Citation
Mixed-use development, Old Town Ft. Collins

Material Information

Title:
Mixed-use development, Old Town Ft. Collins
Creator:
Kaiser, Frank
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Frank Kaiser. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
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OLD TOWN FT COLUNS
THESIS PREP-FALL 1981 FRANK
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J. J. 7
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Project Discript!on .................................................................... 1
History ................................................................................ 2
Physiological Characteristics .......................................................... 4
Goals and Policies...................................................................... 7
Land Use Ordinances and Building Codes..................................................13
Design Guidelines for new construction ................................................ 39
Economic Analysis ..................................................................... 47
Future Development Plans .............................................................. 54
Climatic Data & Analysis................................................................58
Site Information and Anaysis............................................................70
Program of Spaces.......................................................................77
Thesis Semester Schedule .............................................................. 87
Bibliography .........................................................................


1
MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT IN OLD TOWN FT. COLLINS Project Description;
The "Downtown Development Authority" of Ft. Collins has the task of studying ways of revitalizing the old downtown area of Ft. Collins. It has expressed an interest in a wide variety of uses to bring people back to the area, to have a 24 hour people place that doesn't shut down after dark. The project will consist of new mixed use development that will incorporate professional offices, living spaces, and entertainment facilities (possibly an arcade and restaurant). The new development must respond to the historical context of the area as well as passive energy concious design. The project shall adhere to the existing guidelines set forth by the "Historic Old Town Planning Committee" however any deviation from the guidelines may be done as the situation arises. The planners for the area will be consulted for input and feedback throughout the project concerning goals and policies set forth for the area.
Scope and Limits of Project:
The project site is located in the tract of land along the alleyway between Linden St. and Pine St., surrounded by historic buildings (some of which have been restored, some have not). Primary access will be through the allies used as a secondary circulation system throughout Old Town for pedestrian and emergency vehical access.
The total site consists of approx. 1/4 to 1/3 of the block. Total square footage estimated between 30,000 to 50,000 sq. ft. assuming 2 to 3 level complex.
East access to existing entertainment facilities and retail stores.


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HISTORY OF FT. COLLINS OLD TOWN
In 1863, the U.S. Cavalry established a camp in the Cache La Poudre River area to guard the overland stage line and wagon trains against Indian attack.. In 1864, due to flooding of the Poudre River and military command changes, the camp, known as camp Collins was moved to its present site of the Ft. Collins power plant. The site was chosen due to its proximity to the river while being on high, dry land with drainage and a good view of the surrounding countryside in each direction.
The military population attracted enterprising citizens wishing to serve the needs of the soldiers. Joseph Mason recieved permission from the U.S. Government to establish a store which served as a suiter's store, county office, courthouse, church, theatre, and post office. This was built in 1865 on what is now the Linden/Jefferson intersection and became the foundation for Old Town Ft. Collins.
Thus a street system was plated in 1867-1868 that ran parallel to the major environmental landmark;
the Poudre River. However, due to a shortage of Indians, the military contingent was removed, and as such
the towns future was in question.
In the fall of 1872 the agricultural colony was established, with the purpose of crop raising for the surrounding settlers. Officers of the new colony organized the Larimer County Land Improvement Coupany with the goal of encouraging settlement in Ft. Collins. New city streets needed plating, which was done by Franklin C. Avery, utilizing the latest techniques in city planning. The new streets where laid according to the cardinal points of the compass, but kept most of the original surveyed area, thus giving Old Town its characteristic triangular shaped lots and streets.
The arrival of the Colorado Central Railroad in 1877 brought new prosperity to the area. Investments


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The arrival of the Colorado Central Railroad in 1877 brought new prosperity to the area. Investments in housing, businesses, and agriculture rose, as did the building of brick business blocks in Old Town. Competition developed between the Old Town and the New Town located south of Mountain street and College.
The coming of the automobile brought with it problems for the Old Town area. The post office had moved out of the triangle, taking with it much need pedestrian traffic. A major bank had moved, as well as many major retail establishments to locate along Highway 287 frontage in the early 1920's, to cater to the auto-oriented population. Many others moved along College Avenue and by 1930 Old Town began to show signs of decay and age.
The importance of Ft. Collins Old Town lies in its background. It illustrates turn of the century western plains life in this small area. It became home for Colorados first land grant college and even had a notable in-town railway transit system. It responded to the urbanite and farmer alike.
Being between Cheyenne and Denver, the train depot brought in a diverse mix of newcomers; academic, agrilcultural and financial. Old Towns offerings were wide ranging, from hotel accomodations, banks, and restaurants, to hardware stores, feed, coal and hay shops.
The pioneer history of Ft. Collins is no better illustrated than in the four blocks comprising Old Town Ft. Collins. Old Town demonstrates how these people settled a new area and used local materials to decorate it with the styles current back.east, creating a substantial, as well as unique, latter 19th century ’snerican community. From the days of the old fort into the 20th - century, the area carries with it the history and spirit of the town.


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HISTORIC OLD TOWN CHARACTERISTICS
Historic Old Town is flat, creating an impression of openness. The streets are wide but give an impression of being much wider. The railroad and its activity are still visible from Historic Old Town. There is mature landscaping in most of the downtown area and on the periphery, but almost no vegetation exists within Historic Old Town itself.
Within Historic Old Town, the wandering, eccentrically-patterned alleys provide an alternative to the spaciousness found on the main streets while providing many interesting spaces between buildings.
Continuety of space behind the buildings is broken up by the varying depths of buildings.
There is a strong visual continuity because of the similarity of the building ages. The buildings create a strong edge along the street due to their alignment on the front property line. This strong edge is reinforced by the alignment of building cornices due to the similarity of building heights. There is a visible difference between the first floor and the upper floors of the buildings. The first floors are predominantly glass and are oriented towards the pedestrian. The upper floors are basically solid with smaller penetrations for windows.
There is a strong repetition of window shapes throughout Historic Old Town. Many of the upper level windows are aligned across several buildings which creates a strong pattern of openings that again enforce the strong edges of the buildings. This is also the behind the buildings adjacent the site along Jefferson street.
The buildings on the corners are usually larger and have more ornamentation than the buildings at
mid-block;


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the Northern Hotel, the Linden Hotel, the Avery Block, and the Miller Block. These corners, therefore, become the focus areas making the intersections visually strong. There are a multitude of ornate facades with many common details. Decorated cornices occur frequently. Brick is the dominant building material with repetitive quarrystone lintels above doors and windows. Lastly, there is a general absence of large overwhelming signs in Historic Old Town.


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This summary of Old Town characteristics shows relationships that
can't be easily seen at street level.
FORT COLLINS
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These lots are in particularly sensitive places; the character of the development can greatly affect the quality of Hie area/'
View of rail read Depot.

COLORADO DESIGN GUIDELINES
These blocks have particular^ strong 'edges' cr< set directly at th strengthen J this I
These blocks have particularly
Strong 'edges' created by buildings
set directly at the sidevelKTheir unifcrm halite
These buildings serve as Ph special Land mark / re frrence points.
5treet pattern ® at f5'> angle bc> the grid of most
of the city.
Irregularly-shaped alleys are a special feature; fourvd only in the OLd ' Tovn area.
Key sfrtt.V1
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.These are "aof t'edges; no distinction exists between +he site and the street.


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GOALS AND POLICIES OF OLD TOWN
The Goals and Policies are the heart of the Area Plan. They were developed through a public hearing by the Historic Old Town Planning Committee. In addition, these goals and policies have been reviewed and adopted by the City of Fort Collins as a guide to the preservation and rejuvenation of Historic Old Town. GOALS
1. To promote the preservation and maintenance of historic buildings and environs in the Old Town
Ft. Collins National Register Historic District to maintain the renovation, cultural, and investment values.
2. To promote the conservation of limited architectural and cultural resources of Historic Old Town.
3. To encourage the development of Historic Old Town Revitalization Policies which will protect the historic fabric and character of Historic Old Town.
4. To encourage the development of policies which promote the compatibility between land uses in Historic Old Town.
5. To assess the historical, environmental, social, and economic impacts of new development to protect the character of Historic Old Town.
6. To encourage the development of activity areas and open spaces within Historic Old Town.
7. To encourage safe, efficient, and attractive circulation systems which enhance Historic Old Town and which integrate all modes of transportation with pedestrian circulation.


8. To encourage alley redevelopment for pedestrian circulation in Historic Old Town.
9. To encourage the City of Ft. Collins to pursue a program to relocate the railroad lines from the Historic District.
10. To encourage the City of Ft. Col-ins to promote either the proposed Ft. Collins Parkway or another alternate route for Highway #14 to divert through traffic now using Jefferson Street.
11. To promote the utilization of alternative energy sources which do not detract from the histori character of Historic Old Town in the renovation of buildings.
12. To promote the undergrounding of all utility lines in Historic Old Town.
13. To develop Historic Old Town as a focal point of the community.
14. To encourage the use of Old Town as a residential, office, retail, and commercial area.


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POLICIES
Character Design Policies
1. The Association of Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins to define and implement an atmosphere and image for Historic Old Town which is consistent with its historic architectural character.
2. All redevelopment of the exterior portions of existing buildings shall be consistent with the Design Review Guidelines of Historic Old Town.
3. All new development shall respect the architectural character as defined by the Design Review Guidelines and neighborhood characteristics which define Historic Old Town.
Land Use Policies
4. The City of Ft. Collins shall integrate the design guidelines for Historic Old Town in the land use site planning process.
5. Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall analyze the present and potential land uses consistent with the physical characteristics of the area to develop a future land use element of the Area Plan.
6. A mixture of land uses including residential, retail, and commercial office, shall be encouraged in Historic Old Town and the City will hold a public hearing on a change in zoning that, if adopted, would allow residential uses in the area.
7. Attention shall be given to land uses which provide a mixture of day and night time activities
in Historic Old Town.


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8. Special attention shall be given to the development of housing for all income levels in and adjacent to Historic Old Town with recognition of the needs for housing for Elderly, low income, and handicapped persons.
9. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town shall encourage utilization of public rights-of-way to the advantage of people oriented uses coordinated with the needs of private vehicles and public transportation.
10. The City of Ft. Collins shall modify its guidelines and develop other mechanisms so that public rights-of-way for balconies, sidewalks, rear entrances, alleys and access to basements and roofs shall be consistant with the Design Review Guidelines for Historic Old Town.
Open Space Policies
11. Public and private mechanisms should be utilized to acquire open space amenities within Historic Old Town.
12. Historic Old Town should be linked to the Park System along the Poudre River by the development of future rights-of-way.
13. Open space should be acquired particularly in alleys and block interiors for the purpose of enhancing people spaces for leisure activities and for enhancing interior block redevelopment of Historic Old Town.


11
Transportation Policies
14. Develop a circulation system for Historic Old Town which is not a detriment to the historic character of the area.
15. Assessment should be made of the impacts of new development on transportation systems in and around Historic Old Town.
16. Conveniently link Historic Old Town to the rest of Ft. Collins.
17. Encourage the location of proper transit stops in Historic Old Town.
18. Develop adequate off-street parking facilities with convenient access to the general downtown area and to Historic Old Town.
19. Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins on a solution to the overall downtown parking problem.
20. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town shall provide pedestrian circulation system which reinforces the original pedestrian orientation of the area and which complements the land uses.
21. Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins as the City of Ft. Collins addresses the problems of the overall circulation problem in the Central Business District.
Facilities And Services Policies
22. The City of Ft. Collins shall plan and upgrade services, facilities and utilities to accommodate the redevelopment of Historic Old Town.
23. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town should establish financial mechanisms for Historic Old Town to finance its portion of undergrounding the overhead utility lines.


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24. Creative solutions for retrofitting for energy conservation shall be encouraged for the buildings in Historic Old Town.
25. The City of Ft. Collins shall encourage that future development will be accomplished in a manner which will create the least degradation of the presently built and natural environment of Historic Old Town as determined by the Design Review Guidelines Committee.
Organization Policies
26. Historic Old Town Planning Committee shall work with the City of Ft. Collins to establish a phased revitalization work program which will minimize disruption to businesses during any construction project.
27. Historic Old Town Planning Committee shall do all within its power to encourage all new public and private development to comply with the Historic Old Town revitalization policies.
28. The City of Ft. Collins shall give special consideration to the interpretation of adopted buildings within Historic Old Town.
29. The City of Ft. Collins shall develop a design review committee to work with Historic Old Town which will establish a procedure to advise and review developmentsin Historic Old Town.


13
LAND USE ORDINANCES AND BUILDING CODES
Land Development Guidance System For Planned Unit Developments City Of Ft. Collins
The "land Development guidance System" (LDGS) is a new system of land use regulation designed to replace the old P.U.D. regulation of Ft. Collins, with the intention of giving landowners more flexibility in developing their property as long as the project conforms to the criteria stated in the LDGS.
Development of the site will be determined by its size, shape, location, natural features and site concept, thus eliminating the use of a predetermined zoning district classification. The system is based on sound planning principles that address both present and future requirements as well as meeting the physical social, economic and aesthetic needs of Ft. Collins.
Some of the major objectives outline in the ordinonce are:
-To encourage innovations in land development and renewal.
-To encourage patterns of land use which decrease trip length of automobile travel and encourage trip consolidation.
-To increase public access to mass transit, bicycle routes, and other modes of transportation.
-To reduce energy consumption and demand.
-To improve the design, quality, and character of new development.


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-To foster a more rational pattern of relationship between residential, business, and industrial uses for the mutual benefit of all.
-To encourage development of vacant properities within established areas (e.g. Old Town area). PROCESS OF USING THE LOGS
1) Criteria are grouped into "activity" catagories. Each development proposal must satisfy the specific criteria depending on the type(s) of land use being proposed.
Activity Catagories:
A. All Development
B. Neighborhood Service Center
C. Community/Regional Shopping Center
D. Auto-Related and Roadside Commercial Uses
E. Business Service Uses
F. Industrial Uses
G. Extraction, Salvage and Junk Yard Uses
H. Residential Uses
Each use in the mixed use development must satisfy all applicable criterial of the approriate activity catagory. For the proposed project the activity catagories are:


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A. All Development
E. Business Service Uses
H. Residential Uses DESIGN CRITERIA
2) There are 2 types of criteria; numbered and lettered. Numbered criteria are absolute requirements and must be satisfied. These assure compliance with official plans, minimum engineering and public service requirements, and environmental standards. They must be answered yes for city approval of the plan.
Lettered criteria are "points" and are variable, but a minumum percentage must be obtained.
Above the minumum may be ap-plied to providing additional residential units provided on the "density chart".
The site plan is evaluated against lettered criteria and scored on a "point chart" associated with each "activity" catagories. With this the "density chart" is used to calculate the maximum number of dwelling units permitted on a site.
PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
3) a) Number criteria: "yes", "no", "not acceptable"; a no answer to any automatically excludes development from consideration.
b) Lettered criteria: The plan is evaluated against lettered criteria and assigned a score.
Numarical score is based on the following:
Yes ('+1) = Adequate Job
Very Well (+2) = Excellent Job or Best Possible Under Circumstances


CRITERIA
Each of the following applicable criteria must be answered "yes" and implemented within the development pi an.
Neighborhood Impact & Quality
ANY NEGATIVE OR ADVERSE IMPACTS OF ANY PROPOSED USE UPON ANY NEIGHBORING USE SHALL BE MITIGATED IN THE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN. THE CONFLICTS THAT ARE PRESUMED TO EXIST BETWEEN LAND USES AND METHODS BY WHICH THOSE CONFLICTS CAN BE RESOLVED ARE EXAMINED IN ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES PERTAINING TO LAND USE CONFLICTS. WHEN TWO ADJACENT PARCELS ARE DEVELOPED SIMULTANEOUSLY, THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR MITIGATING CONFLICTS IS UPON THE MORE INTENSE USE. WHEN A USE IS THE FIRST TO DEVELOP ON TWO ADJACENT VACANT PARCELS, THE FIRST USE SHALL PROVIDE THE NECESSARY BUFFER TO ANY REASONABLE FUTURE USE AS DETERMINED BY THE CITY. THE SECOND USE TO DEVELOP SHALL, AT THE TIME IT DEVELOPS, TAKE ALL ADDITIONAL STEPS NECESSARY TO MITIGATE CONFLICTS. THE CITY WILL DETERMINE COMPATABILITY OF A PROJECT BASED UPON THE EVIDENCE PRESENTED IN RESPONSE TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA DESCRIBED IN "1" THROUGH "4" BELOW:
r
1. Does the development eliminate any potential
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continued'


mi iu*3\J ^■—————— ■
Yes No NA*
nuisances including, but not limited to: blowing dirt and litter; noise; odor; and glare.
2. Is the development compatible with the adjacent properties and neighborhood including, but not limited to: scale and identity; bulk; materials; and disposition of buildings on the lot?
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3. Is the development in accordance with the adopted elements of the Comprehensive Plan?
4. Is the project designed so that traffic generated by nonresidential uses does not have an adverse impact on residential development?
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Plans and Policies

