Citation
Windham Hill Lodge and Studios

Material Information

Title:
Windham Hill Lodge and Studios
Creator:
Eitemiller, Christine Marie
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Christine Marie Eitemiller. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
WINDHAM HILL LODGE and STUDIOS
„ Grand County, Colorado
Thesis Project By Christine M. Eitemiller
Presented to the College of Architecture, University of Colorado at Denver „ , , . December 1986
ARCHITECTURE & PLANNIN * AURARiA LIBRARY


\
WINDHAM HILL LODGE AND STUDIOS
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
CHRISTINE MARIE EITEMILLER
Fall 1986


The Thesis of Christine Marie Eitemiller is approved
Committee Chairman
Principal Advisor
University of Colorado Fall 1986
at Denver


SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING
THEY HELPED MAKE ALL THIS POSSIBLE
Gary Long, Faculty Advisor Davis Holder, Advisor Paul Bormann, Advisor Michael Murphy, Advisor David Wilson, Acoustics Christopher Jaffe, Acoustics Paul Heath, Advisor
My Mother and Father Dr. Z
Katie and Grampsey
Dave, Dan, Uncle Woody,
Jade, Suellen, J.C.,
Nicole, Evan and Wesley
Marianne Braun
Beryl and Eileen
The Tectonyx
. . . and the countless
others who have believed in me when I was unsure


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION
THESIS STATEMENT
II. CLIENT & PROGRAM INFORMATION CLIENT
SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMED SPACES SPACE CHARACTERISTICS
III. SITE ANALYSIS
MACRO-ENVIRONMENT - PAST
- PRESENT
- FUTURE
MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
SITE PHOTOGRAPHS
ACCESS
DRAINAGE
UTILITIES
SOILS INFORMATION
IV. CLIMATE ANALYSIS SUMMARY
TEMPERATURE RANGE WIND DATA
PRECIPITATION INFORMATION
SOLAR ACCESS


TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
V. ZONING
VI. CODES
VII. DESIGN SOLUTION
VIII. SYSTEMS
IX. REFERENCES


INTRODUCTION


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
'TYPE: LOCATION: SIZE: OWNER: USES:
WINDHAM HILL LODGE & STUDIOS GRAND COUNTY, COLORADO 25,000 SQUARE FEET
MR. WILL ACKERMAN & WINDHAM HILL RECORDS, INC. RESIDENTIAL - SHORT TERM
RESIDENTIAL - LONG TERM RECORDING MUSICAL TAPES AND DISCS
RECREATION


THESIS STATEMENT
For creativity to soar and for the imagination to bloom, it is my belief that a very special environment be arranged so as to nurture the seeds of invention and, like a potted plant, creativity abounds when certain conditions are met. For a delightful shrub, the needs are simple: pleasant soil, appropriate sunshine and moisture, fresh air, proper nutrients, company of other plants (or life forms), retreat, a little doting, and sweet music provide for a generative encompassment ... and for creative propagation, the needs, as well, are simple: pleasant surroundings, contact with nature (sunshine, the natural elements), fresh air, physical nourishment (food and rest), company of other life forms, retreat, desire, a little doting and sweet music provide an enriching climate in which to create and to imagine. Further, "a sense of wellbeing and a feeling of freedom are other advantageous circumstances . . . Among the unfavorable conditions [for creativity] are mental and physical fatigue, petty irritations, noise, worry over domestic or financial matters, states of depression, and strong emotions. Other unfavorable conditions include being driven to work under pressure and being interrupted or feeling that there may be interruption at any time, as in the demand of administrative duties." (1)
When I speak of pleasant soil and pleasant surroundings, the images which greet me specifically are of the country, the mountains, a misty forest and sunstruck clearing, the hum of a breathy breeze and river rushing, the stillness of snow falling ... My roots burrow deep in the soil and I am steadied yet still flexible to sway to the woodwinds ... I shall locate this center of retreat for music and other creative arts in the


Rocky Mountains on a forested site laden with expressive bursts of rock posing as sculpture.
When I speak of contact with nature, I speak of a sensual communication with and recognition of the earth's elements: we see and feel the sun; we hear and touch the wind; we smell the rain; we hear the quiet of the snow; fire brings us warmth. And too, the earth's elements are life givers - the sun, the great luminary, feeds us and lights the world; winds refresh the air; rains quench earth's thirst; fires warm and grant us power.
For the creative spirit to soar, I believe there is a fine line between privacy and human interaction. While some people need to be completely alone, others need less privacy and greater personal contact. In paying due respect to the creative being, such requirements must be met individually and so the atmosphere shall be flexible to accomodate specific needs. Those requiring absolute solitude would be housed in small units away from the main house and those desiring more contact with others would remain in close proximity. Functioning as a work-retreat, the lodge exists as the home and the studio functions as the workplace. This mountain retreat, being for composers, recording artists and other creative individuals, would provide the setting in which such persons may work, relax and reflect in an environment which directly opposes the fast track of the city. The living and working units are quiet, private and secure while the setting nurtures continuance and furtherance of original work from within a restive mountain habitat, which is adjacent to the elements and free from day-to-day interruptions


of telephone, traffic and tumult
How is the country different from the city and how might a contrast be established so as to provide that which the city may lack? I believe the contrast between city and country (or mountains as the case may be) to be an "organic simplicity , , . Any wild flower is truly simple but double the same wild flower by cultivation and it ceases to be so . . . Jesus wrote the supreme essay on simplicity in this, 'Consider the lilies of the field.'” (2) For example, in contrasting the soundscape of city and country, what we would hear in each place would be vastly different.
The city roars with the thundering of air traffic; sirens scream; car and bus engines resound and deafen within the concrete canyons of the city; teens with disco briefcases make known their presence; HVAC systems blatantly blast their hot tempers . . . and a bird's song is barely a whisper in the midst. The soundscape of the mountains reverberates with a simplistic calm-wavering winds strum proud pines; jays jibber and jabber; rodents rustle across the forest floor scurrying after one another; "ears filled with the incessant hum in various notes, now the busy hum of the working bee flying quickly off, then the blaring of the lazy drone" (3); the greenfinch speaks, "wah-wah-wah-wah-chow-chow-chow-chow-tu-we-we"; "in wintertime, the stillness, the absence of life or sound, is weird and oppressive ... sit down upon a fallen tree, and the silence becomes ... almost painful. It is a relief even to hear at last the fall of the snow from the boughs of the cypress, the pine, or the yew, which stretch like dark horse-plumes high overhead." (4)
. . . Just as man requires time for sleep to refresh and renew his life energies so too he requires quiet periods to regain mental and spiritual


composure. At one time stillness was a precious article in an unwritten code of human rights. Man held reservoirs of stillness in his life to restore the spiritual metabolism. Even in the hearts of cities, there were the dark still vaults of churches and libraries, or the privacy of drawing room and bedroom. Outside the throb of cities, the countryside was accessible with its lulling whirr of natural sounds. There were still times too. The holy days were quieter before they became holidays ... The importance of these quiet groves and times far transcended the particular purposes to which they were put. We can comprehend this clearly only now that we have lost them." (5) x
In keeping with the link to nature, it becomes important for the architecture to relate closely with the evironment. As stated by Frank Lloyd Wright in The Natural House, "I began to see a building primarily not as a cave but as broad shelter in the open, related to vista, vista without and vista within." And in following Wright’s idea, I seek harmony between the building and the mountain setting. "In order to maintain a visual interaction of the buildings with the natural environment, the following measures could be taken:
- Keep the buildings at small scale so the eye is not drawn to a building because of its size.
- Use lines from the natural environment in the building
so the eye is not drawn to a building because of its shape.
- Make the boundaries between earth and building ambiguous so they appear physically related. To accomplish this, use local natural materials.
- Use colors seen in the local landscape


- Let placement of buildings copy forms and lines of the natural landscape." (7)
0
This mountain retreat for artistic fellows is to be a lifesource for spiritual renewal so that one's creativity may be greater enhanced.
Seated in a wholly organic environment, the artist is given the opportunity for rejuvenation as daily responsibilities such as preparing food, laundering clothes, and cleaning house are taken care of by lodge staff. Concentration is placed on the artist's need for relaxation and rest so as to free him/her for creative challenge and pursuit. The facility, in harmony with the environment, should function so as to be efficient for those working there and pleasurable and inspirational for those retreating there. ........
In closing, I leave you with words from Plato on inspiration: "[inspiration] is a power divine, impelling you like the power in the stone Euripides called the magnet, which most call 'stone of Hereclea.'
This stone does not simply attract the iron rings, just by themselves; it also imparts to the rings a force enabling them to do the same thing as the stone itself, that is, to attract another ring, so that sometimes a chain is formed, quite a long one, of iron rings, suspended from one another. For all of them, however, their power depends upon that loadstone. Just so the Muse. She first makes men inspired, and then through these inspired ones other share in the enthusiasm, and a chain is formed..."(8)


(1) Cannon, Walter Bradford. "The Role of Hunches in Scientific Thought"
The Creativity Question. Edited by Albert Rothenberg and Carl R. Hausman. Duke University Press 1976.
(2) Wright, Frank Lloyd. The Natural House. Horizon Press, Inc. 1954.
(3) Schafer, R. Murray. The Tuning of the World. Alfred A. Knofp, Inc. 1977. Page 34.
(4) Ibid. Page 20.
(5) Ibid. Page 253-54.
(6) The Natural House.
(7) "Navajo Mission Academy Student Residences" by Wolfgang Preiser.
Programming the Built Environment. Edited by Preiser. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York 1985.
(8) "Inspiration" by Plato. The Creativity Question. Edited by Albert Rothenbeg, and Carl R. Hausman. Duke University Press, 1976.


CLIENT
PROGRAM INFORMATION


CLIENT & PROGRAM INFORMATION
0
The owner of Windham Hill Lodge & Studios is Will Ackerman, President of Windham Hill Records. Although based in California, Mr. Ackerman has become interested in expanding the company and is looking to build a music facility in the mountains of Colorado.
Windham Hill Records specializes in acoustic and instrumental music that boasts an avid audience not only in the United States and Canada, but abroad as well. Only 12 years old, the company has found success on every level: aesthetic, technical and financial.
In seeking to create a special musical retreat and recording center, Mr. Ackerman has requested a lodge be designed for residential use, a recording facility (separate from the lodge), and five cabins for visitors especially seeking extra privacy from the lodge community.


PROGRAM ELEMENTS
Lodge/Public Side:
Lodge/Administrate ve: Lodge/Residential:
Lodge/Functional:
Music Studios:
Circulation:
Exterior Spaces: Parking:
Square Feet
Entry Vestibule 100
Entry Hall 1000
Performance Hall 1200
Sun Room 800
Dining Hall 900
Toilets 150
Manager's Office 150
Accounting Office 150
Owner 2000
Caretaker 300
Cabin - 5 @ 1000 each 5000
12 guest rooms, one handicap 250 to 400 accessible
Kitchen 450
Laundry/linen 100
Receiving 100
Storage 800
Garage for maintenance vehicles 500
Mechanical 200
Recording Studio A 1000
Engineering Control Room A 450
Recording Studio B 600
Engineer Control Room B 300
Lounge 800
6 Practice rooms @ 100 each 600
Storage 200
Kitchen 100
Toilet 100
Mechanical 150
Monumental Stairs Exit Stairs (fire rated)
General circulation (figure 25% of total square feet)
Terrace Overlooks 2500
Guest parking - 22 spaces Parking for service entry - 2 spaces


(Lodge-Public Spaces)
PROGRAMMING: Entry Vestibule____________________________________________________
1 •'
1) Occupants - Who and how many?
» •
2) Activities and Times:
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: Mud room/place to shake off snow, mud
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Passageway into a wonderful place
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool : Not needed.
4.2) Thermal: Not needed
4.3) Ventilation: Natural ... .
4.4) Lighting: Natural and incandescent
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Pre-entry into Entry Hall Near to parking
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Wipe your feet sort of equipment
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes: Natural
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): In proportion to building
Minimum:
Optimum: 80 to 100 Generous:
11) Other Comments:
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(Lodge-Public Spaces)
PROGRAMMING: Entry Hall
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Occupants - Who and how many? Guests entering lodge
*
Main entry to lodge building
Activities and Times: Guest registry, cashier, information, mail, central space to gather; general time is every day 7am to 10pm
Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: mail, keys, orientation for incoming people
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Welcome! Pleasant . . .
Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool: Heating
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:Task lights for functions; general lighting
4.5) Acoustics:
Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Office, entry vestibule, centrally located
Occupant Equipment Requirements: livin8 room furniture, lighting
Speciaf Requirements: Special counter for check in, check out
Length of 10 feet would be desireable
Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 1985 UBC
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 9 sq. ft per guest room
Optimum: 11 I! If it If ii
Generous: 14 If If ii II ii
11) Other Comments:
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(Lodge-Public Spaces)
PROGRAMMING: SunRoom_________________________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Guests of lodge
»
2) Activities and Times: Anytime. Cards, talking, reading, relaxing,
exit to terrace overlook, etc.
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Cheerful place
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool: Heat
4.2) Thermal: Heat and solar gain
4.3) Ventilation : Natural
4.4) Lighting: Natural and incandescent
4.5) Acoustics: Yes
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near to dining and entry hall
and terrace overlook
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Living room furniture
7) Specia/ Requirements: Fireplace
8) Materials/Finishes: Natural
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 400
Optimum: 600
Generous: 800
11) Other Comments:
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(Lodge-Public spaces;
PROGRAMMING: Dining Hall
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Up to 50 people, visitors and owners
2)
3)
Activities and Times:
Eating: Breakfast 7-10; Lunch 11 to 2 Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Spacious
mountains, pleasant
; Dinner 5 to 8
relaxing, view to the
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool: Heat
4.2) Thermal: Heat
4.3) Ventilation; Natural
4 4) Lighting- Pleasant ~ not to° quiet but not reverberant
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to kitchen
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: chairs and tables
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes: Natural materials
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 14 square feet per person
Optimum: 16 ...............
Generous: 18 " ” ”
11) Other Comments:
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VLoage-ruDiit opaces;
PROGRAMMING: Terrace Overlooks_____________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Up to 50 - visitors, owners
2) Activities and Times: Talking, sitting, musical sessions,
storage for firewood, enjoyment of views
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: railed in
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Spacious, gracious
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heet/Cool: NA
4.2) Thermal: NA
4.3) Ventilati n: NA
4.4) Lighting: Lanterns for night
4.5) Acoustics: N/A
Locational Requi rements (Adjacencies):
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): Proportionate to building
Minimum:
Optimum:
Generous:
11) Other Comments:
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Lodge-8ubiic spaces;
PROGRAMMING: Men's and Women's Toilets______________________________________
) •
1) Occupants - Who and how many?
2) Activities and Times: Anytime
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool: Heat
4.2) Thermal: Heat
4.3) Ventilation: - -Yes .. .. . .. ...,
4.4) Lighting: Flourescent
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Centrally located; near to dining, front desk, entry hall
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): 100 square feet
Minimum:
Optimum:
Generous:
11) Other Comments:

