Citation
Parks and open space study, Parachute, Colorado, 1981

Material Information

Title:
Parks and open space study, Parachute, Colorado, 1981
Creator:
Gray, Crystal
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of landscape architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Landscape architecture

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Crystal Gray. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
COLORADO 1981
EXHIBIT Z-8


Prepared by Crystal Gray University of Colorado-Denver Department of Landscape Architecture
CENTER fa
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT a^ DESIGN
1100 14th St Denver. Colorado 80202 (303)629-2816
PARKS AND
OPEN SPACE
STUDY
PARACHUTE,
COLORADO
1981


TABLE OF CONTENTS
PROJECT ORGANIZATION 1.
GOALS 10.
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 12.
INVENTORY & ANALYSIS 15.
PARKS DEVELOPMENT PLAN 33.
PARK DESIGN 45.
in


PROJECT
ORGANIZATION
1


INTRODUCTION
Parachute is located on Colorado's Western slope in the heart of the energy impacted oil shale region. The future growth for this once small agricultrual town is assured to be rapid with the development of oil shale resources north of town and the development of a 'new town' across the Colorado River. Planning for this growth offers the opportunity to develop a healthy community that will prosper after the 'boom cycle.'
Parks, open space, and recreational planning can help to meet the needs of the growing community and at the same time preserve those environmental and cultural features that are unique to the town. This will insure that some of the same character that originally attracted settlers to Parachute will continue to be a factor in contributing to the stability of the region during the oil shale "bust cycle.
The approach of developing a parks 'system' in which all the parts are 'linked,' and in turn linked to the town's other facilities is a method by which physical cohesiveness can be achieved. Development of social cohesiveness in the community has more of a chance to occur when the town is perceived as a whole rather than as separate parts. Energy boom towns are noted for their lack of social cohesiveness and resulting related problems.
Parks and recreation planning offers a chance to contribute to the cohesiveness of a town.
It is this opportunity that forms the base of this study.
PARTICIPANTS
This project was produced as the result of a request to the Department of Local Affairs by the town of Parachute for assistance in preparing a Parks, Open Space and Recreation Plan. Jon Schler, Department of Local Affairs, coordinated this request with the graduate student intern program administrated by Lynn Murphy, Center for Community Development and Design. As a graduate student in landscape architecture at the University of Colorado at Denver, the author contracted to do the study as a final practicum project. Throughout the process the author presented the project to the Town Council of Parachute and the newly formed Recreation Committee.
STUDY GOALS
The purpose of this study is to offer a guide to parks, open space, and recreational development for the town of Parachute.
Development of alternative parks plans that meet the needs of the town, reflect the unique environmental setting, and contribute to the cohesiveness of a fast growing community is the goal of the study.
3


DCATION MAP
Unique Features
A combination of several features gives Parachute its uniqueness that is as apparent today as when the area attracted its first settlers.
The Colorado River is wide and gently flowing as it meanders westward forming Parachute's southern border. The river is very accessible on the Parachute side and there are excellent views from the river's edge of the background mountains high above Battlement Mesa. The bluff on the south side of the river blocks from view much of the new development on the mesa. The Battlement Mesa development has a dedicated open space corridor along the river that will preserve the views from the Parachute side while near the river.
Parachute Creek has dense vegetation along most of its length in contrast to the barren land it flows through to the north. There are several natural "parks" along the creek north of the cemetery. The views from these areas and from the town itself are over the river valley to the mesas and mountains south of the river.
Mt. Callahan, rising dramatically on the west side of the Parachute Creek valley, is visible from the entire town and the Battlement Mesa site.
5


TOWN FEATURES
7


GOALS AND
PROGRAM
DEVELOPMENT


4 Commercial, business and industrial facilities should enhance the community.
Park and recreation acquisition and development fees will apply.
Impacts of oil shale related business will affect traditional forms of recreation.
5 Develop an adequate level of financing.
New growth should pay for itself.
Acquisition and development fees should finance new parks and recreation development.
Special facilities, community and regional facilities and parks, recreation and open space in deficient areas should be financed by special recreation district or by bonding.
6One community concept should be reinforced through the parks recreation and open space guidelines.
Joint use of major special facilities between Battlement Mesa and Parachute used to unite the 2 communities.
Trails will tie together where possible.
7Joint use of school district/park sites where possible.
8 Acquire open space, park or preserve lands in natural hazard areas or to buffer land uses.
Use natural hazards as a park and recreation opportunity.
Flood plains of Parachute Creek and the Colorado River should not be intensively developed. Park and field uses and agriculture use are compatible with the flood plain.
Incompatible land uses should be buffered.
9 Provide a broad range of recreation opportunities for all citizens safely and conveniently located.
Develop park standards for the town that address park types, locations (appropriate distance).
Develop parks in deficient areas of original town.
Develop parks in new areas as part of annexation agreements.
Develop special facilities for the entire town and region that are accessible by paths and trails as well as roads.