5. Is the proposed street system in compliance with the Master Street Plan or other adopted street policies?
6. Is the project in conformance with the adopted Open Space Plan or other adopted open space policies?
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Public Facilities, Services 8c Safety
7. Does the project comply with any design standards, requirements and specifications for the following services?
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-- water supply -- sanitary sewer -- electricity -- natural gas -- storm drainage -- flood hazard areas -- telephone
irrigation companies mass transit fire protection cable television streets/pedestrian walks/bikeways
8. Is the development served by utilities with adequate capacity or have arrangements been made for extension and augmentation for the following services?
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-- water supply -- sanitary sewer -- electricity -- natural gas

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continued1


continued'
Yes No NA*
-- storm drainage
-- streets/pedestrian walks/bikeways
9. Will the project's completion not generate a
traffic volume which exceeds the existing and future capacity of the external street system as defined by the City?
10. Does the street system, including parking lots
and public streets, clearly define vehicular movement on the site?
11. Does the project provide safe and convenient
pedestrian and bicycle access to every building regularly used for human occupancy?
12. If the development is adjacent to a designated
public open space area, has provision been made to avoid interfering with public access to that area?
13. If the project includes an irrigation canal, water body, or other water channel, have necessary precautions been taken to minimize any hazard to life and property?
14. If the project contains known areas of geological hazard or soil conditions unfavorable to urban development, will special engineering precautions be taken to overcome these limitations or have these areas been set aside from development?
15. Does the development meet the parking capacity and design standards and the off-street loading area requirements of the City?
16. Are all portions of the exterior walls of the first story of any building(s) located within 150' of an access roadway in which emergency fire equipment can be maneuvered, or will the build-ing(s) be provided with an approved automatic fire extinguishing system?
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Resource Protection & Urban Design
17. Are all trash containers and outside storage areas of goods, materials and products screened in an aesthetic manner from public view?
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continued1
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Yes No NA*
18. If the site contains an area which serves as a habitat, natural food source, nesting place, wintering area, or source of water for wildlife identified by the Colorado Division of Wildlife as significant and in particular need of attention, have special precautions been implemented in the plan to prevent the creation of environmental influences adverse to the preservation of these areas?
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19. Ecologically sensitive areas, (reserved)
20. Lands of agricultural importance. (reserved)
21. If the proposed project is located within a locally designated Historical District or includes a locally designated landmark structure, is the project in conformance with the City's Landmark Ordinance?
22. If any building is to be greater than forty feet in height above grade, does the project comply with the building height review criteria?
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23. Does the project include a well-designed landscape treatment of exterior spaces which improves the overall quality of the project? For all nonresi-dential uses, the landscaped area shall constitute a minimum of 12% - 17% of the site, depending upon design objectives and intensity and quantity of planting materials.
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24. Does the project utilize and preserve significant existing vegetation to the extent practical?
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25. If the project includes an area known to contain a commercial mineral deposit for which extraction is or will be commercially feasible, has the project been designed not to preclude extraction?
26. Are all signs in the project in compliance with the provisions of this chapter?
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Environmental Standards
27. Will the project not emit or cause to be emitted into the atmosphere from any air contamination source of emission whatsoever, any air contaminant which is of such a shade or density as to obscure an observer's vision to a degree in excess of twenty percent (20%) opacity?
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Yes No NA*
The following situations shall be exempt from this
criterion:
(a) Pilot Plants and Experimental Operations. No pilot plant or experimental operations shall emit or cause to be emitted into the atmosphere any air contaminant for a period or periods aggregating more than three (3) minutes in any sixty (60) consecutive minutes which is of such a shade or density as to obscure an observer's vision to a degree in excess of forty percent (40%) opacity. This emission standard for pilot plants and experimental operations shall be in effect for a period not to exceed one hundred eighty (180) operating days, cumulative total, from the date such operations commence; thereafter, the twenty percent (20%) opacity limitations shall apply to emissions from pilot plants and experimental operations.
(b) Fireplaces or Stoves. Emissions used for non-commercial or recreation purposes.
(c) Temporary Conditions. This criterion shall not apply to emissions during the building of a new fire, cleaning of fires, soot blowing, start-up, any process modification or adjustment or occasional cleaning of control equipment, the shade or appearance of which is not darker than an equivalent opacity so as to obscure an observer's view to a degree not greater than forty percent (40%) for a period or periods aggregating no more than three (3) minutes in any one (1) hour.
(d) Fugitive Dust.
28. Will the project not emit or cause to be emitted any solid or liquid particles at any one point in concentrations exceeding two-tenths (0.2) grain per cubic foot of conveying air or gas? For measurement of the amount of particles in gases resulting from combustion, standard corrections shall be applied to a stack temperature of five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (500*F) and fifty percent (50%) excess air. Detailed plans for the elimination of airborne particles may be required before the issuance of a building permit.
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continued1


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29. Will the project not emit or cause to be emitted odorous air contaminants from any single source such as to result in detectable odors at the property line? Detailed plans for the prevention of odors crossing property lines may be required before the issuance of a building permit.
30. Will the project not emit or cause to be emitted fumes or gases at any point in concentrations or amounts that are noxious, toxic, or corrosive in excess of established City standards for the determination of permissible concentration or amounts. Detailed plans for the elimination of fumes or gases may be required before the issuance of a building permit.
31. Will the project conform to applicable local, state and federal air quality standards?
32. Will the project conform to applicable local, state and federal water quality standards?
33. Can the proposed land uses and activities be conducted so that noise generated is controlled at its source or so attenuated by the structure from which 1t is emitted that when measured from the property line it shall not exceed the following minimum performance levels?
Adjacent Land Uses Max. Noise (dBA)*
Residential uses:
(6:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.) 60
(6:00 p.m. - 6:00 a.m.) 50
Business, Commercial and Industrial Uses 65
General Industrial Uses 70
(♦Measured at property boundaries with a sound meter which meets the specifications established by the American National Standards Institute, SI.4 1971.)
Notwithstanding the foregoing requirements, noise levels may be increased in special situations as set forth below:
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continued


'^WI INI lUtUCJ
Yes No NA

Noise Level Corrections Permitted ____ for Special Situations*_______
Type of Operation or Correction
Character of Noise (in dBA)
Noise source operates
less than 15 minutes of
any one-hour period + 5
Noise source operates
less than 5 minutes of
any one-hour period +10
Noise source operates less than 1 minute of any one-hour period +15
Noise of repetitive, impulsive character
(hammering, etc.) - 5
Noise of periodic or
cyclically varying nature - 5
(*Note: Apply one correction only )
Detailed plans for the elimination of objectionable noises may be required before the issuance of a building permit.
34. If the proposed activity produces intense glare or heat, whether direct or reflected, is the operation conducted within an enclosed building or with other effective screening in such a manner as to make such glare or heat completely imperceptible from any point along the property line? Detailed plans for the elimination of intense glare or heat may be required before issuance of a building permit.
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35. Will the project cause no inherent or recurring generated vibration perceptible without instruments at any point along the property line? Temporary construction is excluded from this criterion.
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36. Is the exterior lighting, except for overhead street lighting and warning emergency or traffic signals, installed in such a manner that the light source will be sufficiently obscured to prevent
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-V-'WI fill lUCm1"”1" — — ——
Yes No NA*
excessive glare on public streets and walkways or into any residential area? The installation or erection of any lighting which may be confused with warning signals, emergency signals or traffic signals shall not be permitted.
37. Will all sewage and industrial wastes be treated and disposed of in such a manner as to comply with applicable federal, state, and local standards?
Detailed plans for waste disposal may be required before issuance of a building permit.
VARIABLE CRITERIA
38. THE LETTERED CRITERIA ARE APPLIED TO ALL LAND USES AND SCORED ON "POINT CHART A" BASED UPON THE DEVELOPER'S PERFORMANCE. THE DEVELOPER HAS THE FLEXIBILITY TO CHOOSE AMONG THE APPLICABLE CRITERIA TO BE IMPLEMENTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT PLAN.
DOES THE PROJECT COMPLY WITH THE SCORE REQUIREMENT OF "POINT CHART A"?
Phasing
a. Is the project located with at least 1/6 of its property boundary contiguous to existing urban development?
Urban Design
b. If the project contains four or more new buildings, does it include a variety of dwelling and building types?
c. If the project contains four or more new buildings, are the buildings clustered into clearly definable groups around areas of pedestrian activity (common open space, courtyards, outdoor living spaces, terraces or plazas)?
d. Are the buildings designed and oriented for passive solar energy use during the winter months or are the buildings equipped with active solar energy collection systems?
e. Does the project maximize dwelling unit access to solar energy by placing higher residential densities on southfacing slopes and lower residential densities and open space areas on north-facing slopes?
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f. Are new buildings in the project located and designed to
minimize the casting of shadows from one structure onto any other existing or planned building; existing or planned active or passive solar energy collection system; and vacant land lying 20 feet or more from the exterior boundary of the parcel on which the structure is situated?
g. Does the residential project provide for private outdoor
areas (which includes private yards, patios and balconies) for use by the residents of the project which have adequate light, sun, ventilation, privacy and convenient access to the household units?
h. Is each active recreational area conveniently located and
accessible to the residential units it is intended to serve, and is adequate screening provided to insure privacy and
quiet for neighboring residential uses?
i. Are the open space areas between residential buildings de-
signed to clearly differentiate their use and to maximize the opportunity for privacy by residents?
j. Are the entrances to new buildings oriented more than 45° off prevailing northwest winter winds, or are these entrances protected from cold winter winds by architectural screening, landscape screening or any combination thereof?
ARE THE MAIN ENTRANCES TO NEW MULTIPLE FAMILY OR NON-RESIDENTIAL
BUILDINGS LOCATED SO THAT THEY ARE NOT SEPARATED BY PARKING OR BY
SERVICE ACCESS BUT RATHER OPEN DIRECTLY ONTO FACILITIES DESCRIBED
IN "K" THROUGH "N" BELOW?
k. A major pedestrian path or sidewalk?
l. The major pedestrian street crossing adjacent to the non-residential building site?
m. Areas of pedestrian activity (courtyards, plazas, or gardens) created by the clustering of buildings?
n. Public open space?
o. Does the project include two-dimensional or three-dimensional works of art that promote neighborhood quality and are prominently displayed for public view?
p. Does the architectural design of the buildings meet the following criteria: compatible in design with the immediate environment of the site; appropriate to the site and function of the project; compatible in an area having a unified design
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' II ll
or neighborhood character; promoting harmonious transitions in scale and character in areas between different land uses; compatible with future construction both on and off the site; and contributing to a well-balanced mix of styles in the community as a whole?
Circulation
q. Does the street system, including parking lots and public streets, contribute to the order and aesthetic quality of the site configuration?
r. Does the project incorporate sharing of common driveways leading from public streets or alleyways to off-street parking or vehicular use areas serving more than one use or parcel as appropriate?
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS MUST BE PROVIDED TO EVERY BUILDING IN THE PROJECT AND MAY BE ACHIEVED IN TWO WAYS: "PUBLIC", AS NORMALLY REQUIRED AND SPECIFIED IN THE ENGINEERING STANDARDS OF THE CITY, AND/OR; "PRIVATE", A SYSTEM OF PEDESTRIAN PATHS AND SIDEWALKS WHICH DEMONSTRATES TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE CITY, EQUAL TO OR BETTER PERFORMANCE THAN THE "PUBLIC" SYSTEM. FOR THE SYSTEM OF PRIVATE PATHS AND/OR PUBLIC SIDEWALKS CHOSEN FOR THIS DEVELOPMENT, PLEASE ANSWER CRITERIA "S" THROUGH "Z".
s. Are all new public sidewalks along collector and arterial
streets separated from the street curb by at least six feet of parkway?
t. Are all new public sidewalks along local streets separated
from street curb by at least six feet of parkway?
u. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks include connections to shopping, public transportation stops, schools, and recreation opportunities for the residents of the project and/or appropriate surrounding residential neighborhoods?
v. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks provide for
direct access and circulation between buildings?
w. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks incorporate
paving patterns, dimensions, landscaping, grade differences or other design features to enhance convenience, safety and amenity across parking lots and streets?
x. Is the project designed so that the existing and proposed private paths and public sidewalks avoid area^ of low pedestrian interest including parking lots, blank walls, and
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continued
fences if possible? If not possible, does the plan utilize landscaping or other design elements to minimize adverse views and noises and maximize amenity?
y. Do the private path, public sidewalk and bikeway systems incorporate a system of landscape shading from unwanted summer sun, but allowing warming winter sun, to further enhance their amenity and user comfort?
z. Does the private path and public sidewalk system provide for adequate security lighting with the amount dependent on the intensity of pedestrian use and the relative need for personal safety?
aa. Is there a system of tree planting and other landscaping along streets and parking lots?
bb. Does the project include a system of off-street recreational paths for bicycles that fulfill the following criteria:
(i) provides for a link-up with the City's bikeway system;
(ii) meets the design standards of the City; and
(iii) does not duplicate the City's bikeway system.
Resource Protection
IF THE SITE OR ADJACENT PROPERTY CONTAINS A BUILDING OR PLACE IN WHICH AN HISTORIC EVENT OCCURRED; WHICH HAS SPECIAL PUBLIC VALUE BECAUSE OF NOTABLE ARCHITECTURE OR IS OF CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE, DOES THE PROJECT FULFILL CRITERIA "CC" THROUGH "EE*' BELOW?
cc. Does the project prevent creation of influences (including environmental, land use, aesthetic, economic, and social) adverse to its preservation?
dd. Does the project assure that new structures and uses will be in keeping with the character of the building or place? Imitation of period styles should be avoided.
ee. Does the project propose adaptive use of the building or place that will lead to its continuance, conservation and improvement in an appropriate manner while respecting the integrity of the neighborhood?
ff. Does the landscape plan reduce the demand for heating and cooling through the selection and placement of landscape
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cortinued1


mi
materials, including vegetation, earth forms, walls, fences, and paving, etc?
gg. Does the landscape plan minimize potential obstruction of solar access to: existing or planned buildings both on and off the site; existing or planned active or passive solar energy collections systems; and, vacant land lying twenty (20) feet or more from the exterior boundary of the parcel on which the structure is located?
hh. Does the residential project reserve a portion of the site (either through private yards or restricted common areas) and provide for the necessary elements (water, sun, proper soils and slope) required for vegetable gardening by the residents of the project?
ii. Is the multiple family and/or nonresidential project planned to minimize the amount of land devoted to surface vehicular parking by utilizing either shared parking, multi-level, underground and/or elevated parking structures as an accessory use to the primary structure. The project will be evaluated on the percentage of total parking spaces that fulfills the above requirement, and scored as follows:
40% or more = Very Well Done 10 - 39% = Yes
less than 10% = No
jj. Does the project minimize the disruption of steep slopes, important natural drainage systems or other existing land forms through the selection of building and street locations?
kk. Are existing natural water courses or water bodies incorporated into the project as amenities, and are these areas accessible to the general public?
11, Can tne developer demonstrate that through the use of improved technology or any additional features of the structure or site development that the project will contribute to the preservation or enhancement of water quality beyond that required by local, state or federal water quality standards?
mm. Can the developer demonstrate that through the use of improved technology or any additional features of the structure or site development, that the project will reduce the demand for water usage (including, but not limited to, water conservation products, recycling systems, aquifer recharge, non-potable water as an irrigation resource and drought-resistant landscaping) beyond that normally required by City Code?
nn. Can the developer demonstrate that through the use of im-
r\j
as
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II II
proved technology or any additional features of the structure or site development, that the project will contribute to the preservation or enhancement of air quality beyond that required by local, state or federal air quality standards?
Public Facilities, Services 8c Safety
oo. Are fire prevention and control measures (including, but not limited to, fire resistant roofs, fire separation walls, space separation, automatic fire extinguishing systems, and fire hydrant spacing) being provided within the project, beyond those normally required by City Code?
pp. Are police protection and security measures (including, but not limited to, building identification, security landscaping, solid exterior doors and jams, sturdy security locks on windows and patio doors) being provided beyond that normally required by City Code?
qq. Does the project significantly exceed the minimum storm drainage requirements of the City for minor storms?
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All DEVELOPMENT POINT CHART A
All Criteria Applicable Criteria Only
CRITERION is ihe Criterion AppiK i«e fin Na III IV
Circle ihe Corieci Scute va- no Munpiw faints torneu Mj.mm AppICCdB *>• SCORE
PHASING
a Urbar; Contiguity (X 2 1 0 1 5
URBAN DFSIGN
b Buiiarg Variety 1 2 0 2
c Clustering 1 2 0 3
d Solar Orientation 1 2 0 4 Add the subtotals from Fbint Chart A to the totals from Fbnt
e Slopes /Soar Access 1 2 0 3 Charts B through F that apply
f Height/Soar Access 1 2 0 4
g Cxjtdoor Space 1 2 0 3 The project must earn 65%
h Access to Recreation 1 2 0 3 of the maximum applicable
i Range of Open Space 1 2 0 2
1 Entrances/Wind 1 2 0 2
k Entrances/Walkway 1 2 0 2 Fbmts Maximum
1 Entrances/Crossings 1 2 0 1 Ftoinls
m Entrances/Nodes 1 2 0 2
n Entrances/Open Space 1 2 0 2 [col ill ) (col IV )
o Works of Art 1 2 0 1 A
P Architecture 1 2 0 3
CIRCULATION R
Q Street System Design 1 2 0 2
r Joint Driveways 1 2 0 3 r
s Sidewalk/Non-local X 2 0 2
t Sidewalk/Local X 2 0 1 n
u Pedestrian Corwenience 1 2 0 2
v Buiding Connection 1 2 0 1 p
w Ffedestrian /Auto 1 2 0 1
x tow Interest Areas 1 2 0 2 F
y Fbth Landscaping 1 2 0 1
z Path Lighting 1 2 0 1
aa Street Landscaping 1 2 0 4
V/vi = v" v. Percentage *
bb Bikepalhs 1 2 0 3
RESOURCE PROTECTION
cc Historic/Environment 1 2 0 2
dd Historic/Character 1 2 0 2
ee Histone /Adaptive Use 1 2 0 2
If Energy Landscapng 1 2 0 3
gg Solar Landscaping 1 2 0 3 earned of j maximum I *>| appltaPe 1—tfl1—1 points, minus 65%
hh Gardens 1 2 0 1
ii Structured Parking 1 2 0 1
It Sleep Slopes 1 2 0 2
kk water as an Amenity 1 2 0 2 Qjaiity (“ bonus 1 1
II Wdler Quality 1 2 0 — 1
mm Wdler Conservation 1 2 0 2
nn Air Quality 1 2 0 1
PUBLIC SERVICES & FACILITIES
oo Fire Protection 1 2 0 2
pp Fblce Protection 1 2 0 2
qq Mapr Drainage 1 2 0 2
VW~ very well done Subtotals