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(Administrative)
PROGRAMMING: ______Manager's Office and Accounting Office ______________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Owner and office help, 2-3 people
« v
2) Activities and Times: Record keeping, administrative duties
and accounting. Hours: 9-5, Monday throught Saturday
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: Telephone
3.3) Psychological Requirements: View to outside
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool : Heat only
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Natural .................
4.4) Lighting: Overhead general with task lighting; natural light
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Close to public; near entry;
directly adjacent to front desk of lobby
5) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Desk space, computer, storage of files and supplies for office
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 1985 UBC
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 100
Optimum: 140 Generous: 200
11) Other Comments:
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PROGRAMMING: Owner * s Space______________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Owner and family, A to 5
2) Activities and Times: General living - sleeping, eating, talking, watching television, etc.
3) Occupant Requirements: 3 bedrooms, kitchen, living, dining
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Integrated with lodge but has
feeling of privacy and separateness
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Various options are possible. Seek best view.
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes: All custom
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 1200 Optimum: 1500 Generous: 2000
11) Other Comments:
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(Residential)
PROGRAMMING: Caretaker unit_________________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many?
* '*
one person
2) Activities and Times:
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: - ... , . . . ........
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Within lodge, with access to exterior and private entrance
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 250
Optimum: 350
Generous: 600
11) Other Comments:
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(, Residential;
PROGRAMMING: 5 Cabins________________________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? For visitors, could hold from 1 to 6
0 *
2) Activities and Times: general living
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Secure
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: separate from lodge for privacy
4) Ambient Environment:
, 4.1) Heat/Cool : Own system
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Natural ... . . .. . .......
4.4) Lighting: Incandescent and natural
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Distance from studio and lodge
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Beds, living furnishings, kitchen applicances
7) Specia/ Requirements:
\
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 600 Optimum: 800 Generous :l 000
11) Other Comments:
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(Residential)
PROGRAMMING: Sleeping rooms for visitors - 12_____________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 to 4 people; provide some doubles
and'some singles'
2) Activities and Times: Sleeping and relaxing, bathing, dressing
Anytime
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable
3.2) Functional Requirements: Sleeping space
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Peaceful, quiet
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Natural
4.4) Lighting: Nat ural, incandescent
4.5) Acoustics: Ac oustically private
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies):
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Seating, bed, bathroom equipment
7) Special Requirements: Closet, bath
8) Materials/Finishes: Carpet, paint, wall covering
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 250
Optimum: 350
Generous: 500
11) Other Comments: There should be a variety of room types. Create special places with individuality.
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(Lodge - Functional)
PROGRAMMING: Kitchen
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 2 to 4 service people
Cooks, servers, "dishwashers
2) Activities and Times: Cooking, preparing food, menu planning,
washing dishes. Before and after scheduled meal times -See Dining.
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Fire safety, safety from slippery floors and swinging doors
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements: pleasant and efficient
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting: natural and good kitchen lighting
4.5) Acoustics:
Special kitchen fan; mechanical and natural
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to dining; near to
service entry, near to storage room, garbage area
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: kitchen appliances, storage for
good and dishes and cookware
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): 45% of dining room area
Minimum:
Optimum: 450 Generous:
11) Other Comments:
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(Lodge - Functional)
PROGRAMMING: Linen Room______________________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 or 2 maids
2) Activities and Times: Mornings during maid service
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: Shelves of linens and storage of maids' supplies
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies):
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): 2 to 4.5 square feet per guest room
Minimum:
Optimum:
Generous:
11) Other Comments:
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PROGRAMMING: Garage________________________________________________________
) '•
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 Or 2
2) Activities and Times: When parking cars or maintenance vehicles
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: For snow removal equipment, cars
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: . — ,.r. ...
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies):
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 300 Optimum: 500 Generous: 750
11) Other Comments:
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(Lodge-Functional)
PROGRAMMING: Mechanical Room_______________________
1 â– 
1) Occupants - Who and how many?
* v
2) Activities and Times:
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Fire resistive walls 2 hour fire rated walls
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment
4-1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): In basement level, near to
service
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): 6 square feet per guest room Minimum:
Optimum:
Generous:
11) Other Comments:
- -i_______i._______i x_____________
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(Studio)
PROGRAMMING: Recording Studio A____________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Musicians - 1 to 20
Engineers - 1 to 2 Visitors - 1 to 4
2) Activities and Times:
Performing music for recording purposes, also video recording.
Use would be 24 hours per day, or as needed.
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable
3.2) Functional Requirements: Size & shape of room to accomodate varying combinations of set-ups/ isolation areas separated w/glass
3.3) Psychological Requirements: comfortable place; should give lift while providing relaxed sense; moods to be created by zoned light, ing(colored spots) for creative spirit to be protected & enhanced
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool : Oversized ducts/lead lined
4.2) Thermal: Thermostat control
4.3) Ventilation: Mechanically operated; oversized ducts
4.4) Lighting: Theatrical lighting from above; spots on dimmers
4.5) Acoustics: Special construction/ no parallel walls, absorpive materials as needed, 20 feet ceiling height
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Next to Control Room A; near
lounge; near rest room; near to practice rooms; near to Studio B
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Baffles, grand piano, music stands, mike stands, etc.
7) Special Requirements: Electrical outlets; isolation areas; video hookups; viewing into control room; studio access via sound lock
8) Material s/Fini shes: Specially selected interior finishes to enhance
acoustical properties with flexibility; drapery rods with heavy drapes to alter acoustic properties; double door interlock
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements: 1985 UBC
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 800
Optimum: 1000
Generous: 1200
11) Other Comments: Color studies; would like visual acces to natural
setting outdoors.
Special construction: floating slabs, special roof, overlapping
joints for gypboard, randomly placed studs
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(Studio)
PROGRAMMING: Engineer Control Room A
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 to 2 2 to 6 engineers visitors
2) Activities and Times:
Engineering of recording, mixing; also viewing area for visitors
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable
3.2) Functional Requirements: Working on recording
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Should be conducive to work and to creativity
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool : Oversize ducts; return ducts to be lead lined
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Yes, will be by mechanical system
4.4) Lighting: on dimmers, variety of lighting
4.5) Acoustics: Live end, dead end, back wall is concave, rear wall diffuser, special attention to acoustics
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Directly next to Studio A, near
lounge area, rest rooms, storage, mechanical room with the electrical equipment
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Delays, reverbs, compressors, tape
machines, mixing board, speakers, etc. Engineer chairs; sofa for people viewing into recording studio.
7) Special Requirements: Wiring under floor, plugs with lines
8) Materials/Finishes: Parquet wood floor, no parallel walls, 2 layers
of sloping glass for viewing into studio
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements: 1985 UBC
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 350
Optimum: 450
Generous: 550
11) Other Comments:
Also see recording Studio A comments on color and construction. Construction; Raised with wiring beneath platform which leads in to electrical room
_»______
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(Studio)
PROGRAMMING: ___Re.rn-r.diag_Studio_B__(SLp.p_Studin A rpqni rpmpnfs)___________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 to 6 musicians
2) Activities and Times:
Recording music - could be 24 hours
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to Engineer Control Room B and near to Studio A
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 400
Optimum: 600
Generous: 800
11) Other Comments:
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(Studio)
PROGRAMMING: Engineer Control Room B ( See Control
j •
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Engineers: 1 to 2
Visitors: 1 to 4
2) Activities and Times:
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation:
4.4) Lighting:
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements:
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum:
Optimum: 350 Generous: 1450
11) Other Comments:
Room A)
Studio B
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PROGRAMMING: Practice/Warm up Rooms - 6______________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? 1 or 2 per room
2) Activities and Times: Used for practicing music and/or
Used gnerally by individuals.
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: Private I
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4-1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Natural an d mechanical
4.4) Lighting: Natural and backup with incandescent
4.5) Acoustics: Acousticall y private
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near studios
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 2 or 3 with pianos, se
with computer and writing space availalbe
7) Special Requirements: View to outside
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Aqency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 50 Optimum: 80 Generous ;10°
11) Other Comments:
warming up.
ting, desk
Pnmat artnntoH •fvr.m ddocdammtmc tmf RIITIT FNVTRONMFNT. Frlitnr Wnlfaana Preiser 1985


(Studio;
PROGRAMMING: Lounge for Studios/Control Rooms________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many? Musicians: 1 to 25
Engineers: 1 to 4 Visitors: 0 to 10
2) Activities and Times: For resting, talking, watching video, smoking, drinking, eating, reading, card games; 24 hours operation possibl
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements: Space for sitting, eating, etc.
3.3) Psychological Requirements: Homelike atmosphere, warm, comfy
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: Natural, as well as mechanical
4.4) Lighting: Incandescent, and natural light
4 5) Acoustics* Soundproof so as to not interupt recording in pro
gress
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near to studios and control rooms; restrooms; kitchen; practice rooms
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Furnishings: chairs, tables for eating, living room furn., video equipment, bookcases, etc.
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes: Carpeting
9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 1985 UBC
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 400 Optimum: 600 Generous: 800
11) Other Comments:
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(Studio)
PROGRAMMING: Kitchen___________________________________________________________
1) Occupants - Who and how many?
2) Activities and Times: Storage of snack foods for those working in
studio; open anytime studios are open
3) Occupant Requirements:
3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements:
3.2) Functional Requirements:
3.3) Psychological Requirements:
4) Ambient Environment:
4.1) Heat/Cool:
4.2) Thermal:
4.3) Ventilation: kitchen fan
4.4) Lighting: Provide natural light
4.5) Acoustics:
5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near studio lounge
6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: cupboards, refrigerator, microwave
7) Special Requirements:
8) Materials/Finishes:
9) Codes/Agency Requirements:
10) Area (Square Feet):
Minimum: 40
Optimum: 60
Generous: 100
11) Other Comments:

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SITE ANALYSIS .


MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Past
The region in which Middle Park lies was claimed by Vasquez Coronado in his expedition of 1540-42 and was held by Spain until 1800. In 1800, Napoleon forced Spain to cede most of the section and in 1803 the land was sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. Colorado territory was established with its present boundaries in 1861.
Before the Spainards' arrival, however, the Northern Utah (Utes) Indians inhabited Middle Park. It had been their favorite hunting ground and game included elk, deer, antelope, bear, mountain sheep, buffalo, grouse, sage hens, ducks and geese. Additionally, Hot Sulphur Springs was a main attraction for the Indians because of the curative powers of the springs, and the high mountain peaks provided protection for the Utes from the Arapahoes and Cheyennes.
The first white men began to appear around 1812 and they came for hunting and fur trading which became a major industry of the time. Long's Peak (14,255 feet in height), at the eastern boundary of Grand County, was first discovered by Major Stephen Long who came to the Rockies in 1819. Gold was discovered on Willow Creek in the 1850's and with such discovery came new settlers. This greatly alarmed the Indians and fighting became the norm.
In 1861, the Overland Mail Bill provided for a daily mail and semiweekly pony express. E. L. Berthoud scouted for the best routes between Denver and Salt Lake to accomodate travel. Roads began to be built for the


MACRO-ENVIRONMENT: Past (cont.)
wagons transporting visitors and settlers to Middle Park. The Continental Divide, being the "great wall" of the Front Range, continued to be a barrier to easy and direct transportation between east and west until 1928, when the first train passed through the Moffat Tunnel providing transcontinental traffic.


MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Present
Transportation:
By car - it is about 80 miles from Denver to the site; west of Denver, the site is near to Arapahoe National Forest land. It is about a 1 1/2 to 2 hour drive, 1-70 to US 40, over Berthoud Pass and through Winter Park, Fraser and Tabernash
Amtrak - daily service west from Chicago and east from San Francisco
Limosine/Taxi service - from the airport in Denver to Winter Park, Fraser and Granby
Airstrip at Silver Creek Ski Area
Recreation:
Downhill skiing at Winter Park, Mary Jane, Idlewild, Silver Creek,
and now in planning stages, Vasquez Mountain
Cross country skiing
Horseback riding
Hunting (deer, elk)
Golf
Jeep tours
Hiking
Tennis
Wind surfing Ballooning Mineral baths Rodeo
Winter Park Jazz Festivel (summertime)
Snowmobiling Roller skating Tubing/sledding Swimming Ice skating Ultralight Flight Theatre
Grand County Museum Sailing (Grand Lake)
Movie theatres
Fauna and Flora:
Extinct in this region are the grizzly bear, timber wolf, otter and mountain goat.
Mammals include mule dear, elk, frogs, toads, moose, Rocky Mountain


MACRO-ENVIRONMENT: Present (cont.)
Fauna and Flora: (cont.)
bighorn sheep, black bears, mountain lion, coyotes, wolverines, beaver, squirrels, gophers, mice, porcupines, chipmunks, marmots, etc.
Birds include hummingbird, great horned owl, ouzel, mountain bluebird, orioles, warblers, golden eagles, red tailed hawks, ravens, gray jays (aka camp robbers) etc.
Fish include rainbow trout, brook trout, brown trout and cutthroat trout.
Wildflowers include snowdrops, bluebells, wild lily-of-the-valley, buttercup, blue columbine, Indian paintbrush, avalanche lily, purple larkspur, wild iris, shooting star, etc.
Trees include Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, white fir, lodgepole pine and aspen.
Geomorphology and Geography
"Many geomorphic processes have been active in developing the surface forms of the region, which was uplifted some 135 million years ago. Consequently, there is no single dominant topographic feature for the range as a whole; valleys vary from deep and narrow to shallow and broad, some interstream uplands are knife-edged whle others are a broad, gently rolling surface; some high peaks have broad, rounded tops, while others are sharp, with only a few square yards on their summit. The prevalent rocks are Precambrian granites and metamorphics in large batholithic masses and Tertiary quartz that occurs in part as stocks, dikes, and sills injected into the Precambrian rock. A complex pattern of faults has affected topography in many parts of the area, but the most dominant factor in determining the modern appearance of the Indian Peaks is glacial activity." (Taken from The Indian Peaks Wilderness Area by John Murray)


MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Future
The Middle Park region has been continually attracting not only tourists but people who have built or are building weekend residences.
Some people have settled in as regular customers maintaining year-round residences. While the economy might not support masses of people, it has steadily grown and appears to be developing as a stable mountain community. Several new residential developments are in planning stages and commercial expansion continues as well. Additionally, much of the Fraser Valley has recently been sold by the Jesuits to developers. Furthermore, discussions have been held to consider the possibility of building a tunnel to Middle Park in order to bypass Berthoud Pass.


MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
'The site consists of 40 undeveloped acres of densely forested land with excellent southern exposure. The trees are mainly lodgepole pines and aspen with low shrubs. The site slopes down toward Middle Park (from about 2/ to 15%) and is greatly enhanced by granite outcroppings
which dot the site


SITE PHOTOGRAPHS


rTTP photographs


ACCESS TO SITE
Traveling from Denver, one would drive 1-70 West and take the exit to Berthoud Pass which is U.S. 40. Over the pass, through Winter Park, Fraser and Tabernash, turn right mile past Tabernash. A county maintained gravel road winds through a residentail development called Winter Park Highlands. Distance to site is approximately 2.5 miles from U.S. 40 turnoff.
Windham Hill Lodge will make use of the existing roads adding only an entry drive and service road to the lodge. Please see maps .


ACCESS TO SITE


CIVIL ENGINEERING - DRAINAGE ON SITE
As rains flow downhill at the west side of the site, water can collect in the parking area and be carried through pipes so as to drain around and away from the lodge and studio buildings. Water from the buildings will be retained in described in Drainage Calculations section, sketch below.
a rubble well as See schematic


UTILITIES
Water: Water storage for human consumption and fire protection
is uphill, west of the lodge in a tank. See Systems for sizing.
Telephone: Lines are to be put in along entry road to lodge and
then up the service road.
Septic Tank: Located downhill from the lodge and studio.
Gas: Butane tank located beneath the terrace accessible at the
service road
Electricity: Existing power line as shown. 14.A KVA available.
Transformer underground.
See Utilities Site Map on following page.


UTILITIES


SOILS INFORMATION
The site consists of decomposed granite with a topsoil of approximately 1^ to 2 feet deep. Building foundations would sit directly on the granite as its strength is great and easily bears the load of the constructed facilities.


CLIMATE ANALYSIS


CLIMATE-SUMMARY
The climate of Colorado is largely determined by two factors of its geography; first, its inland location, far removed from any major sources of moisture; and second, its high elevation with mountain ranges extending generally north and south. Precipitation in the mountains is much greater than in the plains and sometimes reaches annual averages of over 50 inches in the higher ranges.
Colorado is located within the broad band of the temperate westerlies. At the various seasons of the year these winds are interrupted by intrusions of polar air from the north or tropical air from the south. Thus Colorado may get air of varying characteristics from any of the following sources: 1. Cold, gen-
erally dry air from the north and northwest. 2. Cool, moist maritime air from the Pacific Ocan. 3. Warm, moisture laden iar from the Gulf of Mexico. 4. Dry, hot, tropical air from Mexico and southwest desert areas.
Mountain stations show a great difference among themselves. Generally there is a decrease in temperature and increase in rain fall with higher altitude. Snow covered mountain parks and valleys often experience very cold nigth-time temperatures in the winter when skies are clear and the air is still. These temperatures occasionally drop to 50° below zero.
The summer season in the mountains is cool and refreshing, which makes them an ideal vacation area. Average temperatures, are in the neighborhood of 60° and extreme high may fall in the


range of 90 to 95. Above 7,000 feet, nights are quite cool throughout the summer, and the usual bright sunshine makes the days comfortably warm. Even in midwinter when air temperatures are low, the warm sunshine and clear air of higher altitudes make such temperatures much more comfortable than would be exper-
ienced under other circumstances.


I SPF-iNC, 1 .Summer i ^utum/n I # wiihtEr. I
P-ecord l-jigH
Mortal
iSorrvial Min
P-tCOrd Law


U.S.Dept. of Commerce
xjmwmKmxxx

7
FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE Direction* By Speed Groups
SURFACE v^NDS JOB NO. 8824
FRASERr COLORADO STATION NO. 93006 APRIL 1965 - MARCH 1966__________________________ANNUAL
Station Name Period
Station Y E A R M O N T B \Speed Dir\ 1-3 knots 4-6 knots 7-10 knots 11-16 knots 17-27 knots 28-40 knots 41 and over Tout 4 knots and over Total No. of Observations
% Obs.
N 90 101 101 64 5 271 8.3 361
NNE 42 60 49 5 1 115 3.6 157
NE 22 55 23 4 82 2.4 104
ENE 16 16 12 1 29 1.0 45
E 19 18 18 18 3 57 1.8 76
ESE 15 25 19 16! 13 73 2.0 88
SE 21 41 31 18 7 97 2.7 118
SSE 31 70 35 19 10 134 3.8 165
S 60 92 28 14 4 138 4.6 198
ssw • 25 39 18 8 5 70 2.2 95
sw 40 73 15 9 3 l 101 3.2 141
wsw 104 149 13 15 7 CO *—H 6.6 288
w 95 114 46 41 21 222 7.3 317
WNW 25 22 20 21 8 l 72 2.2
NW 68 127 164 143 41 3 478 12.6 546
NNW 17 38 55 45 10 148 3.6 165 i
CALM 31. S l 1390 i i 1
TOTAL S ->â– " 1390 690 1040 647 441 138 5 2271 1 loo.q â–  . ' -4351 i i


