o1 = 1 4 , e&f., lk-7. 14--7 1----

PAGE 15

s. u H-I H I...QA.t;:> ', • Hot::'UW? H .x. 1 2t t 1.-l.---=-P e:f . 2-ot' f'b{-')( { ?d >' -4-d ) ::-&'00 l b 1 ooo ; (t:,oo&> f or 4o1 0x: l2oo >< 12.'1 &&JC1 1 h O r7Z.S 11 d : ?;& ":'>J/t/ ":. ?;}(.,I ? ? '! # L.f ri I"T +v-v wd.

PAGE 16

10 0':. ? wi... 4 172f;, -?Yi A H)..x I.OG liz.'' -,' I L 1 ,0? L p,"'-. C."\'2-.1:> > i K(= H-6J : J..J Hr-=ll$ .= c., 7 I (., 'ZtN? >'-t-f-1x lj.,:? .__;;--..:..-:;;-o_l__,;..;;.......:._ = p-l.f or /6 . l-Jf .Z> z. = 4 o IL' 0

PAGE 17

-==---bw :: ?/I v '1 ':.. 0, ':x/0 d = 11 IZ "2, '?5 ( A. foiO.j( ' = "" (ea>) ( '?o) 1 (j 7 -z.e,) [ 2-1 x. )( ,z.!!) -=-I'' ---

PAGE 18

.,..re H-C?J / 1."2-L-=-iz1-o rt,.?oliiit-iD +fr, ' r ,ooob( tz-;. e4 , ;a.-W.lz.>'-1?2-f::orz. me #! ne-( A. vJ lz. -1. c; & r-ott--n+F-:-H ,4---r Tt+ -rH! h-lk-t.-ol"c'' -z. J (ft-r;;nJA-1..

PAGE 19

Joll?] , ) = fiE x {:J!7o1 ) K. z -n::( 2o t+j ( -:?0 ) z.l-o . ) . vJ::: 1?,2 -R-, N H: 701, ln'-h ') o,t::.., vs > t:> L.--+--LL.f' JC' We;J'ttfl= 1z. 7 7 4o" plf-u_ + / l?o x z' = tA i':.

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III. Lighting There are a variety of lighting needs in libraries due to the variety of visual tasks being performed. The lighting concepts that I have employed in the library addition are as follows: Reading Areas Most reading will occur in thereadingcarrels located at the perimeter of the building. Diffused natural light is provided by continuous strip windows and light shelves. Additional task lighting and night lighting is provided by built-in task lights at each carrel as well as incandescent wall sconces which bounce light off the underside of the light shelf. A shielde d fluorescent strip along the lowered ceiling scoop will also provide ambient lighting. The 1981 IES Lighting Handbook recommends Illuminance Category D or E for reading areas. These categories require from 20 to 100 footcandles of illuminance on the task, depending upon the print size of the written material. Stack Areas A second important library activity is browsing or searching for material within the stacks. The most even and least expensive illumination comes from the two-lamp wrap-around fluorescent luminaire. This type of lighting eliminates shadows on the bottom shelves of the boQk stacks. The luminaires should be located end to end between every range of stacks. The IES Handbook recommends category b (5-10 footcandles, general lighting) for inactive stacks and category D (20-50 footcandles, general lighting) for active stacks. Circulation Areas To visually segregate the walkways from the reading or stack areas, the ceilings will be dropped and incandescent downlighting will be employed. This falls into Category C which requires 10 to 20 footcandles. Atrium The atrium would generally be lit during the day by the natural light from the barrel vault. Sun-sensitive, matt textured louvers would continuously

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Lighting (cont.) adjust themselves to block direct sun and reduce radiant heat gain while allowing for the entrance of reflected sun, sky and ground light into the interior space. Spacing of the louvers should be determined to shield the light source at normal viewing angles. The glass vault would be double glazed. With one light tinted and one clear, the transmittance value would be between 37 % and 45%. At night, HID lights would be used to light the atrium. HID lights are efficient, compact in size and have a long life with low maintenance. The y would have to be chosen carefully, however to avoid introducing a luminaire into the library which hummed or buzzed. Color The use of color would be used to enhance the lighting in the library spaces. Light colors would be used on the walls and ceilings to conform to the following luminance ratios: ceilings 70 %-90% walls 40 %-60% The windows would have a reflectance value of 40 %-60% . The floors would be carpeted for the most part and would have a value of about 30 % . Desk tops would have a reflective value of 35 % in order to reduce contrast glare for the reader. The following exerptcovers the general lighting recommendations for libraries from the 1981 IES Lighting Handbook.

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a rtatt lr'i LI G HT ING HIINflOOOK I \Jill A PPLICA I I O N V OLUME good color rendition may h e less critical, the designer should consider the more efficient and long-lived fluorescent and HID sources. Whe n mercury, metal halide, high or low pressure sodium, or fluorescen t SOUf<.:es, the designer should avoid three common J5itfalls: ballast hum, low ambient temperature effects and inadequacy of color r endition. Ballasts can gene rall _ v he mounted remotel.v from critical areas if ballast nois e will b e When using tluores<"l'nt sources outdoors and in unheated span•s s u c h as ga rag es, o nl y l amps and ballasts rated for l ow ambient temperature should be usee! . The design e r should personally verify the appropri ateness of color temperature and co lor r endit i o n of each source selected . Color of Surfaces and Light. In any h o t e l or restaur ant space, the co l o r o f the environme nt will affe<"L both patr o n s and workers-positively or n egal ively , consc i o usl _ v or unco n sc iou s l y, ac cording to t h e h armony of the sch eme and the ex pectation s o f the vie wers. While n o hard a n d fast rules ex i st, it \s ge n e r ally accept e d t hat strong c o l o r s are relative[_\' stimulatin g w hil e less in I tn s< colors a r e more r es tful and tend l o expand 1 ht JH'JTl' ived s i ze o f a space . Whalt'Vl'r tlw colors '"-l'lt•t ted. it is irllpl'ral ivt• that tlwy bt• L'V a lua il'd utH!t r the I i g h t source o r mix o f sources w hich will b e used in t h e fini s hed space, s ince ligh t "OliiTL's , ary sig nifi c antl_v in their co lor -n•n rlering qualiti es. See Section .') of the 198 1 H ef enJW<' \"olume. a lso page :2-31. The use of colond lig ht is often overlooked as a design t ool. ;--;, rclllg l"oi(Jrs o f light ran neate interesting efftd to prov id e short-duration lighting for l s wit c hed off or climmed at ni g ht the_\ a rt:> sun to disrupt a n intimate clining atmosphere. Whil e it may he possible in a small facilLIBRARIES 7 2 5 ity to meet emergency li ghting needs with inde p endent battery-powered units , a central e m e r gency generator or battery insta lla t ion ma. v he r equired in a major hote l or motel. Options, of which the d esigne r should be aware, include dou bl e c ir cuiting of luminaires and the use of trans f e r r e lays to provide power to emergency-only s o u rces during pow e r failures. Safety. Safe working and livin g co ndi t ion s in hotl'l s, m o tt • ls a n d food servic e fac ilities an d e p e ndent o n good lig h t in g . See Section 2. LI BRARIES8 Libra ries have a variety of seeing tasks. Among them a r e: (I) readin g matter, (2) browsing or searching through book stack s o r storage a r eas, (:l) stud. vi n g at a carrel o r oth e r work surface, (4) v i ewing microform o r computer retrieval sys t e m s , (5) meeting o r conferring, (6) ge n eral office and clerical work and (7) r epair and inspection work. These tasks a l o n g with general illumina tion for circ ul ation spaces or audio booths, spe c i a l lightin g for a ud io-vis ual a reas and accent. lig ht s for ex hib its and clisp l a_vs provicle a varie t v of lig hting problems. See i n g Tasks i n Librari es l{eadin g i s b _ v far t h e vis ual task performed most oft e n in a libra r y. Readin g tasks var y from c hi ldre n' s books printed in 10 to 14 point t y pe on matte paper, to newspaper s printed in 7 point typ e on l o w contrast off-white pulp paper. to law books with l ong p a ragraphs in conde nsed type, to rare hooks with unus u a l type faces printecl on o l d p a p e r . There a r e a lso h andwriti n g tasks in vo lving pencils and pens. Details about t h e ge n eral princ iples whi c h must h e co n sidered to pro v ide the quantity and q u ality of illumination need e d for t hese tasks may h e found in Sections 2 and !i. In addition, illuminance recommendations a r e found in Fig . page 2 -7. A task t h a t is f a irl y unique to t h e library i s t hat of browsing and/or sear ching in a stack o r other form of storage space. In public spaces materia l ma. v l w on low s he l ves, o n tables, on ral"ks . in b in s. e t c .. w hi c h a r e ve r y accessibl e and havt l imi t e d quantities o f items to view . How tver. the vast majorit_ v of hooks, magazines and r e feren ce materia ls a r e stor eci in s h e l ving t h a t i s tightly spacPd and up to 2 . 5 meter s (8 feet) high ... .... --. ..... '---........ t. ..