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DEFINITION:
0
Those activities which are predominantly retail, office, and service uses which would not qualify as or be a part of a neighborhood or community/regional shopping center. Uses include: retail shops; offices; personal service shops; financial institutions; hotels/ motels; medical clinics; health clubs; membership clubs; standard and fast-food restaurants; hospitals; mortuaries; indoor theatres; retail laundry and dry cleaning outlets; limited indoor recreation uses; small animal veterinary clinics; printing and newspaper offices; neighborhood convenience center; and, other uses which are of the same general character.
CRITERIA;
Each of the following applicable criteria must be answered "yes" and implemented within the development
pi an,
Yes No NA*
1.
2.
3.
Does the project gain its primary vehicular access | 11 i
from a street other than College Avenue? I II I
Are all exterior portions of buildings provided with security lighting?
DOES THE PROJECT EARN AT LEAST 50% OF THE MAXIMUM POINTS AS CALCULATED ON "POINT CHART E" FOR THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:
â–¡ â–¡â–¡ â–¡ â–¡
c.
Is the project contiguous to an existing transit route (not applicable for uses of less than 25,000 sq. ft. GLA or with less than 25 employees) or located in the Central Business District?
Is the project located outside of the "South College Avenue Corridor"?
Is the project contiguous to and functionally a part of a neighborhood or community/regional shopping center, an office or industrial park, or located in the Central Business District?
Is the project on at least two acres of land or located in the Central Business District?
â– continued-
CO
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e. Does the project contain two or more principal uses?
f. Is there direct vehicular and pedestrian access between on-site parking areas and adjacent off-site parking areas which contain more than ten (10) spaces?
g. Does the project reduce non-renewable energy usage, either through the application of alternative energy systems, through committed energy conservation measures beyond that normally required by City Code, and/or use of existing buildings?
CO
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BUSINESS SERVICE USES POINT CHART E
For All Criteria Applicable Criteria Only
Criterion Is the Critenan Applicable Ttes No 1 11 HI IV
Circle the Correct Score Mbs VW*No Multiplier Ftomis Earned I x || Moxrrv/Ti Acpccoe Points
a Transit route X 2 0 2
b S. College corridor X 2 0 4
c Part of center X 2 0 3
d Two acres or more X 2 0 3
e Multiple use X 2 0 3
f Joint parking 1 2 0 3
9 Energy conservation 1 2 0 4
h 1 2 0
i 1 2 0
J 1 2 0
k 1 2 0
t 1 2 0
1 ’VW-^fv Weil Done Totals Transfer Totals to Ftotnt Chart A — V
} Percentage Earned of Maximum Applicable Fbmts v/vi-VII %j VII —1
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DEFINITION'
All residential uses. Uses would include single family attached dwellings, townhomes, duplexes, mobile homes, and multiple family dwellings; boarding and rooming houses; fraternity and sorority houses; nursing homes; public and private schools; public and nonprofit quasi-public recreational uses as a principal use; and uses providing meeting places and places for public assembly with incidental office space.
CRITERIA'
Each of answered pi an.
the following applicable criteria must be "yes" and implemented within the development
Yes No NA‘
1. On a gross acreage basis, is the average residential density in the project at least three (3) dwelling units per acre (calculated for residential portion of the site only)?
2. IS THE TOTAL NUMBER OF DWELLING UNITS PROPOSED FOR DEVELOPMENT NO MORE THAN THAT CALCULATED IN THE "DENSITY CHART" THAT FOLLOWS?
â–¡ â–¡â–¡ â–¡ â–¡â–¡
â– cortiajed
CO
4*
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Density Chart
i i i oo < CQ 1 II III
Criterion Multipier Measurement Base Units | XII
Q .75 Tha minimum number of dwellings required under Criterion #2 of this section.
b .2 THE NUMBER OF PROPOSED DWELLING UNITS THAT WILL BE WITHIN: 2000 feet of an existing or approved neighborhood shopping center.
c .1 650 feet of an existing transit stop. J
d .2 ♦000 feat of an existing or approved regional shopping canter. 1
e .2 3500 feet of an existing or reserved neighborhood park, without having to cross an arterial street. j
f .2 4000 feet of an existing or reserved community park or community facility. l
g .2 3000 feet of a major employment center.
h .2 1,000 feet of a child care center or school, meeting all the requirements of the compulsory education laws of the State of Colorado
i .1 "North” Fort Col 11ns
J 1 The Central Business District
OD ID k Calculate the Quality Bonus on Point Chart A and multiply times 2 Bonus Facia
1 Calculate a 1% bonus for every 50 acres Included In the project
m Calculate the percentage of the total acres 1n the project that are devoted to recreational use, enter 1/2 of that percentage as a bonus.
n If the applicant commits to preserving permanent offsite open space that meets the City's minimum requirements, calculate the percentage of this open space acreage to the total development acreage, enter this percentage as a bonus.
o IF A PART OF THE TOTAL DEVELOPMENT BUDGET IS TO BE SPENT ON NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES WHICH ARE NOT OTHERWISE REQUIRED BY CITY CODE, CALCULATE THE AVERAGE INVESTMENT PER DWELLING UNIT OVER THE TOTAL PROJECT AND: Enter a 2* bonus for ev^ry $100 per dwelling urtt Invested 1n public transit \
~Z- 0 CQ P Enter a 1$ bonus for every $100 per dwelling unit Invested 1n other approved facilities and services
q If a commitment 1s being made to develop a specified percentage of the total number of dwelling units for low Income famll1es. enter that percentage as a bonus, up to a maximum of 301.
r If a commitment 1s being made to develop a specified percentage of the total nunfcer of dwelling units for Type "A" and Type "B“ handicapped housing as defined by the city of Fort Collins, calculate the bonus as follows: Type -A- - .5 times - »-o «« In no case shall the combined bonus be greater than 301. 1 1
s If 1t can be demonstrated that the project will reduce non-renewable energy useaqe either through the application of alternative energy systems or through convnltted energy conservation measures beyond that normally required by City Code, a 51 bonus may be earned for every 51 reduction In energy use.
+ 100
| TOTAL TOTAL UNITS IV X III Subtotals 0/ /o IV III


MAJOR BUILDING CODE INFORMATION- UBC 1979
Occupancies: (From table no. 5-A)
Group: B, Division 2- Retail Spaces, Restaurants, Offices Group R, Division 1- Residential considered as apartment use Required separation between B-2 and R-l: 1-hour Group B2 Requirements:
Fire resistance of exterior wall: 1-hour less than 20 ft.
Total floor area of B-2 occupancy = 35,000 s.f.
Type of construction: Type II-F.R.
Allowable area: 39,000 s.f. (Table 5-c)
Allowable height: 12 stories (Table 5-D)
Group R1 Requirements:
Fire resistance of exterior wall: 1-hour less than 5 ft.
Total floor area of R-l occupancy* 13,000 s.f.
Type of construction: type III-l hour Allowable area: 13,500 s.f. (Table 5-C)
Allowable height: 4 stories Exit Requirements: (Ch. 33)
Occupant load (Table 33-A)
-Offices = 100 s.f ./occupant..........130occupants, 2 exits required


37
-Restaurants * 15s.f./occ..................90 occ., 2 exits required
-Retail (Ground floor) = 30s.f./occ........67 occ., 2 exits required
-Dwelling = 300 s.f./occ...................2 occ. (for single units) 1 exit required
2.6 occ. (for couple units) 1 exit required
Total width of exits: (in ft.)
Offices = 2.6 ft.; min. 3*-0"
Restaurant =1.8 ft.; min. 3'-0"
Retail = 1.3 ft.; min. 3'-0"
Residential = 3'-0" min.
Arrangements of exits:
Two exits required shall be placed a distance no less than one-half distance of overall diagonal dimension. Every exit shall discharge into public way or exit passage. Maximum distance to exit from any point shall not exceed 150 ft.
Stairways:
Minimum stairway width; 44"
Private stairways from dwellings may be 30" wide rise and run; rise from 4" to 7%". run from 10" min.
Landings; length equal to width of required stairway, but min. of 4'-0" for straight run stairs. No more than 12*-0" vertically between landings.


38
Exit requirements for Group R-l Occupancies:
Every sleeping room shall have at least one operable window or exterior door approved for emergancy
exit. Windows shall have min. net clear opening of 5.7 s.f., min. height of 24", and min. width of 20", and sill not more than 44" from floor.
Light:
All habitable rooms of 10 s.f. of greater require min. glazing of 1/10 room floor area. Bathrooms require min. glazing of 1/20 floor area and must be operable.
Ventilation:
2 a.c.h. in habitable rooms, 5 ach in bathrooms.
Type II-F.R. Construction Requirements: Type III-l Hr Construction Requirements
Exterior walls 4 hr 4 hr
Interior bearing wall 2 hr 1 hr
Exterior non-bearing 4 hr 4 hr
Structural frame 2 hr 1 hr
Perminant partition 1 hr 1 hr
Shaft enclosures 2 hr 1 hr
FI oors 2 hr 1 hr
Roofs
1 hr
1 hr


39
DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION IN HISTORIC OLD TOWN
(Copied with permission from Ft. Collins Planning office)
Section II—New Construction
These guidelines apply to all new buildings and to the renovation of existing structures that are not designated as historic structures.
Historic Imitation Versus Compatible Contemporary Context
29. Guide!ine: Design new buildings that avoid imitating the historic architecture of Old Town.
Historic structures have a special value as original period pieces which represent the style and technology of their time. Building new structures next to these authentic "antiques" is a special problem. The new should be compatible with the olid, but at the same time it should be distinguishable from the old, so we may accurately interpret the evolution of Old Town.
Consider developing contemporary designs that creatively draw upon the important characteristics of the historic district and thus achieve buildings that are compatible with the area. Use the guidelines that follow to help you identify those characteristics you may use.
Building Alignment and Height
30. Guideline: Maintain cornice alignment. ^
Building heights need not match exactly, but some horizontal element should align with other cornices where feasible.
31. Guide!ine: Maintain approximately the facade heights established by existing buildings on the block in new construction. Maintaining similar building heights along the street helps unify the entire block. New building may step up to 40 feet in the rear, if proven to be necessary.


40
32. Guideline: Maintain the alignment of storefronts at the top of the clerestory on existing buildings.
Reinforce the established horizontal patterns in Old Town by aligning the tops of new storefronts with existing ones.
Materials and Color
33. Guideline: Maintain brick as the major building material.
Many of the original building materials, especially brick and sandstone, have interesting colors and textures that are an asset. In addition, since these are often repeated along the street, they can contribute to the visual unity of the area.
Brick is by far the predominant material for major buidling surgaces. The repetition of brick contributes to the visual continuity of the district. Use brick as a new building material when it is feasible. The Landmarks Preservation Commission may consider other materials when the dominance of brick in the area is not threatened.
34. Guideline: Develop a color scheme for the entire building front that coordinates all the facade elements.
Reserve the use of strong, bright colors for accents where you want to draw the customer's eye-such as to the sign, to ornamentation, and to the entrance.
35. Guideline: A maximum of three (3) colors is best for most cases, except where small amounts are used for trim.
36. Guideline: Background and accent colors should be consistent within separate buildings, or where unity in theme is desired.
Facade Patterns
37. Guideline: Maintain the established pattern of building widths.
Most buildings in Old Town have similar widths. New building should conform to this established pattern.


41
Larger facade designs can be divided into segments to conform.
38. Guideline; Maintain or reinforce the existing pattern created by upper story windows.
The upper story of your facade may have some details that can add interest to your building, if the upper and lower levels are coordinated in their design. Windows at the second story can be a key element in this regard. They can create a pattern that unifies the width of the building. If they line up with openings below, this unity can be even stronger. Other building elements may be designed to maintain existing window pattern.
39. Guideline; Maintain pattern of recessed entries on the street.
Entrances to most shops are recessed, to shelter the doorway and increase exposure of the display windows. When repeated along a row of buildings, these recessed entrances create a strong pattern that contributes to the visual unity of the block.
Building Setbacks
40. Guideline: Maintain the alignment of facades at the sidewalk edge.
Preserve existing storefront lines on the street when developing new structures. If a new storefront must be set back from the sidewalk, use an arcade of columns, landscaping, or other devices to maintain an edge at the sidewalk.
Storefronts
41. Guideline; Maintain the pedestrian-oriented storefront format established by existing buildings on the street, the established pedestrian-oriented storefront format has large glass display windows and
a recessed entrance at street level with a clerestory above. The new storefront should align with existing storefronts at the belt course, just above the clerestory. The traditional storefront elements may be reinterpreted in new construction, but must fit the overall pattern.
42. Guideline; Maintain the alignment of storefront windows.
Display windows are important elements because they line up at the same height down the street and thereby create a visual continuity in buildina facadps. This strpnnthpns thp imanp nf thp a**pa


42
For you individually, display windows are also an effective means of advertising, especially when they complement and do not compete with the rest of the building facade. Remember that the displays should be well maintained. A well-designed display window will enhance the merchandise.
43. Guide!ine: Consider awnings to provide a three-dimensional quality to a flat facade.
Coloraful awnings are both decorative and functional additions to your storefront. They can help draw attention to your shop entrance, and when they align with others in your block, they can strengthen visual unity.
In general, an awning is more successful as a combination sign and weather control device than are horizontal canopeis. These canopies cut off the view of the upper part of the building. Therefore, sloped awnings are preferred; horizontal canopies are strongly discouraged.
Alley Entrances
44. Guideline: Develop new buildings with public access to commercial uses front and rear.
Alley entrances to new buildings offer great potential for new storefronts and access to other commercial ventures.
45. Guideline: Enhance rear entrances with signs and lanscaping when feasible.
As courtyards and alleys behind buildings are developed for public use, rear entrances will become visable commercial entrances. Signs and landscaping will enhance these areas.
Architectural Details and Ornamentation
46. Guideline: Ornamentation is encouraged, but imitation of historic detail is discouraged


43
Ornamentation on new buildings should help define and accentuate the major facade elements described earlier. New buildings that use imitations of historic ornamentation compete and detract from actual historic buildings in the district. Historic ornamentation is also difficult to imitate correctly.
Security Devices
47. Guide!ine: Use security devices that will enhance the area.
Security is a major concern in design, and it is possible to provide adequate protection while also respecting the character of the historic district. The most effective security measures are not phusical elements but community action and cooperation. However, some physical elements should be considered.
Lighting and alarm systems are preferred because they will not alter the appearance of the storefront.
48. Guideline: Do not use permanently fixed bars on storefront windows
Fixed bars on storefront windows disrupt the character of the historic district.
Parking Lots and Structures
49. Guideline: Use landscaping, walls or fences to provide a buffer strip to parking areas.
Open lots for parking break the continuity of the "wall" that building facades create along the block. These gaps should be avoided when new lots are developed and old ones are upgraded.
Provide buffer planting strips along the edge of parking lots to screen cars from the street. Include low shrubs and trees where feasible. In large lots, include "islands" of plant materials to break up the paved area. These will also help to shade cars in summer.
50. Guideline: Maintain the characteristic pedestrian orientation at the sidewalk when developing parking structures.
As parking demands increase in Old Town, new parking structures may be built. Parking garages are a new event in the history of the district that should continue the basic characteristics of the area.