PARK FEATURES
Developing a hierarchy of park types and the appropriate activities help the planner determine the appropriate development of park sites and their locations. Suggested are park types and activities for that park.
Neighborhood Parks: Size 3-10 acres
Safe walking distance of residents might include: picnic area, tot lot, informal areas for field sports, play court; should reflect unique site characteristics.
Cotminity Parks: Size 10-50 acres
1-3 miles of uses. Might include playfields, lighted, courts, pools and all of above.
Open Space:
Can be used for maintaining unique areas for public access or for preservation. Also to buffer land uses„
Urban Parks and Malls:
Usually in business districts, around public buildings or as entry marks.
Regional Park:
To serve several towns. As growth occurs the need to protect and preserve natural areas for recreation arises„ County-wide benefits.
FACILITY DEVELOPMENT
Facility Guidelines
Suggested facilities for Parachute to develop from 1980-1985 (assuming the current rate of growth) are:
Softball diamond Baseball diamonds Outdoor ice skating
Outdoor pool Tennis courts Basketball courts Soccerfi elds/footbal1
Population
below 2500
2500 5000
2-4 4-6
1 1-2
1 1-2
1
2-4 4-6
1-5 5-10
1-2 2-3
Regional park need as Battlement Mesa and Debeque develop.
Parachute has recently adopted, as part of their subdivision regulations, the following Parks and OpenSpace land acquisition and development fees:
Land Acquisition
15% Land dedication Negotiated depending on site features.
Development Fees
$400 Residential Unit $400 Acre/Commercial
13


INVENTORY & ANALYSIS
15


NVHvnvo iir
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SJLNlOd 1IANV


natural park
CEMETAI
gravel pits
100* undisturbed wetlands
wildlife
r.OLQfi^
vegetation along___rjyer &creek
ENVIRONMENTAL OPPORTUNITIES
lils to mt. callahan & springs
M LANDS
flood pla
BATTLEMENT MESA
openspace
T. CALLAHAN
COLORADO RIVER
IMFmANT RBSIOHAU WLAL KKLFEMI0NAL i
ENVIRONMENTAL BESOUK0&
rm\vez> A r?rthe parks system
PARACHUTE CREEK
IMfZTRTANT NATURAL ^PEEN SPAHSTHRpUOH WH K7TEHTIAL 05PRIR9R 127 LINK OLREP- TZWH TO N£|4 PEVEUSTMEHT SOUTH OF TOWN
MT. CALLAHAN
LANDMARK NTT.
PUPLI6 LAMPS’
TRAILS APE SEPARATED FROM WH Pf
FTWATE LAN RS> â– 
fPTENTIAL RA-TRAILfe 13 LINK TP SP6E-K
BATTLEMENT MESA
ExTEN^E FA/EP IP NEki|MB5PN25'P& Rf TBAIL& A4YN6, BLUFpb < PRAl NA GRAVEL PITS
P6SLAMATLN PLANS’ SALL BP CEDILATIPN TO TOWN A6 LAKES’ 4 FRESep/AriOMOF WETLANP=> PITPPTUHITY TP peVELOP VARIETY OF USES’
KPSM MILbUFE HABITAT ID NBLNEATIPH AL USES
FLOOD PLAINS
EXESELLfeHT
M/JS’T ARES 'AH PE UNKEpTZ? A FLO^p fTAIH MANY ’NATURAL PAY&' AL5NS, RlAtTp PLAIN VEGETATION
FR5VICS& WILDLIFE HABITAT *
S+TAtST AMENITY G6FEDAU-Y AL?N VIEWS
MAHf EVLELLEHT VIEWS 'SAN BE IHc»Rf»RATE:t= INTO PARK PLANNING
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO
O 200 400 800 1200'
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C-DENVER 1981
19


Big Sagebrush Zone:
These areas are generally found around the edges of the valley floor and up the gentler slopes.
In some cases they support livestock and deer and are a habitat for small mammals.
Wildlife
Waterfowl and migratory birds are found along the Colorado as are many raptors (birds of prey) such as hawks and bald and golden eagles. The cottonwood riparian habitat provides roosting areas and cover for raptors, as well as cover for the mammals they feed on„ Alterations in this habitat will lead to a reduction in the variety of wildlife found in the area.
The Colorado River, as it passes through Parachute, has a more diverse fish population at the east end than at the west end of town. Gravel mining along the banks of the river would affect the quality of fishing while gravel pits in the floodplain can be reclaimed and developed into excellent fish habitat.
Floodplains:
The floodplains of the Colorado River and Parachute have not been mapped at this writing, but both streams have visual characteristics along with historic performance that are informative.
The Colorado River has a meandering floodplain which is characterized by a stream that "normally" does not overflow its banks but erodes along the outer edge of its meanders.
Survey control points set along the Colorado indicate the river drifted as much as 15 feet in places this year.
Parachute Creek has flooded in recent years, and this watershed is characterized by a rapid runoff and "flash flood" conditions.