.SUMMARY UF MONTHLY CLIMATIC DATA KIM FRASER
LATITUDE - 39 57
COLORADO FDD YEARS 1931-1974 UJNGtrilUF. - 19b 50 ELKVATtllN - 8560 FKKT
SDD,STATION NO. 51113 DIVISION 2
JAN EEH MAR APR
MUNTHl.Y MEAN MAXIMUM TEMP (FI AVfc. 29.1 32.6 37.3 *1.1
MAX. 36.3 41.6 4 b. b 57.3
YKAH 1954 1954 194b 1943
MIN. 22.7 22.3 30.7 3H.5
YKAK 1937 + 1939 1 NbS 1970
YEARS OF HKCMHD 43. 44. 43. 44.
MUNTHI.Y MEAN MINIMUM TFMP (K) AVK. -5.9 -2.H 3.6 16.0
MAX . 7.5 12.9 12.H 22.2
YKAH 1953 1939 1 9.44 194 3
MIN. -17.1 -15.1 -H.b 7.1
YFAH 1961 t 964 1 ^b4 197 0
YKARS OF RKO'HD 43. 44. 43. 44.
MUMTHbY MEAN AVERAGE TKMP (K) AVK. 11.7 14.6 20.5 31 .6
MAX . 21.1 24.4 29.1 39. H
YKAH 1953 19 34 194 b 1943
HIM. 3.5 4.7 1 t .6 22.8
YKAH 1937 1939 1064 1970
YKARS OF RFCMHU 43. 44. 4 1. 44.
PECRKF OAYS (BASE 65F) AVK. 1671.1 1450.3 1428.1 1037.5
MAX. 1 HH5 1736 1 hbO 1260
YKAH 1964 1964 1 Nb4 19/0
MIN. 1357 1157 1 245 H 1 9
YKAH 1953 1954 tob3 1954
YKARS OF RF.CURU 23. 24. 23. 24.
NO PAYS MAX TKMP GTR OR KO 90F AVK. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
MAX. 0 0 0 0
YEAR 194R 194H 1948 1948
MIN. 0 0 0 n
YKAH 1974 + 1974 + 1974 + 1974 +
YFAHS OF RF.CORD 25. 26. 26. 26.
NO DAYS MAX TtMP f,FSS OP KO 32F AVK. 19.7 14.0 9.2 2.5
MAX. 26 7H 19 7
YKAH 1964 + 1960 1 9b4 1970
MIN. B 3 1 0
YKAH 1954 1954 1949 1972 +
YKARS OF RECOHI) 26. 27. 2b. 27.
NO DAYS MTU 1KMP IjKSS UP tO 37F AVK. 30.9 2H.3 30.9 29.9
MAX. 31 31 31 30
YKAH 1 974 + 194R 19744 1974 +
MIN. 30 2H 30 2fl
YKAH 1969 + 1974 + 1 9bb ♦ 1961
YEAHS OF RECORD 26. 27. 2b. 27.
MAY JUN Jim* AUG SEP IICT NOV DEC A 7N
SH .8 68.b 74.6 l/.K 66.4 55.2 30.5 31.7 51.2
bb . 7 73.b 78.2 76.3 72.7 64.3 40.7 39.1 55.2
1934 I960 1934 1V44 1 048 1050 1040 19 70 1034
61 .b bO.H 71.5 67.4 55.3 40.5 3 2.2 71.6 48.0
1931 |9h9 19 37 1068 1061 1060 1068 106/ 10/0
4 1. 4 3. 4 3. 43. 43. 43. 47. 43. 41 .
74.3 '29.6 34.3 17.5 74.1 16.4 5.3 -1.? 14.5
7H.6 3 3.2 37.9 37.6 33.4 23.1 12.7 5.0 18.5
1 04 7 1949 1 94b 1 945 1040 104 / I040 1046 1040
1 9.b .77.1 29.9 76.8 17.0 10.5 -4.0 -17.0 0.8
1 °bb 1 9664 1958 1 R67 1056 1064 1068 1054 1 *16 4
43. 43. 43. 43. 43. 43. 4 1. 43. 41 .
41 .b 49.1 64.5 57.6 45.3 35.8 22.4 14.0 3 2.8
4 m . b 52.6 6H.0 55.8 50.0 41.7 31.2 21 . 1 3o.5
1 o 34 193b 1 94b 1960 1040 1050 I 040 1033 1034
3b. H 46.2 61 .b 40.7 40.1 76.7 14.1 7.7 20.5
1 9 3 3 19 39 1 9 b ’2 ♦ 1065 1071 1060 1 068 1066 loot
4 1. 4 1. 4 1. 43. 43. 43. 4 f. 43. 41.
72b.9 484.1 3 34.0 305.7 675.1 971.7 1207.7 1640.517015.7
812 67 3 4 1 0 484 741 1181 1520 • 177b 128/0
1971 1 9 S 1 1962 1065 10/1 1060 1068 19bb 1064
bl2 3HCI 2 16 784 511 772 1103 1 457 10653
1968 1962 1954 1060 106 3 1963 1054 195b 1054
'24. 23. 23. 73. 73. 73. 23. 73. 22.
0.0 0.0 0.0 .0 0.0 o.n o.u 0.0 .0
0 0 0 1 0 D 0, 0 1
1948 1948 1 948 1060 1048 1948 1048 1948 1000
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1974 + 197 3 4- 19734 1073 + 107 3 + 1973 + 1073 + 197 34 10 11*
2b. '26. 26. 75 . 75. 75. 25. 7b. 24.
. 1 0.0 0.0 0.0 .0 .9 7.6 1R.4 73.4
2 0 0 0 1 7 16 27 107
I9b7 1948 1948 104 8 1071 1969 1 068 + 1 9b 7 4 loo4
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 41)
1 97 4 f 19734 19734 1073 + 1973 + 1973 + 1040 19SU 1054
2b. '2b. 25. 75. 25. 75. 26. 7b. 24.
29.2 22.3 13.8 17.fl 27.7 30,7 20.9 30.9 322.4
31 ’2 H 25 70 30 31 JO 31 345
19744 19714 1958 1050 1071 + 1973 + 197 3 + 197 3-4- 1062
2b 1 4 1 7 2 3 2R 79 30 301
1958 4 1949 1954 ~7061 1054 1972 1950 + 1 9554 1040
27. 26. 2b. 76. 26. 26. 26. 7b. 24.
NO DAYS HIM TFMP I.ESS OR ED 0 F AVE.
MAX.
YEAH
MIN.
YEAR
YEAHS OF RECORD
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (E)
TEMP
20.3
2H
1961
9
1953
26.
50
17.5
26
1964
H
I 95H 27.
55
13.9
25
1 964
5
1960 E
26.
63
3.0 .1 0.0 0.0 0.0 .1 1.0 10.3 20.3 Nri. 1
8 t 0 0 0 1 6 70 27 112
1970 1 9b7 4 1948 1948 1948 1970 + 1969 1968 1954 lOhH
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 17 bb
1972 + 197 4 4- 1973 + 197 34 19734 1073 + 1973 + 1954 19554 19b3
27. 2b. 2b. 2b. 2b. 25. 25. 26. 7b. 2 3.
72 81 87 9 4 9H 8 2 73 65 58
YEAR AND DAY195020t19SH21♦194630 194330 194226 195423 193910 196901 194804+195804 194702 193911 YEARS OF RECORD 43. 44. 43. 44. 43. 43. 41. 43. 43. 43. 43. 43.
LOWEST TEMPERATURE
F) TEMP -53 -49 -39 -30 -1 1 3 IH IS -2 -12 -37 -44
YEAR AND 0AY196210 19622H♦196214 197904 195517+193919 106801 196B24+195930 197131 195727+196226 YEAHS OF RECORD 43. 44. 43. 44. 43. 44. 43. 43. 43. 43. 41. 43.
PREPARED MY : COLORADO CLIMATE CEM7ER
DEPARMENT OE ATMOSPKw1C SCIENCE COLORADO STATE HMIVFHS1TY FORT COLLINS, CO R9S23 (101) 491 - MS4S


r
a
SUMMARY OF MONTHLY climatic DATA FOR FRASFR CMLMHAI)»» FUR YFAPR 1031-1974 RUMSTAT INN NO. 531 13 DfVTMUN 2 k
LATITUDE - 39 57 LUNGITIJUK - - 109 90 F.ljF.VATlUN - H9b0 FKKT
JAN FKH MAH APR MAY ilUN jul Aur« SfcP MCT NOV MFC ANN
MflMTHI.Y PRECIPITATION (IN) AVE. MAX. YEAR 1 .hO A. Oh 1^97 1.48 h.77 1 .nJ 4.30 1932 1.92 9.33 13 3 3 t.hb S. 02 I4b7 1.97 4.7 h 1 l.hh 1.h9 4.9H 9.70 lVhb lOhi 1 . 4h 7.hO 19h 1 1.10 9.12 1999 1.23 1.011 1955 1 .JR 9.14 1991 1H.39 30.33 19*>7
MM. .IS .35 .SI .23 .14 .24 .18 .21 .03 .OS .22 .23
YKA H 1931 193S 1442 1937 1474 1968 19S0 1442 1444 I4S2 1944+ 144b
YEARS IIF RECORD 44. 44. 44. 44. 44. 43. 4 1. 43. 43. 43. 43. 43.
I'LfarpST DAILY PRECIP (INI AMOUNT 1.03 1.04 .77 1.21 2.50 1.30 1 .31 .97 3.20 1.33 .b3 1.51
v»Hr AI KoT DAILY PHLL1P U"J.AR ,,A y, g5,-J4 195508 195814 197120 195704 14SH05 196212 197104 195927 195904 195515 19731B
YEARS IJF RECORD 2b. 27. 2b. 27. 27. 27. 2b. 2b. 2b. 2b. 2b. ?b.
MONTHLY SNOWFALL
I
(IN) AVE.
MAX. YEAR MIN. YKAH
YEARS OF MFCOHI) GRTST DEPTH SNOW ON GRND IN MUN (IN)
HO DAYS PRECIP GTK OR F.O 0.1
MAX.
YEAH MIN. YEAR
YEARS OF RECORD
NU DAYS PRECIP GVR OH EO 1.0 IN AVE.
MAX.
YEAR
MIN.
YKAH
YEARS OF RECORD
24.9
55.5
143b
21.0 M 2.4
193b
20.5
44.4
1432
14.2 52.0 143 3
4.2
17.0
1955
.5
10.0
1447
3.0 5.0 0.0 3.0 o.o 0.0
>31 1915 197 4 1949 19/4 + 1972 +
27. 24. 28. 31. 32. 38.
47 49 49 40 14 5
!01+195709+195915+195201 145710 197011
:c«»mh 24. 24. 24. 24. 23.
avk. 8,4 6,8 8.H 7.4 9.9
MAX . 18 lb 21 1 8 19
YKAK 1953 1952 1992 1951 1 9S 3
MIN. 1 2 2 2 0
YKAH 1451 1970 + 19b9 1953 + 1974
CURL) 2b. 27. 29 . 27. 27.
AVK. .4 .2 .h .7 .4
2
1952 +
0
1974 +
2
1957
0
1974 +
3
144 H
0
19744
3
1941)
0
1972 +
2
1959 + 0
1974 +
23.
5.0 17
1949
1
| 4bH ♦
21.
1.0 3
1 954 +
0
1473 +
0.0 0.0 1431 0.0 19 77 + 42.
0
0
25.
0,0 0.0 1431. 0,0 1 973 + 42.
1.0
14.0
1470 0.0 1972 + 37.
7.1
55.0 1 9h9 0.0 1973 + 35.
15.3
43.5
1945
0.0
1444
27.
15.9
37.0
1945
4.0
1959
70.
0 13 31 27 4H
0 145927 195905 195S1H 195131 26. 25. 23. 73.* 74.
h . 4 6.8 5.3 4 . b 6.2 ’ 8.7
17 18 12 12 14 21
1 94 H 1952 1461 + 1949 1948 1951
2 2 0 1 1 7
19714 1970 + 1956 19hS4 1 965 196b +
29. 26. 25. 2b. 25. 7b.
.9 .8 1.0 .4 .3 .7
9 3 7 2 2 4
1949 1957 + 1 9b 1 19704 1955 1951
0 <1 0 • 0 0 0
19704 1970+ 1973 + 19734 1972 + 1972 +
25. 25. 29. 26. 25. 2h.
.0 .0 0.0 .0 .7 • 1
1 1 0 1 1 1
1951 1955 1948 1971 1973 + 19744
0 0 0 0 II 0
NUMBER OF DAYS WITH HAIL
AVE. MAX. YEAH MIN. YEAR YEARS OF RECORD
1974 +
25.
0.0
0
1956
0
1974 +
1H.
1974 +
2b.
0.0
0
1956
0
1974 + 19
1974 +
25.
0.0
0
145b
0
1474 + 1H.
1974 +
25.
0.0
0
1956
0
1974 + 19.-
1974 +
25.
0.0
0
1955
0
1974 + 14.
1973 +
26.
0.0
0
1956
0
1974 + 1H.
25.
.1
1
1955 + 0
1 973 +
25.
.1
1
14b7 + 0
1973 +
1H.
75.
0.0
0
1 44 H
0
1473 + 25.
0.0
0
1956
0
1973 + 1H.
25.
.2
3
1951
0
1973 + 25.
o.o
o
195b
0
1973 +
1H.
25.
.1
7
1969
0
1973 +
25.
0.0
0
1956
o
1973 + 1H.
25.
0.0
0
194 R
0
1473 +
25.
2.4
2H
I960
0
1473 +
1H.
25.
.1
1
1973 +
0
1472 + 25.
0.0
0
195b
0
1973 + lb.
1944
43.
140.4
213.4 1445
57.H 1431 17.
H 4.3 151 1949 53
1 4hb +
23.
7.5
17
1949
3
1450 +
24.
.«
3
14h9 +
0
1970 + 24.
2.4
2M
14hH
0
1973 + lb.
»» NUTE : MARY WEATHER'STATIONS DU NOT HECnRD ALL MAIL. OCCURRENCES. THEREFORE THESE DATA MAY NOT ME HEPHESENTA UVE.
NO, OF DAYS WITH SNOW ON GROUND AVE. (GTR OR Ed 1 INCH ON GROUND) MAX.
MIN.
YEAR
YEARS OF RECORD
31,0
31
1453
31
1471 +
9.
28.2 24 1972 + 2H 1971 ♦ 10.
2b. 9 31
1971 +
0
1474
H.
16.4
30
1970
H
1953
10.
1.7
5
1965
0
1974 +
10.
0.0
0
14h3
0
1972 + 4.
0.0
0
I4b3
0
1472 +
10.
0.0
O
1453
0
1973 +
II.
.4
4
1970
0
1972 + 4.
4.7
22
1954
0
1473 + 10.
14.1
28
1 45 R
7
1 9b 1 H.
29.6
31
1971 +
2 3
1969
8.
I bb ,5 173 1955 lbl 1471 4.
PREPARED BY !
COLORADO CLIMATE CENTER IIEPAMMENT OF ATMUSPFM1C SCIENCE COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORT COLLINS, CO 80573 (303) 491 - H545


SOLAR ACCESS
â– % M ~ T>M |A2IMUTH IALTITUDE C AM -PM
IA2IMUTHIALTITIIPE J «o* o j 2fc*-}o r
MMUTH) ALTITUDE


ZONING


ZONING
At present, the site is zones for residential, however,
Planner for Grand County, Tim DeWitt, suggested that the
property be rezoned (down-zoned) to Forestry and Open
Zoning which allows for lodge and ancillary cabins. Necessary
steops to be taken in the zoning process would be as follows:
- Substantiate water rights
Submit building plans with engineered septic design, engineered foundation design and show adequate water supply
Designs would have to be submitted 30 days prior to Planning Commission meeting. Such -request would be advertised in the Grand County Jounal.
Additional water right would more than likely be necessary (Glenwood Springs - Water Court #5)


CODES


BUILDING CODE SEARCH
Project Name: Windham Lodge and Studios,
Thesis Project
Location: Grand County, Colorado
Applicable Code Name: Uniform Building Code Date: 1985
I tern Section
1. Fire Zone
2. Occupancy Classification: R-l Table 5-A
Also see 1202
Principal occupancy: Hotel Table 5-A
Other Use: Recording studios
3. Occupancy separations required:
R-l : one hour 702, 1202
4. Construction type: Type IV - Heavy Timber Table 17A
5. Maximum allowable floor area:
R-l: unlimited 505,506,507
The total combined floor area may be twice that permitted by Table 5-C for one sotry buildings and floor area shall not exceed that permitted for a one-story building. If sprinklered, areas in Table 5-C may be tripled in one-story buildings and doubled in buildings of more than one story.
6. Maximum allowable height: See 5-D
65 feet
R-l: three stories


Item
Section
7. Fire resistance of exterior wall Table 5-A
* (see occupancy type and construction type)
R-l: One hour less than 5 feet
8. Openings in exterior walls Table 5-A
R-l: Not permitted less than 5 feet
9. Windows required in rooms:
Habitable rooms: area - 1/20 of floor area; 1205
minimum = 10 square feet
bathrooms, laundry rooms: operable window area 1206 ^ 1/20 floor area; minimum = 1§ square feet
Enclosed or semi-enclosed courts, req. size:
3 feet wide for one and two stories. If more than 2 stories, width shall be increased at a rate of 1 foot per story.
Courts: minimum = 3 feet wide; if windows
opening on opposite sides, minimum = 6 feet.
If greater than 2 stories, increase court one foot width and 2 foot length per story.
11. Minimum ceiling heights in rooms:
Not less than 7'-6"; kitchens, halls, 1207
bathrooms, toilets at 7 feet measured to lowest projection from ceiling
12. Minimum floor area of rooms: 1207
Every dwelling unit shall have at least one room ^ 120 square feet. Other habitable rooms except kitchens ^ 70 square feet.
Width: habitable rooms ^ 7 feet in any
dimension


Item
Section
13. Fire resistive requirements:
* Exterior bearing walls Interior bearing walls Exterior non-bearing walls Structural frame Permanent partitions Vertical openins Floors Roofs
Exterior doors Mezzanine floors Roof coverings Boiler room enclosure
14. Structural requirements:
Table 17-A
4 hours 1 4
1 or heavy timber 1 or heavy timber 1
Heavy timber Heavy timber Heavy timber
1 hour
See 3203(e), 4307
2 hours
to be determined
15. Exits:
Occupancy load - basis (sq.ft./occupant ) Chap. 33
Number of exits required: Every building shall have at least one exit
Minimum width of exits: Total width of 3303(b)
exits - total occupant load served divided by 50.
Exit separation arrangement: reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked, others are available.
Maximum allowable travel distance to 3303(d)
exit: 150 feet, 200 feet with sprinklers.
Distance may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within corridor complying with Section 3305.
Allowable exit sequence: Rooms may have one exit through an adjoining room which provides a direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor provided total distance of travel does not exceed provisions in code.