44
The most important factor is respect for the pedestrian-oriented storefront on the street level. Refer to the guidelines on alignment of cornices and upper story window patterns as well.
Section III —Design Guidelines for Signs
Selecting a concept for your sign is one of the most important design decisions for your building, because it is such a prominent part of the business image. First, consider what type of signs will be appropriate:
1. Flush on the building
2. On the window
3. Projecting from the wall
4. Flags/banners hanging from the upper facade (if allowed by Cidy Code)
5. Awnings over the display window
6. Living signs—the real product on display
7. Symbol signs
In terms of sign design, the important concerpt is to improve readability. In general, keep signs simple and place them where they can be seen. This usually means locating a sign on the upper portion of the facade, and, in particular, in display windows themselves. Symbols as signs are encouraged because they add interest to the street, are quickly read, and are remembered better than written words.
Here are guidelines that will help you develop a facade design concept:
51. Guideline: Align signs approximately with others on the block when feasible.
Look at your building facade in relation to the adjacent stores and buildings. Could there be some overall order given to the signs? It may be possible for all signs within your building or block to line up. This can establish visual continuity along the storefronts, and at the same time, provide uniform sight lines for viewers. Alignment makes all signs more readable at a glance.
In many situations aligning signs is just not possible. In these cases, look for other features to determine placement of your sign. Each store sign may relate directly to the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all signs may be placed in windows.


45
Finally, ordering signs in this way creates a visual continuity that should be emphasized whenever possible.
52. Guideline: Your sign size should be subordinate to the other facade elements.
In general, signs should not overpower the image of the facade as a single composition, and therefore the signs should be a part of the facade, not cover it. Use a smaller sign than permitted by the sign code.
In general, one flush sign used in conjunction with one special sign-on glass, on the awning, or projecting—should be enough. Where several businesses are in one building, consider using a directory to consolidate many individual names.
53. Guideline: Select a sign design that is compatible in color and material with your facade and the street as a whole.
Sign colors strongly influence the sign's readability. When sign colors compete from building to building, visual or perceptual clutter is created, making it harder to see individual businesses. Compatibility of sign colors and facade colors results in a more memorable impression. Light colored letters on a dark colored background are more readable than the reverse.
Sign materials should be sympathetic to the facade materials, the image you wish to portray, and to the sign's wearability.
54. Guideline: Position signs so they will not obscure existing architectural details.
Look at your building or store facade. Do any architectural details suggest a location, size or shape for your sign? These could be decorative bands, or brickwork panels indented in the face material. These features can be emphasized by placing your sign to fit within them.
55. Guideline} Maintain all signs in good repair.
Signs in disrepair portray a bad business image and cause the deterioration of the visual environment.


46
56. Guideline: Indirect illumination is recommended for signs.
Light fixtures mounted on the front of your building that shine on your sign are called "indirect sources". These light a portion of the face of your building. Shield these fixtures to prevent glare on the street and sidewalk. This type of lighting emphasizes the continuity of the building surface, and signs become an integral part of the facade.
57. Guideline: Internal illumination may be acceptable under these conditions: When only the letters themselves—not the background—are lighted, or when neon is used.
In either case, the intensity of the light source should not overpower others on the street.
Section IV—The Public Sector
59. Guideline: Preserve irregular building shapes and alley forms as a record of the historic site plan of Old Town.
As a result of the intersection of the two street grids in Old Town, a few buildings have irregular floor plans—they are not rectangles. Some interesting exterior building shapes and alley forms result from this street plan.
Enhancement of alleys is encouraged. These alley designs should help to dramatize the existing shapes and forms.
60. Guideline: Use contemporary street furniture of materials traditionally used for street furniture in the surrounding area.
61. Guideline: The placement of street furniture should function so as to serve the public.
62. Guideline: Do not use elaborate imitations of historic street furniture.
Historically, street furniture in Old Town was sparse and simple. As pedestrian use increases in the area, a more intense development of street furniture is expected. While this is encouraged, take care to avoid misrepresenting the history of the street with elaborate imitations of historic designs.


47
ECONOMIC DATA
Ft. Collins economic goals and policies for the Old Town Area have been developed, reviewed and adopted by the City of Ft. Collins as a guide to the economic rejuvenation of Historic Old Town.
Economic Policies: (From Historic Old Town Area Plan)
-Historic Old Town shall be continued and enhanced as an economic and commercial center of the community.
-Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall investigate private and public funding sources for revitalization of the area.
-Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall actively encourage local lending institutions to participate in loans to the area.
-Historic Old Town shall promote a variety of businesses and shopping opportunities within Historic Old Town in order to promote a healthy business climate.
-Historic Old Town shall encourage compatible businesses and services to locate in the area.


48
GOALS: Economic Development
"Develop and utilize as fully as possible the shopping, government, business offices, and cultural functions of the downtown as a focus for the redevelopment of the rest of the older city.
-Provide continued support for redevelopment activities in the downtown area.
-Encourage higher density housing which is consistent with the character of the neighborhood in the general downtown area.
-Encourage location of «ajor retail, governmental, and financial institutions and other service functions in the downtown area.
-Locate major cultural facilities such as the library, theatre, and the like in the downtown area." MARKET DATA:
There has been no formal market study done in the Old Town Area to determine the supportable retail, office, and residential square footages, or what types of services and goos would be most economically feasible, Even so, there is currently a study being conducted by various groups as part of Old Town's revitalization plan. Earl Wilkinson, chairman of (D.D.A.) the Downtown Development Authority says that "downtown will never again be a major shpping area,... Those days are gone. Other things will bring people back downtown, making it once again the vital core. Wilkinson is very enthused about the prospects for a return to economic prosperity.
According to the D.D.A., the potential exists and money can be generated in a plan that encourages
private development.


49
For Old Town to survive, it must adapt through meeting different needs of consumers than the shopping centers to the south, which cater to volume consumerism. Old Town must compliment rather than compete with other shopping centers.
Chuck Mabry of the City Planning Office envisions Old Town as "...A people place... an attractive, comfortable center where consumers will come to browse and to find entertainment, where businesses and professional offices thrive, and where people live." (Denver Post, Aug. 13, 1981). A cornerstore of the authorities plan is cultural and entertainment facilities - theatres, restaurants, arcades, to bring people to the area in the evening. In addition, the D.D.A. sees these activities coupled with one-of-a-kind shops, easy parking and pedestrian access, then people will probably stay awhile. A series of parking garages is planned to service the area.
There is currently a large supply of office space in existing buildings, but it is undesirable and in generally poor condition. This is the case above most retail space in existing buildings along Jefferson street. Most of this space is vacant, but some is used for storage or office space. These spaces would make ideal lower-income housing units with a good view across Jefferson st. to the Poudre River. The second level location helps isolate the units above the noise and traffic along Jefferson. Similar conversions are already taking place in other areas adjacent to the site. Higher-income housing units are appropriate on the interior of'the site, provided they contain appropriate ameneties.
Given the urban lifestyle of Old Town and mix of people, the most likely residents would be professional people, single or married, but typically without children. This market would, in all probablility, desire this lifestyle and have the income to affort it.


50
A mixture of units would be primarily one and two bedroom units with some efficiencies. In most
units it would be desirable to have a private studion space. The addition of residential space and other
nighttime uses creates an important 24-hour place.
In the office aspect of the plan, it was noted that attractive office space will help entice a solid core of professionals downtown. Several major banks have located downtown already.
In addition to beautification plans and other improvements, the natural assets of the Poudre River would be brought out, thus eventually there could be public parks, nature trails and foot bridges amid the hustle and bustle downtown.
Political Implications:
Separate owners of frontage buildings along Jefferson street own separate lots extending back through the site to the alley right-of-way. These separate owners of separate parcels, a cohesive development throughout the site becomes difficult. Conflicts may arise between owners of various parcels. In talking with some of these owners, some were enthused about the potential for mixeduse development along the alleyway, while others opposed any kind of development. A closer look at the makeup of the existing business establishments and land use along Jefferson street may indicate reasons for support or opposition to new development.
Current zoning for the parcel is "C" (commercial district), which includes storage uses, retail and office uses and service uses. The existing uses along Jefferson street include all of these types of
uses


51
The most supportive of new mexed use development are the small retail shop owners. Even so, they differed in opinion as to what the mexed use should include, as well as a concern for the parking problems that will accompany new development. Many of these shop owners have begun enthusiastcally upgrading their existing storefront facades in accordance with design guidelines for the area, and have tried to encourage adjacent businesses to do the same.
Most reluctance to new development comes from auto service related businesses located along the southern portion of Jefferson street and corner of Linden street and Jefferson streets. Incompatability of these existing uses with proposed new development plans are in conflict with the goals and policies of the Area Plan to promote compatibility between land uses in Historic Old Town.
In order to create compatible land uses, it is desirable that these incompatable businesses be relocated. Although no formal studies have been done, the future senario as indicated by area business people is that these businesses will eventually be forced to relocate as the area develops. Rising land costs will make selling their properties financially attractive and relocation more possible. In this light, future availability of these properties for other uses seems almost assured, thus enhancing the economic potential of the site. Compatable use will also allow a more cohesive development of the site.
Financing
Private financing is most encourage in Old Town. In the situation that exists on the site currently, it would be difficult for individual owners to fund any development; however, by pulling together in a joint partnership with a reputable developer as the managing partner, financing becomes much easier.


52
This concept is currently being used in other areas of Old Town by Mitchell and Co. it allows property owners to commit all or part of their holdings into the association. Ray Chamberlain, Vice-President of Mitchell and Co., explains that property appraisals will make it possible to "equalize investments" and that people can put dollars or buildings into the association giving them a voice in decision-making.
He admits, however, that "given the number of people and government agencies involved, we don't expect to pull it off without any hitches at all."
Financial support from the Downtown Development Authority is also sought by developers in the form of tax-increment income to help pay for public improvements such as burying utilities, installing street lights, resurfacing roads and alleyways, and providing parking.
Socialogical Factors
The Ft. Collins Historic Old Town "Area Plan" developed by the Historic Old Town Planning Committee summarizes their socialogical goals as:
"Provide housing and other services for all income levels in an adjacent to Historic Old Town with recognition of the special needs for elderly, low income, and handicapped persons." (pg. 2 Area Plan)
This statement is, while wellmeaning is somewhat limited in scope. The social implications of the Old Town involve more than housing an servies. It involves an understanding of peoples perception of Old Town as a market place, an entertainment place, a place to work and place to live. Thus, any development must be stimulated by a great variety of sensory impressions, rather than purely functional.


53
People, in chosing alternatives, intuitively select variety. An important concept to keep in mind concerning new development in Old Town. The development must also satisfy peoples sense for adventure, for everchanging scenes and unexpected elements. The Old Town Area provides a setting for this to occur.
Urban legibility projects to people a rich mental image of an urban space, both in sensory and emotional qualities, thus giving spaces a personality. According to Kevin Lynch, people use five basic elements to form a mental image of urban space;
1) Pathways (pedestrian/vehicular/bike etc)
2) Districts (Old Town/New Town/Suburb)
3) Edges (termination of Old Town district)
4) Landmarks (corner buildings)
5) Modes (Plazas, centers of activity)
Time can also be used to create an image of security. The proposed development will attempt to create a 24-hour space. This has some important socialogical implications. Not only does it create a setting for daily social interation in the market areas, it should also create a sense of community within the project. This sense of community enhances security, as people help look out for one another, reducing crime rates, because someone is always present.


54
Future Development
Future development in the area related to the site will attempt to provide for these elements. The "Old Town Center" project is planned to be one of the largest preservation developments in the nation.
Old Town center is planned as a multi-purpose center incorperating a mix of entertainment, commercial, residential, recreational, and retail activities, while providing an atmosphere of delight and enjoyment. The focus of the project is the new plaza at the intersection of Linden and Walnut streets. The plaza is large enough to accomidate exibits, art performances, and outdoor public events. This is in contrast to a series of smaller public spaces between allies using them as a secondary circulation system developed exclusively for predestrians.


55
OLD TOWN CENTER PLAN
1 New Parking Structures
2 New Floor Space
3 Central Plaza


56


CLIMATIC DATA:
- Narrative Description
- Radiation Data
- Wind Data
- Temp./D.D./Precip.
- Relative Humidity Interpolated
- Collection Sheet
- Graphic Presentation CLIMATE ANALYSIS:
- Summary
- "Climate" Program Analysis I
- Mean Temp, vs Diurnal Range Analysis II
- Bioclimatic Chart Analysis III DESIGN RESPONSES
CLIMATIC SITE ANALYSIS:
57


58
CLIMATIC DATA
Climatic data was collected from the primary sources; the Auraria library and Colorado climatology office in Ft. Collins. Library data was difficult to come by, though most of the required data was available from Ft. Collins.
Temperature, degree days and precipitation data are from the "Summary of Monthly Climatic Data for Ft. Collins". Solar radiation was available from "Colorado Solar Radiation Data", however only average daily values for each month were available, and only for four years of record. Fortunatly this is measured data for horizontal surfaces, global radiation in metric or U.S. units.
Wind data was available "Solar Radiation Data" wind summary. Although a monthly breakdown of wind direction was not available, the wind summary both seasonal and daily discriptions of wind activity as well as an annual wind rose.
Relative humidity information was totally unavailable. Humidity data was generated through interpolation of available data for Denver and Cheyenne. Since both areas have roughly similar humidity levels, the generated for Ft. Collins should be fairly close to what actually exists.


59
CLIMATIC SUMMARY
Ft. Collins is located in north central Colorado near the foothills on the eastemslope of the Rocky Mountains. The climate is characterized by moderate tempertures, light precipitation, and light winds interupted occasionally by strong Chinook winds. The average monthly temperature varies from 27.5®F in January to 71.3°F in July. Winter temperatures are moderated by the sporadic occurrences of warm Chinook winds. The average annual precipitation is about 15 inches, most of which falls during the growing season. Afternoon thundershowers occure quite frequently during the summer months but they are usually quite light. Seasonal snowfall averages about 46 inches, but persistent snowcover is unusual. March is typically the snowiest month.
DESCRIPTION OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA
Measurements of solar radiation have been made since 1975 in support of research activities at the Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science. Instrument calibrations are performed annually at the National Calibration Facility in Boulder and maintenance is performed regularly.
Some problems with the data storage/recovery system has resulted in some missing data, but the overall data quality is excellent.


60
FORT COLLINS
ELEVATION 5279 FEET MSL LATITUDE *0 DEG 3b MIN LONGITuOE 105 DEG 8 MIN
bOuRCE OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA — COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENLL INSTRUMENTATION — EPPLEr PRECISION SPECTRAL PYRANOMETER
OBSERVED SOLAH RADIATION DATA — AVERAGE DAILY TOTAL HEMISPHERIC RADIATION ON A HORIZONTAL SURFACE, MAY 197S-NOVEM8ER 1978.
TILTED SURFACE RADIATION DATA -- CALCULATED FROM THE OBSERVED HORIZONTAL DATA USING THE MtTHUU DEVISED BY LIU AND JORDAN (1960). VALID FOR SOUTH-FACING SURFACts. REFLECTIVITY = 0.2
llimatic data — all data collected at Colorado state university main campus weather station, temperature and PRECIPITATION AVERAGES ARE FOR THE 1951-1970 PERIOD, DEGREE DAY AVERAGES bASED ON 19*1-1970 D»TA. MEAN »IND SPEED OBTAINED FROM 1893-1957 DATA. AVERAGE STATION PRESSURE AT ELEVATION 500* FEET BASED ON 1887-1987 DATA.
SOLAR RADIATION JAN FEB MAR APH MAY
HEMISPHERIC (KWH/SQM/DAy) 2,50 3.03 4.81 5.16 5.BA
HEMISPHERIC (BTU/SQFT/DAY) 79* 960 1525 1635 1 B50
(HEMISPHERIC / ETR) RATIO .60 .5* .63 .53 .53
COMPUTED TILTED SURFACES (K«H/SQM/0AY> latitude - 15 DEG. *.13 *.19 5.91 5 . A B 5.69
latitude *.79 A.58 8.12 5.20 5.27
LATITUDE ♦ 15 DEG, 5.16 *.71 &.C0 A.BA 4 . tJ 3
VERTICAL 4,8* 4.03 A. '2 3.07 2.60
CLIMATE
Extreme maximum temp, ideg F) 68,0 75.0 78.0 83.0 90.0
average maximum temp. M£AN TtMP. 27,5 31 .4 35.4 46.1 56.3
extreme minimum temp. 13.4 18,0 22.0 32.1 4*. 8
EXTREME minimum temp. -32.0 -41.0 -23,0 -8.0 25.0
DEGREE DATS
HEATING(65 DEG. BASE) 1184 960 918 558 297
COOLING165 DEG. BASE) 0 0 0 0 5
PRECIPITATION (INCHES) .42 .44 1 .10 1.55 2.8B
SNOWFALL (INCHES) 6 , J 6.6 13.3 6.4 .2
AvERAGt WIND SPEED (MPH) 6.4 6.6 7.5 7.B 6.6
AVERAGE STATION PRESSURE (MB) 84*. 5 844,4 843.4 844.* 844.8
JUN JUL AUG StP OLT NOV DEC ANN wtcowu (YtAHS)
6.82 6.26 5.60 4.84 3.94 2.43 2.16 4 . *♦ 5 4
2163 1984 1775 1536 1249 770 6B6 1 4 1 0 4
.58 .55 .55 .57 .62 .53 .57 .57
6.39 5.95 5.68 5.50 5.23 3.6M 3.71
5.79 5.4* 5.37 5.50 5.61 4.14 4.34
4.95 4,7 0 4.61 5.21 5.67 4.38 4.7?
2.57 2.53 2.85 3.61 4.63 3.96 4.so
102.0 102.0 99.0 95.0 87.0 73.0 73.0 20
79.1 85.9 83.6 75.5 64.9 51.0 43.7 20
65.0 71.3 69. 1 60.1 49.7 37.1 30.4 48.3 20
50.8 56.7 54. s 44.7 34.4 23.? 1 7.0 20
33.0 40.0 39.0 27.0 8.0 -17.0 -17.0' *0
101 7 12 175 4 n 834 1076 6599 30
80 1 b7 133 25 0 0 0 h 30 30
1.99 1.53 1.62 1.08 1.14 • 55 .36 1 <♦. bb 20
0.0 0.0 u. 0 .1 2.5 5.5 4.9 4b . 0 20
5.4 4.7 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.9 5.9 6.0 65
849.1 P49.? 848.3 84 7.8 8^7.1 *4b.4 8*6.? d *♦ 6,2 71