EXISTING PARKS & OPEN SPACE


FUTURE LAND USE
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PARKS AND OPEN SPACE PARACHUTE, COLORADO
INDUSTRIAL
{WHY terminal facility ua^AnspHBPe to $nal& facility
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e<5ME ^HUNTY BE6R&ATPH FATAgLE
BUSINESS & COMMERCIAL
£UBIHE£A> USB MAINLY PgTAH'+'S’PFI^e ^IMEPHAL LfeB AUA'I'B WtoLBBALE i &BPJIBB LfeEB
IMMUNITY PtoPeATIiSH IBIT1 E£>THAT
ABNE^TE TPAFF1A AFE APPHSm^TE Uk&HTfeP S^LLFIBBPfe A^MFATABLE
TRANSITIONAL RESIDENTIAL
PEAJPBUTIAL < LIHTBD ED9NB5& UfeE PAPAS rLAYABC’L'ND^AHP FTAYFTELpb top pAYTIME UBC APB ^HFATABoe
MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL
MAIN PBBIb&HTIAL AP^A Ll^ur&p B*U, FIEUPfe AP F?,PPa THAT &ePVB BUF.F£!UNDIN<$ APEA AfpRrjppiAfE
FLOOD PLAIN
APPFOFPIAre R?g PBSP&ATkJHAL U&B& WITH LKhHT BTPLiBTIJpBfe, FIELP&, PATH& ^toPEH STALE
STUDY
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C.-DENVER 1981
/ /
25


CIRCULATION PATTERNS
MAIN ENTRY
$
niiiiiiiiiiiin|
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO
lTNLYEYITFPOM INTERSTATE. TO fAfWHUTt f CATTLEMEHT ^Niy AUTO LINK- PenNEEH OJXP-IPkIH i NEW PEyiELPFWfeNTS
ENTRY TO BATTLEMENT
ONLY LINK BETWEEN BATTLEMEHT <
PARACHUTE
BPIP6E HA6 BIKE LAKES
PEDESTRIAN OVERPASS
HI FOI* PIPE*. * WAIAI HP,.
FSTEWTIAl pop PATH ALON4 CREEP UN CEP HIGHWAY
1-70
DNPER CONSTRUCTION WILL PNIP& WN
MAJOR ROAD
HEAVf TRAFFIC TO OIL SHALE TRACTS PNLY PL>Ap-K> BATTLEMENT
PROPOSED MAJOR ROAD
THE NKBY-PAES WOULD SERV& THE SURFOUN PI K6 AREA - FUTURE LKHT INDUSTRIAL ZONE
FPPNTA66 PAD TO «=BRVB SOUTH ERH AREA
PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN-BIKE PATH
FECeSTHAH-BIAE LANE BUILT INTO BRICSE UHNN6 UP WITH (SArTL6M&HT& £*rEHSVE SYSTEM fTOF^eP ^EPFAJfeT I-TC& PFOVIPBRSOUS r<5P Bl KE POTENTIAL FOR BIKE PATH
ABIKBFATH LAN BE PIANNBP F©R NEW ROADS FIRST ST. t FARVHUTEAVE AN BE R6PBSK5NE& for- BK6B % RfcpS
PROPOSED OPEN SPACE
PJKTHE CAN EE pUNNEP
> for these
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C-DENVER
1981
27


GRAVEL PITS


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PARKS
DEVELOPMENT
PLAN
33


PARKS DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Combining the information from the analysis with the park and recreational needs of the community leads to the development of a plan with specific sites for certain activities.
This study has developed three alternative plans. Each would serve the needs of the community yet each offers a different focus for the town.
The following common elements are represented in all three develoment plans. They are important concepts for achieving the goal of creating a cohesive community within Parachute and with Battlement Mesa while providing parks and open space for the residents.
1. All the plans provide for public access along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek. This can be negotiated as land is annexed or redeveloped.
2. All parts of the system are linked by on-street or off-street trail systems. The river and creek corridors serve as the major off-street corridors. Parachute Ave., First Street, and the proposed South Frontage Road are the major on-street corridors. The river corridor and South Frontage Road link directly to the Battlement Mesa entrance. A path under the highway and railroad, along the the creek, links directly to the rodeo grounds.
3. Each plan contains parks that serve a variety of community needs with the neighborhood parks serving their surrounding residential areas and the community parks containing activities for the entire town.
4. All the plans show continued public use of the rodeo grounds while recognizing that the land is in private ownership (Rodeo Association).
5. Upon completion of 1-70, First Street will no longer carry the heavy traffic load that it currently does and can be redesigned to provide for additional parking, bike lanes, and landscaping.
6. The assumption that the Battlement Mesa recreation center will be shared with Parachute and there will be joint use of ball fields is considered in all plans.
35