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h --.. -. .. .,.--..... 7-26 INSTITUTIONS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS or in compact shelving with limited The task involves reading a tit l e or name assisted b y perhaps a numbering applied to the material. The or other mate rial are often well used o r o ld causing the t itlt or other mean s o f identification to h e of very poor con trast. When a library is associated with an educa tional institution, areas used for stud,\ ing imol ve both reading and writing tasks. Such nJa\' have several work stations or individual work stati o n s s u c h as a study carrel. Task lighting is ofte n provided at t lol'at and veiling r eflections should h e minimized at lol' a t ions. Lighting Systems A variety o f lighting an in li braries. Many libraries make use of da.vlight throug h windows or skvlights. In all the lumina nce comfort recommendations should h e the same as for offices and edul'at ion a I fal' ilit ies . See ,'ections 5 and ti. In areas where a r l'hitectuml a n dom inant, design < nrHtpts may requirl' o f efficiency for esthetics when translating the ar('hitcct's con(' e pt s into pra('t il'allight ing dt•signs . In that do not hav< dolllinant arl'hitt t tural Fig. 7-23. Two light ing techniqu es are combm e d in th1s high-ceiling college libr a ry . General light ing is provided by a lli g h m len si ty discharge lamp downlighting The chandeliers. with l ow-wa ttage l amps, are used as decorative e l e m ents in keepin(] with th e o n g i mtl <1r c hi tP.c t' s r1P.sign con cept. 1 1 •,1'11 '1 /lflt,lt. ,. ."-1 ' I r I • ;, 1 f j • • I I ft--iltures. the lighting hv :--tlJH'I'ial l . v importa nt to a,.,id direct and reflected glare and to a\oid \ ' l'rlrng r eflections when lighting equipme n t. Specific Areas Reading Areas. l{eading i n libraries. including main readin,.: and n ft•nm< rooms, occur through o ut tlw
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II '1 llf,lt lltll , tll\tJIHHI()K l'IHI 1\1'1 '111 AIICIN VCHIJMI Frg . 7-24. L o w cclim9 library, whc:r c open access s t a c k s .t rr lil' t ion:-; L:-;peciall_v from lo calizl'd luminain " and Stack Areas. This area applie:-; to :-;hrl \ in).!' and :-;toragl' units for all types of 11\alt'rial,.; in add it i11n to hooks. Tht• v isual tasks in hook :-;tacks are \ e r . \ difficult: for example, it i:-; rwn:-; :-;ar\' to identif\' the hook hy number and ;1111 lwr 1111 tlw lm\ r:-;t ,...htIL /\:-;a 1'!':-ittlt of :-;tudit•:-; rrraclt ol t \ pit ;rl hook:-; at al'lual v iewing anglts. it i:-; nt o rnrrrLrHit:d that. when practical, non g lossy plastic book jackets should he used rathe r than gloss. \; large and legible non-glossy lettering :-;houlcl lw used for authors' names, hook titles a nd ind1x r111mher . Dark hook, :-;helf and floor ,...urfans n lltt t ve ry lit tit-light: the refore. the use ollight l'olort'd surfaces :-;lwuld be encouraged. Open Acce.<;.<; Stacks. Open access stacks are opt• n tu tlw public fur finding their own books or for lmm,...ing . Hook :-;tacks a r c usually arranged in row:-; with nmt inuotts rows of fluorescent lu rnittain,... lot attd along till' l't•ntt• r of each aisle. An altt'matiw i:-; to locate luminaires at right a nglt:-; to tlw stal'k:-; (sL'L' Fig . 7-2-1). Obtaining LIBRARIES 7-27 maximum illumination on the lower shelves ts the greatest concern. Umited Access or Closed Stacks. These slacks are used primarily b,v library p e r sonnel. The aisles are usually narrower which increases the problem of obtaining illumination o n the lower shelves. Compact shelves may also be used for limited ac('ess or closed stacks. Luminaires controlled bv d elayed time switches ma. v be con sidt• r!'d for l hese stack areas. Card Catalogs. Individua l files of card in dexes are usuall,'r ' lo cate
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---_ ...... . ___ ___ ..... ,_ .. , . ---.•. ------------..... -. . ... --.. . -. .. ---------...... . ' ... 7-28 INSTITUTIONS AND PUBLI C BU ILDINGS p ermit much larger holding s of news p a per files, r a re books, special collections a nd technical pub lications. Microform materia l s include roll s a nd car t ridges of mi c rofilms on strips, a p erture cards containing single frames of micro film and mi c rofic h e cards or s heets containing a series of redu ce d micro-images. One of t h e most diffi cult seeing task s i s reading a screen filled with a printed page located unde r a ge n e ral light in g system needed for oth e r tas k s in the area. ( H eflections , diffu se and s pecular, t e nd to wash out the already p oo r image on t h e screen . ) Wh e n notes must b e taken over l ong p e riods oft im e, it i s desirable to provirl e illumination on tl w not (• p a d , but controlled to r e rlu ce r eflll t i o n s on t h e sc r een. Hi g h e r illumin a n ces a r e need e d for fills of mi c r ofor ms than a r e n ee d e d for v i ewing . Where viewers must be place d in readin g a reas o r wor k a reas with hi g h e r level gen e r a l illumi nation and n o controlled lighting o r dimmi n g i s a vailabl e , machines should be se lected t hat a r e hood e d a nd have screens whi c h are treated lo reduce r eflec t ion s . A s mall lumin a ire s hould h e pro v id e d b etween viewers to illuminate a fixe d or s l idi n g s helf i n front of eac h mac hin e for not e taking. Suc h a luminaire should h e moveable so t h a t it may be indiv id uall y located lO a cc ommodate right o r left-handed op erators. Offices. Office a r eas in l ibraries s houl d b e illuminate d in a ccordan ce with t h e r ecomme n dation for Offi ce Lighting in .Sectio n :>. Rare Book Rooms. High e r illumina n ces are recommend e d for rare bo o k rooms b ec au se o f t h e poor quality of printing often found in m a n v r a r e books; h o w eve r , lighting techniques s u c h t h ose u se d in Museums and Art Galleries should b e u se d for book s di splayed in g lass ca ses. These would include means of redu ci n g t h e amount o f deleterious radiation . Archives. Arc hives are for the stor age a nd examination of public documents of all kinds. This would include legal docume n ts, minutes of meeting, legislative a c tions and other histo ri cal papers . Pencil writing, s mall letter s and condensed type are used in m a n y of these d oc u m e n ts. Map Rooms. M a p rooms have both storage and reading areas. Storage of maps inv olv es t lw u se of deep cabinets whi c h , in turn, requires a i s les sufficiently wide enough to open drawers for ac c ess to the maps. Maps mounte d on vertical surfaces r equire vertical surfa c e lighting. II ll•,ltlltl(, I IMHIIU1t ! K ! I . i\l'i 'lll ;\/l(!t J jf!IIIMI Fine Arts, Picture and Print f{ooms. See Museums and Art Gal l eries for 1 he propl'r lig ht ing of di s pla ys, paintin gs a nd art objects. Group Study Rooms. Sometim t s a g r o u p of 4 to 6 students is assigned to a p r oj( lt to he solv e d h . v consulting among t ht'III Sl'kls. a11d i so la t e d rooms m a . v h e for 1 his purpose. T echniques u se d for class room lighting a r e r e c ommended f o r t h ese r oo m s . .See Section fi, Edu cational F ac iliti e s Lig h t ing. Overnight Study Halls. Sometimes stude n ts prefer to work all night when preparing f o r aminat ion s, a nd lib raries ma.v provide a p o r t ion of the building that ca n h e i solatPd for 1 his pur pos e. Lightin g for these a reas i s similar to t h at require d for f{eading A reas or In dividual Studv Ar eas. . Entrance V estibules and Lohhics. Lig h ting in e ntran ce vestibules and lobbi es s hould c reate a n atmosph e re suitabl e for the parti cula r t y pe of libr a r y. The lig h t i ng ma.v emph asize t h e archi te c t ura l features a nd provide a smooth transit ion to the function a l are as. MUSEUMS AND ART GALLERIES A m useum i s d efi ned b y a leading orga nizatio n (the Ameri ca n Ass ocia tion of Museums! a s "an org anized a nd p e rmanent non -profi t i n st it ut ion . esse n t i ally educational o r est h et i c in purpose. with profess i o n a l staff. w hi c h owns and ut ilizl's tang ibl e o bj ec ts. car es for th e m , a nd t hem to t h e publi c o n a regular s c hedule." F o r illuminances r ecommendations, Sl'l ' Fig . pag e 2 8 . A museum 's highest res pon sib ilit y i s to the study and ca r e of its collec tion and t o t h e coll ec t ion ' s e ffective publi c d i s pla .v. Thus. lig htir•g has he e n co n s id e r e d to he t h e t hird . o r perhap s the second, mo s t import ant. r es pon s ibilit v oft hl' nr rator o r d es ign e r . for la c king efft!cl i ve light i ng, the most interestin g collecti on and tasteful dis pla ys are ineffectiv e . Lighting, howe v er. can cau se o r acce l erate degradation of certain kind s o f museum a nd art ga ller y objects a nd thi s should be k ept 0 mind. Damage to Museum and Gallery Objects The principle ri s k s associated w i t h museum a nd art g alle y objects are due to:

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IV. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Due to the complex nature of the heating, cooling and ventilation requirements of the old/new building combination, I chose to use individually zoned, water-source heat pumps with self contained heating and cooling capability. The name of the system is EnerCon. I have included a brochure entitled "EnerCon, How It Works" to introduce the reader to the specifics of this highly flexible system. This system removes the problems of overheating on the southern exposure while freezing on the north. I also allows heating of one area while cooling another. The cooling tower and boiler which provide the water to the units are located on the roof near the elevator core, with the boiler and piping being located inside a mechanical penthouse. Water is supplied and returned to heat pumps as indicatied on the Structural-Mechanical Plan (illustration) . Condesate drains from the heat pumps would drain to the city sewer through the existing basement. Fresh air ventilation is provided through two make-up air units-one on the roof of each building. Four gravity vents are also located on the roof of each building to prevent the buildings from over-pressurizing. A special feature of this system is the ability to vent hot atrium air in the summer and to recirculate it to the lower zones in the winter. A pump would pull the air into ducts which would distribute the warm air to the lower atrium and entry foyer in winter. (See Mechanical/Structural Section) Air would be pumped through an areaway into the parking garage for fresh air ventilation in that area. The air would be heated in winter to provide protection against freezing the fire sprinklers. Stale air would exhaust to the outside in a concealed location above the east parking exit stair. Following is a collection of information describing in detail the various elements of the HVAC system I have employed.

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Struc tural S y stem 0ne ... oy ltnSIOfle r t 'iloO spoomnq tonoet e colvrTYII a t Vl.l'lurHJ ond servtC e ort05 F0>.6 SIOf) JO'" 40' s.t " l home ,.•th concret• on tneiOI Sp
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-' A r-1 lc.lJ; C> I l c. . • . . F-l • r F .u. .. .. ' [L. "" ' ' , . -. :.., c...J '-' LJ l-...1 1.........J '--' '--' . --. ... b b.. J L 0 Sect ion 1 • o P a rki ng o Se r v ice ED

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! ! 1-++Hi u _ _ __ --------. -------. . ----------.. -----------.:..,.; . t ----------.--_ _ ..... _,. . . ---------.---_;__ . ------. _ -.r:= : -_---_----------. ; ___ L_. /IV!tUfll (;. ---. --+-. . --.. ----. --------...,... ----

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Energy-conserving cooling and heating for any multi Heating and coolingfrom a single unit. The heart of the system i s a series of EnerCon source heat pumps that have self-contained heating and cooling capability, due to a reversing valve that regulates the flow of hot and cold refrigerant gas. They are connected by a water loop of simple , uninsulated piping , through which water is cont inu ously circulated . Heat is rejected into the water loop when units are on cool i ng and i s t aken out of this loop when the units are heating. Therefore , heat energy i s never wasted as long as it' s needed anywhere in the building . And frequently some areas of a building will require cooling, while others require some degree of heating . What else is involved? Obv i ously, there ' s a circulating pump , to keep water flowing through the system , and to allow it to transfer heat energy . The only requirement with regard to the wa t er i s that it be k ept between approx i mately 60 and 90 degrees . To keep it i n that range . the system has two other components: a supplementary heater such as a simple immersion water heater , and a heat r ejector such as an evaporative cooler . When needed, one or the other will operate to maintain the required water loop temperature . But they never operate simultaneously . SUPPLY COOL CONDITIONED A I R ssF RETURN CAPILLARY TUBE ENERCON COOLING Let's take a closer look at cooling. l As the thermostat calls for cooling , here ' s what happens : the reversing valve guides hot refrigerant gas from the compressor to the water coil. Heat is removed from the gas by the water . The gas condenses into a liquid . The liquid flows through an expansion device such as a capillary tube , and goes into the a ir coil as a cold liquid. The refrigerant then boils , becomes a vapor , and absorbs heat from room a ir as the air passes over the a ir coil. The vapor then flows through the reversing valve and i nto the compressor . com pleting the cyc l e . WARM CONDITIONED AIR And in heating . . . 70F CA P ILLA R Y TUBE ENERCON HEATING 64•F The reversing valve now changes its pos ition, reversing the flow of r efrigerant in all parts of the system except the compressor. Hot gas fr om the compressor enters the tubes of the air coil , which serve as a condenser . Room air i s heated as it passes over the tubes. absorb ing heat from the refrigerant as it condenses . The liqui d refrigerant flow s through the capillary tube to the water coil. As the refriger ant vaporizes . i t extracts heat from the water loop . The vapor is then conducted back through the reversing valve to l the compressor . c omp letin g that cyc le . COLD WEATHER OPERATION EnerC!an SYSTEM When the entire system is heating ... OFF R E J E CTO R In e xtr eme ly cold weather . wh en most units are on t he heating cycle. the supplementary water heater maintain s a minimum t emperat ure of 60 degrees in the water l oop .

PAGE 32

n building. When the system ' s cooling ... Note that the evaporative cooler comes into operation . to maintain water loo p temperature at no more than 90 F . HOT WEATHER OPERATION EnerC!on SYSTEM And when you need some of both ... WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMP S "
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NOW THE BEST IS EVEN BETTER! AAF's EnerCon II combines optimum heating and cooling capabilities with Low Installed Cost and High Efficiency. Long before the O i l Cri s i s turned " energy " and "conservation " i nto buzzwords , American Air F il ter . recog n i z i ng the importance of lower operat i ng costs , developed one of the first commercially successful water-source heat pumps EnerCon . And now, after more than a decade of successful operating exper i ence w i th thousands of i nsta ll ations , AAF introduces t h e next generat i on : EnerCon II. All of the knowledge and i ns ight ga i ned from that decade of \ experi ence have been combi ned w it h i nnovat ive en. ...J g i neer i ng i n a state-of-the-art un i t that provides in div i dua ll y controll ed comfort, low i nstalled cost , super ior efficiency rat i ngs , and a w i de array of opti ons . EnerCon II ... tru l y an "Ameri can T r adition ."