fr a t-j


i


IMMARY OF MONTHLY CLIMATIC DATA FDR FUST COLLINS
COLORADO FOR YEARS 1931-1979
SUBSfAPI3N SO. 53305 UXVISIOS 4 61
la riruoE - 40 35 LOSS xriiDE - 1 05 5 ELEVAHOS - 5000 1 FEET
JA S FEB mar APR MAY J JS JUL AUS SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
)S MLY REAS RAXJ RJR TE«P (F) AYE. 40.5 44.4 50. 3 50.3 69.3 79.2 85.8 83.6 75.5 65.1 5 0.9 43.6 52.3
MAX. 52.2 58.9 60.4 54.3 76.3 87.5 91.2 87.3 82.0 71.8 53.9 b ? . 6 5b. 8
YEAR 1953 1954 1972 1946 1934 1955 1954 1937 1943 1950 1949 1957 1954
R1S. 24.7 32.5 39.9 50.9 57.8 71.1 79.5 80.0 64.9 50.9 43.0 30.0 59.8
YEAR 1937 1942 1 9o5 1 957 1935 1945 1950 1977 1965 1969 1947 1932 1 951
YEARS OF RECJR 0 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 4b. 48 .
ISTHLY REAS MINIMJM TEMP (F) AYE. 12.5 17.3 23.2 32.9 42.3 50.3 56.5 54.4 45.1 34.6 22.8 16.4 34.0
RAX . 21.7 23.6 30.0 33.0 46.4 56. 7 60.5 58.1 51.8 39,9 2 3.4 2 4.5 3b,9
YEAR 1934 1954 19 72 1043 1977 1977 1966 1969 1940 1957 1955 1933 1977
MIS. -3.3 4.9 14.3 26.7 38.1 45.4 53.5 49.3 39.7 29.4 15.1 . 9 31.6
YEAR 1937 1942 1965 1345 1950 1951 1942 1950 1934 1 9b 9 1952 1932 1 951
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 48. 48.
INTRLY REAS AYERASE TEMP CF) AYE. 25.5 30.8 36.8 15.6 55.8 65.0 71.2 69.0 60.4 49.9 35.9 30.0 48.2
M AX . 35.9 41.3 45.2 53.0 51.0 71.3 74.8 72.0 64,b 54,7 45.9 38.5 51.0
YEAR 1953 1954 1972 1 346 1934 1977 1966 1937 1977 + 1963 1949 19 33 1 954
R1S. 13.7 1 B. 7 27.1 39.6 48.9 58.5 6b. 8 65.4 52.9 40.2 30.0 15.4 45.7
YEAR 1937 1942 1965 1 945 1935 1945 1950 1950 1965 1969 1952 1932 1951
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 4b. 48.
SREE DAYS (BASE 5 5 F) aye. 1171.4 928.9 367.8 519.9 273.1 67.1 6.5 14.7 161.3 461.4 3 40.7 1073.7 6416.4
MAX. 1525 1233 1 165 743 385 1 95 42 49 357 763 1041 1316 7 223
YEAR 1952 1955 1965 1957 1 957 1951 1972 1964 1 9bS 1969 1952 1972 1951
MIN. 365 658 606 372 153 0 0 0 52 313 572 864 5631
YEAR 1953 1954 1972 1954 1974 1977 19 7 6s 1973 + 1963 196 3 1955 1957 1954
YEARS OF RECORD 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29. 29.
DAYS RAX ierp jrs OR EO 90F AYE. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .0 4.1 9.2 5.7 1.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.5
MAX. 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 23 1 5 6 0 0 0 45
YEAR 1948 1943 1948 1348 1969 1955 1954 1960 1960 + 1948 1948 1948 1 960
MIS. 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 6
YEAR 1 979f 1979s 1979s 1 379s 1 979 + 1972s 1970 + 1977 1975 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1 9b7
YEARS OF RECORD 31. 31 . 31 . 31. 31. 32. 31. 31 . 32. 31. 31. 31. 31.
OAYS RAX rERP LESS JR E 0 32F AYE. 3.5 4.5 3.2 .5 .0 0.0 0.0 ,..-0.0 0.0 .2 2.4 5.0 24.4
R AX . 2 1 1 2 9 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 1 3 39
YEAR 1 9 79 s 1973 1965s 1 359 1 954 1943 1948 1948 1948 1969 1952 19 72 1949
MIS. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
YEAR 1955s 197 7s 1 979s 1 379s 1 979s 1 979s 1 979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1971 + 1957 1953
YEARS OF REC OP'D 32. 31 . 32. 31 . 31 . 31. 31. 31 . 31. 31. 32. 32. 31.
DAYS R I S rERP LESS OR E3 32F AYE. 30.3 26.7 26.9 13.3 2.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 11.5 25.2 30.3 168.3
MAX . 31 29 31 21 6 0 0 0 6 23 3o 31 189
YEAR 1 979s 1 9 6 4s 1 965s 1368 1979s 1943 1948 1948 1965 1952 1979 + 1979 + 1952
MIS. 23 23 21 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 23 27 148
YEAR 1971 s 197 7 19 7 4s 1378 1 977 + 197 9s 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1974 + 1 974 + 19 7 7 + 197 1
YEARS OF RECORD 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 31. 31. 31. 31. 32. 32. 3 2. 31.
DAYS MIS TEMP LESS OR EO 0 F AV£. 5.3 2.4 1.0 .2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .6 2.3 ll .b
MAX. 1 6 1 1 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2 2b
YEAR 1 952 + 1955 1948 1359 1948 1 948 1948 1948 1948 1948 1 952 19 72 1948
MTS. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
YEAR 1965 1977 + 1979 + 1379 + 1379 + 1973 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 197 3 + 1978 + 1970 + 1 97J
YEARS OF RECORD 32. 32. 32. 31. 31 . 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 32. 32 . i 1 •
SREST TEMPERATURE fFl TEMP 68 75 80 83 90 102 102 99 95 87 79 76
YEAR ASO DAY195312+195403 197830+197710+196927+195423 195411 196908 195905+196703 19340b 193911
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 43. 49. 49. 49. 43. 49. 49.
WEST TEMPERA HIRE fFl TEMP -32 -41 -31 -10 22 23 40 39 21 6 -17 -30
YEAR AND DAY19b210 1 9 51 0 1 194306 194504 194805 194713 195208 196430+197119 194817 195102 193212
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 43. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49.
PREPARED BV : COLORADO CLIMATE CENTER
UEPARMENT OF ATMDSPERIC SCItS.E COLORADO STATE JSIVERSirY FORT COLLISS, CO 83523 (303) 491 - 3545


' M M A R Y JF MONTHLY CLIMATIC DATA FDR FORT C 3LLINS COLORADO FOR YEARS 1931-1979 SUBS T ATI ON NO . 5 3 305 DIVISION 4 62
LATITUDE - 40 35 LONG ITUDE - 135 5 ELEVATION - 5000 FEET
0 A N F E3 MAR APR MAY JJN JUL AUG SEP ocr NOV DEC ANN
4thly precipirarioy (tn) A V£ . .39 . 44 .98 1.81 2.78 1.81 1.40 1.48 1.22 1.36 .55 .44 14.36
MAX. 1.17 1,26 3.38 5.53 7.0b 6.31 5.8b 7.39 7.35 6.70 2.29 1.62 28.42
YEAR 1 952 19 S 1 1 961 1942 1961 1949 1977 1951 1938 1942 1973 1979 + 1961
KIM. D. 03 .32 .01 .22 .01 .35 0.00 .03 .01 0. DO D.00 0.00 7.34
YEAR 1931 1 9 7 3 P 1 966 1 955 1974 1933 1939 1960 1932 1934 + 1 955 + 1959 + 1 96b
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49. 49.
CATFSr DA T 1. Y PR EC T P YIN) AM LI J N T .85 . 41 1 .26 2.18 3.21 3.54 4.43 3.06 1.62 1.67 1.26 .96
Yi.AR AND DAY19623B 196125 197918 195702 196113 194904 197725 195103 197117 195105 197920 197531
YEARS OF RECORD 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32 .
NTHLY SNOWFALL (IN) Al/E. 5.8 6.2 10.7 5.5 1.5 .3 0.0 0.0 .5 2.6 5.1 6.2 46.8
MAX. 19.7 15.6 32.6 34.1 27.8 . 5 0.0 0.0 15.0 14.7 2 9.1 20.7 137.2
YEAR 1971 1931 1970 1945 1978 1947 1931 1931 1971 1969 1979 1979 197 9
MIN. 0. D 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 13.7
YEAR 1 9 3 4 + 1 97 3 P 1966 1 959p 1 977 + 197 9 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1973 + 1 955 + 1959 + 1934
YEARS OF RECORD 49. 49. 47. 49. 48. 48. 49. 49. 49. 47. 49. 49. 44.
rsr DEPTH SNOW JN GRND IN MON (IN) 1 3 9 17 18 4 0 0 0 10 12 1 8 1 4
YEAR AND 0AY196208 I95608P195614 195702 197 91 Op 3 0 0 197117 196912 197920 1 97929 +
YEARS OF RECORD 30. 23. 30. 23. 30. 32. 32. 32. 32. 29. 28. 27.
DAYS PREC1P SIR OR ED 3.1 IN AYE. 2.1 1.9 4.3 4.8 6.0 5.1 4.8 4.3 3.3 2.9 2.3 1.8 43.9
MAX. 9 7 1 1 10 12 1 6 lb 14 10 9 8 8 110
YEAR 1948 1943 1 951 1 95 3 p 1952 + 1951 1 950 1951 195 0 1949 1 9S2 1951 1951
MIN. D 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Y EAR 1 9 7 7 + 1 9 7 7 P 1966 1 9 5 3 P 1 974 1971 1963 1960 1978 + 1964 + 1 978 + 1977 + 1977
YEARS OF RECORD 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 31. 32. 32. 3 1 •
DAYS PRECIP 3TR OR ED 0.5 IN AYE. .1 .0 .5 1.3 1.5 1 . 1 .8 .7 .7 .8 .2 .2 7.6
MAX. 1 1 3 4 5 5 3 3 5 4 3 2 1 9
YEAR 1 959 P 1943 1961 1971 1957 1949 1961 + 1979 1961 1969 1973 1948 1 949
MIN. D 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
YEAR 1 9 7 9 P 1 97 9 P 1978P 1970P 1 9 77 + 1977 + 1979 + 1978 + 1979 + 1977 + 1 978 + 1978 + 1 9o64
YEARS OF RECORD 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31 . 31. 31 . 31 . 31 . 31. 31. 31.
DAYS PRECIP 3 T R OR ED 1.0 IN AYE. 3.3 0.0 .1 .3 .8 . 3 .2 .2 .0 .2 .0 0.0 2.1
MAX. 0 0 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 3 6
YEAR 1948 1943 1979P 1971 1978 + 1 979p 1961 1951 1971 1969 1979 1948 1 9794
MIN. 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
YEAR 1 9 7 9 P 1979P 1978P 1 9 7 8 P 1977 + 1978 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1 9 78 + 1 979 + 1 9724
YEARS OF RECORD 31 . 31 . 31 . 31. 32. 31 . 31 . 31 . 31 . 31. 31 . 31. 3 1 .
3ER OF DAYS WITH RAIL AYE. D. 3 0.0 0.0 .3 .0 0.3 .0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 .1
MAX. 3 0 0 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 3 1
YEAR 1956 1955 1956 1964 1958 1955 1962 1956 1956 1956 1956 1956 1 9644
M I N . 3 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 U
Y EAR 1 979P 1 9 7 9 P 1 979P 19 7 9 p 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1 9 79 + 1979 + 1 9794
YEARS OF RECORD 23. 24. 24 . 24. 24. 24. 24. 24. 24. 2 4. 23. 24. 2 2.
♦» NOTE ! MANY WEATHER STATIONS DO NOT REC ORD ALL RAIL OCCURRENC ES. THEREFORE THESE DATA MAY NDT 6 £ I AT Hi.
OF DAYS *IIH SON ON GROUND AYE. 12.9 5.9 5.6 1.7 .1 0.0 0.0 0.0 .2 1.2 5.0 8.9 37,6
R OR ED 1 INCH ON GROUND) MAX. 24 18 1 3 5 2 0 0 0 3 8 1 6 2 2 d2
YEAR 1953 1965 1963 1 975P 1979 1963 1963 1963 1971 1 969 1979 1 979 196 3
MIN. 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 26
YEAR 1955 1 9 7 4 P 1 966 1 9 78 P 1 977 + 1 979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1979 + 1978 + 1971 + 1974* 1974
YEARS OF RECORD 14. 15. 15. 15. 15. 17. 17. 17. 17. 17. 1 7 . 1 3 • 7.
PREPARED BY : COLORADO CLIMATE CENTER
DEPARMENT OF 4TM0SPERIC SCISNCt COLORADO STATE JN1VERSITY FORT COLLINS, CO 80523 ( 30 3 ) 491 - 8545


63
WIND SUMMARY
Summary period: January 1954
December 1963. Summary based on 42,510 observations, 12 observations per day at 2-hour intervals.
Location: Colorado State University main campus weather station.
Ground elevation 5004 feet.
Anemometer height: 65 feet 1/54 12/63 (above ground)
Seasonal vatiations: Average wind ' speeds vary from about 5 mph in August to 8 mph in April.
Although average wind speeds are quite light, strong W-NW winds (downslope winds) occur occasionally particularly during winter and early spring. There is a distinct
i •
diurnal variation in wind Annual Wind Rose
direction throughout the year with NNW winds prevailing at night while SE winds prevail during the day.


I.vv« I iun.
uvnuuuue: yt&~ ^
STATION: ^.4^00^ 4\1\>A^y + LATITUDE: ^ 3^' fl-
ELEVATION:
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC MEAN TOT
DAILY SOL. 3? UX4/rrPJa^ 3>b2> f .01 fe, ^ to.tb 7. Q% SUNSHINE (p(p (p^ 6?(p 6Z 6 1 6 7 (PA 07 7 \ 7 0 2SZ 6?4
X DD HEAT |*7I z-73 67 A 1 5 1 ip\ 4b| \<71k b4-l(p>
^ DD COOL — — - — b~~ 135 — — — - 4*r?
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MEAN RAIN ■3>4 .44- • it ).3\ 7-7^ \.40 A ^ \.tz. \.b_
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66
ANALYSIS OF CLIMATIC DATA "CLIMATIC" PROGRAM:
Judging by some of the design recommendations of the program, the climate would be classified as a hot arid climate. It calls for reducing exposure to the sun by orienting the building along and East-West axis. This doesn't make sense, as an EaSt-West axis would expose the broad side to South increasing exposure.
Many of the recommendations, however, are quite applicable to an area with a large diurnal swing; compact planning large mass walls and heavy roof.
MEAN TEMP. VS DIURNAL RANGE:
A computer analysis of diurnal ranges in Ft. Collins was available from the "Colorado climatology office". It shows the requency of diurnal ranges and begins to give an overall picture of the climate.
The values shown represent the number of days throughout the entire period of record that falls within a particular diurnal range for a given mean temperature. A concentration of high frequency occurs at a mean temperature of about 58 °F to about72°F and a diurnal range from (I) 13°F to (I) 20 F°. Summers seem to be where the greatest numbers lie. This pattern would indicate a good potential for night radiation for cooling, as well as storage mass to flatten the diurnal range.


67
BIOCLIMATIC CHART
The bioclimatic chart is the only graphic representation of a climate and its comfort requirements. Ft. Collins is a temperate/cool climate with a large diurnal range. This provides cool summer nights and hot summer days and cold winters. Humidity is almost always within the comfort range, not to dry and not to humid. Summers are infrequently above the comfort zone in shaded areas. Daytime breezes along the Poudre are generally from the southeast and nightime breezes are generally from the Northwest.
There is little precipitation and lots of sunshine throughout the year to help counteract the lower temperatures with the suns radiation.