DEVELOPMENT PLAN - 1
mimmiimm
NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
PICHIC -1N FDPHAL RAY FIELDS,
FLAY E«UIFMEKTf
path uhpek hichHaY-
co'-°
DOWNTOWN
LAMPSC-APB FIRfef BTRePT TREK, i- PEhtH BIKE LAHE
NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
6*»5CeR-F(!i5TeALL TBHNUb CSLRTE.- LI6HTED TEMRJFAFY SKlYfIELP L/2AF19H
COMMUNITY PARK
H LILiWTEP BALL FIELP&-6HAF.6P WITH BATTLEMEHT civic AeHTEiKRW, 'BeHDHe&-&HUFrFUBpt7AFP rtJpse±H5eb-PBHC- SHARED FARKIHC WITH EAU-FIELDS FUTURE ACPITY)H 10 TWNHALL R5K AFTB-CfiAPTb t-KBC ClA£&Ei> PTARP3F TRAIL 6Y&TEM IHTERpreTATlYE 6|AN4>
PATH
inniiiiiiiiiuiL HUH WO FPST RATH - PI FT
MINI PARK, WITH PLAY BRUIITIEHTTO 4€FYe SPRING VALLEY E6TATE& PICNIC TABLED
RIVER CORRIDOR
RUBLE /CABeeALL AL5H6 RIVER MAINLY CIREH4PALB WITH TRAIL* FYHE 6R<716 LAR6E LAKE AOeeiBLE (SMALL 61 PEfe â– 6MALL LAKE RSK HILPLIFE HABITAT ACBSIBLE BUT Nc TRAILS,
iHravKErATivE. *14m, hpk lake area
NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
IHFCRMAL FLAY Fia-LA.-ETAYEPUIPMEHT-PE'NC RjablBLYTENlFPRARY BALLFIELD USLATkSIN
(7REH SPACE PBPICATEP A6 LAMP AHNBTES1P TSWN NEl<>He PARKS AND PARACHUTE
OPEN SPACE STUDY ,COLORADO
0 200 400
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C - DENVER 1981


DEVELOPMENT PLAN
(/&N6C15 TKAIL>,UP
Mr ^ALLAHAH |\ /
NEIGHBORHOOD
FlCHC-INFORMAL nAYReLP-L0L.L6YepU-
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PATH LlHt^P.
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RIVER CORRIDOR
rUBMi /fc/%&AU-/4L0H6 FU27P PLAI si M<5 TPAILfe AL5N NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
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OF6H fcWB AUAVJ Kf/ssP. A6«L)lsec>
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PATH
...... onsrp-eer aisfc path
nuntd oFFerPEer are* pgpeerPiAN W-WtUtt W\ fATH OWX
TOWN HALL -LIBRARY
TPAIL& i. PATH& STAPTHEPE I rtTPBPP6WIVE LAMPi^PeD CUC PLATA PAPA
COMMUNITY PARK
2U6HTCP &ALLFlfelp&
4LLOBB.-ffcCTEAU, FlBup -fAPPI N Id
2
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C. - DENVER 1981


DEVELOPMENT PLAN - 3
PATH
allfapns> of
uinuiHiitiHni smeer
â– draa <=>FF tTXEET
,« KCT" P"fH TOWN HALL-LIBRARY
TRAIL SYSTEM srAKT&HEpe YlVfc denTER- PIAZA"
mini wy. KirrH itlhe * t^t tiaY area
RIVER CORRIDOR
ruH-id Lm46fAdeujrrn -trail aloha river
LAPAE LAKE SeKVBi AS dTEIMUH fTY PARK -SMALL LAKE AdJE^IBL6 BUT TL7T CeV6LT?FEfc> AHHe/Bp
HIM park t play Area Hew al)bpivi&Ii?N
NEIGHBORHOOD PARK
B°LL FIELDS-«- IHWFMAL riAF’FlSLPE PDNKf. PLAP E5?UI pm &HT -FWMS P5R ALdEefeTD LAKE AREA
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO

200 400 800 120C
CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U. C-DENVER 1981
41




PARK DESIGN
45


SITE INVENTORY
w«o
nvrz&Ei >
•SFEEMWAf
Colorado
TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO.
30 20100 30
crystal gray
landscape architecture ac.-denver


DESIGN CONCEPT
Colorado
/' Design Concept
/ The active areas are grouped close to the ^road for two reasons:
1. to allow easy carrying of sports and picnic equipment, and a child's play area away from the river.
2. To allow for a natural area as a transition to the river frontage.
TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO.
crystal gray landscape architecture u.c.-denver
30 2010 0 30
49


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 1
existing cottonwoods
new trees
path
foot path
Colorado
TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO.
30 2010 0 30
crystal gray landscape architecture u.c.-denver
51


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 2
LEGEND
removed trees existing cottonwoods
new trees
fl picnic tables —.— property line
Colorado
TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO.
trm: mmm
302010 0 30
crystal gray landscape architecture u.c. - denver
53


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 3
55


DETAILS
LANDSCAPED PARKING
This landscaped strip uses a combination of wood and rock bollards to prevent autos entering the park. Trees and shrubs soften the parking and 4" washed river rock is used for mulch.
All three designs considered how the park would fit into an overall parks plan.
A natural area was maintained along the river. This ties into the concept of providing an open space corridor along the river.
bollard
ENTRY BERM
PARKING 'WOOD WALK
BOLLARD cobble stones
57