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Low Operating Costs With EER' s up to 11. 6 and COP ' s as h i gh as 4 . 1 , EnerCon II helps keep energy costs under control. : ase of Installation lorizontal EnerCon II units up through 9 , 000 BTU /hr c oo ling capacity are ava i l ab l e l i th e i ther a straight-through or 90 degree a i r ischarge , which can be repositioned i n th e eld i f so desired . )uiet Operation Jni ts are h eavily i nsu l ated to m i n i mize ompressor and revers 1 ng v alve no ise. [J --. . . -1:1 LJ : hooae From a Wide Range of : ontrol Options actory-mounted con t ro l packages prov i de ptimum control flex i bil i ty . Up to t hree oponal relays c an be inclu ded to handle a umber of control or energy management JnCtiOnS. Rugged Galvanized Construction The heavy gauge galvan 1 zed steel ca b i net 1 s corrosion-resistant. Un lik e pa1nted un i ts . i t i s not subject to chippi ng or peel i ng that can result i n an uns1ghtly appearance . Opt i mum Protection Aga inst Water Freeze-up AAF's patented Freezestat provides the most accurate means i n th e industry for directl y sens i ng low water temperatures i n the un i t ' s water co il. Th i s is far supenor to l ess accurate wells . strap-on dev i ces . or pressure ty pe sens i ng means used by others . Protection Against Condensate and Water Damage With it s die -formed construction. t he Ener Con II drain pan is seam l ess . Ot hers units conta i n welded seams wh1ch could cause problems. An optional dra in pan senso r shut s down th e compressor automatic a lly i n th e unlikely event th at the pan beco mes full . And an opti onal annunciator light alerts the use r to the possibility of a c l ogged dra i n pan . Filter Change-Out A Snap Rout i ne ma i ntenance on the horizontal models i s made s i mpler . since the filt er can now be removed from either the s i de or the bottom of the unit. For simp lified filter maintenance. AAF ' s manually advanced roll filt er i s also availab l e as an o pt1on . Wiring Accessibility EnerC on II control w i r i ng connections a r e conveniently loca ted on a termmal str i p on the outsi de of the un1ts. Lower Pumping Costs Larger water connecti ons resul t i n s i gnific antly lower pressure drop which reduces system pumping co s ts . Short Lead Times Most s t andard EnerC on II u n 1ts are produce d for stock. and can u s ua lly be s hi pped from In ventory to meet ru s h requ1reme nts . HW07 HW19 VW23 VW4l HW49 HW30 VW30 YW .. 9 VWUt VWl(i VW30 HW07 HW12 lllfO!t HW30 HW36 VW09 VW12 HW41 More Models to Select From The EnerC on II line i nc lu des horizontal units rang i ng fro m 7000 BTU /hr to 90 , 000 BT U /hr cooling c ap ac i ty , and v e rtical units from 9000 BTU /hr to 180 . 00 0 BT U / h r cool i ng capacity.

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! i I I , I 'I I I i II , I I' ' I I• 1 c ESP-In. WG HW VW PHASE , 60 HZ , 230 VOLTS HZ . 200 , 230 & 460 VOL TS --1 L WT • f GPM Senalble ' Power Total HNt Ht . Rej. Total ' Ht. Abs . ' Input EWT GP . .:c.M:__-1-_ BTU '-' H_.___--"B _ T..::..U __ H_+-_ R _do _ _ _.__ __ BTUH 3 . 8 I 31,759 22, 297 0.702 40. 074 2.43 6 29. 532 2 1 . 2 / 9 2418 60' F 7 . 7 33,7 6 3 2 2 . 986 0 .681 41.427 2,245 31. 300 2 2 . 777 2 .497 ______ 1 _ 0 . 0 34 , 0 23 23, 0 6 8 __ 0_._67_ 8 __ 41.60_ 6 __ 23. 0 03 2 . 510 3 . 8 31, 02 6 22.04 1 0 . 710 39. 590 2.509 30. 648 22. 224 2 .468 65' F 7 . 7 32, 958 22. 712 0 . 689 40 . 8 7 5 2.319 3 2.6 48 23. 914 2 559 70" F 75 " F 80 F 85 F 90 F 10 . 0 33, 22_7_ 775 0 . 68? __ 4 1 060 2.29 4 32 946 3 8 7 7 10.0 3 . 8 7 1 J.O 33 7 7 10 0 3 . 3 7 . 7 10. 0 3 . 8 30. 252 21,771 0 . 720 39. 053 2 . 518 31. 886 32 . 197 22.426 0 . 697 40.374 2 .396 34 .)2 4 3 2.474 2 2 . 5 2 9 0 . 694 40. 564 2 370 34 3 5 I ----------2 9.478 21. 487 0.72 9 31. 392 22, 1 5 6 0. 706 31.678 22, 240 0 . 702 28.704 21,241 0.740 3 0 . 587 21 870 0.715 30.882 21. 9 6 7 0 7 1 2 7 ,969 21.008 0 .751 29, 8 2 5 21 , 629 0 725 30 , 128 21 .738 0. 7 22 ---27 , 194 20.727 0 .762 38. 512 J 9 . 822 .:o 0 3 31 067 3 9 .::66 .:o 2 . 647 2 470 2 . 4..13 2 . 2 <:;I • 0 35 --= 3::' : ': 3 7 2.78 2 35. d 83 3 3 .755 2 616 38. 655 3 . 967 2 589 3 9.08 1 3 6 , 912 2847 37 . 32i 7 . 7 29, 019 21. 340 0.735 24, 6 4 ) 513 23 2 /1 2 :)2.1 2 5 0 71 -:.:: 3 -_:::) :: .3 C:J ::::s :; -6 _ ; -1.! d3 -.:: . -.: '2 --: ;;j_:.:; -.. -J . .;:: -I '.3 ,. ? 1 0 '355 29.258 ':!.87 8 -. 21. 312 .::!.78 6 30. 267 2 . 9 42 I I 0 . 0 ___j_2 _ 9;_,331_ 1 _.?__1 . 3 8 , 190 I 2 . 687 40.309 3 8 .41 o _ L _ 2 , 659 _ 30, 68 8 2.969 __j lnterootation I S p er m . ss 1 b l e . .s \..:•""'l ,..., ' 5 :"': ... ';"!.::;--:...., I Motor Model 1 Tap HW30 FAN PERFORMANCE ( CFM vs . ESP) ---EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (ln. WG) BASED ON COOLING (Wet Co il) & CL EAN F ILTER 1 o .os o .2s : o .3o 1 1 1.160 I 1,050 1 .010 980 940 900 B55 800 1 .230 ! 1 , 125 1 ,090 1 ,050 1 .010 970 330 8 8 0 1 .300 1 ,200 1 .170 1 .130 1 090 1.055 015 9 0 920 1 ,380 1 ,290 1 ,250 1 ,220 1 .180 1.140 1.100 1 055 1 . 0 0 960 870 970 1 ,060 1 .010 . Do nol ex trapol at e . [ IT:

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CAPACITY RATINGS-SINGLE PHASE, 60HZ, 208 VOLTS r I ... , -. • -Tolllt Input Dill/ Na•lllll .. ".. . ; . :;.•. IWT LWT -........ ITUH w .... COP CN' : ..... YW .,.-., ., QPM Cooling 29,400 2 , 580 11.4 80/67 I 85 95 910 0 . 25 0 . 39 70 I 70 I 63 7.7 Heating 34 , 600 2 , 670 3 . 8 Units rated i n accordance w i th ARI Standard 320. COOUNG PUFOII.IdMCI'-EAT 10/17•P -HEAT1NG PERFORMANCE-EAT 70•f ; .......... .i :. ,,, PORI POftf -... ,:.:.:.-. Tollll ......... ....... ' ToW Ht. Abe. ...... . GPII BTUH ITUR' ' Jilii:.''" .;'!". . w.u. 8TUH BTUH Walls ;;. 3 . 8 31, 393 I 20,443 0 .651 I 39 , 578 2 , 397 30 , 150 i 21, 7 57 2 , 459 60• F 7 . 7 33 ,354 ! 21 ' 1 34 I 0 . 634 40 , 900 2 ,211 31 , 912 23 , 236 2,542 10 . 0 33 ,621 i 21.241 0 . 632 I 41, 082 2 , 186 I 32 , 180 I 23 , 459 2 , 555 3 . 8 30 , 625 i 20 , 170 I 0 . 659 39 ,051 I 2 , 468 I 31, 278 22 , 70 4 2 .512 I I 65. F 7 .7 32 , 555 I 20 . 869 I 0 .641 40 , 354 2 , 285 I 33 , 222 24 .331 2 , 605 I 10 . 0 I 32 , 873 i 20 ,981 I 0 . 638 40 ,591 2 ,261 I 33 , 519 24. 580 2.619 3 . 8 29 , 856 : 19 , 884 0 . 666 38 ,521 2 , 538 32,477 23 , 70 9 2 . 569 I 70. F I 7 . 7 31, 798 20 , 589 0 . 648 39 , 854 2 , 360 34.612 25.48 9 2 , 673 _____ ____ _____ 0_.6 _ 4 _ 5 ____ ____ 2_.3 _ 3 _ 4 __ __ 3 _ 4 _ . 9 _ 4 _ 1 _____ 25 , 7 6 _ 0 _____ 2._69 _ 0 3 . 8 75 • F 7.7 10. 0 3 . 8 ao F 7 . 7 10 . 0 3 . 8 as F 7 . 7 10 . 0 3.8 go F 7 . 7 10 . 0 InterpolatiOn 1 5 perm i s s .ble. Motor I 29.087 30 , 999 31, 2 92 28 , 317 30 . 1 99 30,501 27. 547 29 . 39 9 29 .709 2 6 , 818 2 8 , 598 2 8 , 9 1 8 19 . 614 0 . 674 37 , 986 20 .301 0 . 655 39 , 308 20,40 6 0 . 652 39 , 508 19 , 3 57 0.684 37 ,44 7 20 , 00 0 0 . 662 38 , 758 20 .116 0 . 660 38 , 966 0 . 693 36,904 0.671 38 , 203 0 . 668 38 , 419 0.702 36 , 404 0 . 680 37 , 644 0 . 676 37 , 868 2 , 607 33.7 42 2 , 434 36 . 08 9 2 ,407 36.44 9 2 . 6 75 35. 07 4 2 , 507 37 . 63 4 2, 480 38 , 0 27 2,741 2.579 2 ,551 2 , 808 2 , 6 50 2 . 622 ' 2 4 . 765 2 . 63 0 2 6 . 699 2.75 1 26 . 994 2 ,770 -25. 869 2 . 697 27.9 64 2 . 833 28. 286 2 , 85 4 27 , 013 2 ,771 29 , 2 7 7 2 , 920 29 , 6 23 2 ,943 Contin uou s <::perat ! on ir. a rea I S not r ecommen de d FAN PERFORMANCE (CFM vs. ESP) EXTERNAL STAT1C PRESSURE (ln. WG) BASED ON COOLING (Wet Coil) & CLEAN FILTER I I I : Tap ! 0.05 ! 0 .10 I o.15 1 0.20 I o.2s 1 I o.35 1 o .4o I o .45 o .55 1 o.so 1 .. --------i--. Red 9 7 0 940 900 865 Y ellow 1 .Cl5 0 1 . 0 20 9 8 5 950 B l ue 16 5 1 , 130 1 .100 1 . 090 HW3 0 B l a c k 1 .310 1 . 280 1 , 25 0 1 , 210 ----Re d • . 0<15 l . OiO 980 940 Yellow ' 1 55 1 . 125 1 . 095 1 . 06 0 B l u e 1 310 . 2 75 1 ,240 1 . 2 1 0 B l a c k 1 J 15 1 3 90 1 . 36 0 1 320 i VW30 L__--'-----J. __ *Fa ctory :: J"' f'Jr tao s . ; HEATING CORRECTION FACTORS Entering Air ( oF) so i 65' w 75 so I Heating Capacity• ; 1.04 I 1.02 1.00 0.98 0.97 CFM CORRECTION FACTORS o/o Rated CFM I 80% : 90% 100 % 110% : 120% Total Cooling• i I or Heating Cap. I 0 .96 0 .98 1.00 1.02 1.03 Sensible Coo lin g o I i Capacity ! o. 9 o I o . 9s 100 ' 1.06 1.10 I I 830 ' 795 I 7 60 7 25 69 0 655 910 ' 880 8 40 800 7 6 5 730 1 ,030 1 . 75 910 1 , 025 1 ,170 1 . 290 995 1 9 60 920 880 il45 510 1 . 140 1 . 10 0 1.060 . 015 -<-V --------880 I 840 800 7'0 7
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.. . , .... .. ,. ... .7 DIMENSIONS MODEL HW30 ACCESS PANELS r I I • I A • r . i @ " I . r I I I i Control W i r i ng '-...ij l o i 'lo P o w er W i r ing ( 'h " Conduit) FRONT VIEW 44 n jl . ..,, . ...._: .I d 6 ".;; "! st..!dard O lecharge f ; 1214 ---Optional LEFT SIDE VIEW 2 6 D lacharge 27 -1 4 Y o TOP VIEW ,, 1 FPT Water Out I 1 ... I., _ _ _ i I FPT Water I n 4).{, . 1 ,., Condensate 'X , REAR VIEW Access Pa n el E l e ctncal a n d Aefngerat1 on -Access Panel Fan (Standard Di scha rg e ) Access Panel Fan ( O pt ional D i scharge) Access space must be provided to perform serv ice Contro l Box I . _ _, t_ ___ : , F J'J.;, ' I 11'/o c:c:=:====='::of..JI--' RIGHT SIDE VIEW Model Blower Motor H . P . Nominal Rated CFM 208 230 Volts A ir Coil Face Area (It') Coil Rows F i lter Hei ght x Width (in . ) 1" Thick O perating Wei ght (lbs.) S hipping Weight (!bs. ) see Note on Pa g e 4 . HW30 I 9 1 0 1o9 o I 1 3 .25 ! 4 1 8 28 245 255 --------------------------FINISHGALVANIZED STEEL ____ _ A L L DIMEN SIONS I N I NCHES MODEL VW30 5 ' J .Jtle t TO P VIEW 1 • 1 ACCESS , PANEL I : I I ' 1' 1,1, P ower W t r 1 n9 , I ' (1/2" Conduit) 3"p , ' W iring J 1l: I ---l.---. . -16 -.. 26 ' • J.: ' -AIR FLOW 44 l , 0 . 0 C on den s a ! e 1 71/• ... 5 1 ';, • --1 I FPT Water Oul 1 FPT Water In : -l' LEFT SIDE VIEW -. ...::;--. -= l I i 'i I I i I' i I I' I: '' =====I• FRONT VIEW . ' I ' r... l I Model I VW30 '------------Blo"'ar M otor H P . J -----------I Ncmtr.al '{aea '::F t\-1 208 Von w '19•) r-A t r A;ea --( f t') 3 25 ---. -. Cotl Rows 4 ------------F il ier Hei ght X W idth (in.) I" T h1ck 20 < 3 0 r-----------------I Operat m g Wei ght ( lbs. ) 250 r----( lbs. _ ) _______ [ __ : • Se e Note on Page 4 . I I I I I