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69
DESIGN RESPONSES
According to the bioclimatic chaut (OLGAY)sun is always preffered in the morning hours throughout the year, thus morning activities should be oriented to the South and Southeast. Sun should be excluded from middle June to about late August, and during mid-morning to very late afternoon.
The large diurnal swing and low relative humidity are helpful! in both summer and winter, and indicate that heavy mass walls are a benificial responses to flatten the diurnal range. Mass heat storage walls, trombe walls and insulated roofs would be recommended to make use of solar radiation and protect from cold winter. Neutral colors outside.
Southern orientation of daytime use and protection from strong Northern winds is desirable in winter The bioclimatic chart does not indicate a great need for evaporative cooling and air movement. Southeast breezes should be used for summer cooling light colored materials oriented to reflect light inside during winter and a way during summer is desirable, as is a compact plan.
Shade devices must be flexible due to the unpredictable nature of Colorado weather.
Perminant shading devices may be used particularly for the hot afternoons during summer months.




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LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICT

NATIONAL HISTORIC DISTRICT


SITE VIEWS
73
/**
ADJACENT 2-STORY BUILDINGS TO THE NORTHEAST TO REMAIN & BE INTEGRATED WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT. FIRST FLOOR RETAIL, SECOND FLOOR STUDIOS & RESIDENTIAL UNITS.


74
SITE ENTRY SEQUENCE 1
1) WALNUT STREET ENTRY
2) EXISTING PARKING TO BECOME A PRIMARY ENTRYWAY TO SITE


SITE ENTRY SEQUENCE #2
75
2)
service^ fi re Access'3* ALLEY becomes a pedestrian experience,
1) WALNUT STREET ENTRANCE


1) LINDEN STREET ENTRY: EXISTING BUILDINGS ALONG LINDEN STREET ARE OR WILL BE RENOVATED
2) PEDESTRIAN & SERVICE ALLEYWAY; TO BE LANDSCAPED WITH UTILITIES BURIED
--—•--— 1 -------------------' in.' •—-—SB—
3) ALLEYWAY TO BECOME PRIMARY ACCESS TO NEW RETAIL, OFFICE, ENTERTAINMENT AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT (RIGHT OF ALLEY)




77
GENERAL PROGRAM PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS AND OBJECTIVES
The basic objective of the program is to give the main characteristics of various spaces and to outline performance requirments for these spaces. Performance are based on satisfying the main objective of an integrated mixed-use development where each use is mutually supportive of the other. Most of the requirements have been documented though Christopher Alexander's Pattern Language.
Approximate space allocations have been determined though either a source or an educated guesstimate. These area requirements are generally for the individual use rather than the commulative area of that use throughout the project.
Space requirements are subject to modification throughout the design development phase of the thesis.
GENERAL SPACE DETERMINATIONS FOR PRIMARY MIXED-USES Site land area = 27951 s.f.
11% min. open space = 3,069 s.f.
10% circulations space = 2,790 s.f.
27,951 - 5,859 = 22,000 (+) s.f. ground level building area
Typical retail shop: 25 by 80 = 2000 s.f. average 18,729 = 9 shops
2,000
r Restaurant/Cafe; Figures 0 1650 s.f., 2 of them = 3,300 s.f. total including outdoor seating Office 0 second level: approx. 13,000 s.f. gross floor area


Residential @ third level: approx. 11,000 s.f. (+) gross floor area 5 single units: @ 600 s.f./unit = 3000 s.f.
78
10 couples units: @ 800 s.f./unit = 8,000 s.f.
PROGRAM FOR RETAIL SHOP SPACES
SPACES
PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
APPROX. AREA
Enterance
Display Areas
ffewp?
1
Entry space must be easily identifiable and oriented to pedestrian traffic, it must serve as a transition point between pedestrian activity on the street and shopping activities inside. In keeping with Old Town character, entries should be set back from pedestrian
path______________________________________________________
Prominant, flexible display areas for goods and services oriented to the pedestrian, on raised platforms. Should be able to look beyond display into store activity. Provision for open air display and canopies or similar shelter for shoppers and protection of goods from sun rain, etc.________________________________________________
30 sf/ea
70 sf/ea


79
SPACES Sales Area

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Storage .
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Small private office
Restroom & Utility
Service Entry
>>I P7^
^.rp'ts
Employee Parking
PERFORMANCE REQUIRMENTS___________________________________
Sales area flexible so that goods can be arranged any way suitable to the owner, includes activities such as checkout, display, demonstration, etc., Must be easily accessable by storage areas, high ceilings & clerestory lighting where possible to keep with Old Town Character. Size varies with shop, from 15% to 20% of gfa. Provide shelves for stocking merchendise or service items. Must be accessable to sales area and delivery entry. May require large doors to service sidefor bulk items, high
ciellngs desired._________________________________________
Bbokeeping, files, paperwork, etc. , located
in an inconspicuous part of the shop______________________
Sink, and toilet is all that is needed, plus a separate closet for storing janitorial supplies, include
a service sink.___________________________________________
Delivery of goods to store, with direct access to
APPROX. AREA
1600 sf/ea
375 to 625 sf/ea
100 sf/ea
50 sf/ea
storage area. Not veiwed from pedestrian areas, placed
on "service side" ._______________________________________i
Provided for off-site


80
PROGRAM FOR RESTAURANT/CAFI SPACES E SPACES PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS APPROX. AREA
Street Cafe ! 1 , [ y-xysuiA \ L ' ! Must front a busy path, and be open to the street, yet intimate place with several rooms opening to a busy path. A place where people sit with a drink and relax in public. Provide chairs, tables, sitting walls or steps, canvas roof for shade and color. Extend the chairs and tables into the path. 350 sf/ea 700 sf total
Inside Spaces F^nvimSSr Provide several inside spaces with a variety of games fire, chairs, tables etc. Allows people to be more private than the street cafe, should also serve as a connection between outdoor activity nodes. b&O 700 to 800 sf/ea
Food Preparation Simple foods and drink. Not much preparation space requiered. Contains a counter, microwave oven, refridgerator,and storage area. Accessable to eating spaces and a service entry. 200 sf/ea
Public restroom Men; 3 Urinals, 2 toilets, 3 lavatories Women; 4 toilets, 4 lavatories 150 sf/ea 150 sf/ea


81
PROGRAM FOR PUBLIC OUTDOOR SPACE
SPACE PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
Small Promenade (alleyway) i i i (0.1 i f\ Attract people down it by providing activity nodes every 150 ft. . Provide a variety of activities serving as destinations (e.g. ice cream parlors,, offices)to create centers of activity.
Tw5rTTTcr^ pefloE.
Activity Nodes Concentrate compatible facilities at path intersections
Small Public Square foo?
Ir'l&T<£4L
feep activities concentrated, about 45'by 60' and providing essential elements of sitting space, food landscaping, water. If too big, it loses intensty; and feels deserted.
Service Road
P\ye>L\L
3
Not seen by public froip pedestian path. Can handle delivery vehicals to serve shops arid other facilities, one-way circulation about 10' wide and min. 13' height clearance.
APROX. AREA
n/a
n/a
3000 sf max.
2500 sf


82
PROGRAM FOR OFFICE SPACES
SPACE_________________
Flexible Office Space
Restrooms
Circulation
PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
APPROX. AREA
Users need to be able to create a homelike environment, with the possiblity to mix a variety of room sizes, wall heights, windows etc., to suit any situation,and of course , natural light. Thus create wings of open space with free standing columns positioned around edges to define half private and common open spaces. Arrangement of welcoming things at entrance (e.g. fireplace, food, coffee) . Position receptionist to pysically greet people, and of course plenty of natural
light.____________________________________________________
Workspace enclosure must be at least 60 sf of wall space, with8 ft. min open space in front. Provide
arrangements for view out to larger spaces._______________
Central locations in main portions of building, adjacent exits , but give inconspicuous entries if possiple.
Men; 4 urinals, 3 toilets, 3 lavatories (2 restrooms)
Women; 6 urinals, 4 lavatories____________________________
Non-leasable; 10% max. of G.F.A., includes stairs
12100 sf (net leasable
150 sf/ea
60 sf min.
175 sf/ea 700 sf total
up.
1300 sf
area)


PROGRAM FOR LIVING UNITS
83
Two basic types of living units are provided; studio type for single people geared toward professional people, and married couples without children or very young children.
PROGRAM FOR BOTH UNITS (COMMON USES REGARDLESS OF UNIT TYPE)
SPACE ERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS APPROX. AREAS
Parking Ip To be marketable, on-site parking is necessary, so provide one space per unit only, favor alternative modes of transportation. The "car connection" should be positive, thus create a room for the car and integrate it with the building. 10 by 20 space 200 sf/space
Entrance transition ffff -reEiu6> frovide graceful transition from parking or pulic paths to entrance. Marked by changes inlight, direction, sound , levels and perhaps gateways and trellised walk or canopy 1200 sf
Roof Garden ^ *fT*-rr m *) / i r* v/ / Make use of roof areas adjacent living spaces for private outdoor space. Provide trellises, built in sitting areas , and garden boxes, etc. 100 sf/ea


84
PROGRAM FOR SINGLE PEOPLE SPACE
Main Living Area

PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
One- room cottage studio space with large and small alcoves around it for sitting, cooking, working, bathing, sleeping, dressing, and bulk storage
APPROX. AREA
250 sf
Kitchen
-

Bathi
Workspace JJ ^
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Bed Alcove
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Country style, large enough to integrate with living space. Locate stove, sink, and counter around the edge and provide for a large table and variety of chairs,and as always, natural lighting.
120 sf
Concentrate bathtub, toilet,, shower and basin in single tiled area, with private access, give access to outdoor garden____________________________________________________
Small alcove with plenty of light and window to outside activity and shelving space
No need for Bedrooms- Provide an individual bed alcove off non-sleeping functions with a lower ceiling than the rest of unit, provide some storage ^
80 sf
to
-4CTsf
60 sf


85
SINGLE PEOPLE CONT'D
PROGRAM FOR COUPLES SPACE______________________
Couples Realm
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PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS________________________________
Provide distinct common areas shared by couple which includes areas to sit, the bed with morning sun, dressing room, bathing room, central living and kitchen area.
Private realm
The provision of a small alcove for each person at opposite ends of the intimacy gradient for private work or contemplation ; a place to be alone.
APPROX. AREA
2 0 40 sf 80 sf total


COUPLES UNIT CONT'D.
86
SPACE PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS APPROX AREA
Bedroom area r* '? jX Separate bedroom area with special meaning. Create intimacy with low ceiling or canopy with the space shaped to it, provide morning sun. locate adjacent to dressing, bath, and private roof garden.. 150 sf
Main Living Area ' See Program for Singles 275 sf
Kitchen See Program for Singles 120 sf
Bathing Same as Program for Singles , but provide 2 basins 90 sf
Dressing Room Same as Program for Singles, but provide 2 closets 70 sf
total ...785 sf/Unit


WORK SCHEDULE FOR THESIS SEMESTER- SPRING 1982
TASK TIME DATE OF COMPLETION
GENERATION OF ALTERNATIVE DESIGN
CONCEPTS 3 WEEKS FEB. 10,
SELECTION OF PREFFERED ALTERNATE 1 WEEK FEB. 17
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 9 WEEKS APRIL 21
PRESENTATION 3 WEEKS EXACT DATE TO BE
DETERMINED


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alexander, Christopher and Ishikawa, Sara and Silverstein, Murray et. al. A Pattern Language. New York: Oxford University Press, 1977.
Code of the City of Fort Collins (Subdivison of Land and Zoning). Spencerport: General Code Publishers Corp., 1981.
Cole, Barbara A. and Winter, Nore V. et. al. Good Neighbors Building Next to History,
State Historical Society of Colorado, 1980.
Design Guidelines for Historic Old Town Fort Collins. Ft. Collins: Planning Department of Ft. Collins, 1981.
"Fort Collins Planning Old Town Renovation," The Denver Post. (September 28, 1981), p, 8C. Kemper, Alfred. Architectural Handbook,New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1979.
Mabry G. C. et. al. Land Development Guidance System. City of Fort Collins: 1981.
Old Town Fort Collins, Colorado Area Plan. Historic Old Town Planning Committee, 1980. "Revived Downtown Ft. Collins Goal," The Denver Post. (August 13, 1981).
Uniform Building Code. Whittier: International Conference of Building Officials, 1979.


DESIGN


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WALL SECTION




Full Text

PAGE 1

MIXED-USE-DEVELOPMENT, . . . . . . OLD -TOWNv COLLINS ' .... . . . . . .,,. . . THESIS P. o1rchJ . " FRANK ., , . "', ........ 1111 Ill . !I

PAGE 2

l lllllllllllllllllll l llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll l llllllllll/1 I 3 1204 00255 5135 CONTENTS Project Discription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 History •••••• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physiological Characteristics Goals and Policies •••••• . . . . . . . . . land Use Ordinances and Building Codes •••• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 7 13 Design Guidelines for new construction ••••••• . . . . . . . . . . • • • • 39 Economic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . Future Development Plans •••• . . . . . . . . Climatic Data & Analysis •• . . . . . . . . . Site Information and Anaysis Program of Spaces ••• Thesis Semester Schedule • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B ibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r . . . . . . • • • • 47 . . . . . . . . • • • • • 54 . . . . . . . • • • se . . . . . . . . . . . • • 70 . . . . 77 . . . • • • • • • • • • • • 87 . . . . . . . .

PAGE 3

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT IN OLD TOWN FT. COLLINS Project Description: 1 The "Downtown Development Authority" of Ft. Collins has the task of studying ways of revitalizin g the old downtown area of Ft. Collins. It has expressed an interest in a wide variety of uses to bring people back to the area, to have a 24 hour people place that doesn't shut down after dark. The project will consist of new mexed use development that will incorporate professional offices, living spaces, and ente r tainment facilities (possibly an arcade and restaurant). The new development must respond to the historical context of the area as well as passive energy concious design. The project shall adhere to the existing guidelines set forth by the 11Historic Old Town Planning Committee" however any deviation from the guidelines may be done as the situation arises. The planners for the area will be consulted for input and feedback throughout the project concerning goals and policies set forth for the area. Scope and Limits of Project: The project site is located in the tract of land along the alleyway between Linden St. and Pine St., surrounded by historic buildings (some of which have been restored, some have not). Primary access will be through the allies used as a secondary circulation system throughout Old Town for pedestrian and emergency vehical a ccess. The total site consists of approx. 1/4 to 1/3 of the block. Total square footage estimated between 30,000 to 50,000 sq. ft. assuming 2 to 3 level complex. East access to existing entertainment facilities and retail stores.

PAGE 4

2 HISTORY OF FT. COLLINS OLD TOWN In 1863, the u.s. Cavalry established a camp in the Cache La Poudre R iver area to guard the overland stage line and wagon trains against l ndian attack • . In 1864, doe to flooding of the Poudre River and military command changes, the camp, known as camp ollins was moved to its present site of the Ft. Collins power plant. The site was chosen due to its proximity to the river while being on high, dry land with drainage and a good view of the surrounding countryside in each direction. The military population attracted enterprising citizens wishing t o serve the needs of the soldiers. Joseph Mason recieved permission from the U.S. Government to establish a store which served as a sulter's store, county office, courthouse, church, theatre, and post office. This was built in 1865 on what is now the L in den/Jefferson intersection and b ecame the foundation for Old Town Ft. Collins. Thus a street system was plated in 1867-1868 that ran parallel to the major environmental landmark; the Poudre River. However, due to a shortage of Indians, the military contingent was removed, and as such the towns future was in question. In the fall of 1872 the agricultural colony was established, with the purpose of crop raising for the surrounding settlers. Officers of the new colony organized the Larimer County Land Improvement Coopany wiu h the goal of encouraging settlement in Ft. Collins. New city streets needed plating, which was done by Franklin c. Avery, utilizing the latest techniques in city planning. The new streets where laid according to the cardinal points of the compass, but kept most of the original surveyed area, thus giving Old Town its characteristic triangular shaped lots and streets. ;(---lhe arrival of the Colorado Central Railroad in 1877 brought new prosperity to area. Investments

PAGE 5

The arrival of the Colorado Central Railroad in 1877 brought new prosperity to the area. Investments in housing, businesses, and agriculture rose, as did the building of brick business b l ocks in Old Town. Competition developed between the Old Town and the New Town located south of M ountain street and College. The coming of the automobile brought with it problems for the Old Town area. The post office had moved out of the triangle, taking with it much need pedestrian traffic. A major bank had moved, as well as many major retail establishments t o l ocate Highway 287 frontage in the early 1920's, to cater to the auto-oriented population. Many others moved along College A v enue and by 1930 Old Town began to show signs of decay and age. 3 The importance of Ft. Collins Old Town lies in its background. It illustrates turn of the century western plains life in this small area. It became home for Colorados first land grant college and even had a notable in-town railway transit system. It responded to the urbanite and farmer alike. Being between Cheyenne and Denver, the train depot brought in a d iverse mix of newcomers; academic, agrr1cul tural and financial. 01 d Towns offerings were wide ranging, from hotel accomodations, banks, and restaurants, to hardware stores, feed. coal and hay shops. The pioneer history of Ft. Collins is no better illustrated than in the four blocks comprising Old Town Ft. Collins. Old Town demonstrates how these people settled a new area and used local materials to decorate it with t h e styles current bac k . . aast, ere a s ubstarntia l , as well as unique, latter 19th century community. From the days of the old fort into the 20th century, the area carries with it the history and spirit of the town.