Item
Section
Exit doors: swing in direction of exit travel
Minimum width: 3 feet wide and 6 feet 8 inches high
Maximum leaf width: A feet
Width required for number of occupants:
Use net dimension of exitway
Exit corridors: Minimum width = AA inches
Required to have exit at each end of corridor? No, if less than 20 feet
Dead end corridors are allowed but maximum length is 20 feet.
Wall fire resistance require - need not be of fire resistive construction with occupant load of 100 or less if sprinklers and smoke detectors are installed.
Doors and frames fire resistance required:
When corridor walls are of one-hour fire resistive construction, door opening shall have smoke/draft control assembly.
16. Stairs:
Minimum width = AA inches if occupancy load is 50 or more; 36 inches if occupancy load is A9 or less
Maximum riser allowed: not less than A" nor greater than 7"
Minimum tread allowed: not less than 11"
Are winders allowed? No
Landings: Equal to width of stairway, not
more than AA" where stair has straight run
Maximum vertical distance between landings is 12 feet
Required height of rails is 30" to 3A"
3303(b)
3306(b)
3306(g)


Item
Section
Handrails:
Required at each side: yes
Intermediate rails required at stairs:
Yes, if greater than 88"
Maximum width between intermediate rails is 88"
Exceptions are available: Private stairways 30" or less need only one.
Also, if less than A risers, no rails are needed .
Height above nosing: not more than 34" or less than 30"
Intermediate rail required: Yes, if 88" or wider and shall be spaced approximately equally across the entire width
Handrails return to wall at ends: Yes or shall terminate in newel posts or safety terminals.
Handrails extend beyond stair: Yes, not less than 6" beyond top and botton risers.
Stair to roof required: Yes, if 4 stories or more unless root's slope is greater than 4 in 12.
Stair to basement restrictions: If basement stairway and stairway up terminate in same exit enclosure, an approved barrier shall be provided to prevent persons from continuing on into the basement.
Access to roof required: If 4 or more stories approved hatch openable to exterior not less than 16 square feet in area.
Horizontal exit requirements: Shall have fire protection rating of not less than one and one half hours.
3306
3301(b)
3308


Item
Section
17 .
Ramps:
Maximum slope: shall not be steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal
Handrails required: like stairs requirement
Balcony rails: not less than 42" in height
Where required: landings, ramps, balconies,
porches which are greater than 30" above grade or floor below
Balusters or intermediate rails required -make it so 6" in diameter cannot pass through
Toilet room requirements:
Lavatories - unobstructed space beneath lav at 30" wide, 29" height and 17" deep
Drinking fountain requirements: Spout
within 33" of floor and shall have upfront hand operated controls. If in alcove, alcove shall not be less than 32" in width.
Handicapped requirements: Clear space of 42" wide and 48" long in front of water closet stool. Entry has clear width of 32" when located at the end and clear width of 34" when located at the side. Grab bars at 33" to 36" above and parallel to floor; bars are 42" long.
511


DESIGN SOLUTION





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- WOCO SHAKES -ASPHALT SATURATED REIT
- Rj'AOOO CBCK -IfCULATlON
- POST t STRJTI6 « 6») ARE BOLTED TO A a 12 1 METAL STRAP FORMS TENSION *N0
-FLASHINO -ROOF JOIST WOOO PANEUNO
—LICHTINO COVEANO DRAPERY BRACKET RjNS PERIMETER OF performance mall
-double pane tiehmalglass MIAOOW BEYONO

- PIANO
- WlfCCNv SiLL CXXJ0LE TOP**TE
-CEDAR SidNG -SF€AThinO ' INSULATOR -STUO MALL 2«l
• VAPOR BARRIER
• OTP BOARD
• RjWCOO CBCK W/FMSM FU»i
• FLA&ANO
- STOf€ SILL
- SILL PLATE ON MORTAR BSD
• J • BOLT
• TRUSS JC6T. 2 « 12 ’ METAL JOIST HANGER
-STONE
-ACTAL MILL TES
======â„¢
, . j--.
- R1GC INSLLATON 1 V7 “GRAOE BEAM -GRADE BEAM BEYCN)
REINFORCING STEEL VAPOR BARRiCR NON FROST • SUSLEPT ortflVtl ROCK DOtfB. MC6FENT WDK CROCK
MALL SECTION




•/ ///


photographs


MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS


SYSTEMS


STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING - GENERAL INFORMATION
Foundation: Drill piers to bedrock, insert reinforcing rods and
pack with cement; place concrete - grade beams support bearing walls.
Floor: Truss joists bolted to stem wall; insulate throughout.
Stone veneer sits on shelf of concrete stem wall.
Structure: Wood frame (2x6 construction @ Z'i " O.C., typical
throughout). Exposed glulams in dining and living rooms.
Envelope: Wood siding (shingles or tongue in groove cedar siting)
Roof: Skeletal system would consist of wood trusses. Membrane
would consist of plywood sheathing. Roofing would consist of wood shakes. Use 15-lb felt over sheathing
Interiors: Partitions would be wood framing with gypboard, paint
or wallpaper. Floor finishes v-ould be tongue in groove wood floors, or tile or carpet. Sound insulation as required.


aoaoi jo nvu dniwvhj oiivnjhds




MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS






SYSTEMS


STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING - GENERAL INFORMATION
Foundation: Drill piers to bedrock, insert reinforcing rods and
pack with cement; place concrete - grade beams support bearing walls.
Floor: Truss joists bolted to stem wall; insulate throughout.
Stone veneer sits on shelf of concrete stem wall.
Structure: Wood frame (2x6 construction @2.^ " O.C., typical
throughout). Exposed glulams in dining and living rooms.
Envelope: Wood siding (shingles or tongue in groove cedar siting)
Roof: Skeletal system would consist of wood trusses. Membrane
would consist of plywood sheathing. Roofing would consist of wood shakes. Use 15-lb felt over sheathing
Interiors: Partitions would be wood framing with gypboard, paint
or wallpaper. Floor finishes v^ould be tongue in groove wood floors, or tile or carpet. Sound insulation as required.


SCHEMATIC FRAMING PLAN OF LODGE
£
5
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rac^mcor
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Cold Climate Construction 109
MEAN ANNUAL AIR_______PROVINCE BOUNDARY
TEMPERATURE, c*
SOUTHERN LIMIT __ __COUNTRY BOUNDARY
CONTINENTAL
PERMAFROST
----SOUTHERN LIMIT-
DISCONTINUOUS
PERMAFROST
RMAFROST. ICE WEDGES AND AND FRO^T HEAVE
IN N OF PERMAFROST: Ground of any that stays colder than the freezing temperature of ' throLighout several years
VIS
VE LAVER: Top layer of ground subject to an freezing and thawing
5T HiEAVING: Lifting or heaving of soil surface 16 by the freezing of subsurface frost susceptible rial.
ST SUSCEPTIBLE SOIL: Soil that has enough eabifj*ty and capillary action (wickability) to ex upon freezing
.ENSE (TABER ICE): Pocket of ice.
WEDGE: Wedge shaped mass of ice within the Vedges range up to 3 or 4 wide and 10 deep.
LETQK: Frozen layer at the base of the active that remains unthawed during cold summers.
DUAL THAW ZONE: Layer of unfrozen ground ren i?he permafrost and active layer. This layer not e*xist when annual frost extends to the perma but as present during warm winters.
ROUND LEVEL
v: £ ‘ ^ c-round
f" ~ ~~ J ur Jt N OROUNu
VENTURI EFFECT CREATED
BUILDING
HEATED CRAWL SPACE FOR
CONDITION
SNOVN
LEVEL
^'ACTIVE
CONDITIONS OF BUILDING ON PERMAFROST
CONDITION 1: Building elevated on piles allows for the dissipation of building heat to help prevent the ground from thawing Added benefits include winter refreezing of ground by cold winter air and prevention of snowdrift buildup.
CONDITION 2: Building elevated on nonfrost suscep tible gravel pad. Benefits include lessening of snowdrift problems and retardation of permafrost thaw. Existing ground cover can remain as insulation. Rigid insulation can also be used.
EAVE AND FOUNDATION DETAILING IN COLD CLIMATES
Snow buildup on the roof is warmed by heat loss from the building. The melting snow flows down the roof and is refrozen at the eave because of the eave s cold condition. The use of a cornice vent and insulation to create a "cold roof" helps to reduce the problem of ice damming. When an ice dam is created, the water backs up, leaking under roofing materials. The placement of metal flashing on the roof at least 2 ft 0 in. up from the wall line causes the snow and ice to slide off and also prevents moisture penetration.
All vapor barriers in cold and arctic conditions must be on the warm side to avoid condensation in the insula tion. Use of rigid insulation on the exterior of the foundation wall (with a metal or cement asbestos board cover for protection) creates a heat bank and keeps the utility space from freezing
PILES
In the arctic, piles are popular because they are a simple way of providing thermal isolation of heated structures, minimize disturbance of existing thermal regime, permit flow' of flood waters, and prevent the buildup of drifting snow. However, frost heaving can force the piles upward during the freeze season without allowing the piles to return to the original level when the soil thaws.
Solutions to the problem of pile heaving.
1. Anchor the pile against uplift by placing anchors or notches on the pile within the permafrost zone.
2. Break the bond in the active layer. (Use bond breaking plastic wrap or grease pile in the active layer.)
3. To aviod thaw of the surrounding soil, use one of the three main one way heat extractors: (a) The gaseous flow system or, (b) the liquid system, containing tubes with "Venturi" funnels to allow warm liquid to rise and cold liquid to sink, and (c) a mechanical refrigeration system. The designer must be careful not to allow heat to be transferred from the building to the pile (thus avoiding thawing the permafrost).
UTILITIES IN COLD CLIMATE AND ARCTIC CONDITIONS
Utilidors or utiliducts are the most common way to provide protection, easy access, and insulation of utility lines to avoid disturbance to the permafrost.
Human waste at isolated facilities may be handled by compost privies (waterless toilets) and chemical toilets, which are commonly referred to as "honey buckets." Disposal systems include incineration and sewage lagoons
OE Anclioioi)* , Alfc’.V


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING - GENERAL INFORMATION
The main mechanical room is in the basement level of the lodge and services both the lodge and studio. The buildings are heated with hot water heat - a boiler is in the basement and fin tube baseboards will be placed in all rooms. Individual rooms have thermostats. Exhaust through bathrooms. Cooling in the lodge is not required. (See Mechanical Diagram 1).
The kitchen has an exhaust system of its own. (See Mechanical Diagram 2).
For the studio: For cooling, outside air is used. Use oversized ducts with sound absorbing duct liners. Locate all air handling a minimum of 30' prior to breaking a sound seal. In order to avoid sound transmission from studio to control room, separate ducts need to be installed. Equipment shall be on independent slab. 90-degree bends in ductwork to create intentional baffling for air borne noise. Install sound traps at intermittent locations in air delivery system. Use low air velocites (under 400 feet/minute). (See Mechanical Diagram 3).


Mechanical Diagram 1
Mechanical Diagram 2
*
Mafe-up dir
J^rt'Ghcn
m
Exhaust"


Mechanical Diagram 3


LIGHTING DESIGN
Lighting: Room
Offices
Living , Dining Rooms
Kitchen, Baths Studio lobby Practice rooms Engineering Recording
Footcandles 100 to 150
10 to 30 (adjustable) 10
30 to 50 10
10 tc 70 (adjustable! 10 to 100 (adjustable) 10 to 70 (adjustable)
For the Recording Studios and Control Rooms: In the studio, the lighting must be powerful enough to provide musicians with the ability to see one another, communicate and read music or lyric sheets. And too, it must not be excessive so that it is distracting with the emotional sense of the music being recorded. The lighting system should be flexible. A combination of white and colored lights can be used to maximize flexibility. Dimmers can be installed to control brightness. Track systems can be effective. If recessed lighting is used, it shoul be placed in a soundproof box. Fluorescent fixtures should be avoided in studios and control rooms because of their tendency to induce electrical and acoustical hum.


ACOUSTICAL DESIGN
Approximate reverberation time for the performance hall is to be between 1.1 and 2.0 seconds.
Approximate reverberation time for the studio is to be between 0.4 and .06 seconds with flexibility built in so as to increase reverb time to 2.0 seconds if necessary.
Special drapery rod is to be installed carrying heavy velvet drapes to allow for adjusting sound absorbtion in the performance hall and recording studios.
Walls and glazing are splayed so as to prevent parallel walls which contribute to standing waves.
Studio is separate from loege to further enhance transmission loss .
Double wall construction is used on studio and a sound transmission class of 55-60 is desired. Please see following diagrams (taken from Building a Recording Studio, By Jeff Cooper, Synergy Group, Inc., 1984)


Figure 3-19 Floating ceilings suspended from a) above b) below
Existing floor
vibration
isolator
^ Finish floor / / 3/4” plywood
Sand fill Vapor barrier
Figure 3-17 A typical floating wood floor
figure 3-15 A typical floating wall (wood)


STC 55-60
Figure 3-7(h) Double-wall construction


STC 57-62
Figure 3-11(c) A higher performance wood floating floor with suspended ceiling attached


Figure 3-21 Control room window detail


Full Text

PAGE 1

WINDHAM HILL LODGE and STUDIOS . .. . . •• t • A+P LD 1190 A72 1986 E57 c.2 ..... , .. Grqnd _ Coynt y, _ Colo rad o Thesis Project B y Christin e M . Eitem ill e r Presented t o t he Coll e g e o f Archi t ecture, Un iversr ty of Colorado at D !'nve r •.•..... , ....... .. . ., . , . • . . . . • • .

PAGE 2

. ._ .... , ... . .. . .. • .. WINDHAM HILL LODGE AND STUDIOS An Architectural Thesis presented t o the College of Architecture and Planning . univerSi i:y of Colorado at. Denver in partial fulfillment o f the requirements Jo.r tJ'le 9} of , Date Due .,. __ .., __ .__.._. ... , . CHRISTINE MARIE EITEMILLER Fall 1986 ' -

PAGE 3

. -; '4. The Thesis of Christine Marie Eitemiller is approved. Committee Chairman Principal Advisor I' • ' ' . ..... • • • ''• • ... • • 1,. • •• _,. ... , "•:•-,. •.1 . . ... "' • ,..._, I • University of Colorado at Denver Fall 1986

PAGE 4

• . t SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING THEY HELPED MAKE ALL THIS POSSIBLE : Gary Long, Faculty Advisor Davis Holder, Advisor Paul Bormann, Advisor Michael Murphy, Advisor David Wilson, Acoustics Christopher Jaffe, Acoustics "Paul Eeath, "AdViddr ••• 4 ••• ' • My Mother and Father Dr. Z Katie and Grampsey Dave, Dan, Uncle Woody, Jade, Suellen, J.C., Nicole, Evan and Wesley Marianne Braun Beryl and Eileen The Tectonyx . and the countless others who have believed in me when I was unsure .,. . • ... J - •

PAGE 5

TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION THESIS STATEMENT II. C L I E N T & P R 0 G R A M I N F 0 R M A T I 0 N CLIENT SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMED SPACES SPACE CHARACTERISTICS . ' III. S I T E A N A L Y S I S • o 4 '<''• •• • • ..,,., • MACRO-ENVIRONMENT PAST PRESENT FUTURE MICRO-ENVIRONMENT SIT E PHOTOGRAPHS ACCESS DRAINAGE UTILITIES SOILS INFORMATION IV. CLIMATE A N A L Y S I S SUMMARY TEMPERATURE RANGE WIND DATA PRECIPITATION INFORMATION SOLAR ACCESS

PAGE 6

TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) V. ZONING VI. CODES VII. DESIGN SOLUTION VIII. SYSTEMS ... • ... ..... IX. REFERENCES .. ... . . ...; ' ,. . ...., ! ... & "' .. r 0 •' r • ' .. 1 0 0. •• ••• • l •"-. o , • , .., • , , • ... ... ... . .. . • t:'" . . . ,... . . ... •• --' .

PAGE 7

-.... :.-•.' .. ' '/.." .. ...... , '.: •• 1. •,.!•'.; • -:- •••• . .. : .'t '.'! • • ••. • ..... .. . . . ,. .• -..... !r : • • • , ••• • • ..... .• . . . .. . I NTRODUCTION . --) ..,., . ... .,. .. • ................ ...... \ . : .......

PAGE 8

PROJECT DESCRIPTION .. TYPE: LOCATION: SIZ E : OWNER: USES: -- • J • '•,• ' , . ., •' • I • ..... (. '). ...... . . WINDHAM HILL LODGE & STUDIOS GRAND COUNTY, COLORADO 25,000 SQUARE FEET MR. WILL ACKERMAN' & WINDHAM HILL RECORDS, INC. RESIDENTIAL SHORT TERM RESIDENTIAL LONG TERM .RECORDING MUSICAL TAPES AND DISCS RECREATION

PAGE 9

THESIS STATEMENT For creativity to soar and for the imagination to bloom, it is ... my belief that a very special environment be arranged so as to nurture the seeds of invention and, like a potted plant, creativity abounds when certain conditions are met. For a delightful shrub, the needs are simple: pleasant soil, appropriate sunshine and moisture, fresh air, proper nutrients, company of other plants (or life forms), retreat, a little doting , and sweet music provide for a generative encompassment . . . and for creative propagation, the needs, as well, are simple: pleasant -• 'T • contact with nature (sunshine, the natural elements), fresh air, physical nourishment (food and rest), company of other life forms, retreat' desire. a little doting and sweet music pro.vide an enridu'ng climate in which to create and to imagine. Further, " a sense of well-being a n d a feeling of freedom are othe r advantageous circumstances ••• Among the unfavorable conditions [for creativity] are mental and physical fatigue, petty irritations, noise, worry over domestic or financial matters, states of depression, and strong emotions. Other unfavorable conditions include being driven to work under pressure and being interrupted or feeling that there may be interruption at any time, as in the demand of administrative duties." (1) When I speak of pleasant soil and pleasant surroundings, the images which greet me specifically are of the country, the mountains, a misty forest and sunstruck clearing, the hum of a breathy breeze and river rushing, the stillness of snow falling . . . My roots burrow deep in the soil and I am steadied yet still flexible to sway to the woodwinds ••• I shall locate this center of retreat for music and other creative arts in the

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0w;.•t .... ., Rocky Mountains on a forested site laden with expressive bursts of rock posing as sculpture. When I speak of contact with nature, I speak of a sensual communication with and recognition of the earth's elements: we see and feel the sun; we hear and touch the wind; we smell the rain; we hear the quiet o f the snow; fire brings us warmth. And too, the earth's elements are life givers -the sun, the great luminary, feeds us and lights the world; winds refresh the air; rains quench earth's thirst; fires warm and grant us power. .. .. . . For .. I a between privacy and human interaction. While some people need to be completely alone, others need less privacy and greater personal contact. In paying due respect to the creative being, such requirements must be met individually and so the atmosphere shall be flexible to accomodate specific needs. Those requiring absolute solitude would be housed in small units awa y from the main house and those desiring more contact with others would remain in close proximity. Functioning as a workretreat, the lodge exists as the home and the studio functions as the workplace. This mountain retreat, being for composers, recording artists and other creative individuals, would provide the setting in which such persons may work, relax and reflect in an environment which directly opposes the fast track of the city. The living and working units are quiet, private and secure while the setting nurtures continuance and furtherance of original work from within a restive mountain habitat, which is adjacent to the elements and free from day-to-day interruptions

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of telephone, traffic and tumult. How is the country different from the city and how might a contrast be established so as to provide that which the city may lack? I believe the contrast between city and country (or mountains as the case may be) to be an "organic simplicity ••• Any wild flower is truly simple but double the sam e wild flower by cultivation and it ceases to be so ••• Jesus wrote the supreme essay on simplicity in this, 'Consider the lilies of the field.,;, (2) For example, in contrasting the soundscape of city and country , what we would hear in each place would be vastly different. The city roars with the thundering of air traffic; sirens scream; car and bus engines resoun d and deafen within the concrete canyons o f the city; ieeris wi. th .. diSCO briefcaSes make . -know their presence; HVAC syst"ems " blatantly blast their hot tempers ••• and a bird's song is barely a whisper in the midst. The soundscape o f the mountains reverberates with a simplistic calm-wavering winds strum proud pines; jays jibber and jabber; rodents rustle across the forest floor scurrying after one another; "ears filled with the incessant hum in various notes, now the busy hum of the working bee flying quickly off, then the blaring of the lazy drone" (3); the greenfinch speaks, "wah-wah-wah-wah-chow-chow-chow-chow tu-we-we"; "in wintertime, the stillness, the absence of life or sound, is weird and oppressive ••• sit down upon a fallen tree, and the silence becomes ••• almost painful. It is a relief even to hear at last the fall of the snow from the boughs of the cypress, the pine, or the yew, which stretch like dark horse-plumes high overhead." (4) . . • Just as man requires time for sleep to refresh and renew his life energies so too he requires quiet periods to regain mental and spiritual

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composure. At one time stillness was a precious article in an unwritten code of human rights. Man held reservoirs of stillness in his life to restore the spiritual metabolism. Even in the hearts of cities, there were the dark still vaults of churches and libraries, or the privacy of drawing room and bedroom. Outside the throb of cities, the countryside was accessible with its lulling whirr of natural sounds. There were still times too. The holy days were quieter before they became holidays ••• The importance of these quiet groves and times far transcended the particular purposes to which'they were put. We can this clearly only now that we have lost them." (5) ... . ,. ... In. keeP.i,ng .the link t _ o . • . . important .. architecture to relate closely with the evironment. As stated by Frank Lloyd Wright in The Natural House, "I began to see a building primarily not as a cave but as broad shelter in the open, related to vista, vista without and vista within." And in following Wright's idea, I seek harmon y between the building and the mountain setting. "In order to maintain a visual interaction of the buildings with the natural environment, the following measures could be taken: Keep the buildings at small scale so the eye is not drawn to a building because of its size. Use lines from the natural environment in the building so the eye is not drawn to a building because of its shape. Make the boundaries between earth and building ambiguous so they appear physically related. To accomplish this, use local natural materials. Use colors seen in the local landscape.