PAGE 39

WIRING DIAGRAMS LEQ!NO M1 -A. A . FAN MOTOR M2 COMPRESSOR R2 COMP . R E LAY R4 -FAN RELA Y RRRESET RELAY V I -VALVE REVERSIN G HPHI G H P R ESS . SWI TCH T2 -LOW WATER TEMP . PROTECTION THERM O STAT XI -TRANSFORMER CLAS S 2 VOLTAGES N-ep1•t • N o m in•t I Volt• .. Volt ... 208 v 1 0 2 08 v . 10 230 v 10 240 v . 10 265 v . 10 277 v 10 200 v 3 0 208 v 30 230 v 30 240 v 30 j 460 v 30 480 v 30 208 / 230 U NITS ARE FACTORY WIRED F O R 230 . WHEN POWER SUP P LIED IS 208 VOLTS . CHANGE T RANSF O RMER CONNECTIONS AS SHOWN O N THE U N IT WI R ING DIAGRAM . Note : When factory installed night setback control o ptions are ordered , factory supplied 2 x 4 junction box must be f ield-installe d over power wiring openi ng . W hen Energy Management S ys tem is used . the system must provi de for a Smin ute d e lay between compressor starts to pre v ent com p ressor dama ge due to sho rt cycli ng . UNIT OPER AT I ON HEAT ING/ C OOL INGTHERMOSTAT CYCLES CO M PRESSOR TO MA I NTA I N THERMOST AT S ETT ING. REVERS IN G VALVE I S ENERGIZED IN H EA TING MODE . R OOM F AN W I TH FAN S W ITC H I N " ON " P O SITION , FAN RUNS CONTINUOUS L Y I N " AUTO " POS I T IO N . FAN CYCLES O N DEMAND FOR HEAT O R COOL . RES E T RELAY-OPENS C I RCUIT UPON HIG H RE FRI GERANT PRESS UR E O R LOW WATER TEM PERAT URE. TO RESET . U N IT POWER CAN BE SH U T OFF AT THERMOSTAT O R MA I N POWER SOUR C E AND THEN T U RNED BA CK O N . CHA N G E O V ER-AUTOMATI C O R MANUAL CH ANGEOVER IS DEP ENDENT UPON THE TYPE OF THER M OSTAT P U R C H ASED . C ompresso r 1 5 oro t e c ! e a aga ,r.st vo n age liP':H on and pha s e l o ss on l y t o !'i:e by IJ L Standard 559 L L.l G U / N ' , L-----------.., I _______ j , . ' G . ...., 0 l l 0 ll u SIZE 30 SINGLE PHA S E r--------------...J ' : _______ j I I I . . ooow A T ( AUTO CHANOEO VIIt l 2 4 't'OLf CI. AS.S 1 .,-------------;{•• • ( . : d 1>---...../ s J. S IZE 30 T HREE PHASE ELECTRICAL DATA ' ....., Co...,MMr ' Max . Fuse S ize I . ...., Min. Ckt. ....., v .... I PhaM "'"" IIIlA I LRA HW/VW30 i I HW/VW30 I HWIVW30 I HW/VW30 E R-1-186 • SZP-83 208/23 0 I 1 2.5 10 . 0 I 59. 0 17 . 6 I I 265 1 2. 0 8 . 3 : 46. 0 ' 1 5 . 9 200 / 230 3 2. 5 I 6 . 5 I 5 0 . 0 i 12 . 4 460 I 3 I 1 . 2 3 . 4 I 23. 0 6 . 1 Amencan Atr F1l ter Company has a policy of conttnuous p r oduct res ea r c h and tmprovement and reserves the r tght t o change destgn and spectftcattons w 1tho u t nottce American Air AN ALLIS-CHALMERS COMPANY Better Air is Our Business ENVI RONMENTAL CONTROL DIVISION • P . 0 ROY tnt uc::vu' c-t1v AM'>" '"'""' 25 I -25 I i -----; I 20 i i 15 '

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. . t i ' , . I• t I 3/8" CONTINUOUS THREADED ROD . :&CURE TO STRUCTURE AS (QU IRED.------... !,!!AT PUMP---trLE ' X CONN . , TYP. .. I ... ' . . ,, ... -;: : HfURN t, ftl .... -IN -I HI: Aft . , tM\.A tORS a 00\Utl. i ! CONN!CTIONS . : 'At ROO. : f HEAT PUMP • 1 r [ l . ., .. " t .;:}_. SUPPLY DUCT GATE .VAL,V E MANUAL AIR VENT ILLINOIS SERIES 6000 COMBINATION SHUT-OFF 8ALANC1NQ VALVE DETAIL •cs "cR

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l J ( ( ) 1 .... 0 •. .rl----i I FliOM HEAT I . I . . TT

PAGE 42

) ) PA&'f the The .__,._. ing wa.tu aDd tltroug& q_. coil .Urface. ne air evaporates the small quaaaity o water required for cooling but carries alon& it 10me unevaporated water. Tllis entrained .water D removed from the air in the eliminator and eventually dript down into tlw pan. Mak.-ap . water it introduced through the 4oa.c vawe it evaporated. BIUEF THEORY The Evaporative Condenser has proved to be one. of the most moden:uneam of conserving water in the air coaclitioning aa6 refrigeration industry. It was deaigaed to alleviate the problema arising from the use of water condensers wlbch waste the cooling water to the .wer. Tllroughout the United States there has been a condriual lowering of the water table creating a severe water shortage. This, coupled with overbur dened drainage facilities bas resulted in city codes prohibiting or penalizing the use of equipment which wastes large quantities of water. Where codes have not been enacted, the cost of water often has so sharply that it is uneconomical to use it in large quantities for air conditioning and refrigeration applications. In water cooled condensers, the heat extraction depends entirely on the water sensible heat gain. With an average water temperature rise of 20 , there is an equivalent "pick-up" of approximately 20 BTU /lb. of water. In the evaporative condenser, however, the heat extraction depends on the evaporation of water. Since it takes approximately 1,000 BTU's to evaporate one pound of water, the "pick-up" is I ,000 BTU's per pound instead of 20. Thus, one pound of water in an evaporative con denser theoretically does the equivalent work of 50 pounds of water in a water cooled condenser, or the evaporative condenser requires only 2% of the water required in a water cooled condenser. In actual practice, however, this theoretical saving cannot be attained. Through both evaporation and "bleedoff" the water used in evaporative condensers ap proaches 5 % of that used in water cooled condensers. As water evaporates it leaves behind its impuri ties. Also , the air washing of fumes that pass through the unit will leave impurities in the w::tter . This causes a continual build-up of chemicals that can be either alkaline or acidic. Scaling or corrosion may occur at a rapid rate if the impurities are ::tllowed to become too concentrated. Normally, it is good engineering practice to bleed off as much water as is evaporated, thus causing a constant change to fresh water and preventing the build-up of impurities. DESIGN OF EVAPORATIVE CONDENSERS Basically, the evaporative condenser is a cooling tower in which a condensing coil is incorporated. Figure 1 shows the basic components. The circulating pump draws water from the pan and forces it through the water distribution system. This consists either of a series of distribtuion troughs or a spray header with nozzles. The water is discharged from the troughs or nozzles in a specially designed pattern to fully wet B.A.C. Evapontive are . of the centrifugal fan 01:' .... ne units are designed on the "Blow.-Thria" with their moving parts (fans, ahalta, bearings) in the dry en tering air rather than in the saturated discharge air. This greatly extends the life of these parts and makes ..... o!t...,. I ...... Figure 1 Centrifugal Fan Evaporative Condenser -....... Figure 2.-Tubeaxial Fan Evaporative Condenser 3

PAGE 43

hem more accessible for maintenance because they re conveniently located near the base of the unit. Discharge cowls, used on centrifugal and tubeaxial an units, increase fan efficiency and provide better ir distribution through the unit. The Blow-Thru esign using fans with discharge cowls is an exclusive altimore Aircoil development and is patented under T.S. Patent No. 3,132,190. Since centrifugal fans are quieter than tubeaxial a.ns, the centrifugal fan "Blow-Thru" (Fig. 1) units re recommended for most applications. The tubeaxial fan units (Fig. 2) require consider bly lower fan horsepower than the centrifugal fan nits and are recommended for industrial applications rhere low sound levels are not as important. These .nits are constructed only in larger sizes where the orsepower savings is of consequence. .ASIC THERMODYNAMICS Vithout going too deeply into theory, Figure 3 traces he condition of the air as it passes through the evap rative condenser. It is assumed that the air enters igure l-Psychrometi. c Analysis of Air Path hrough an E-vapora.tiv.e Condenser ; ; .: :-: ;.,. he condetiter .at . lOme. uAiat1arated condition, Point rA." tJai. sadace, it is washed 'id1 fallinS . wat.r; .-.by dae-time it enters the coil t can be auumed for coavenience that it is saturated tdiabatically, POint "B." Tlten. u it passes through .. ,. .. . \ .. _ " .• . ... .. ... . f.-:-:,,:-v j .. the coil, it absorbt heat from the coil and the sur rounding water. This increases the total heat con tent of the air, and since it ia continually being washed with falling water, the process follows the saturation line. The final temperature of the air leaving the condenser, Point "C," depends on the quantity of air used which is dependent upon the design of the condenser. From this discussion, it is seen that the perform ance of an evaporative condenser depends entirely on the load imposed upon it and the wet bulb tem perature of the entering air. The air dry bulb temperature or relative humidity has no effect on the capacity of the unit. REFRIGERATION CYCLE F igure 4 shows a typical refrigeration cycle on a diagram. The refrigerant I \ I \ \,.. __ -----------ENTROPY I I I A : ; I l I E 1.3 I I ) "---Gos 'G. L. \ Figure 4-Temperature Entropy Diagram Showing Theoretical Refrigeration Cycle (Solid Line Shows Path of Refrigerant Through Condenser) enters the condensing coil at a superheated condition, Point "A." The superheat is removed, and the satur ated vapor condition, Point .. B," is quickly reached. As it progresses farther through the coil, it begins to condense along a constant temperature line uB-C" until reaching a completdy liquid state at Point uc.u Theoretically, the fwu::tion of the co:adenser f now complete actually, in mott condenRra, there il a small degree_ of liquid nibcoolin&, as iDdU:atecl by the line 1C-D'' iD the diagram • . .. : . . < • ... • C .