PAGE 6

4 HISTORIC OLD CHARACTERISTICS Historic Old Town is fiat, creating an impression of openness. The streets are w ide but give an impression of being much wider. The railroad and its activity are .still visible from Historic Old Town. There is mature landscaping in most of the downtown area and on the periphery, but almost no vegetation exists within Historic Old Town itself. Within Historic Old Town, the wandering, eccentrically-patterned alleys provide an alternative to the spaciousness found on the main streets while prov iding many interesting spaces between buildings. Continuety of space behind the buildings is broken up by the varyin g depths of buildings. There is a strong visual continuity because of the similarity of the building ages. The buildings create a strong edge along the street due to their alignment on the front property line. This strong edge is reinforced by the alignment of building cornices due to the similarity of buildin g heights. There is a visible difference between the first floor and the upper floors of the buildings. The first fioors are predominantly glass and are oriented to w ards the pedestrian. The upper floors are basically solid with smaller penetrations for windows. There is a strong repetition of window shapes throughout Historic Old Town. Many of the upper l e vel windows are aligned across several buildings which creates a strong pattern of openings that again enforce the strong edges of the buildings. This is also the behind the buildings adjacent the site along Jefferson street. The buildings on the corners are usually larger and have more ornamentation than the buildings at mid-block;

PAGE 7

5 the Northern Hotel, the Linden Hotel, the Avery Block, and the Miller Block. These corners, therefore, become the focus areas making the intersections visually strong. There are a multitude of ornate facades with many common details. Decorated cornices occur frequently. Brick is the dominant building material with repetitive quarrystone lintels above doors and windows. Lastly, there is a general absence of large overwhelming signs in Historic Old Town.

PAGE 8

This summary of Old Town cha r a cteristi cs shows relationships tha t can't be easily seen at street level. FORT COLLINS COLORADO DESIGN GUIDELINES are. no d istinction bel:wesn the. -nd the 5traet. 6

PAGE 9

7 GOALS AND POLl CIES OF OLD T0'1IN The G oals and Policies are the heart of the Area Plan. They were developed through a public hearing by the Historic Old Town Planning Committee. In addition, these goals and policies have been reviewed and adopted by the City of Fort Collins as a guide to the preservation and rejuvenation of Historic Old Town. GOALS 1. To promote the and maintenance of historic buildings and environs in the Old Town Ft. Collins National Register Historic District to maintain the renovation, cultural, and investment values. 2. To promote the conservation of limited architectural and cultural resources of Historic Old Town. 3. To encourage the development of Historic Old Town Revitalization Poli c ies which will protect the historic fabric and character of Historic Old Town. 4. To encourage the development of policies which promote the compatibility between land uses in Historic Old Town. 5. To assess the historical, environmental, social, and economic impacts of new development to protect the character of Historic Old Town. 6. To encourage the development of activity areas and open spaces within Historic Old Town. 7. To encourage safe, efficient, and attractive circulation systems which enhance Historic Old Town and which integrate all modes of transportation with pedestrian circ ulation .

PAGE 10

8. To encourage alley redevelopment for pedestrian circulation in Historic Old Town. 9. To encourage the City of Ft. Collins to pursue a program to relocate the railroad lines from the Historic District. 10. To encourage the City of Ft. Col-ins to promote either the proposed Ft. Collins Parkway or another alternate route for Highway #14 to divert through traffic now using Jefferson Street. 8 11. To promote the utilization of alternative energy sources which do not detract from the histori c character of Historic Old Town in the renovation of buildings. 12. To promote the undergrounding of all utility lines in Historic Old Town. 13. To develop Historic Old To\ffl as a focal point of the community. 14. To encourage the use of Old Town as a residential, office, retail, and commercial area.

PAGE 11

9 POLICIES Character Design Policies 1. The Association of Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins to define and implement an atmosphere and image for Historic Old Town which is consistent with its historic architectural character. 2. All redevelopment of the exterior portions of existing buildings shall be consistent with the Design Review Guidelines of Historic Old Town. 3. All new development shall respect the architectural character as defined by the Design Review Guidelines and neighborhood characteristics which define Historic Old Town. Land Use Policies 4. The City of Ft. Collins shall integrate the design guidelines for Historic Old Town in the land use site planning process. 5. Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall analyze the present and potential land uses consistent with the physical characteristics of the area to develop a future land use element of the Area Plan. 6. A mixture of land uses including residential, retail, and com mercial office, shall be encouraged in Historic Old Town and the City will hold a public hearing on a change in zoning that, if adopted, would allow residential uses in the area. 7. Attention shall be given to land uses which provide a mixture of day and night time activities in Historic Old Town.

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8. Special attention shall be given to the development of housing for all income levels in and adjacent to Historic Old Town with recognition of the needs for housing for elderly, low income, and handicapped persons. 10 9. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town shall encourage utilization of public rights-of-way to the advantage of people oriented uses coordinated with the needs of private vehicles and public transportation. 10. The City of Ft. Collins shall modify its guidelines and develop other mechanisms so that public rights-of-way for balconies, sidewalks, rear entrances, alleys and access to basements and roofs shall b e consistant with the Design Review Guidelines for Historic Old Town. Open Space Policies 11. Public and private mechanisms should be utilized to acquire open space amenities within Historic Old Town. 12. Historic Old Town should be linked to the Park System along the Poudre River by the develop m ent of future rights-of-way. 13. Open space should be acquired particularly in alleys and block interiors for the purpose of enhancing people spaces for leisure activities and for enhancing interior block redevelopment of Historic Old Town.

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Transportation Policies 14. Develop a circulation system for Historic Old Town which is not a detriment to the historic character of the area. 15. Assessment should be made of the impacts of new development on transportation systems in and around Historic Old Town. 16. Conveniently link Historic Old Town to the rest of Ft. Collins. 17. Encourage the location of proper transit stops in Historic Old Town. 18. Develop adequate off-street parking facilities with convenient access to the general downtown area and to Historic Old Town. 11 19. Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins on a solution to the overall downtown parking problem. 20. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town shall provide pedestrian circulation system which reinforces the original pedestrian orientation of the area and which complements the land uses. 21. Historic Old Town shall work with the City of Ft. Collins as the City of Ft. Collins addresses the problems of the overall circulation problem in the Central Business District. Facilities And Services Policies 22. The City of Ft. Collins shall plan and upgrade services, facilities and utilities to accommodate the redevelopment of Historic Old Town. 23. The City of Ft. Collins and Historic Old Town should establish financial mechanisms for Historic Old Town to finance its portion of undergrounding the overhead utility lines.

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12 24. Creative solutions for retrofitting for energy conservation shall be encouraged for the buildings in Historic Old Town. Z5. The City of Ft. Collins shall encourage that future development will be accomplished in a manner which will create the least degradation of the presently built and natural environment of Historic Old Town as determined by the Design Review Guidelines Committee. Organization Policies 26. Historic Old Town Planning Committee shall work with the City of Ft. Collins to establish a phased revitalization work program which will minimize disruption to businesses during any construction project. 27. Historic Old Town Planning Committee shall do all within its power to encourage all new public and private development to comply with the Historic Old Town revitalization policies. 28. The City of Ft. Collins shall give special consideration to the interpretation of adopted buildings within Historic Old Town. 29. The City of Ft. Collins shall develop a design review committee to work with Historic Old Town which will establish a procedure to advise and review developmentsin Historic Old Town.

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LAND USE ORDINANCE S : AND BUILDING CODES Land Guidance System For Planned Unit Developments City Of Ft. Collins The 11land O!velopment guidance System11 (LOGS) is a new system of land use regulation designed to replace the old P.U.D. r e gulation of Ft. Collins, with the intention of giving landowners more flexibility in developing their property as long as the project conforms to the criteria stated in the LOGS. 13 Development of the site will be determined by its size, shape, location, natural features and site concept, thus eliminating the use of a predetermined zoning district classification. The system is based on sound planning principles that address both present and future requirements as well as meeting the physical social. economic and aesthetic needs of Ft. Collins. Some of the major objectives outline in the ordinnnce are: -To encourage innovations in land development and renewal. -To encourage patterns of land use decrease trip length of automobile travel and encourage trip consolidation. -To increase public access to mass transit, bicycle routes, and other modes of transportation. -To reduce energy consumption and demand. -To improve the design, quality, and character of new development.

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-To foster a more rational pattern of relationship between residential, business, and industrial uses for the mutual benefit of all. 14 -To encourage development of vacant properit jes within established areas (e.g. Old Town area). PROCESS OF USING THE LOGS 1) Criteria are grouped into "activity" catagories. Each development proposal must satisfy the specific criteria depending on the type(s) of land use being proposed. Activity Catagories: A. All Developme n t B. Neighborhood Service Center c. Community/Regional Shopping Center D. Auto-Related and Roadside Commercial Uses E. Business Service Uses F. Industrial Uses G. Extraction, Salvage and Junk Yard Uses H. Residential Uses Each use in the mixed use development must satisfy all applicable criterial of the approriate activity cata g ory. For the proposed project the activity catagories are:

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A. All Development E. Business Service Uses H. Residential Uses DESIGN CRITERIA 2) There are 2 types of criteria; numbered and lettered. Numbered criteria are absolute requirements and must be satisfied. These assure compliance with official plans, minimum 15 engineering and public service requirements, and environmental standards. They must be answered yes for city approval of the plan. Lettered criteria are "points" and are variable, but a minumum percentage must be obtained. Above the minumum may be ap.J)lied to providing additional residential units provided on the "density chart11• The site plan is evaluated against lettered criteria and scored on a "point chart" associated with each "activity" catagories. With this the 11density chart11 is used to calculate the maximum number of dwelling units permitted on a site. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION 3)a) Number criteria: "yes", "no11, "not acceptable11; a no answer to any automatically excludes development from consideration. b) Lettered criteria: The plan is evaluated against lettered criteria and assigned a score. Numerical score is based on the following: Yes = Adequate Job Very Well {+2) = Excellent Job or Best Possible Under Circumstances

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& ACTIVITY: All Development A DEFINITION: All land uses must be reviewed against the criteria in this section. CRITERIA: Each of the following applicable criteria must be answered 11yes11 and implemented within the development p 1 an. Neighborhood Impact & Quality ANY NEGATIVE OR ADVERSE IMPACTS OF ANY PROPOSED USE UPON ANY NEIGHBORING USE SHALL BE MITIGATED IN THE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN. THE CONFLICTS THAT ARE PRESUMED TO EXIST BETWEEN LAND USES AND METHODS BY WHICH THOSE CONFLICTS CAh BE RESJLVED ARE EXAMINED IN ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES PERTAINING TO LAND USE CONFLICTS. WHEN TWO ADJACENT PARCELS ARE DEVELOPED SIMULTANEOUSLY, THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR MITIGATING CONFLICTS IS UPON THE MORE INTENSE USE. WHEN A USE IS THE FIRST TO DEVELOP ON TWO ADJACENT VACANT PARCELS, THE FIRST USE SHALL PROVIDE THE NECESSARY BUFFER TO ANY REASONABLE FUTURE USE AS DETERMINED BY THE CITY. THE SECOND USE TO DEVELOP SHALL, AT THE TIME IT DEVELOPS, TAKE ALL ADDITIONAL STEPS NECESSARY TO MITIGATE CONFLICTS. THE CITY WILL DETERMINE COMPATABILITY OF A PROJECT BASED UPON THE EVIDENCE PRESENTED IN RESPONSE TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA DESCRIBED IN 11111 THROUGH 11411 BELOW: 1. Does the deve 1 opment e 1 im in ate any potentia 1 .... -----------continJed-_. -5-

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\../VI 1111 .... nuisances including, but not 1 imited to: blowing dirt and litter; noise; odor; and glare. 2. Is the development compatible with the adjacent properties and neighborhood including, but not limited to: scale and identity; bulk; materials; and disposition of buildings on the lot? 3. Is the development in accordance with the adopted elements of the Comprehensive Plan? 4. Is the project designed so that traffic generated by nonresident i a 1 uses does not have an adverse impact on residential development? Plans and Policies 5. Is the proposed street system in compliance with the Master Street Plan or other adopted street po 1 icies? 6. Is the project in conformance with the adopted Open Space Plan or other adopted open space policies? Yes 1\b N.A:' DO DO DO DOD DOD DOD Public Foci I ities, Services & Safety 7. Does the project comply with any design standards, requirements and specifications for the following services? water supply sanitary sewer electricity natural gas storm drainage flood hazard areas telephone irrigation companies mass trans it fire protection cable television streets/pedestrian walks/bikeways 8. I s the de v e 1 o pm en t served by u t i l it i e s w i t h adequate capacity or have arrangements been made for extension and augmentation for the following services? water supply sanitary sewer e 1 ectric ity natura 1 gas DO DO .._----------continued-..... -6..... (X)

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• continued--------------. --storm drainage --streets/pedestrian walks/bikeways 9. Will the project's completion not generate a traffic volume which exceeds the existing and future capacity of the external street system as defined by the City? 10. Does the street system, including parking lots and public streets, clearly define vehicular movement on the site? 11. Does the project provide safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle access to every building regularly used for human occupancy? 12. If the development is adjacent to a designated public open space area, has provision been made to avoid interfering with public access to that area? 13. If the project includes an irrigation canal, water body, or other water channel, have necessary precautions been taken to minimize any hazard to life and property? 14. If the project contains known areas of geological hazard or soil conditions unfavorable to urban development, will special engineering precautions be taken to overcome these limitations or have these areas been set aside from deve 1 opment 7 15. Does the development meet the parking capacity and design standards and the off-street loading area requirements of the City? 16. Are all portions of the exterior walls of the first story of any building(s) located within 150' of an access roadway in which emergency fire equipment can be maneuvered, or will the building(s) be provided with an approved automatic fire extinguishing system? Yes f\b N.A: DO DO DO DOD DOD DOD DO DO Resource Protection & Urban Design 17. Are all trash containers and outside storage areas of goods, materials and products screened in an aesthetic manner from public view? DOD ------------continu ed----7-

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............. II If 1'-'4'-'\......A ------------------------.. 18. If the site contains an area which serves as a habitat, natural food source, nesting place, wintering area, or source of water for wildlife identified by the Colorado Division of Wildlife as significant and in particular need of attention, have special precautions been implemented in the plan to prevent the creation of environmental influences adverse to the preservation of these areas? 19. Ecologically sensitive areas. (reserved) 20. Lands of agricultural importance. (reserved) 21. If the proposed project is located within a locally designated Historical District or includes a locally designated landmark structure, is the project in conformance with the City• s Landmark Ordinance? 22. If any building is to be greater than forty feet in height above grade, does the project comply with the building height review criteria? 23. Does the project include a well-designed landscape treatment of exterior spaces whic h improves the overall quality of the project? For all nonresidential uses, the landscaped area shall constitute a minimum of 12% -17% of the site, depending upon design objectives and intensity and quantity of planting materials. 24. Does the project utilize and preserve significant existing vegetation to the extent practical? 25. If the project includes an area known to contain a commercia 1 mi nera 1 deposit for which extract ion is or will be commercially feasible, has the project been designed not to preclude extraction? 26. Are all signs in the project in compliance with the provisions of this chapter? Environmenta l Standards 27. Wi 11 the project not emit or cause to be emitted into the atmosphere from any air contamination source of emission whatsoever, any air contaminant which is of such a shade or density as to obscure Yes f\b N.A: DOG ooo DOD DO DOD DOD DOD an observer • s vision to a degree in excess of D D twenty percent (20%) opacity? ---------------continued.... -8N 0

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vUf lllf 1Ut;U---------------.. The following situations shall be exempt from this criterion: (a) Pilot Plants and Experimental Operations. No pilot plant or experimental operations shall emit or cause to be emitted into the atmosphere any air contaminant for a period o r periods aggregating more than three (3) minutes in any sixty (60) consecutive minutes which is of such a shade or density as to obscure an observer's vision to a degree in excess of forty percent (40%) opacity. This emission standard for pilot plants and experimental operations shall be in effect for a period not to exceed one hundred eighty (180) operating days, cumulative total, from the date such operations commence; thereafter, the twenty percent ( 20%) opacity limitations shall apply to emissions from pilot plants and experimental operations. (b) Fireplaces or Stoves. Emissions used for non-commercial or recreation purposes. (c) Temporary Conditions. This criterion shall not apply to emissions during the building of a new fire, cleaning of fires, soot blowing, start-up, any process modification or adjustment or occasional cleaning of control equipment, the shade or appearance of which is not darker than an equivalent opacity so as to obscure an observer's view to a degree not greater than forty percent (40%) for a period or periods aggregating no more than three ( 3) minutes in any one ( 1) hour. (d) Fugitive Oust. 28. Will the project not emit or cause to be emitted any solid or liquid particles at any one point in concentrations exceeding two-tenths (0.2) grain per cubic foot of conveying air or gas7 For measurement of the amount of particles in gases resulting from combustion, standard corrections shall be applied to a stack temperature of five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (sooF) and fifty percent (50%) excess air. Detailed plans for the elimination of airborne particles may be required before the issuance of a building permit. DO ..... -9N .....