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... ( .. , -Let placement of buildings copy forms and lines of the natural landscape." (7) This mountain retreat for artistic fellows is to be a lifesource for spiritual renewal so that one's creativity may be greater enhanced. Seated in a wholly organic environment, the artist is given the opportunity for rejuvenation as daily responsibilities such as preparing food, laundering clothes, and cleaning house are taken care of by •lodge staff. Concentration is placed on the artist's need for relaxation and rest so as to free him/her for challenge and pursuit. The facility, in harmo ny with the environment, shoul d function so as to be efficient for 'thOse working there and inspirational f o r thos e r etre atin g .there. In closing, I leave you with words from Plato on inspiration: "[inspiration] is a power divine, impelling you like the power in the stone Euripides called the magnet, which most call 'stone of Hereclea.' This stone does not simply attract the iron rings, just by themselves; it also imparts to the rings a force enabling them to do the same thing as the stone itself, that is, to attract another ring, so that sometimes a chain is formed, quite a long one, of iron rings, suspended from one another. For all of them, however, their power depends upon that loadstone. Just so the Muse. She first makes men inspired, and then through these inspired ones other share in the enthusiasm, and a chain is formed ••• "(8)

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(1) Cannon, Walter Bradford. "The Role of Hunches in Scientific Thought" The Creativity Question. Edited by Albert Rothenberg and Carl R. Hausman. Duke University Press 1976. (2) Wright, Frank Lloyd. The Natural House. Horizon Press, Inc. 1954. (3) Schafer, R. Murray. The Tuning of the World. Alfred A. Knofp, Inc. 1977. Page 34. (4) Ibid. Page 20. (5) Ibid • . Page 253-54. (6) The Natural House. (7) '' Navajo Mission Academy Student Residences" by Wolfgang Preiser. Programming. the Built. En.vironment. Edited .bY .Preiser. . _ __ . Reinhold Company, New York 1985. (8) "Inspiration" by Plato. The Creativity Question. Edited by Albert Rothenbeg, and Carl R. Hausman. Duke University Press, 1976.

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... ',. ._ ... \ . . . . . .. p. ••• •• • -••• l ...... . .. :-.," CLIENT & PROGRAM INFORMATION .. . . -.

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... ,.,. . CLIENT & PROGRAM INFORMATION .. The owner of Windham Rill Lodge & Studios is Will Ackerman, President of Windham Rill Records. Although based in California, Mr. Ackerman has become interested in expanding the company and is looking to build a music facility in the mountains of Colorado. Windham Hill Records specializes in acoustic and instrumental music that boasts an avid audience not only in the United States and Canada, but abroad as well. Only 12 years old, the company has found success on every level: aesthetic, technical and financial. ........... '• In seeking to create a special musical retreat and recording center, Mr. Ackerma n has requested a lodge b e designed for residential use, a recording facility (separate from the lodge), and five cabins for visitors especially seeking extra privacy from the lodge community. . .. :

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PROGRAM ELEMENTS Lodge/Public Side: Lodg e/Administrative: Lodge/Residential : Lod g e /Functional: Mus i c Studios: Circulation: Exterior Spaces: Parking: Entry Vestibule Entry Hall Performance Hall Sun Room Dining Hall Toilets Manager's O ffice Accounting Office O wner Car etaker C abin -5 @ 1000 each 12 guest rooms, one handicap accessible Kitchen Laundry/linen R e ceiv i n g Storage G arage for maintenance v e hicles M echanical Recordi n g Studio A Engineering Control Room A Recording Studio B Engineer Control Room B Lounge 6 Practice rooms @ 100 each Storage Kitchen Toilet Mechanical Monumental Stairs Exit Stairs (fire rated) General circulation (figure of total square feet) Terrace Overlooks Guest parking 22 spaces 25% Square Feet 100 1000 1200 800 900 150 150 150 2000 3 00 5 000 25 0 to 400 450 100 100 800 500 200 1000 450 600 300 800 600 200 100 100 150 2500 Parking for service entry -2 spaces

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. t (Lodge-Public Spaces) PROGRAMMING: Entry Vestibule 1) Occupants Who and how many? "* 2) Activities and Times: 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: Mud room/place to shake off snow, mud 3.3) Psychological Requirements: Passageway into a wonderful place 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: Not needed. 4.2) Thermal: Not needed 4.3) Ventil.ation: Natural .,. 4.4) Lighting: Natural and incandescent 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Pre-entry into Entry Hall Near to parking 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Wipe your feet sort of equipment 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: Natura 1 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): In proportion to building Minimum: Optimum: 80 to 100 Generous: .,, ) Other Corrments:

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(Lodge-Public Spaces) PROGRAMMING: Entry Hall • -. t 1) Occupants -Who and how many? Guests entering lodge .. Main entry to lodge building 2) Activities and Times: Guest registry , cashier, information , mail, central space t o gather; general time i s every da y 7am t o !Opm 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: mail, keys, orientation for i ncomi ng people 3.3) Psych9logical Requirements: Welcome! Pleasant . 4 ) Ambien t Environment: 4.1) 4 .2) Heat/Cool: Heating Thermal: Ventilation: .. . . 4.4) Lighting:Ta s k lights for functions; ge neral lighting 5) 4.5) Acoustics: Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): centrally rocated Office, entry vestibule, 6) Occupant Equipment Require ments: livin g room furniture, lightin g 7) Specia. ( Requirements: Special counter f o r check in, c he ck ou t Length o f 1 0 feet would be desireable 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 1985 UBC 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 9 s q . ft per guest room Optimum: 11 " " " " " Generous: 14 " " " " " 11) Other CoiTITlents:

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-I I (Lodge-Public Spaces) PROGRAt1M I NG: SunRoom 1} Occupants -Who and ,how many? Guests of lodge A 2} Activities and Times: Anytime. Cards, talking, reading, relaxing, exit to terrace overlook, etc. 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1} Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2} Functional Requirements: 3. 3) Psychol ogi ca 1 Requirements: Cheerful p 1 ace 4) Ambient Environment: .. ... 4.1) .J-Ieat/Coo 1: Heat 4.2) Thermal: Heat and solar gain 4.3) . . ventilation: . .. Natural ... _ -,.. '' •' 4.4) Lighting: Natural and incandescent 4.5) Acoustics: Yes 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): and terrace overlook Near to dining and entry hall 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Living room furniture 7) Special Requirements: Fireplace 8) Materials/Finishes: Natural 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 400 Optimum: 600 Generous: 800 11) Other CoTTJTlents: .-____ .._ --'--... --' _r ____ nnnrniiUUTJ.Ir TUC' OIITI T l:'rH+nv-PrPiC:Pr 1QR5

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(Lodge-Public PROGRAMMING: Dining Hall 1) Occupants -Who and how many? Up to 50 people, visitors and owners ' 2) Activities and Times: Eating : Breakfast 7-10; Lunch ll to 2 Dinner 5 to 8 3) Occupant Requirements: 3 . 1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: mountains, pleasant Spacious, relaxin g , v i e w to the 4 ) Ambient Environment: Heat/Cool: 4.2) T her mal: Reat. Heat . . 4.3) .. Vent nation.: Natur.al .......... 4.4) Lighting: Pleasant -not too quiet but not reverberant 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Require ments (Adjacencies): Adj acent t o kitc hen 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Chair s and tables 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: Natural materials 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 14 square feet per person Optimum: 16 II II II II Generous: 18 II II II II 11) Other Comments: ..... : ........ .... ____ _ .._ _ ..J _ _ .._ _ ..J .r _ ___ nnnl"nlluuTul" TUI:' DIITI T t:'M\ITD(HJtJIC't.IT C',H+n"' PrPic:.Pr lQRS

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-' wpacesJ Terrace Overlooks 1) Occupants -Who and how many? Up to SO -visitors, owners 2) Activities and Times: Talking, sitting, musical sessions, storage for firewood, enjoyment of views 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: railed in 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: Spacious, gracious 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) 4 . 2) Heat/Cool: NA ' . Thermal: NA Ventilati n: • -. • t NA . • • • ... • .... ••• .1'. • • , • -. ' . _4.}_) 4.4) Lighting: Lanterns for night time 4.5) Acoustics: N/A 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): 6) Occupant Equipment Require ments: 7) SpeciQ/ Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Requirements: .. • •• • • • • •••• ' l .... s •• , • .. ..... . .._.. -.... 10) Area (Square Feet): Proportionate to building Minimum: Optimum: Generous: 11) Other Comments: ... m:.+ -F ... nm DRnr.RAMMTNr. THF RIJTIT FNVTRONHEfH. Editor Holfaana Preiser 1985

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Lodge-Yubllc PROGRAHMING: Men's and Women's Toilets 1) Occupants-Who and how many? 2) Activities and Times: Anytime 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: Heat/Cool: He!=it 4.1) 4 .2 ) ..... 4. 3) Thermal: Heat Ventilation:---Yes-, .... ' • • • • • .> ' '• ' • .... • of • • • I ' ' • . ' . -•. .. ............... ,. . . . . . 4.4) Lighting: Flourescent 4 . 5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Centrally located; near to dini n g , front desk, 'entry hall 6) Occupant Equipment Require ments: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): 100 square feet Minimum: Optimum: Generous: 11) Other

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(Administrative) PROGRAMMING: Manager's Office and Accounting Office 1) Occupants -Who and ,how many? Owner -and office help, 2-3 people I 2) Activities and Times: Record keeping, administrative duties and accounting. Hours : 9-5, Monday throught Saturday 3) Occupant Requirements: 3 . 1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: Telephone 3.3) Psych()logical Requirements: View to outside 4) A mbient Environ ment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: Heat only 4.2) Thermal : -.,.. .... 4.3) . Ventilation: .. . . Natural ... . '"' . 4.4) Lighting: Overhead general with task lighting; natural light 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Close to public; near entry; directly adjacent to front desk of lobby 6) Occupan t Equipment Requirements: Desk space, computer, storage of files and supplies for office 7) Specia( Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 100 Optimum: 140 Generous: 200 11) Other Comments: 1985 UBC ,... ____ ..._ _ ... __ ...__ ... .c:. ___ nnnl"'niiUUTlll"' TUt:' DIITI T 1:'111\ITDf'III.IMI:'t.IT 1:'.-l;+n ..... PrPiC:.Pr lQR5

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\.l"l.t::::>.J.Ut::lil..J.d.J.) PROGRAMMING: Owner's Space 1) Occupants -Who and how many? Owner .and family, 4 to 5 2) Activities and Times: General living -sleeping, eating, talking, watching television, etc. 3) Occupant Requirements: 3 bedrooms, kitchen, living, dining 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: Integrated with lodge but has feeling of privacy and separateness . . 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) Ther mal: ... . Ventilation: 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: .. .. . . .. ; ... ..... .. ..... , ..... .. ' , ..... . 5) Locational Requirements {Adjacencies): Various options are possible. Seek best view . 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: All custom 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 1200 Optimum: 1500 Generous: 2000 11) Other Comments: t:"n ... m::.+ ::.rlnn+orl -f="w-nm oonr.onMMHJr. RIITI T FNVTRONM!="NT _ Fditor Preiser 1985

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(Residential) I NG: Caretaker unit 1) Occupants Who and how many? . . one person 2) Activities and Times: 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) . Heat/Coo 1 : 4.2) Thermal: 4 . 3) Vent i lat ion • . ,. . ., . . .• . . .. -•. .. • [ • • 1 ... , • .. , .. • .......... ••• •• 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): \olithin lodge, with access to exterior and private entrance 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 250 Optimum: 350 Generous: 600 11) Other Comments: ..-_____ ..._ ..C---TUI:' DIITI T CM\/TOr\1\IMCt.IT r,H+n.,.. Pr,:dc:Pr

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PROGRAHMING: 5 Cabins 1) Occupants -Who and how many? For visitors, could hold from 1 to 6 ,. ' 2) Activities and Times: general living 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Secure 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: separate from lodge for privacy 4) A mbient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: Pwn 4.2) Thermal: 4.3) -Ventilation: . Natur-al .... .. . ... . , .. 4.4) Lighting: Incandescent and natural 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Distance from studio and lodge 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Beds, living furnishings, kitchen applicances 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): M i n i mum : 6 0 0 Optimum: 800 Generous :1000 11) Other Comments: ,... ____ ... _ _. __ ... _ .... -"'---TUI:" DIITI T t:"t..I\ITOf\MMI:"t.IT t:",H+nV' t.Jnlf"n.=lnn PrPiC:.Pr'

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(Residential) PROGRAMMING: Sleeping rooms for visitors -12 1) Occupants -Who and how many? 1 to 4 people; provide some doubles andsome singles' 2) Activities and Times: Sleeping and relaxing, bathing, dressing Anytime 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable 3.2) Functional Requirements: Sleeping space 3.3) Psych9logical Requirements: Peaceful, quiet 4) Ambient Environment: 4. 1 ) Heat/ Coo 1 : 4.2) Thermal: Ventilation: Natural 4.4) Lighting: Natural, incandescent 4.5) Acoustics: Acoustically private 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Seating, bed, bathroom equipment 7) Specia.l Requirements: Closet, bath 8) Materials/Finishes: Carpet, paint, wall covering 9) Codes/A9ency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 250 Optimum: 350 Generous: 500 11) Other ColliTlents: There should be a variety of room types. Create. special places with individuality.

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(Lodge -Functional) PROGRAMMING: Kitchen 1) Occupants -Who and how many? 2 to. 4 service people Cooks, servers, aishwashers 2) Activities and Times: Cooking, preparing food, menu planning, washing dishes. Before and after scheduled meal times See Dining. 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Fire safety, safety from slippery floors and swinging doors 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3. 3) Psychplogica 1 Requirements: p 1 ea san t and efficient 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) Thermal: .. Special kitchen f _ a _ n; mec._han ____ ical and natural 4.3) Venti1ati-on: . 4.4) Lighting: natural and good kitchen lighting 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to dining; near to service entry, near to storage room, garbage area 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: kitchen appliances, storage for good and dishes and cookware 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/A9ency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): 45% of dining room area Minimum: Optimum: 4so Generous: 11) Other CoTTITlents: '

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. 7 (Lodge -Functional) PROGRAMMING: Linen Room 1) Occupants-Who and how many? 1 or 2 maids 2) Activities and Times: Mornings during maid service 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functi o nal Requirements: Shelves of linens and storage of maids' supplies 3.3) Psychplogica1 Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/ . Cool: 4.2) Thermal: . 4 . . 3) Vent i.l ati on: . . ..... . . ........ 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies}: 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): 2 to 4.5 square feet per guest room Minimum: Optimum: Generous: 11) Other Comments: RIITI T Preiser 1985

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' --..... 0 .... --PROGRAMMING: Gara e 1} Occupants Who and _how many? 1 Or 2 2) Activities and Times: When parking cars or maintenance vehicles 3} Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2} Functional Requirements: For snow removal equipment, cars 3.3) Psychological Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) Thermal: . 4.3) .Venti 1 at i . on: . -... .. ' .. " . . . . . . ) . . 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7} Special Requirements: 8} Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 300 Optimum: 500 Generous: 750 11} Other Comnents: _ _. __ ..... _ _. -t----TUI:" DIITI T CI\11/TDfU..IMt"t.IT Llnl.f"n.::onn Pl"l">iC::I">I" lQRI;

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PROGRAMMING: Mechanical Room 1) OccupantsWho and ,how many? " 2) Activities and Times: 3) Occupant Requirements: 4) 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 2 hour fire rated walls 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychological Requirements: Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) T her mal: ..4.3) Ventilation: 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: (Lodge-Functional) Fire resistive walls : ....... . .. .. 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): service In basement l e v e l , n ear to 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Specinl Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area {Square Feet): 6 square feet per guest room Minimum: Optimum: Generous: 11) Other Comments: ,... ____ _ ..._ _ _. __ ...__.J .r ____ nnnl"'nlluUTlll"' "TUI:" DIITIT .... .,. l.lnl-f="n2nn Pv-.:>ic.:>v-lQRS