Full Text

PAGE 2

. , Prepared by Crystal Gray University of Colorado-Denver Department of landscape Architecture CENTER fcx COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ord DESIGN llOO 14th St Denver. Colorado 80202 '---=------J \303) 629-2816 PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO 1981

PAGE 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS PROJECT ORGANIZATION 1. GOALS 10. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 12. INVENTORY &ANALYSIS 15. PARKS DEVELOPMENT PLAN 33. PARK DESIGN 45. iii

PAGE 4

PROJECT . ORGA IZATIO 1

PAGE 5

INTRODUCTION Parachute is located on Colorado's Western slope in the heart of the energy impacted oil shale region. The future growth for this once small agricultrual town is assured to be rapid with the development of oil shale resources north of town and the development of a 'new town' across the Colorado River. Planning for this growth offers the opportunity to develop a healthy community that will prosper after the 'boom cycle.' Parks, open space, and recreqtional planning can help to meet the needs of the growing community and at the same time preserve those environmental and cultural features that are unique to the town. This will insure that some of the same character that originally attracted settlers to Parachute will continue to be a factor in contributing to the stability of the region during the oil shale bust cycle. The approach of developing a parks 'system' in which all the parts are 'linked,' and in turn linked to the town's other facilities is a method by which physical cohesiveness can be achieved. Development of social cohesiveness in the community has more of a chance to occur when the town is perceived as a whole rather than as separate parts. Energy boom towns are noted for their lack of social cohesiveness and resulting related problems. Pqrks and recreation planning offers a chance to contribute to the cohesiveness of a town. It is this opportunity that forms the base of this study. PARTICIPANTS This project was produced as the result of a request to the Department of Local Affairs by the town of Parachute for assistance in preparing a Parks, Open Space and Recreation Plan. Jon Schler, Department of Local Affairs, coordinated this request with the graduate student intern program administrated by Lynn Murphy, Center for Community Development and Design. As a graduate student in landscape architecture at the University of Colorado at Denver, the author contracted to do the study as a final practicum project. Throughout the process the author presented the project to the Town Council of Parachute and the newly formed Recreation Committee. STUDY GOALS The purpose of this study is to offer a guide to parks, open space, and recreational development for the town of Parachute. Development of alternative parks plans that meet the needs of the town, reflect the unique environmental setting, and contribute to the cohesiveness of a fast growing community is the goal of the study. \ 3

PAGE 6

)CATION MAP .,_ " 0 .. . , • MOFFAT COLORADO WES'J;'u 1..-gend Regional Roadway Network Railroad Unique Features A combination of several features gives Parachute its uniqueness that is as apparent today as when the area attracted its first settlers. The Colorado River is wide and gently flowing as it meanders westward forming Parachute's southern border. The river is very accessible on the Parachute side and there are excellent views from the river's edge of the background mountains high above Battlement Mesa. The bluff on the south side of the river blocks from view much of the new development on the mesa. The Battlement Mesa development has a dedicated open space corridor along the river that will preserve the views from the Parachute side while near the river. Parachute Creek has dense vegetation along most of its length in contrast to the barren land it flows through to the north. There are several natural "parks" along the creek north of the cemetery. The views from these areas and from the town itself are over the river valley to the mesas and mountains south of the river. Mt. Callahan, rising dramatically on the west side of the Parachute Creek valley, is visible from the entire town and the Battlement Mesa site. 5

PAGE 7

/ \ /; \. , -0---.;,\ 'b I "tl TURKEY 'i SHOOT 12? &i HEL.D OH MT tA ' \ " /' METH DIST ICfiURCH./ / I I . ,/ / I I I I 1/ //""\' ' . I I . / . Y I " ' ' / : .> :_ -----l"'L_ -TOWN FEATURES L SE:ffi HCl NbE:.I BRIDGE RIVER . PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO 0 200 400 800 1200' CRYSTAL G RA Y LANDSCAPE ARCH IT ECTUR E U. C . DENVER 19 8 1 7

PAGE 8

GOALS AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT . 9

PAGE 9

business and industrial facilities should enhance the community. Park and recreation acquisition and development fees will apply. Impacts of oil shale related business will affect traditional forms of recreation. !) Develop an adequate level of financing. New growth should pay for itself. Acquisition and development fees should finance new parks and recreation development. Special facilities, community and regional facilities and parks, recreation and open space in deficient areas should be financed by special recreation district or by bonding. E)One community concept should be reinforced through the parks recreation and open space guidelines. Joint use of major special facilities between Battlement Mesa and Parachute used to unite the 2 communities. Trails will tie together where possible. j'Joint use of school district/park sites where possible. open space, park or preserve lands in natural hazard areas or to buffer land Use natural hazards as a park and recreation opportunity. Flood plains of Parachute Creek and the Colorado River should not be intensively developed. Park and field uses and agriculture use are compatible with the flood plain. Incompatible land uses should be buffered. a broad range of recreation opportunities for all citizens safely and conveniently located. Develop park standards for the town that address park types, locations (appropriate distance). Develop parks in deficient areas of original town. Develop parks in new areas as part of annexation agreements. Develop special facilities for the entire town and region that are accessible by paths and trails as well as roads. 11