PAGE 44

-_2 -;;t l t. 6-::6JI8" "-------16 @ Fan Mo t or Location ... t • 2 - • t e.l -----_J ------J . . t,L_

PAGE 45

NOTES: 1 . The standard arrangement for Model Nos. VLC-130A through VLC-175A is with the connections located on the left end when facing the fan sec tion. Connections can be furnished on the right end by special order. Water connec tions and refrigerant connec t i ons are always located on the same end of the unit. 2. Refrigerant connect ion sizes shown ar e standard sizes furn i shed on B . A . C . conden sers. Other connection sizes are available on special or der . 3. U nit sizes SSOA through 1 OOOA have ident i cal refriger ant connections and pump assemblies on both ends. 4. For in door appl i cations of VLC evapora tiv e condensers. the room is normally used as a plenum with ductwork attached to the discharge only. Inlet ductwor k can be attached to unit sizes 130A through 175A but a n encl osed fan sec t ion must be prov i ded . Consult your B.A.C . representative for details. 5. The fans on e i ther side of unit sizes 200A through SOOA can be cycled to give SO% capacity control. Unit sizes SSOA through 1 OOOA are constructed in two cells with a common pan . The fans on each side of each cell can be cycled to give 25, SO, 75, and 100% capacity. 6 . Uni t sizes SSOA through 1 OOOA hav e tw o 2 " MPT water makeup connec tions , both loca ted on one end of the unit. i • • _________ .,., , , ______________ ___.. 17

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) ) ) VLC E vaporativ e Condensers are factory assembled. centrifugal fan . blow-through type, available in 18 standard models . They offer many in stallat io n and eng i neer in g advantages , some of wh i ch are: Des igned w it h air entry on both s i des of the un 1 t . VLC evapora tive con dens ers prov i de a lo w s ilhou et t e and requ i re m i nimum sp ace i n the large capac i ty range . On mul t i p l e coi l u n it s . each coil i s ser ved by a sep ar a t e fan sect i on . perm i tt ing the max1mum numb er of s t eps o f capacity cont r o l when cycl i n g f ans to mai nta i n condens ing pressur e . All mov ing parts a r e located at th e base of the uni t i n the dry entering a i r stream . making them read il y access i b l e for routine maintenance and in spect io n . . . Slow speed centri fugal fans provide quiet opera tion , making the VLC evaporat iv e condenser part i cularly sui tab l e for noise sens it ive i n stallat i ons .