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(Studio) PROGRAMMING: Recording Studio A 1) Occupants-Who and how many? Musicians 1 to 20 Engineers -1 to 2 Visitors -1 to 4 2) 3) 4) .. Activities and Times: Performing music for recording purposes, also video recording. Use would be 24 hours per day, or as needed. Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable 3.2) Functional Requirements: Size & shape of room to accomodate vary ing of isolation areas separated w/glass 3.3) Psycholo _ g1cal Requ1rements: comfortable place; should give lift whi 1 e p rov id in. g relaxed sense; moods . to be created by zoned 1 i gh ing(colored spots) for creative spirit to be protected & enhanced Amb1ent Environment: 4. 1) 4.2) .. . -4.3) Heat/Cool: Oversized ducts/lead lined Thermal: Thermostat control Ventilation: o _perated; _.oversized ducts 5) 4.4) 4.5) Lighting: Theatrical lighting from above; spots on dimmers Acoustics: Special construction/ no parallel walls, absorpive materials as needed, 20 feet ceiling height Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Next to Control Room A; near lounge; near rest room; near to practice rooms; near to Studio B 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: mike stands, etc. Baffles, grand piano, music stands, 7) 8) 9) 10) Specia.( Requirements: Electrical outlets; isolation areas; video hookups; viewing into control room; studio access via sound lock Materials/Finishes: Specially selected interior finishes to enhance acoustical properties with flexibility; drapery rods with heavy drapes to alter acoustic properties; double door interlock Codes/Agency Requirements: 1985 UBC Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 800 Optimum: 1000 Generous: 1200 11) Other Coll1llents: Color studies; would like visual acces to natural setting outdoors. Special construction: floating slabs, special roof, overlapping joints for gypboard, randomly placed studs .-_____ .._ _ _. __ ...__.J ..r: ____ nnnf'nllu•n•of' Tur::-DIITIT t:MI/TDf'INMt:t.IT r:,H+nl"' PrPic:Pr lQAS

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(Studio) PROGRAHMING: Engineer Control Room A 1) Occupants-Who and how many? 1 to. 2 engineers 2 to 6 visitors 2} Activities and Times: Engineering of recording, mixing; also viewing area for visitors 3} Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: Lockable 3.2} Functional Requirements: Working on recording 3.3) Psychplogica1 Requirements: Should be conducive to work and to creativity 4) A mbient Environment: 4. 1 ) Heat/ Coo 1 : 0 v e r size ducts ; return ducts to be 1 e ad 1 i n e d 4.2) Thermal: 4.3) Ventilation:Yes, will. be. b y syst. em 4.4) Lighting: on dimmers, v ariet y of lighting 4.5} Acoustics: Live end, dead end, back wall is conc ave, rear wall diffuser, special attention to acoustics 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies}: Directly nex t to S tudio A , n ear l ounge area, rest rooms, s t orage, mechanical roo m wit h the electrical e quipment 6} Occupant Equipment Requirements: Delays , reverbs, compressors, tape machines, mixing board , speakers, etc . Engineer chairs; sofa for people viewing into recording studio. 7) Specia.( Requirements: Wiring under floor, plugs with lines 8) Materials/Finishes: Parquet wood floor, no parallel walls, 2 layers of s loping glass for viewing into studio 9) Codes/A9ency Requirements: 198 5 UBC 10) 11) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 350 Optimum: 450 Generous: 550 Other Cornnents: Also see recording Studio A comments on color and construction. Construction: Raised with wiri n g beneath platform wh ich leads i n to electrical room

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(Studio) PROGRAMMING: Recording St11dio B (See Studio A requirements) 1) Occupants-Who and ,how many? 1 to 6 musicians 2) Activities and Times: Recording music -could be 24 hours 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychplogical Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4 . 2 ) The rma 1 : 4.3) Ventilation: 4.4) Lighting: 4.5) Acoustics: " • " #' • • • •• • ' .. o e ,• , "•., 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to Engineer Control Room B and near to Studio A 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 400 Optimum: 600 Generous: 800 11) Other Cofi1Tlents: -rttr"' niiTI T .. IUt:""IT D ..... o;r-0""

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(Studio) PROGRAMMING: Engineer Control Room B ( See Control Room A) 1) Occupants-Who and how many? 2) Activities and Times: 3) Occupant Requirements: Engineers: 1 to 2 Visitors: 1 to 4 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psych9logical Requirements: 4) A mbient Environ ment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) Thermal: -4.3) .. Ventilation:. 4. 4) Lighting : 4.5) Acoustics: " . 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Adjacent to Studio B 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 200 Optimum: 350 Generous: 450 11) Other

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I NG: ' ) up Rooms -6 1) Occupants-Who and how many? 1 or. 2 per room 2) Activities and Times: Used for practicing music and/or warming up. Used gnerally by individuals. 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: Private! 3.3) Psychplogical Requirements: 4) A mbient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4 . 2) Thermal: 4.3) .Venti .lation: Natural and mechanical. ,, . , _ ........ . 4.4) Lighting: Natural and backup with incandescent 4.5) Acoustics: Acoustically private 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near studios 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: 2 or 3 with pianos, seating, desk with computer and writing space availalbe 7) Specict( Requirements: View to outside 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: SO Optimum: 80 Generous :100 11) Other Comments: J:"n.-m;:o+ f'.-nm oonr.DL'.MMHJr. RIITI T FNVTRnNMnJT _ Frlit.nr Preiser 1985

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-, PROGRAMMING: Lounge for Studios/Control Rooms 1) Occupants-Who and how many? Musicians: 1 to 25 Engineers: 1 to 4 Visitors: 0 to 10 2) Activities and Times: For resting, ta 1 king, watching video, smoking, drinking, eating, reading, card games; 24 hours operation possibl 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: Space for sitting, eating, etc. 3. 3) Psych()l ogica 1 Requirements: Homelike atmosphere, warm, comfy 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool : 4.2) Thermal: .... .. 4.3) Ventilation: Natural, -.as wellas .me.chani_ cal . 4.4) Lighting: Incandescent, and natural light ..... 4.5) Acoustics: gress Soundproof so as to not interupt recording in pro 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near to studios and control rooms; restrooms; kitchen; practice rooms 6 ) Occupant Equipment Requirements: Furnishings: chairs, tables for eating, living roo m furn., video equipment, .bookcases, etc. 7) Specia( Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: Carpeting 9) Codes/A9ency Requirements: 1985 UBC 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 400 Optimum: 600 Generous: 800 11) Other Corrments: ,... ____ ..._ _ _, __ .r ___ Tur::-DIITI T t'l'fi+nv1985

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(Studio) PROGRAMMING: Kitchen 1) Occupants-Who and how many? I ' 2) Activities and Times: Storage of snack foods for those working in studio; open anytime studios are open 3) Occupant Requirements: 3.1) Health/Safety & Security Requirements: 3.2) Functional Requirements: 3.3) Psychplogical Requirements: 4) Ambient Environment: 4.1) Heat/Cool: 4.2) Thermal: -4.3) -Ventilation: .... k>i..tchen .fa.n 4.4) Lighting: Provide natural light 4.5) Acoustics: 5) Locational Requirements (Adjacencies): Near studio lounge • I • • 6) Occupant Equipment Requirements: cupboards, refrigerator, microwave 7) Special Requirements: 8) Materials/Finishes: 9) Codes/Agency Requirements: 10) Area (Square Feet): Minimum: 40 Optimum: 60 Generous: 100 11) Other Corrments:

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. . ... ' -...... ... 4NAL}'SIS ...... , . .

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MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Past region in which Middle Park lies was claimed by Vasquez Coronado in his expedition of 1540-42 and was held by Spain until 1800. In 1800, Napoleon forced Spain to cede most of the section and in 1803 the land was sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. Colorado territory was established with its present boundaries in 1861. Before the Spainards' arrival, however, the Northern Utah (Utes) Indians inhabited Middle Park. It had been their favori t e hunting ground and game included elk, deer, antelope , bear, mountain sheep, buffalo, ,grouse, hens, ducks.and_geese •.. Additionally_ , . Hot Sulphur.,Springs was a main attraction for the Indians because of the curative powers of t h e springs, and the high mountain peaks provided protection for the Utes from the Arapahoes and Cheyennes. The first white men began to appear around 1812 and they came for hunting and fur trading which became a major industry of the time. Long's Peak (14,255 feet in height), at the eastern boundary of Grand County, was first discovered by Major Stephen Long who came to the Rockies in 1819. Gold was discovered on Willow Creek in the 1850's and with such discovery came new settlers. This greatly alarmed the Indians and fighting became the norm. In 1861, the Overland Mail Bill provided for a daily mail and semiweekly pony express. E. L. Berthoud scouted for the best routes between Denver and Salt Lake to accomodate travel. Roads began to be built for the

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MACRO-ENVIRONMENT: Past (cont.) wagons transporting visitors and settlers to Middle Park. The Continental Divide, being the "great wall" of the Front Range, continued to be a barrier to easy and direct transportation between east and west until 1928, when the first train passed through the Moffat Tunnel providing transcontinental traffic. ............ . . ....... .

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MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Present .. Transportation: By car -it is about 80 miles from Denver to the site; west of Denver, the site is near to Arapahoe National Forest land. It is a bout a 1 1/2 to 2 hour drive, I-70 to US 40, over Berthoud Pass a nd through Winter Park, Fraser and Tabernash Amtrak -dail y service west from Chicago and east from San Francisco Limosine/Taxi service -from the airport in Denver to Winter Park, and Granby Airstrip at Silver C reek Ski Ar e a Rec reation : Downhill skiing at Winter Park, Mary Jane, Idlewild, Silver Creek, a nd now i n . • . V a _sque z .. C ross countr y skiin g Horseback r i ding Huntin g (deer, e lk) Golf Jeep tour s Hikin g Tennis Wind s urfing Ballooni n g Min eral baths Rodeo Winter Park Jazz Festive! (summertime) Snowmobiling Roller skating Tubing/sledding Swimming Ice skating Ultralight Flight Th eatre Grand County Museum Sa iling (Grand Lake) Movie theatres Fauna and Flora: Extinct in this region are the grizzly bear, timber wolf, otter and mountain goat. Mammals include mule dear, elk, frogs, toads, moose, Rocky Mountain

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MACRO-ENVIRONMENT: Present (cont.) #Fauna and Flora: (cont.) bighorn sheep, black bears, mountain lion, coyotes, wolverines, beaver, squirrels, gophers, mice, porcupines, chipmunks, marmots, etc. Birds include hummingbird, great horned owl, ouzel, mountain bluebird, orioles, warblers, golden eagles, red tailed hawks, ravens, gray jays (aka camp robbers) etc. Fish i .nclude rainbow trout, brook trout, brown trout and cutthroat trout. Wildflowers include snowdrops, bluebells, wild lily-of-the-valley, buttercup, blue columbine, Indian paintbrush, avalanche lily, purple larkspur, wild iris, shooting star, etc. Trees include Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, white fir, lodgepole pine and aspen. Geomorphology and Geography "Many geomorphic processes have been active in developing the surface forms of the region, which was uplifted some 135 million years ago. Consequently, there is no single dominant topographic feature for the range as a whole; valleys vary from deep and narrow to shallow and broad, some interstream uplands are knife-edged whle others are a broad, gently rolling surface; some high peaks have broad, rounded tops, while others are sharp, with only a few square yards on their summit. The prevalent rocks are Precambrian granites and metamorphics in large batholithic masses and Tertiary quartz that occurs in part as stocks, dikes, and sills injected into the Precambrian rock. A complex pattern of faults has affected topography in many parts of the area, but the most dominant factor in determining the modern appearance of the Indian Peaks is glacial activity." (Taken from The Indian Peaks Wilderness Area by John Murray)

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MACRO-ENVIRONMENT OF MIDDLE PARK: Future • The Middle Park region has been continually attracting not only tourists but people who have built or are building weekend residences. Some people have settled in as regular customers maintaining year-round residences. While the economy might not support masses of people, it has steadily grown and appears to be developing as a stable mountain community. Several residential developments are in planning stages and commercial expansion continues as well. Additionally, much .of the Fraser Valley has recently been sold by the Jesuits to developers. Furthermore, discussions have been held to consider the possibility of building a tunnel t o Middle Park in order bypass Bert. hopd . Pass.

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MICRo-ENVIRONMENT site consists of 40 undeveloped acres of densely forested land with excellent southern exposure. The trees are mainly lodgepole pines and aspen with low shrubs. The site slopes down toward Middle Park (from about 2% to 15%) and is greatly enhanced by granite outcroppings which dot the site.

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SITE PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 48

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 49

ACCESS TO SITE Traveling from Denver, one would drive I-70 West and t ake the exit to Berthoud Pass which is U.S. 40. Over the pass, through Winter Park, Fraser and Tabernash, turn right mile past Tabernash. A county maintained gravel road winds through a residentail development called Winter Park Highlands. Distance to site is approximately 2.5 miles from U.S. 40 turnoff. Windham Hill Lodge will make use of the existing roads adding only an entry drive and service road to the lodge. maps. Please see

PAGE 50

ACCESS TO SITE / ' / -, , , , ' --, ---. , , --,. ------, , , . , , , ,---, ' I I I I . I I I ' . I I ' . I I \ I I I \ \ I I \ I I \ \ \ \ ' ---.... ----------. --------l i I fi ' I .. -------... -; ,,,o --.. --...... --. uoo---' ... ' ' ' ' I ', ' ' ' I \ ' ' \ ' ' ' . I I I \ ' ' ' \ ' 0 • ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' \ ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' I ' ' ' \ ' I I ' ' \ \ ' ' ' \ ' I ' ' ' ' \ \ I I I I \ I ' I I i \ I I I I I \ I \ I I I I I I I I I I ' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I \ I \ I I I I I ... / . I I I I I I. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I ! I I 1 I I I I I I I ' I I I ' ' \ ' --< / I )\ I 0 .. I I I \ \ . \ ' ' \ \ \

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' ' ' ' CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAINAGE ON SITE " As rains flow downhill at the west side of the site, water can collect in the parking area and be carried through pipes so as to drain around and away from the lodge and studio buildings. Water from the buildings will be retained in a rubble well as described in Drainage Calculations section. sketch below. See schematic . . . . I ' ' \ ' \ \ \ \ \ ' -...... __ ------------------,,oo----.... ' ' ' ' \ ' ' --\ \ ' -i I I I I ' ' \ ' \ \ ' \ ' ' \ \ '. ' ' ' ' \ ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' \ ' \ \ \ ' ' I I \ I I ' ' ' ' ' ' \ ' \ \ 7v-l \ , I I ) ' ' . I ,' / ; / ) ,' I I ) I I I I ,' I ' I ,' ,' I I , , ,' , , , , , , , , ..,,' ,. .... ""' ,"" ,,' ' ' ' \ \ \ \ \ \ \ ' I I I I I I I I I I I I ' . ' I I . \ \ ' \ I ' I I I I I I ' I I I I I I I I I I I I , I I I I . • • . I I I I I I I I I I ' I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ' I I , I I I I ' I I I I I • I ' . -r ' I I I ,... \ 0 .. 'I I I \ \ \ \ ' ' ' \ \

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..... _..__ ,; UTILITIES Water: Water storage for human consumption and fire protection is uphill, west of the lodge in a tank. sizing. See Systems for Telephone: Lines are to be put in along entry road to lodge and then up the service road. Septic Tank: Located from the lodge and studio. Gas: Butane tank located beneath the terrace accessible at the service road .,._ • ...... • r • .. : • ... .., . -... "'.. . -.. '. . . . . .. ---Electricity: Existing power line as shown. 14.4 KVA available. Transformer underground. See Utilities Site Map on following page.

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UTILITIES ' ' ' ' ' ' ', ' ' .... ...., -.... ' ' .... , --, .... _ --' ' ' -' ' , . , I I ' I , . ' I I , I I ' , , , . , ' ' ' II , , I ' I I ' I ' I \ : I \ ' I ' \ I \ I \ I \ \ I \ ' --.... _ -----------------I E ' ' ' / ' ' I I ' ' / ' I / / I / / I / ' ' ' ' I I I I , ' ' ' ' , , , ' / I , ,. ' ' I " ' , ... _ , , .... ' ,, ' ... •' , ,,o-I / . I I / l ' I ---Fi I I I 0 I • Tckf-!lc.ne I I I I ' I ' ' \ I ' ' \ \ ' I"' ' \ ' \ \ ' ' ' ' \ ' ' ' ' ' \ \ I ' ' \ I uoo--..... ' ' \ \ \ \ I ' \ \ .... ' \ \ I .... ' ' ' ' ' ' ' \ \ I ' ' ' \ ' I ' ' ' \ I ' ' ' ' ' ' ' I I ' ' \ \ I I \ '-{ \ \ ' I I \_, \ \ ' \ I I \ \ \ ' I c,., I \ \ I \ I I I l v'\v 1 (( I I I I I .. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ' I I I I I I I I I 0 I ?// / I I I I I I I I I t, (' I I I I / ( j _, I I I. I I I \ / \. ),. v ,. /II I I I I I ,...,-.., ' .,.., I I ' I ' ' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ' I I I I I I I ' I ' ' I \ \ ' \

PAGE 54

SOILS INFORMATION The site consists of decomposed granite with a topsoil of approximately 1! to 2 feet deep. Building foundations would sit directly on the granite as its strength is and easily bears the load of the constructed facilities . . . . .... . . . . ... ... ........ ................ .. -; .. • . . .. ....... -. . ... . : ...

PAGE 55

. CLIMATE ANALYSIS ... r; ....... ...... . : ; - • . _ .. ' . . ............ ,.. . . . . .. . . ' ....