PAGE 10

PARK FEATURES Developing a hierarchy of park types and the appropriate activities help the planner determine the appropriate development of park sites and their locations. Suggested are park types and activities fot that park. Neighborhood Parks: Size 3-10 acres Safe walking distance of residents might include: picnic area, tot lot, informal areas for field sports, play court; should reflect unique site characteristics. Community Parks: Size 10-50 acres 1-3 miles of uses. Might include playfields, lighted, courts, pools and all of above. Open Space: Can be used for maintaining unique areas for public access or for preservation. Also to buffer land uses o Urban Parks and Malls: Usually in business districts, around public buildings or as entry marks. Regional Park: To serve several towns. As growth occurs the need to protect and preserve natural areas for recreation arises. County-wide benefits. FACILITY DEVELOPMENT Facility Guidelines Suggested facilities for Parachute to develop from 1980-1985 (assuming the current rate of growth) are: Softball diamond Baseball diamonds Outdoor ice skating Outdoor pool Tennis courts 11 courts Soccerfields/football Population below 2500-2500 5000 2-4 4-6 1 1-2 1 1-2 1 2-4 4-6 1-5 5-10 1-2 2-3 Regional park need as Battlement Mesa and Debeque develop. Parachute has recently adopted, as part of their subdivision regulations, the following Parks and OpenSpace land acquisition and development fees: Land Acquisition 15% Land dedication Negotiated depending on site features. Development Fees $400 Residential Unit $400 Acre/Commercial 13

PAGE 11

I VENTORY &ANALYSIS 15

PAGE 13

,_/ j ' --, \ ••• f 1ENVIRONMENTAL OPPORTUNITIES I COLORADO RIVER I Hf'OJqANT IONAL LttAL KI:L-f't=ATIONAL A f'Mi<$ PARACHUTE CREEK IHf"aTAHT HA1URAL 1ZJWH W UN!<-1lJI..-IH IO HE\'! PE\Iel..t:f"MI:'I-ff ft;>i..Jn-1 OF WhJN MT. CALLAHAN LAHDMMIS MT FU!!>LIC. TAAI L-b Ff'OH 'WNH rw ATE LAN t:'S-. 1FAILh 1ZI UH I" lV i/f'i';E.i"-6ATTLEMENT MESA tl'1::M CU'I-lNIX--r'S TO 8'( Pi.t>HC,. BLUI"'"fS i-PpAINAC::.EJ.-lA'(b GRAVEL PITS f't..A/'6 tAL-L ft;l< TIOH lV lVhJH /6 t OF TO 1:'6/aO' OF US!:'? P'f'CM HABrtf\r lV AI-USES FLOOD PLAINS Bi!:?&E:LLEHT . ?Ff'OfCTLJ NIT'( Fi:/1"-!!'AI Lb, i !OME; F:t:it:-f/It:E> hJILDLIFE HABITAT "f. AHEHrTY azt:Et'-t fl-IYEJ'<. VIEWS HAH'( BI'-I':U.Eiif 0'-N 8E IHTO PAF
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Big Sagebrush Zone: These areas are generally found around the edges of the valley floor and up the gentler slopes. In some cases they support livestock and deer and are a habitat for small mammals. Wildlife Waterfowl and migratory birds are found along the Colorado as are many raptors (birds of prey) such as hawks and bald and golden eagles. The cottonwood riparian habitat provides roosting areas and cover for raptors, as well as cover for the mammals they feed on. Alterations in this habitat will lead to a reduction in the variety of wildlife found in the area. The Colorado River, as it passes through Parachute, has a more diverse fish population at the east end than at the west end of town. Gravel mining along the banks of the river would affect the quality of fishing while gravel pits in the floodplain can be reclaimed and developed into excellent fish habitat. Floodplains: The floodplains of the Colorado River and Parachute have not been mapped at this writing, but both streams have visual characteristics along with historic performance that are informative . The Colorado River has a meandering floodplain which is characterized by a stream that 11normally .. does not overflow its banks but erodes along the outer edge of its meanders. Survey control points set along the Colorado indicate the river drifted as much as 15 feet in places this year. Parachute Creek has flooded in recent years, and this watershed i s characterized by a r apid r unoff and 11flash flood11 conditions. 21

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, ( I ;; " --\ \ . \. .... EXISTING PARKS & OPEN SPACE . j < : -PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO o 200 400 eoo 1200 CRYSTAL GRAY LA N DSCAPE ARCHIT E CTURE U . C . DENVER 1981 23