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SUBMITTAL RECORD JOB ________________________________________ __ LOCATION ____________________________________ __ SUBMITTED TO--------------------SUBMITTAL PREPARED BY ______________ _ APPROVED BY ____________________ _ RXC SPECIFICATION FORM 357 New Specificat i ons subject to change without nottca . DATE ____________________ ___ I Iri REZNOR ""'"""" ... .. , RXC SERIES 4 ROOF-CURB MOUNTED, GRAVITY VENTED, GAS FIRED, MAKE-UP AIR WITH EVAPORATIVE COOLING DESCRIPTION For Heatlnt end Coollnt Meke-Up Air. Supplies heated outalde air to shi pped separately for attachment to the unit by the lnataller. Standard space where exhausters are pulling air from buildi ng . Air volumn range heat exchanger I s patented venturi deelgn conatructed of aluminized from 1542 CFM to 5556 CFM. A full curb cap i s furnished for mounting steel. If inlet air temperature will be below 4o•F, specify either E3 unit to a full roof curb. Return air and supply a i r open i ngs i n unit bottom stainless steel or 321 stainless steel heat exchenger . Burnera ere d ie are flanged for connection t o duct systems . Return 1lr openlne 11 capped formed alum i nized steel but may be specified steln leea when extreme unieaa damper system i1 apeclt'-d. Reznor Thermocore RXC Ser ies 4 c ondensation of flue products i s expected . All units contain an A . G . A . forced air furnaces are gravity vented . Appropri ate s iz e vent caps are certified duct furnace with factory Inst alled components . STANDARD EQUIPMENT •Alumini zed steel heat exchanger . •Gravi ty vent cap . • 2 4 volt controls . • 120 volt supply line voltage. •Motor contactor. •Capped base f or curb mounting. •Spark ignited safety p il ot system with elec tro nic fl ame supervision . Natural ga s , auto . relight ( non-100%) . Propane gas, auto . recycling (interrupted) . •Li m it control and safety fan control. •Reverse flow limit switch (manual reset ) . •Centrifugal b l owers . • Natura l or propane gas . •Lift eyes f or rigging. •Capped bottom air open ing . •Duct fl anges . COOLS, CLEANS. FILTERS , 100% FRESH AIR •DPST switch for remote fi eld i nstallation . •Baked -on enamel tawny colo r . OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT Opt. Fill and Dra i n Kit, F i eld In stalled 296 !for explanation of Options SH No . E l ectron ic Modulation (Natural Gas ptlon Guide Form 007] Only) 9 Motor C:: Driv e Two-Stage F iring 40/100% w i th Q Motor Starter 97 Ductstat (50 through 300) 10 Filter Rack ( Less Filters) 4 Room Override Thermos t at ' Sta i nless Steel Heat Exch . E 3 ( 409) 286 (TwoStage Only ) 13 Stainless Steel Heat E xch . (321) 287 C Two-Stage Heat/ One-Stage Cool --Stainless Steel Burners 72 Thermostat (Two-Stage Gas Un it s = '=; Burner A i r S hutters 111 Only ) 28 A uto . Recycl i ng I nter r upted Pilot Thermostat Guard 153 System Natural Gas 6K Roof Curb. lnsul. Pre -Fab 165. 166, 167 Auto. Recyc li ng In terrupted 100 % Horizontal Dischar ge ( D im ensions Shut -Off P ilot System P ropan e 6P s ame as outsi de a i r opening . ) "Alternate Control Transformer 41 -= Disconnect Swi tch F i e ld Mounted -: Al te rnate 208 i 230V Pump Motor 276 Convenience Out l et 480V K VA Transformer to Operate Dr i p Pan E-3 Sta in less S tee l 115V Pump Motor 114G1 -= Manual Shut-Off V a lv e and Un ion ALUMINUM MESH F ILTERS ISTANOAAO\ FLOA T VALVE " 1 / 4 .. COMPRESSION O P TIONAL F I LTER RACK F ITIJNC'. ' "'-._ .-r--;,...,..,.,.,......,.-'---...... ...1.--11.-'T'"""---, OVERFLOW 'A P T ' O R 1 / 2'' F P T D RA I N 3 1 4 . M . P T O R 112" F P T rB = Duct Width of Supply and Return Air Openlnta SPECIFICATION DATA SIZE 200 225 BTUH Input 200 , 000 225 . 000 BTU H Ou1put 1 50 , 000 1 68 .750 *Gas Na1 1 1 2 " J / 4 " Co nnect tons N a l 112 " 3 / 4 " 1 N ol Supply Prop 112 " 1 / 2 " APPROXIMATE WEIGHTS Lme S tze) Prop 112" 1/2" **'Ftl ter S•zes ( 2116x20 ( 2) 1 6 x20 1 or 2 ( 2 1 16x25 ( 2 ) 1 6 x25 lnnerent VA Load 20VA 20VA Standard Unit Size Ship Net 200 /225 901 772 250/300 1109 918 250 300 250 . 000 300 . 000 187, 50 0 225 . 000 3 1 4 . 3 1 4 .. 3 / 4 " 3 / 4 " 112 ' 3 1 4 .. 3/4" 3 / 4 " ( 2 ) 20x20 1 2 1 20x20 ( 2 ) 20x25 ( 2 ) 20x25 20VA 20VA 113 228 269 68 60 400 400 000 300 .000 3 1 4 1 " ) , 4 3 / 4 " I J I 16<2 5 t 2 1 20 x25 20VA 400 1350 1148 •Gas conn ect t nns shaded area t ndtcates ptpe s tze lor Optton 8 **Ftlters not furnt shed -number i n parentheSI S t 5 nu":lber requtre
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OPTIONAL HIGH/LOW AlA FLOW SYSTEM WITH REMOTE CONTROL CENTER FOR EVAPORATIVE COOLING OPTION NO. taWS THROUGH 8: This ay1tam provldal h igh and low air flow to match t he r equ irements o f a two-speed system w ithout the use of multi-speed motors. Dlmen1lon1: 15-1/8" tong. 4 5 / 8 " h igh, 2-5 / 8 " wide. Note: If r ecessed . deduct 1 / 4 ' from width to permi t removal of cover. Includes o uts1de a i r damper. 24 volt 40VA damper transformer. 24 volt spring return modu lating damper motor. damper controller (Potentiometer). r emote console , with s i x -position switch for h i gh or low ventilation, high or t ow evaporative cooling , high or low heat ing. plus on -off sw i tch and rel ays where requ ired. Operetlon: Low and h igh air flow accompl i shed by pos tti o n tng outside a i r damper. Low flow w i th damper i n partially open pos•t•on through potentiometer circui t to modulating damper motor. Htgh fl ow wtth outs i de air damper fully open . VEN.T = No atomiz i ng PSYCHOMETRIC CHART: To determi ne l eav i ng dry bu l b temperature: t . F i nd entering dry bu l b temperature = } or summer Thermometer design 2 . Ftnd entenng wet bulb temperature = cond i t t ons S li ng Psychrometer 3 . F i nd t he wet bulb depress i on (WBD) = ENT. DB m i nus ENT. WB 4 . Correct wet bulb depress i on = WBD x . 80 (Evaporati ve Effecti ve n ess ) 5 Determtne leav i ng dry bulb = ENT. DB m i nus (WBD x . 80) Example 1 E nt enng d ry bu l b 95' F 2 Entenng w ei b ul b = 7 5 ' F 3 Wet bul b d ep re s s t on = 95 • F minus 75 • F = 20' F 4 Correct W BD = 20 x 80 = 1 6 ' F 5 Leav1ng d r y bulb = 95' F ENT. DB m t nus 1 6 ' F = 79'F DRY BULB TEMPERATURE-DEGREES F : Nota-For best re sults . a lull atr c ha n g e shou ld occur ea ch 1 to 2 m t n u tes . A conststent wet b ulb 1eo resston 1 W BD 1 of 16 degrees or more ( when c ool t ng • s r equtredl IS usually sufftcte nt to dete rmine tf evaporatt v e cooling tS practical for a q1ven locale To Size Cooler(1 1 S e l ect Zone fro m M ap . ( 2 ) Determtne 1;p e ol heat l oad Hi Loss -Hi Load-Un-1nsul ated bu il d i ngs wtth ar eas NhiCh produce htgh 1ntenor he a t l o ad such a s Restaura nt Ktlchen s . Baker 1es Laundrtcs . Dry Cl eaning Es tablt shment s . etc A reas wh e r e ne at I S gen erate d by p eop l e such as 1ndoor 1enn1s courts . oowl 1 ng alleys. Protected Hi Load-In s ul ate d butld1ngs f o r s a m e areas a s abo v e . Hi Loss Normal Load-U n tnsu t at ed butldtngs for a r eas w1th normal 1nter1 or hea t loa d . Protected Normal Load-I nsu l a t ed bu1ld 1 ngs f or a reas wtth norm al 1nte n o r heat lo ad . (3) Air ChangesTh i s t able prov.des the app rox i mate number of m1nu1es re qu1red per atr c han g e . pump running. no heat. Optlen UM With No. Furnece Size• 98W3 400 *98W4 200 / 225 *98W 5 250 / 300 *98W6 400 Remot!! Cont r o l Center s ht pped separatel y . Outsi de damper. modulatI n g . dam per m o tor . damper transformer. r e l ay . damper controller. tact or y •nsta ll ed tn heater . *Less two-stage the r mostat. A l lowances must be made for any unusual heat l oad or other conditione that may ex i st . Determine t otal cubic feet of space to be cooled llld divi de by number of minutes required per change. Example-Width 24 ft. x length 28 It. x he ight 12 ft. = 8064 cubic feet of space to be c ooled . 8064 d i vided by 1 . 5 minutes required per air change = 5378 CFM. Refer to motor and dri ve table and select cooler . motor and dri ve wh i ch will de l i ver 5376 CFM at des i red e xternal static pressure. '-; .. ... l , ... , 0 • ' '"r r-• L'ld O . • i .. • r"' d o ._ ,.r; ' l":l M • nuln P•r Air Ct'llftt• • I 7( "; I '• .....:. \ J EFFECTIVE DRY BULB COOLING --;......:. 79' F WET BULB DEPRESSION--;,J F tEMPERATURE A t SE •• TEMPECIATURE i=IISE MOTOR AND DRIVE SELECTION TABLE: Add to base p n ce o f u n11. Add total system e xternal s1at1c pressu r e ( E . S . P . ) t o select motor horse power ( H P ) and dri ve (OR) . F o r more de t a il ed fan p erforman c e d ata refer to Reznor Form No . 604 . Inlet temperatu r e plus t e mperature r i s e f rom chart = dis ch a rge tempe r a t u r e . Shaded area = statiC pressur e of a lumi n um f ilters i n coo l ing sect1on ( F . S . P .) which must be added t o external sta ttc pressure when select1 ng motor a nd drive . 2S E S P S E S P IS f S P l 0 E S P MOGel I C F M OII'IIVE MP O"tVE MP D R IVE H P CF"' RPM L RPM J ..... :"' l '"' . , ' '. ' . . l"ll .. 1'0 11• I 0 2 " I I I ' • ' ..65 • : ::; tel< 2oolC I .... i u o i 2 .: '. 1 1 j.'.'.l, Olt 510 q s c • ., ... IQr LA'6' ... 1 . .. , ).:.f} •000• I .. ll')() l"''S!IC ... J I . . .. I , . '"'" 95 C •"1'S• """ 70 f: T E M P E R A T U ftE R I SE 2!1 E S P S E S P 7SESP tOES" 1,,. :>39 • .. o I I ' ,, i i .. i ' . .;-; ':OJ" =00 .,, "1;5 . . . ' . F S P = A luminum Mesh F ilttr Stati c Pressure Loss . SELECTOR GUIDE E 5 P HP 'I ' .., } i J ' . . I . ; , . .. 2S E S P HP D RIVE , RPM : S ESP 75 E 5 P t 0 E S . P M P 10111111 \IE I Q A II J f HP OAIVE } F t;tr. R P M • M P I RPM CIPM •. ' ' ' "" 1 ' I : .. . I ;._ ' ' 1 ' I er.• . ., 'I 1 990 'l'l'l ' ' " " :j I' 2 ..'.'', J ot .... ' I '"' .' . .o.J
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• J q ' , ; , , :' i ' .. ' . } ' . OttCT THRU ROOF----4 . N . ALE =--.--=.-;.;-QWQ E:)UtAUSTR CAULK BY MC FLASHING 8Y G . C . ROOF OAMPER . R .9Qf DETAIL