PAGE 56

CLIMATE-SUMMARY The climate of Colorado is largely determined by two factors of its geography; first, its inland location, far removed from any major sources of moisture; and second, its high elevation with mountain ranges extending generally north and south. Precipitation in the mountains is much greater than in the plains and sometimes reaches annual averages of over 50 inches in the ianges: Colorado is located within the broad band of the temperate ... 'westerlies: ' At the vari o u s seasons of the year the s e winds are air from the south. Thus Colorado may get air of varying char-acteristics from any of the following sources: l . Cold, gen-erally dry air from the north and northwest. 2 . Cool, moist maritime air from the Pacific Ocan. 3. Warm, moisture laden iar from the Gulf of Mexico. 4 . Dry, hot, tropical air from Mexico and southwest desert areas. Mountain stations show a great difference among themselves. Generally there is a decrease in temperature and increase in rain fall with higher altitude. Snow covered mountain parks and val-leys often experience very cold nigth-time temperatures in the I winter when skies are clear and the air is still. These tempera-tures occasionally drop to 50 below zero. The summer season in the mountains is cool and refreshing, which makes them an ideal vacation area. Average temperatures. are in the neighborhood of 60 and extreme high may fall i n the

PAGE 57

range of 90 to 95. Above 7,000 feet, nights are quite cool throughout the summer, and the usual bright sunshine makes the I days comfortably warm. Even in midwinter when air temperatures are low, the warm sunshine and clear air of higher altitudes make such temperatures much more comfortable than would be exper-ienced under other circumstances. ,. .. ., ..., • ... \ '• • : I, • ... .•, • .• :
PAGE 58

1 Nor,.,.,al M01x. f'ior rncd M i r1. fZ.ec.ord Low

PAGE 59

I I / l ,'' : ' ' FRASER, COLORADO STATION NO. 93006 Station y M r:s\ 0 1-3 4 -t. 7-10 Stat1on N knott knots knot! A T R l:i . N 90 101 101 NNE 42 60 49 f"E 22 55 23 ENE 16 16 12 E 19 18 18 -ESE 15 25 19 SE 21 41 31 SSE 31 70 35 s 60 92 28 ssw 25 39 18 i 1 sw 40 73 15 I WSW 104 149 13 w 95 114 46 I .. •• • 25 22 20 'i\W 68 127 164 ... 17 38 55 CALM j LS 1390 690 1040 647 1 F!U. lJUENCY, OF OCCURRENCE By Groupe APRIL 1965 MARCH 1966 p.,riod 11-1& 28-40 41 and Total knot• knott knoll 4 knots ovtr and over 64 5 271 5 1 115 4 82 1 29 ' : 3 18 57 16: 13 73 18 7 97 19 10 134 14 4 138 8 . 5 70 9 3 1 101 15 7 184 41 21 222 21 8 1 72 143 41 3 47845 10 148 = -.. 441 138 5 2271 Af'.INUAL \ sUiU'ACE r.-1:-;os JOB NO. 8824 Total No. of .,. Oba. 8.3 361 3.6 157 2.4 104 1.0 45 l.S 76 2.0 88 2, I 118 3.e 165 4.6 198 2.2 95 3.2 141 6.6 288 7.j 317 2.2 I 97 i 12.6 I I ; 3.E 165 ; ! I I I 31. I 1390 i d-. !1oo.g I I 4351 1 i I l I I I ! i _j

PAGE 60

:.SIIMI>IAI!J UF' IIONTHI. Y CLlo4fi'C: llATfl Hill f'R CIILIIWAUt l f '(HI YF:IIWS 1'131 SllfiSTATTON NO, !>Ill J IJIVlSitm J. I, fiT 1 3'.1 !'17 (,lJNG T TIIIH. I()'> 5(1 H'>hiJ n : n JAN n ;11 l\1'11 MfiY .}liN f Attr. IICT NIIV nt:r. A ' W I MUNTHt.Y MEA II MAXP1UI4 TF;'lP (r) AV.,;, 2'1,1 3l,h 37 .J \1, j f>ij,fi '14 ,h "l'l,ll &1,,4 55.2 3'1,5 31. 7. !>l,l MAX. Jt>,j 41,1> 41>,5 57 , . l hb,1 73.h 7H, 2 72 , ? b4 • . i 4'1,7 J 31, 'l :14. , 414,11 143H 19.1'1 1':170 I 'I J I i'lh\1 I 'I J ' l l':lhH 1"1>1 l'lh'J I In AH ; , -5.9 •2,R J.l> \h,ll ?.4,3 'l'l.h H • . l 24.1 11\, 4 s,3 .?. 14,5 fiX. 7,5 1'l,IJ 12,11 2').. 2 'IH, 5 .13./. 37 , 9 3'1." Jl.4 :.u.t t:l • . , 5.'1 IM,5 H:Af< 195J l\13\1 14 .14 I \14 J 1'147 I 1'141> 1 \145 1'1411 I \14' 1 I''"" 194ft 14411 IHN, -I 7. 1 5,1 •H , 5 7,1 l\1,1> , '1.1 • I 'l'l,'l l'>,H 11,q Ill,<; -4.0 .,,(1 'I,H YF:AH l'lbl I4 l9bH l\154 141>4 Yf:fiRS (JF" Rf;Citf.2 l • t) 4'1,2 411,1 'lb,1 14, I 1.1 2'1 . ) n :AH I '131 lq3') 1':1b'l I :.!+ I 'I h). 1'1'11 l'lh':l l9hH l'll,b l4b4 n:ARS llf' WE:CIIIHI 43. 44, 4 I, 44, 41, 4 I, 4 l . 4J, 4J. 41. 4 I, 4J, "'I • IJE:GRI::F.: !lAYS {f\fiSj,; 65r) AVE, 1671,1 1450,3 14211,1 11)37 ,5 12b.9 4114. I 3.14.11 t>:lS,I '17.1. 2 12'1 '1,7 1"40,51?.015, 7 'lAX, 11!115 173" lh511 12r, ( t 1112 j 41ll 4H'I 141 IIIli 1771'. 1 :I.M' I'I YI::AH 1'1&4 191>4 1<>1>4 \\1'/!) IQ71 f 1'11>4 1357 1157 l'l45 HI 4 n:fiiiS IJf' Rf.CUHU 23. 24. 13, 24. :.!4, :.u. J. .1. '}J, 23. 2J. 23, 7J, v.. II! I !lAYS MAX TEMP GTR nR E:!l 90f' o.o 1),0 o.o O,ll o . o n.n 0,0 .o 11.0 o .o o.o o.n .o MAX, II u n II l) 0 () . I 11 o 1'14tJll, 11 I Yf;AH 1'148 1'14H I \141J 1941! 144H j44H 1'1411 1'11>'1 14411 1\1411 1':141! 1'1b'l MIll, 0 IJ 0 n u 0 0 0 0 0 0 II 0 lq74+ 1974+ 1914+ 191H \Q74+ 197.!+ 141H I '17 J+ 191.1+ 1973+ 197 J+ 1'17h 1 '1'1.1+ YF;AHS llf' Rf.CIJUI) 25, 2&. '1.1\, 'lh. 25. 7.S, 2'>. ?.:>, :1. 1. NtJ llAYS MAX TEMP J,f.SS till • : u 32F "Vf_ , 19.7 14,0 9 , 2 7., 5 • I 11.0 11.0 11,0 .o ,9 7,b 111,4 1J .4 IIAX, 2& 7.11 14 7 1 0 (I I '1'18.11 I 7 I b 27 11!7 Yt.Ail 19ft4+ 191>1! 1'1114 1970 l<1h7 19'1H 194H 1971 19"9 1 '1ftl!+ I IJ(, '/+ 1<>h4 MIN, II 3 1 0 0 (I 0 0 0 0 Q 40 Yt::AW 1'154 1954 l '144 1 '17?. + 1474+ 19'11+ 1973+ 197J+ 1 '1'13 + 1q4q 1'150 11154 YEARS (lf RECIIRII 21>. " 7.&. 27. 2,, 25. 7.5_ . 2S, 75. 'l.(,. '}t>, 'l4 , !No !lAYS Htll l'F :HP liP EO 3?.f AVt; , 211,3 j(),'l 2'1,9 29.2 .22,] t3 ,II 11 , R 27.7 30,7 2'1.9 j(I,:.! "1 II, 30 2H 30 2R 2b 14 I 1 23 2R ').Cj Jn JU1 y.,;l\f( l'lh9+ 1974+ l'lhh+ l9bl IQ51l+ 1'144 l'l54 -1\IF.I 1'172 1950+ 1955+ 1<14'1 YEARS 2h, 11. ;!h , 1.1. 21. 7.'>. 'J.h. 7.b, 2,, 7.1>. 2h , 2b, 2 1, Nll llfiY5 kilo TF:MP llR E;U 0 F AVF;, 20,3 l.l.'l 3.0 • I n •. , 0,11 0,0 • 1 1,0 10.3 JO,J Mil X. 2H 2to 7.5 8 I f) () I) 1 , :.10 :n ll'l n :flll 1\lhl 1 9ft4 l'lb4 1970 19.,7+ 1'-1411 t'I4R 19411 1970+ 19&q 1'154 14hH Mltl , 'I H s n 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 I'} 1953 19511 l 'l hll+ 1972+ I Q74+ 1'173• t 3+ 1473+ 1473+ 1'17.!• 1954 l':l'i5+ I'I>J YF:I\WS nr 'lb. 27. ih, n . 'J.h. 25. 2 5 . 25. 2">. 'l5. 2". ?5. :l j. lllr.HEST te:MP.,;RATIIIIF: (F) n .MP 50 so; b.l 7?. HI 111 114 4H ll'l 73 &5 5H Yt:AH ANU UAYIIJ5020+1'!'iH'll+l'14h311 194BO l <>422ft 19547.3 I QJ'IIO 191'.901 1'14H04+19!>H114 1'14701. IIJ:l214 1 '17'J114 I Qf>HIII 19F.H24+1Q5930 197131 I '1571'1.+ I '162?b H:ARS llf ru:cn1w 43, 44. 4 .1. 44. 4 .1. 44. 4 3 . 43 , 4 .1. 4J. oj .1, 4J. f\Y C111AlHI\Illl CL1'1An: IW A 'PI I T C .... o : Clti.IHI/\Itll snn: FIIHT CIJI, I oiNS , Cll J I .Hill 4'11 -

PAGE 61

f' SUIIM-Ill UF MONTIH.Y CLIMATIC OATA FUll FIVISF:H SliiIIJN loAT • 39 57 TUllE IIC1' NIJV -.nuTHI,T (JN) AVE . 1.60 t.nJ 1.9 '). 1.1.& l.ft'l !.4ft 1.10 1.7.3 I.JP Mnx. •"" t..7l 4.7h J.nu s.l4 I YJ6 11Jl 19hl 1 YbY IUrl. .15 .lb .'ll .2J .14 .2Q . 1.1 .nJ .us .'1.2 .:l. l YEAH 1931 1915 1442 1937 1'174 1'144 1 949+ YF:ARS IIF I!F:CIIHIJ H. 44. 44. 44 . H . 43 . 41. 43. 4J. IIJ. 4J. 43. DAlLY I'I!ECIP (rN) Ml(lllflT 1.0. 1 1.04 .17 1.2 1 7..50 1 • .111 1.31 .97 3.'10 1.Jl .hl YF:Ail 1\Nfl llAYI9517.9 l'lhll14 1971'1.0 1<1'>704 t9<;Hn'> l 'lft'l.l'l. 1'171!19 1'1&904 19551S 1973111 I)F IIECIJI(IJ :16. ').7. 2h. 'J.l . ;n . '1.'1. 'J.h . 7h. 2h. 2"• ?b. Mflfl'f•lt,Y l>IJt llif'ALL (IN ) 1.4.9 :n.n 20.5 1'1. 2 4.:.1 .'i U.U tl.U 1.0 7.1 Ill.] l,;.q MnX. 17.0 111.11 !l.!l o.u 14.0 J:7.0 Y t:Ail HJb I9Jii l''l'l ' 1447 19 3 1 . 1 9711 \91.'1 1 4 4 h MIN. J . o '> • 0 U . 0 J . o I!. (l I! . n U . 0 II t 0 n. 0 !I • 0 U. 0 4 • 0 1QJ1 1915 1'174 1949 1'114+ 1'17:1+ 191:7+ 1977.+ 197 3+ 1'14'1 Yf.AHS fW IIECLIIW ').7 . 211. Jl. 37.. 3H. 4:J.. 4'1.. 31. 27. r.RT S T llt::I'TH SNUW liN r.J HHl IN MIIN (IN) 47 4'1 4 5 4fJ 14 S n :AH Alii! 14 571!1 197011 (I II 2'i . Y E AH.<; IJF' RECIIIW 24. 24. H . '1.4. 2J. 2J. tl•J I'RF.CIP GTH OR F.:f) 0.1 IN AVf; . "'AX. n : Ail Mil l • Y EAH YEAilS llf' llF:CfiiHI NU DAYS I'HKCIP GTil Ull f.O 11.5 IN AVF.:. MAX. YF.:Ail lilt!. n ;AII YE:AilS IIF llECIIRIJ I NU DAYS I'H KCIP t:l'R rtll gn 1.u IN AVF; . Y K AII Mlll. YEAH OF' RECUIW H.4 Ill 1953 1 1'1&1 21>. .4 2 1 !11>2+ 0 1 914+ .o 1 1'151 f) 1974+ :.15. NUMHt:R Of UAYS O.U Mil X • 0 YI::Ail 1'156 MlN. 0 n : llfl 1'174+ YEARS nf' Rf.CUHU 1 8 . ** NUn: : MArl Y STATliJNS flU NtJ. IIF DAYS wl'l'H :;NOW 1111 r.HIIUIW An: . (G1'1! IIR EU I lNt:H fl'l t;HrtUNU) MAX. n :AH Mll'l. H :AH Yf.AH5 fW llf.CltllU .2 2 1967 0 1 9 H + 21>. .o I 1955 0 1'174• 21>. s .H :J.I 2 l'lb9 1h. " J 1 94H f) 1'174+ o .o ll II I '174+ o.o u.o 0 0 19'>6 n o 1974+ 1974+ 19. NflT llt:CORIJ Al,l, :111.2 1977.+ 2H 1 9 '11 + to. 2&.9 J l 1<171+ II 1 '114 H • 7.4 11:! 1'15 1 :J. I '11>3+ 21. • r J I I 1<172+ 21>. . o 1 1971 I) I '114+ 21>. 5.4 1 5 JQ5] II 1'174 27. .4 :J. lQhQ + I) 1'174+ 'I. h . . 2 I I'I'IH II l'llo\+ "" ... o 1 7 1'14Y I 1 • 11>11+ 21 . 1.11 3 19!>4+ , , 1973+ ' '-" .I I 1914+ (I t '173+ 2b. h.4 17 1'14H 2 I '171+ . 9 5 1 9 40 u 1'1711+ • 1 I f) I 973+ o.u o.o o . o .1 II 0 !I I 1'151. \956 l'lb2+ 0 u 0 0 1974+ 1'114+ 1974• 1973+ I !! . -1 'I • 111 • 1 H • IIHL UCCIJHHE:NCF.:S . 11;.4 3 U 1970 H 1 9!.3 10. 1.7 r; I 'll>') 0 1'114+ ln. o.o II \'lh] II 1972+ 4 . o . u (I l 'l'>.l 0 1'112+ 1 n . f) 13 . 31 22 41! 0 1'15<127 196'1115 19551H 19'il31 26. 25. 2J. 7 . 1 ." ?4. h.R II! 7. 197(1+ 21>. .II 3 1'15 7+ II 197tf+ 25. n.o () lY4H () 1973• 25. o.o 0 1'151> II I 913+ 11!. TIH :St: n.o II 19fd II 1 '173+ I 1. s.3 12 11 0 1973+ :1.5. 4.1; 12 1949 I 19f>'i+ 2&. :4 2 1970 + 0 1'113• 2S. • l :1. 1969 f) 1'17Jt 1!>. o.o o.o 0 0 195h 19 5 & 0 II 1<173+ 1973+ 1 ij. 1 H. OATA MAY NUT .4 4 1970 0 1'172+ '1. 4.7 1.2 19!.4 0 1913+ to. ". 2 • IY 1<14H 1 I 'IIIIi 2h. .] 'l 1'15 5 0 1 Q12 + 1'>. u.o 0 0 147 .1+ 1'1.1 'lll l9bH 1 19bJ ... R.? 21 1951 7 19"b• :7b. .7 4 1':151 0 19741+ • I I ('}73+ f) 1 977.+ 2'1.1\ 31 1971+ :0 191\Y " jii.Jj 14:>7 11 .u4 1'144 4J. H4.3 19hb+ lJ • I 7 1'149 . I l4. " J l'lh9+ 0 19711+ :lol. 11>1 1'171 4. CIILIIRI\00 O .Nn: k n r fiiiiYF.IISJTI rnwr col,t.IN5, c o (303) 4'11 H545

PAGE 62

SOLAR ACCESS

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. : .. • • 4 ; ... .... . .... t . .... . -,.... ., .. ... _.. I'.I ;r " •,.,; =' : ,... .... .. -I' . '.ZONI.NG

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ZONING At present, the site is zones for residential, however, Planner for Grand County, Tim DeWitt, suggested that the property be rezoned (down-zoned) to Forestry and Open Zoning which allows for lodge and ancillary cabins. Necessary steops to be taken in the zoning process would be as follows: ... .• • i J . • • '•"\ ••• -water rights .. -Submit building plans with engineered septic design, engineered foundation design and show adequate water supply Designs would have to be submitted 30 days prior . --;.. -.. • to Planning Commission m eeting . --Such req-uest. would be advertised in the Grand County Jounal. Additional water right would more than likely be necessary (Glenwood Springs -Water Court #5)

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; t . '!' • • .... ; .. \ ! .... • ..... . --•':, ... CODES .. • 4..... ... .. ...... .