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. .. I I I ' FUTURE LAND USE INDUSTR-IAL &Pt.OHY TEJ':MiNAJ... FN:.ILITY LaA%t:> -ro fMIL.tTY FAIL!'OAD "t1 %F-Vt&E:: ME"A L..rrtE:> IWOHF'ATABI-1':: UGHT INDUSTRIAL WLot-iY P.AFr-1 LOf f'L,AHH 8D i--'1AHlJFN--rUfi:IN6,, e-e l.J%10 Wl1\-i IN COHHUNtn coMFATABLE. 0 BUSINESS & COMMERCIAL l.li.l-OH<:> {. IJ<;,E1;> U>t-'IMLJHtTI f.At-IL-111 E61HAT 6ff:NE.f?.t'\1C NS Fi?f<. t:>AYI!t1E: lY-:>E: AI"E: 0 MEDIUM DENS I TV RESIDENTIAL .t-'IAIH AF-q\ L eALL riE.LD? &a-iF'l-ICT ;..1111-1 f<.ES. THAT E: ?Uf<.f'CUNDtH
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( . I CIRCULATION PATTERNS / MAIN ENTRY TO ONLY AJ)TO LIHj(. IOIJN 2 ENTRY TO BATTLEMENT OHLY LIHJ<'. ( Hl>6 131KE:: LAHe=. PEDESTRIAN OVERPASS HJ(qH t;EIT . IO 13UILD Ai-l tN!:ofl. f"N.:INC. l.JP 1-J rrH J'l'Of!"'EP OIE:PFl.6( 1-'"0 f'R)V I DE fi?C.U<;, I"OF' B1 1'\'E I F'-'i111 I H TOWN POTENTIAL FOR BIKE PATH A 6 11'\E. rAni CAH BE f'IANNCP N f f c{) PROPOSED OPEN SPACE AND OPEN SPACE PARACHUTE, COLORADO U . C . -DENVER 1981 27

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. " ' ILDLIFE fl..! a< I'::>AH A VA P-I EfY IF TH I? .APEA 1ATU p JS/161..-8 b l --rE?. 'la.J4H lMAU.. ff'OVI t::E; i't:VD 'l?f< .f J:::EE:.R. 1 / fl))(,SKUNI'; , / .ABef5 // I / ) I I] I __ .. / , _/---/ ' .jf = // :>otbridge __ _,.,-----'• iJQJPE IOC<::JNNECT '---1 :CSibEHTLAL ,AP&I TO L.A/".E? \ \ I _..,/ ' -} I ( GRAVEL PITS KOCH PIT 6M'V'e.L I-11NE.D BY TI-le ---F'F-OJ t;t.T-44 PeDENELCJf'I:::.P l'b A AHt:> PE:Dit:ATE:t:> TOIHE:: k?l<-lH PtT bU?F'I7-:>-I PARACHUTE PIT HIH!:P e;f u:PN C.Ofi611>..1..lCrlcti .,.,.....--"' Af '5::>' IA::-EF f"rf io 1'E DBIE:i..Of"8D />f.:> A 1-AI'.E. TO J.HE gy l'feh .___ z :J, A H ..A:f'Ct\ I
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'I / / / . ' . I / ,' I /1 / ', / /.P / I . . / . / / ,. , I I. L POTENTIAL PARK SITES 'OLD TOWN' I . I -__...; ---NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS possible sites: 1. creekside L-OCAf'E:b II NTH E Ft.AI M ffl:>M Ot...Det<. f He.kl H q . TO I""OThNTIAL-'1'1'l PAeLE: t--a:-A:TI? N OF TH f<.E:E BIKE-PEDESTRIAN WAYS ftJFAA!'-SITES iTH .?111 E.F-.u:>MM UtHTY t=';?l UTI B on street: NE:E.l/STo f+AVE: UMITW FP0M IF='U!:>6D. S>TJ<.E;t;T kliLL. HAVE: tiP I---JAY 1-lO 1.? offstreet: ?rz.E;.E: t<-. C::.Of<.!<:l t:::??F<. CA.I'-1 BE. DB<'E:.LUfEt::> ,Ab L..l't1P 116 fEr::e.'/ C;[.l) F' BUSINESS DISTRICT r=orE:!iTlAL-FVR LAN 6 AlNq 11-l E I' 1=1 .f:::TF:EeT I t. 'bt--1AL.L. Ft/t 7A ef
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PAR 5 DEVELOPMENT PLAN 33

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PARKS DEVELOPMENT PLAN Combining the information from the analysis with the park and recreational needs of the community leads to the development of a plan with specific sites for certain activities. This study has developed three alternative plans. Each would serve the needs of the community yet each offers a different focus for the town. -The following common elements are represented in all three develoment plans. They are important concepts for achieving the goal of creating a cohesive community within Parachute and with Battlement Mesa while providing parks and open space for the residents. 1. All the p . lans provide for public access along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek. This can be negotiated as land is annexed or redeveloped. 2. All parts of the system are linked by on-street or off-street trail systems. The river and creek corridors serve as the major off-street corridors. Parachute Ave., First Street, and the proposed South Frontage Road are the major on-street corridors. The river corridor and South Frontage Road link directly to the Battlement Mesa entrance. A path under the highway and railroad, along the the creek, links directly to the rodeo grounds. 3. Each plan contains parks that serve a variety of community needs with the neighborhood parks serving their surrounding residential areas and the comm unity parks contain ing activities for the entire town. 4. All the plans show continued public use of the rodeo grounds while recognizing that the land is in private ownership (Rodeo Association). 5. Upon completion of I-70, First Street will no longer carry the heavy traffic load that it currently does and can be redesigned to provide for additional parking, bike lanes, and landscaping. 6. The assumption that the Battlement Mesa recreation center will be shared with Parachute and there will be joint use of ball fields is considered in all plans . 35