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f . , . BUILDING CODE SEARCH Project Name: Windham Lodge and Studios, Thesis Project Location: Grand County, Colorado Applicable Code Name: Uniform Building Code Date: 1985 .. \ Item 1. Fire Zone 2. Occupancy Classification: R-1 Principal occupancy: Hotel Other Use: Recording studios 3. Occupancy separations required: R-1 one hour 4 . Construction type: Type IV -Heavy Timber 5. Maximum allowable floor area: R-1: unlimited Section Table 5-A .Als o see 1202 Table 5-A 702, 1202 Table 17A 505,506,507 The total combined floor area may be twice that permitted by Table 5-C for one sotry buildings and floor area shall not exceed that permitted for a one-story building. If sprinklered, areas in Table 5-C may be tripled in one-story buildings and doubled in buildings of more than one story. 6. Maximum allowable height: 65 feet R-1: three stories See 5-D

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Item 7. Fire resistance of exterior wall 8. A (see occupancy type and construction type) R-1: One hour less than 5 feet Openings in exterior walls R-1: Not permitted less than 5 feet 9. Windows required in rooms: .. Habitable rooms: area z 1/20 of floor area; minimum = 10 square feet Section Table 5-A Tabl e 5-A 1205 bathrooms, laundry rooms : operable window area 1 /20 floor area; minimum = 11 square feet 1206 Enclosed or semi-enclosed-courtsi req. si&e: 3 feet wide for one and two stories. If more than 2 stories, width shall be increased at a rate of 1 foot per story. Courts: minimum = 3 feet wide; if windows opening on opposite sides, minimum = 6 feet. If greater than 2 stories, increase court one foot width and 2 foot length per story. 11. Minimum ceiling heights in rooms: 1 2 . Not less than 7'-6"; kitchens, halls, bathrooms, toilets at 7 feet measured to lowest projection from ceiling Minimum floor area of rooms: Every dwelling unit shall have at least one room 120 square feet. Other habitable rooms except 70 square feet. Width: habitable 7 feet in any dimension ••.. 1 1207 1207

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Item Section 13. Fire resistive requirements: Table 17-A Exterior bearing walls Interior bearing walls Exterior non-bearing walls Structural frame 4 1 4 1 h ours or heavy timber 1 4 . Permanent partitions Vertical openins Floors Roofs Exterior d o-ors Mezzanine floors Roof coverings Boiler room enclosure Structural requirements: 1 or heavy timber 1 Heavy timber Heavy timber Heavy t imber 1 hour See 3203(e), 4307 2 hours to be determined 15. Exits: Occupancy load -basis (sq.ft./occupant) Number of exits required: Every building shall have at least one exit Minimum width of exits: Total width of exits total occupant load served divided by 50. Exit separation arrangement: reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked, others are available. Maximum allowable travel distance to exit: 150 feet, 200 feet with sprinklers. Distance may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within corridor c omplying with Sectio n 3305. Allowable exit sequence: Rooms may have one exit through an a djoining room which provide s a direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor provided total distance of travel does not exceed provisions in code. Chap. 33 3303(b) 3303(d)

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Item 16. Section Exit doors: swing in direction of exit travel Minimum width: 8 inches high 3 feet wide and 6 feet Maximum leaf width: 4 feet Width required for number of occupants: Use net dimension of exitway Exit corridors: Minimum width = 44 inches Required to have exit at -each end of corridor? No, if less than 20, feet .... Dead end corridors are allowed but maximum length is 20 feet. Wall fire resistance require -need not be o f fire resistive construction with occupant ioad. of .. 100 or ie'ss 'if spri-nkler' s 'ana srnok' e ..... detectors are installed. Doors and frames fire resistance required: When corridor walls are of one-hour fire resistive construction, door opening shall have smoke/draft control assembly . Stairs: Minimum width = 44 inches if occupancy load is 50 or more; 36 inches if occupancy load is 49 or less Maximum riser allowed: not less than 4" nor greater than 7" Minimum tread allowed: not less than 11" Are winders allowed? No Landings: Equal to width of stairway, not more than 44" where stair has straight run Maximum vertical distance between landings is 12 feet Required height of rails is 30" to 34" 3303(b) .. -...... 3306(b) 3306(g)

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Item . ; ... . Section Handrails: Required at each side: yes Intermediate rails required at stairs: Yes, if greater than 88" Maximum width between intermediate rails is 88" Exceptions are available: Private stairways 30" or less need only one. if less than 4 -risers, no rails are needed. Height above nosing: or less than 30" not more than 34" Intermediate rail required: Yes, if 8 8 " or wider an d shall b-e spac-ed approximately equally across the entire width Handrails return to wall at ends: Yes or shall terminate in newel posts or safety terminals. Handrails extend beyond stair: Yes, not less than 6" beyond top and botton risers. . ..... Stair to roof required: Yes, if 4 stories or more unless root's slope is greater than 4 in 12. Stair to basement restrictions: If basement stairway and stairway up terminate in same exit enclosure, an approved barrier shall be provided to prevent persons from continuing on into the basement. Access to roof required: If 4 or more stories approved hatch openable to exterior not less than 16 square feet in area. Horizontal exit requirements: Shall have fire protection rating of not less than one and one half hours. 3306 3301(b) 3308

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Item 17. Section Ramps: Maximum slope: shall not be steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal Handrails required: like stairs requirement Balcony rails: not less than 42" in height Where required: landi n gs, ramps , balconies, porches which are greater than 30" above grade or floor below Balusters or intermediate r ails required make it so 6" i n diam e ter canno t pass t hroug h Toilet room requirements: Lavatories -unobstructed space beneath lav at 30" wide, 29" h eight and 17" deep Drinking fountain requirements: Spout within 33" of floor and shall have upfront hand operat e d contr o ls. If in a lcove, alcove shall n o t be l ess than 32" i n width. Handicapped requirements: C l e a r space o f 42" wide and 48" long in front o f water closet stool. Entry has clear width o f 32" when located at the end and clear width o f 34" when located a t the s ide. Grab bars a t 33" t o 36" above and parallel to f loor; bars are 42" long. 511 ... . ,, ..... ......

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• ••••• l • • ....... ' ........ . ............. "' • • ••• DESIGN SOLUTION .. ........ -. . ... ,;.:,;. ....... """ ...... ,.,.;-. . : . . ... . . . " .. . ... . , .....

PAGE 73

; • • ' ' ' ' \ ,< I I I I I I I , , . ' ' I I I I \ \ \ ' I I \ \ I ; / ; ' ; ; ; I ' , ' ' ,-" -' I ' . l I I fi I I \ I I I \ I , I ' -----' ',, ' ' ' \ I ' \ \, ' \ \ ' ' ' \ \ ' ' I ' I ' ' \ ' ; ' ' ' ' ' ' ; " , , ' ' \ ' \ I I I I I ' ' ' / ' ; ' ' I ' ' \ I I I I I I I ' I I I I I ' I I ' , , I I ' ' ' ' / , I I I \ I I I ' ' , I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I \ ' / ' I ; I I I I I I I I I I I I WINDHAM HILL LODGE and STUDIOS Grand County, Colorado Thes i s Project By C h r i s ti n e M. E i t emiller Presented to the College of Architecture, Universi ty of Colorado at D e n ver December 1986 ( ' I Q . \ \ I I \ \ \

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i : I I I i l+ i I I l -----------------------_ j

PAGE 77

-. . "': . ...:_ .. .. . I ; ' I . ------itJt I ... _.; . . . . f : . ... ; , . ( ( ( ( '•\ ' ; .: ' .... _, ..

PAGE 78

' ,...---""' . , "--' r-. ' . '--._.; . I f;[. 7--' . \ . \ '1--( ' {'. / 0 % ' / -9 _ , '..., '': ' . . , _ ..... : ' .

PAGE 79

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 80

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 81

SYSTEMS

PAGE 82

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING -GENERAL INFORMATION Foundation: Drill to bedrock, insert reinforcing rods and pack with cement; place concrete -grade beams support bearing walls. Flooi: Truss joists bolted to stem wall; insulate throughout. Stpne veneer sits on shelf of concrete stem wall. Structure: Wood frame (2x6 construction @Z't" O.C., typical throughout). Exposed glulams in dining and living rooms. E nvelope: Wood siding (shingles or tongue in groove cedar siding) Roof: Skeletal system would consist of wood trusses. embrane would consist of plywood sheathing. Roofing wou l d consist o f woo d s h a k e s . U s e 1 5-1 b f e 1 t o v e r s h e a t hi n g Interiors: Partitions would be wood framing with gypboard, paint or wallpaper. Floor finishes would be tongue in groove wood floors, or tile or carpet. Sound insulation a s required.

PAGE 83

SCHEMATIC FRAMING PLAN OF LODGE l l

PAGE 84

\. ! CJISIN PLAN I . -.. ) . ' ( ' ' ( ( ( ) ./ ? ( \ ( .

PAGE 85

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 86

. ! ; t .:.. .. . I It-... I''. , .. I • l ,. • -.... • , .. ,, L. : • .,. J ,. l , l..a... , 1 , . • r t .. '1 ' ' .:; 1 • 1. . . • ' . J . 1 l • ' .. t ' •.. ,.. : . t .. • . , f 1' ..J. , ' f ... " ;-' • • ! . ' .. . I ' . . r .. . . , .... _. 1 , _ / / ) tr J w . ) ' \ I ) / . t ) I ) l---y . -"' . . t j 'r ..... 1 , .... . , I rJ!1; __./ \ J ' .. ,........ .. • . .... .. 0 0 JS'Bi!MOH ( .... / ( ( \ -_ (

PAGE 87

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

PAGE 88

SYSTEMS

PAGE 89

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING GENERAL INFORMATION Foundation: Drill piers to bedrock, insert reinforcing rods and pack with cement; piace concrete-grade.beams support bearing walls. Flooi: Truss joists bolted to stem wall; insulate throughout. Stpne veneer sits on shelf of concrete stem wall. Structure: \\food frame (2x6 construction @2.'+" O.C., typical throughout). Exposed glulams in dinin g and living rooms. Envelope: siding (shingles or tongue in groove cedar siding) Roof: Skeletal system would consist of wood trusses. Membran e would consist of plywood sheathing. Roofing would consist o f wood shakes. Use 15-lb felt over sheathing Interiors: Partitions would be wood framing with gypboard, paint or wallpaper. Floor finishes would be tongue in groove wood floors, or tile or carpet. Sound insulation as required.

PAGE 90

SCHEMATIC FRAMING PLAN OF LODGE

PAGE 91

( ARCTIC OCEAN Clf""I.-1• :>ARY SOUTHERN LIMITD ISCONTINUOUS PERMAF""ROST -SOUTHERN LIM I T CONTI ENTAL PERMAFROST _ _ _ -COUN"n'>Y BOUNDARY FROST. ICE WEDGES AND -J; -"'>. AND HEAVE ir\ N OF PERMAFROST: Ground of any that stays colder than the freezing temperature of throoghout several years. Y\5 I VE luAYER: Top layer of ground subject to a n freezing and thawing . 5T H.:EAV ING : Lifting or heavi ng of soil surface a d 'i the fre e zing of subsudace fros t suscept ible r ial . ;T SCEPTIBLE SOIL : Soi l that has enough eabi y and capillary action (wickability) to ex upon lreezing .ENSl (TAB ER ICE}: Pocketofice. WEDGE: Wedge shaped mass of ice within the Vedqes range up t o 3 or 4 wide and 10 deep. :LETOK: Frozen layer at the base o f the active that .rema ins unthawed during cold summe1 s. DU THAW ZONE : La yer of unf rozen ground :en e permafrost and active layer . This layer not ""xi s t when annual frost extends to the perma but iis present d ur i n g warm winters. V : C .. R QUNO c:-_-_-U l J t R uZE:.. N GROUN(J VENTURI CRE<.TED BUILD ING SNOW LEVEL CONDITION :;! : CONDITIONS OF BUILDING ON PERMAFROST / CONDITI O N 1 : Bu ildi ng elevated on piles allows for the d i ss ipation o f building heat to help prevent the ground from thawing. Added benefits include w inter refreezi ng of ground by cold winter a ir and prevention o f snowdrift buildup . CONDITION 2 : Bu i ld ing elev a ted o n nonfrost suscep tible grave l pad. Benefits include lessening of s nowdrift problems and r eta1dation of permafrost thaw. Exis t i n g ground cover can remain as insulation. R ig1d insulation can a lso be us n d . Cold Climate Construction P OTENTIAL ICE DAM--......_ EAVE ICE CORNICE SNOVV LEVEL GROUND R IGID INSULATION 1\h METAL OR E ASBESTOS 109 CEMENT BOARD • NON FROST SUSCEP WALL SECTION TIBL E GRAVEL EAVE AND FOUNDATION DETAILING IN COLD CLIMATES S n o w buildup o n tn e roof 1S warmed b hea t los s from the building. The meltin g snow flows down the roof a nd is refro1en at the eave because of the eav e ' s cold condi tion. The use of a cornice vent and in su lati o n to create a "cold roof" helps to reduce the p roblem of ice damming. When an ice dam is created, t he water backs u p , leaking under roofing materials. The pla ce ment of metal flashing on the roof at least 2 ft 0 in . u p from the wall lone causes the snow and ice toilets! and chemical toil e ts, which are commonly referred t o as "honey bucke ts . " DisJ.JOSal systems include incineration and s e wag e l aguons.

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL INFORMATION The main mechanical room is in the basement level of the lodge and services both the lodge and studio. The buildings are heated with hot water heat a boiler is in the basement and fin tube baseboards will be placed in all rooms. Individual rooms have thermostats. Exhaust through bathrooms. Cooling in the lodge is not required. (See Mechanical Diagram 1). The kitchen has an exhaust s ystem o f its own. 2). (See Mechanical For the studio: For cooling, outside air is ducts with sound absorbing duct liners. Locate all air handling a minimum of 30' prior to breaking a sound seal. In order to avoid sound transmission from studio to control room, separate ducts need to be installed. Equipment shall be on independent slab. 90-degree bends in ductwork to create intentional baffling for air borne noise. Install sound traps at inter-mittant locations in air delivery system. Use low air velocites (under 400 feet/minute). (See Mechanical Diagram 3).

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Mechanical Diagram 1 "' '-' ,...,. '-I I""\ '-' ;i'-/ ' Mechanical Diagram 2

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Mechanical Diagram 3 __ Stud1o ' / -

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LIGHTING DESIGN Lighting: Room Offices Living, Dining Rooms Kitchen, Baths Studio lobby Practice rooms Engineering Recording Footcandles 100 to 150 1 0 to 30 (adjustable) 10 30 to 50 10 10 t o 70 (adjustable) 10 to 100 (adjustable) 1 0 to 70 (adjustable) For the Recording Studios and Control Rooms: In the studio, the lighting must be powerful enough to provide musicians with the ability to see one another, communicate and read music or lyric sheets. And too, it must not be excessive so that it is distracting with the emotional sense of the music being recorded. The lighting system should be flexible. A combination of white and colored lights can be used to maximize flexi bility. Dimmers can be installed to control brightness. Track systems can be effective. If recessed lighting is used, it shoul be placed in a soundproof box. Fluorescent fixtures should be avoided in studios and control rooms because of their tendency to induce electrical and acoustical hum.

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ACOUSTICAL DESIGN Approximate reverberation time for the performance hall is to be between 1.1 and 2.0 seconds. Approximate reverberation time for the studio is to be between 0.4 and .06 seconds with flexibility built in so as to increase reverb time to 2.0 seconds if necessary. Special drapery rod is to be installed carrying heavy velvet drapes to allow for adjusting sound absorbtion in the performance hall and recording studios. Walls and glazin g a r e splayed so a s t o p revent parallel walls which contribute to standing waves. Studio is separate from loege to further enhance transmission loss. Double wall construction is used on studio and a sound transmission class of 55-60 is desired. Please see following diagrams (taken from Building a Recording Studio, By Jeff " Cooper, Synergy Group, Inc., 1984)

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Ceilin g joist Ex1strng ce11ing Air g a p Figure 3-1 9 Floating c eili n gs suspended from a ) above b ) below 1/2 ':. sound d eage.ning boa rd .. • . ..... 5 /8" g y psum board Exist i n g floor V ibr at ion ( A ) figure 3-17 A typiul floating wood floor figure 3-15 A typial floating wall (wood)

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STC 55 Figure 3-7(h ) construction ___ , O u tsid e row of studs 1 /2" sponge rubber (2" x 3" studs are shown , to economiz e on space u sage, but 2" x 4" studs are pe rfec t ly acceptable) .... , Double I a yer of 5/8" gypsum board (join t s staggered) O utsid e plate Isolation line

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STC 57 • Impact r a tmg = '28 t o +33 3/2" insuldt io n (applied between floor res ilient channel 5 /8" g rr,um h oJrd (;t"prnded belrm fo1 n il.\ 1 " >. 3 .. wood flo01 (boHom 2 Figure 3-11(c) A higher performance wood floating floor with 5uspended ceiling attached

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Pla ce comprtSsed fibreg las o ver isolation g ap, sprinkle w ith sil ica gel t o maintai n relative humi d ity ; cov er w ith fa bric f inish \ Wood stop 3 /4" p ly wood rough jamb , , x 3 " trim isolat ion pp figure 3-21 Control room window

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REFERENCES

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REFERENCES Climate Information: Colorado Climate Center Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 (303)491-8545 Waters, Salma, Editor. Yearbook of the State of Colorado 1959 -61, Colorado State Planning Division Solar Angles: Callender, Editor. Time Saver Standards for Architectural Design Data, 6th Edition, McGraw-Hill 1982. Zoning/Codes: Uniform Building Code 1985 Tim DeWitt, Planner for Grand County County Court House Hot Sulphur Springs, CO 80451 (303)725-3347 Chet J. Valance, Building Inspector of Grand County Department of Building and Sanitation County Court House Hot Sulphur Springs, CO 80451 (303) 725-3347 Forest Information: Craig Brumbaugh, Forester Colorado State Forest SErvice Granby, Colorado 80446 (303)887-3121

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REFERENCES (continued) Background Information for Grand-County: Black, Robert C., Island in the Rockies: The History of Grand County, Colorado t o 1930, Pruett Publishing, Company, Boulder, CO 1965 Cohig, Ruth Cowdery, History of Grand County, Colorado, Master Thesis Denver, Colorado 1939. Murray, John, The Indian Peaks Wilderness Area, Pruett Publishing Boulder, CO 1985. Pamphlets and booklets put out b y Winter Park Chamber of Commerce Fraser Valley Comprehensive Land Use Plan Programming: Callender, John, Editor. Time Saver Standards for Architectural Design Data 6th Edition. McGraw Hill 1982. DeChiara, Joseph and Callender, John. Time Saver Standards For Building Types 2nd Edition McGraw Hill 1980. DeChiara, Joseph, Editor. Time Saver Standards for Residential Development. McGraw Hill 1984. DeChiara, Joseph, Editor. Time Saver Standards for Site Planning McGraw Hill 1984 Preiser, Wolfgang, Editor. Programming the Built Environment, VanNostrand Reinhold Company Inc., 1985.

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; = ( • h REFERENCES (continued) Thesis Statement: Rot enberg, Albert and Hausman, Carl R. Duke University Press 1976. The Creativity Question Wright, Frank Lloyd, The Natural House. Horizon Press, Inc. 1954 Schafer, R. Murray. The Tuning of the World, Alfred A. Knofp, Inc. 1977. "Navajo Mission Academy Student Residences" By Wolfgang Preiser. Programming the Built Environment. Edited by Wolfgang Preiser. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York 1985. Recording Studio, Acoustics, Lighting: Cooper , Jeff, Building a Recording Studio, Snynergy Group, Inc. 1984. Egan, M . David, Concepts in Architectural Acoustics, McGrawHill. New York 1972. Egan, M. David, Concepts in Architectural Lighting, McGrawHill. New York 1983.