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NEIGHBORHOQP PARK PIGHit. I PLAY E6tUI f'ME. PAT\-! UHDE;;I'H tqf-IN-llf---"'L DOWNTOWN / ' /. /: . I ;/ . . J> i O F8H PEoi>ICATEI:> A<; -..,_'X/ LAHD I'HNE:l(e>12> I NE:I&He.?fZ.HX'P f"ARf:. H8EI:>::.D H:> AREA D6YELOPe:> . DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 .PATH IIUIUIIIIIIIUl 0H \?T/'eef-UPI--JrrH BIKE: 0000 OF F bTf'ET-i-lllmlll\\11 FT PATH-Dl l"r NEIGHBORHOOD PARK PLAY BALL-FlE:L.D L
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\ ' \ \ -0--';\ \ \ 1 'i \ ..._ ' ttJtl H E:C!? TO T I'AI L \1 U f' HT. C:ALl-AHAN \ / --Es: NEJGHBORHOD Fif'YFleLD-Vl\.i.Ye.HLY TOWN HALLLIBRARY *-FAT$ S>fAI"'rHI::f NEIGHBORHOOD PARK . lNFi:f'MAL Flet.P i.JJ-ll--l61t-tri:P PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO 0 200 400 800 1200' CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U . C . DENVER 1981 39

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/ \ /; \ , ....... "V" 1>"<:1 ---\ \ --;,\ 'b I 'i ( ..... ' / j/ 1/ DEVELOPMENT PLAN -3 .. -----iL__ PATH bt'HI41;;Cl'i:> Or IIIIIUIIftlltHIII t'H 6TJZeEi dJ::It:l OFf -11111 I'WI 01-lt-Y TOWN HALL-LIBRARY !RAIL. 9T"AF<:F-> t.ei--!Tt'f<. rtAZA'' PARKS AND OPEN SPACE STUDY PARACHUTE, COLORADO .-..-.1 0 200 400 800 1200' CRYSTAL GRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U . C . DENVER 19 8 1 41

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PARK DESIGN 45

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APAf?F LA PLATA CIRCLE ___ / . .' f'ASTUF'f: f WHEAT 61'Y'f.h 6ia't:> toTTt?NWoot::0 1..1'-Y-.IK::::Io. 'I; "" v, 'v . "' "' OVEJ<.C.POWN WrrH co\orado SITE INVENTORY TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO. crystal gray landscape architecture 1 • A u.c.-denver 47 30 2010 30

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ACTIVITY AREA colorado shelter tot lot picnic PASSIVE AREA '""•"// ::....---DESIGN CONCEPT . __ II Concept The active areas are grouped close to the ;::/"road for two reasons: 1. to allow easy carrying of sports and picnic equipment, and a child•s play area away from the river. 2. To allow for a natural area as a transition to the river frontage. TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO. crystal gray landscape architecture 1 • A u.c. denver 302010 30 49

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l_ ENTRY LA . PLATA C IR CLE co\orado SOCCER /FOOTBALL 120' X 300' DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 1 I I I existing cottonwoods new trees path ............. '> foot path I I TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO. crystal gray landscape architecture :b 1'10! 30 u. c. denver 51

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I I r I D LA PLAT A CIRCLE 0.\ I ; I . I . . / ---------I SOFTBALL I I I I -t + + + " + / / / . / PLAYFIELD DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 2 LEGEND + removed trees * existing cottonwoods to slough & lakes R VE' . ' new trees Ll picnic tables NATIVE GRASS I -property line . ......... ' /' I / / jl TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO. crystal gray landscape architecture LM_ u.c.-denver 3020100 30 53

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L A PLATA CIRC L E SOFT BALL GRAVEL BEII C R colorado DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 3 . , -....... J LEGEND + removed trees * existing cottonwoods new trees LJ picnic tables propel'ty line .1 NATURAL AREr I I I TOWN PARK PARACHUTE, COLO. crystal gray landscape architecture ;-::--. u.c. denver 302010 0 30 55

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DETAILS LANDSCAPED PARKING This landscaped strip uses a combination of wood and rock bollards to prevent autos entering the park. Trees and shrubs soften the parking and 4" washed river rock is used for mulch. All three designs considered how the park would fit into an overall parks plan. A nqtural area was maintained along the river. This ties into the concept of providing an open space corridor along the river. •• • .. . ENTRY BERM L---.L __ ... ROCK BOLLARD WALK PARKING • -+---------------1----::-:----PARKING WOOD BOLLARD cobble stones 57