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'-'\....../' 1111 .. 29. Wi 11 the project not emit or cause to be emitted odorous air contaminants from any single source such as to result in detectable odors at the property line? Detailed plans for the prevention of odors crossing property lines may be required before the issuance of a building permit. 30. Wi 11 the project not emit or cause to be emitted fumes or gases at any point in concentrations or amounts that are noxious, toxic, or corrosive in excess of established City standards for the determination of permissible concentration or CJnounts. Detailed plans for the elimination of fumes or gases may be required before the i s suance of a building permit. 31. Will the project conform to applicable local, state and federal air quality standards? 32. Will the project conform to applicable local, state and federal water quality standards? 33. Can the proposed land uses and activities be conducted so that noise generated is controlled at its source or so attenuated by the structure from which it is emitted that when measured from the property line it shall not exceed the following minimum performance levels? Adjacent Land Uses Max. Nois e (dBA)* Residential uses: (6:00a.m. 6:00 p.m.) 60 (6:00 p.m. 6:00 a.m.) 50 Business, Commercial and Industrial Uses 65 General Industrial Uses 70 (*Measured at property boundaries with a sound meter which meets the specifications established by the American National Standards Institute, 51.4 1971.) Notwithstanding the foregoing requirements, noise levels may be increased in special situations as set forth below: DO DO DO DO DO .... ----------continued.... -10-N N

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'-"\...../' un 1uc:;u-----------------------Noise Level Corrections Permitted __ for Special Situations* Type of Operation or Character of Noise Noise source operates less than 15 minutes of any one-hour period Noise source operates less than 5 minutes of any one-hour period Noise source operates less than 1 minute of any one-hour period Noise of repetitive, impulsive character (hammering, etc.) Noise of periodic or cyclically varying nature Correction (in dBA) + 5 +10 +15 -5 -5 (*Note: Apply one correction only ) Detailed plans for the elimination of objectionable noises may be required before the issuance of a bu i1 ding permit. 34. If the proposed activity produces intense glare or heat, whether direct or reflected, is the operation conducted within an enclosed building or with other effective s c reening in suc h a manner as to make such glare or heat completely imperceptible from any point along the property line? Detailed plans for the elimination of intense glare or heat may be required before issuance of a building permit. 35. Will the project cause no inherent or recurring generated vibration perceptible without instruments at any point along the property line? Temporary construction is excluded from this criterion. 36. Is the exterior lighting, except for overhead street 1 ight ing and warning emergency or traffic signals, installed in such a manner that the light source wi 11 be sufficiently obscured to prevent Yes f\b DO DO .... ----------continued..... -11N w

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'--'V' 1111 1ucu----------------------.. excessive glare on public streets and walkways or into a n y residential area? The installation or erection of any ligh ting which may be confused with warnin g signals, emergency signals or traffic signals s hall not be permitted. 37. Will all sewage a n d indust rial wastes be trea ted and dis pose d of in s uch a man ner as to comply with applicable federal, state, and local standards? Detailed plans for waste disposal may be required before issuance of a building permit. VARIABLE CRITERIA 38. THE LETTERED CRITERIA ARE APPLIED TO ALL LAND USES AND SCORED ON "POINT CHART A" BASED UPON THE DEVELOPER • S PERFORMANCE. THE DEVELOPER HAS THE FLEXIBILITY TO CHOOSE AMONG THE APPLICABLE CRI TERIA TO B E IMPLEMENTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT PLAN. DOES THE PROJECT COMPLY WITH THE SCORE REQUIREMENT OF "POINT CHART A"? Phasing Yes f\b N,A: DOD DOD DO a. Is the project located with at least 1/6 of its property boundary contiguous to existing urban development? Urban Des1gn b. If the project contains four or more new buildings, does it include a variety of dwelling and building types? c. If the project contains four or more new buildings, are the buildings clustered into clearly definable groups around areas of pedestrian activity (common open space, courtyards, outdoor living spaces, terraces or plazas)? d. Are the buildings designed and oriented for passive solar energy use during the winter months or are the buildings equipped with active solar energy collection systems? e. Does the project maximize dwelling unit access to solar energy by placing higher residential densities on south facing slopes and lower residential densities and open space areas on north-facing slopes? -12-

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..._,'-"' II II IU'-..1'-..A------------------------f. Are .new buildings in the project located and designed to minimize the casting of shadows from one structure onto any other existing or planned building; existing or planned activ e or passive solar energy collection system; and vacant land lying 20 feet or more from the exterior boundary of the parcel on which the structure is situated? g. Does the re!idential project provide for private outdoor areas {which includes private yards, patios and balconies) for use by he residents of the project which have adequate light, sun, ventilation, privacy and convenie n t access to the household units? h. Is each active recreational area conveniently located and accessible to the residential units it is intended to serve, and is adequate screening provided to insure privacy and quiet for neighboring residential uses? i. Are th e open space areas between residential buildings de signed to clearly differentiate their use and to maximize the opportunity for privacy by residents? j. Are the entrances to new buildi ngs oriented more than 45 off prevailing northwest winter winds, or are these entrances protected from cold winter winds by architectural screening, landscap e screening or any combination thereof? ARE THE MAIN ENTRANCES TO NEW MULTIPLE FAMILY OR NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS LOCATED SO THAT THEY ARE NOT SEPARATED BY PARKING OR BY SERVICE ACCESS BUT RATHER OPEN DIRECTLY ONTO FACILITIES DESCRIBED IN 11K11 THROUGH 11N11 BELOW? k. A major pedestrian path or sidewalk? 1. The major pedestrian street crossing adjacen t to th e nonresidential building site? m. Areas of pedestrian activity (courtyards, plazas, or gardens) created by the clustering of buildings? n. Public open space? o. Does the project include two-dimensional or three-dimensional works of art that promote neighborhood quality and are promi nently displayed for public view? p. Does the architectural design of the buildings meet the following criteria: compatible in design with the immediate environment of the site; appropriate to the site and function of the project; compatible in an area having a unified design ------------continued----13N U1

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-'-'' 1111 IU\..../'-..A-----------------------.. or neighborhood character; promoting harmonious transitions in scale and character in areas between d ifferent land uses; compatible with future construction both on and off the site; and contributing to a well-balanced mix of styles in the community as a whole? Circulation q. Does the street system, including parking lots and public streets, contribute to the order and aesthetic quality of the site configuration? r. Does the project incorporate sharing of common driveways leading from public streets or alleyways to off-street parking or vehicular use areas serving more than one use or parcel as appropriate? PEDESTRIAN ACCESS MUST BE PROVIDED TO EVERY BUILDING IN THE PROJECT AND MAY BE ACHIEVED IN TWO WAYS: 11PUBLIC11, AS NORMALLY REQUIRED AND SPECIFIED IN THE ENGINEERING STANDARDS OF THE CITY, AND/OR; 11PRIVATE11, A SYSTEM OF PEDESTRIAN PATHS AND SIDEWALKS WHICH DEMONSTRATES TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE CITY, EQUAL TO OR BETTER PERFORMANCE THAN THE 11PUBLIC11 SYSTEM. FOR THE SYSTEM OF PRIVATE PATHS AND/OR PUBLIC SIDEWALKS CHOSEN FOR THIS DEVELOP MENT, PLEASE ANSWER CRITERIA 11S" THROUGH uzu. s. Are all new public sidewalks along collector and arterial streets separated from the street curb by at least six feet of parkway? t. Are all new public sidewalks along local streets separated from street curb by at least six feet of parkway? u. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks include connections to shopping, public transportation stops, schools, and recreation opportunities for the residents of the project and/or appropriate surrounding -residential neighborhoods? v. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks provide for direct access and circulation between buildings? w. Do the private paths and/or public sidewalks incorporate paving patterns, dimensions, landscaping, grade differences or other design features to enhance convenience, safety and amenity across parking lots and streets? x. Is the project designed so that the existing and proposed private paths and public sidewalks avoid areaJ of l o w pedestrian interest including parking lots, blank walls, and ---------_-14 _ ---continued----

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continued------------.. fences if possible? If not possible, does the plan utilize landscaping or other design elements to minimize adverse views and noises and maximize amenity? y. Do the private path, public sidewalk and bikeway systems incorporate a system of landscape shading from unwanted summer sun, but allowing warming winter sun, to further enhance their amenity and user comfort? z. Does the private path and public sidewalk system provide for adequate security 1 i ght i ng with the amount dependent on the intensity of pedestrian use and the relative need for personal safety? aa. Is there a system of tree planting and other landscaping along streets and parking lots? bb. Does the project include a system of off-street recreational paths for bicycles that fulfill the following criteria: (i) provides for a link-up with the City's bikeway system; (ii) meets the design standards of the City; and (iii) does not duplicat e the City's bikeway system. Resource Protection IF THE SITE OR ADJACENT PROPERTY CONTAIN S A BUILDING OR PLACE IN WHICH AN HISTORIC EVENT OCCURRED; WHICH HAS SPECIAL PUBLIC VALUE BECAUSE OF NOTABLE ARCHITECTURE OR IS OF CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE, DOES THE PROJECT FULFILL CRITERIA "CC" THROUGH "EE" BELOW? cc. Does the project prevent creation of influences (inc 1 ud i ng environmental, land aesthetic, economic, and social) adverse to its preservation? dd. Does the project assure that new structures and uses will be in keeping with the character of the building or place? Imitation of period styles should be avoided. ee. Does the project propose adaptive use of the building or place that will lead to its continuance, conservation and improvement in an appropriate manner wh i 1 e respecting the integrity of the neighborhood? ff. Does the landscape plan reduce the demand for heating and cool ing through the selection and placement of landscape ..... ----------continued----15-

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'-''-II II II IUvu-----------------------.. materials, including vegetation, earth forms, walls, fences, and paving, etc? gg. Does the landscape plan minimize potential obstruction of solar access to: existing or planned buildings both on and off the site; existing or planned active or passive solar energy collections systems; and, vacant land lying twenty (20) feet or more from the exterior boundary of the parcel on which the structure is located? hh. Does the residential project reserve a portion of the site (either through private yards or restricted common areas) and provide for the necessary elements (water, sun, proper soils and s l ope) required for vegetable gardening by the residents of the project? ii. Is the multiple family and/or nonresidential project planned to minimize the amount of land devoted to surface vehicular parking by utilizing either shared parking, multi -level, underground and/or elevated parking structures as an accessory use to the primary structure. The project will be evaluated on the percentage of total parking spaces that fulfills the above requirement, and scored as follows: 40% or more 10 -39% less than 10% = Very Well Done = Yes = No jj. Does the project minimize the disruption of steep s l opes, important natural drainage systems or other existing land forms through the selection of building and street locations? kk. Are existing natural water courses or water bodies incor porated into the project as amenities, and are these areas accessible to the general public? 11. Can tile developer demonstrdte that through the use of improved technology or any addit ional features of the structure or site development that the project will contribute to the preservation or enhancement of water quality beyond that required by local, state or federal water quality standards? mm. Can the developer demonstrate that through the use of improved technology or any additional features of the structure or site development, that the project will reduce the demand for water usage (including, but not limited to, water conser vation products, recycling systems, aquifer recharge, nonpotable water as an irrigation resource and drought-resistant landscaping) beyond that normally required by City Code? nn. Can the developer demonstrate that through the use of im------------continued..... -16N co

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'-"'--"' uu 1uvu-------------------------proved technology or any additional features of the structure or site development, that the project will contribute to the preservation or enhancement of air quality beyond that required by loca l , state or federal air quality standards? Public Facilities, Services & Safety oo. Are fire prevention and control measures (including, but not limited to, fire resistant roofs, fire separation walls, space separation, automatic fire extinguishing systems, and fire hydrant spacing) being provided within the project, beyond those normally required by City Code? pp. Are police protection and security measures (including, but not limited to, building identification, security landscap ing, solid exterior doors and jams, sturdy security locks on windows and patio doors) being provided beyond that normally required by City Code? qq. Does the project significantly exceed the minimum storm drainage requirements of the City for minor storms? -17-

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All DEVELOPMENT All C rit e r ia I II CRITERION I!> the Ct•te riOfl Co'•ect "A..IIIPiet Sc.odopf1vP Use 1 2 2 ---1 --ff Energy Landscaping , 2 0 3 -oo So10r Londscoptng , 2 0 3 hh Gardens 1 2 0 1 11 S lruclured Fbrk1ng 1 2 0 , --1... -1--2 J 1 SIC.peS 1 2 0 kk Vltlter osan Amef'1lty 1 2 0 2 II I.Atller Quali ty 1 2 0 1 mm \1\0ier Oonse rvotm 1 2 0 2 1 -n n "''' Qt.JOIIty 1 2 0 1 PUBLIC SEP'iiCES & rACILITIES oo Ftrf' Proteclm 1 2 0 2 !--'------------fpp Fblce Ffo tect m 1 2 0 2 <+1 MJpr Dr01noge 1 2 0 2 VW verv well done SubtGIOIS -18-POINT CHART A Applica b l e Cri ter i a Onl y Ill N Po•nts M:l>mm for neo !\>• Add Ire SUbtOTOIS from Fbln t O'Orl A to the lotols f rom Fbnt Cro r t s B thro_.gh F lh:lt apply Tre prqect rrust earn 65% d the rrax1mum pants. Fbnts Mox1mum Earned Applicable fbnts (col ill l (cot' v l ---A ------B ------c ------D -----1: ---F ------D D '1v1= VII"\ F-ercentoge earned o f D mox1mum opplreoble VII point s 1m1nus oo% Q..Jo11lyCJ bonus w 0

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ACTIVITY: Business Service Uses E DEFINITION: • Those activities which are predominantly retail, office, and service uses which would not qua 1 i fy as or be a part of a neighborhood or community/regional shopping center. Uses include: retail shops; offices; personal service shops; financial institutions; hotels/ motels; medical clinics; health clubs; membership clubs; standard and fast-food restaurants; hospitals; mortuaries; indoor theatres; retail laundry and dry cleaning outlets; limited indoor recreation uses; small animal veterinary clinics; printing and newspaper offices; neighborhood convenience center; and, other u s es which are of the same general character. CRITERIA: Each of answered plan. the following applicable criteria must be "y es" and implemented within the development 1. 2 0 3. Does the project gain its primary vehicular access from a street other than College Avenue? Are all exterior portions of buildings provided with security lighting? DOES THE PROJECT EARN AT LEAST 50% OF THE MAXIMUM POINTS AS CALCULATED ON "POINT CHART E11 FOR THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: Yes t'-b N.A: DO DOD DO a. Is the project contiguous to an existing transit route (not applicable for uses of less than 25,000 sq. ft. GLA or with less than 25 employ Ees) or Lcated in the Central Business District? b. Is the project located outside of the 11South . College Avenue Corridor"? c. Is the project contiguous to and functionally a part of a neighborhood or community/regional shopping center, an office or industrial park, or located in the Central Business District? d. Is the project on at least two acres of land or located in the Central Business District? .... -----------continJed-_.. -28w ......

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e. Does the project conta i n two or more principal uses? f. Is there direct vehicular and pedestrian access between on-site parking areas and adjacent off-site parking areas which contain more than ten (10) spaces? g. Does the project reduce non-renewable energy usage, either through the application of alternative energy systems, through committed energy conservation measures beyond that normally required by City Code, and/or use of existing buildings? -29w N

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BUSINESS SERVICE USES FDINTCHART E For AJI Crtter.ia Applicable Criteria Onlv I II Ill IV Criterion Circle lhe M::xxrTVT'I Correct Po1n1s AQ:x:coe Score Earned Po1nts Ves t\0 !as VW"I\b I X II a Transit route IX 2 0 2 b S. College corridor 2 0 4 c Port of center X 2 0 3 d Two acres or more X 2 0 3 e Multiple use X 2 0 3 t Joint parking 1 2 0 3 g Energy conservation 1 2 0 4 h 1 2 0 I 1 2 0 J 1 2 0 k 1 2 0 I 1 2 0 vw-Vary Well Dare Totals Transf8f blots Ia Feint Oat A --v VIPercentage Earned of Maximum Applicable Fbints v/vl=vul Jd VII 30-

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& ACTIVITY: Residential Uses H DEFINITION: All residential uses. Uses would include single family attached dwellings. townhomes. duplexes. mobile homes. and multiple family dwellings; boarding and rooming houses; fraternity and sorority houses; nursing homes; public and private schools; public and nonprofit quasi-public recreational uses a s a principal use; and uses providing meeting places and places for public assembly with incidental office space. CRITERIA: Each of the following applicable criteria must be answered "yes" and implemented within the development plan. Yes f\b 1. On a gross acreage basis, is the average residential density in the project at least three (3) D dwelling units per acre (calculated for residential DO portion of the site only)? 2. IS THE TOTAL NUMBER OF DWELLING UNITS PROPOSED FOR DEVELOPMENT NO MORE THAN THAT CALCULATED IN THE "DENSITY CHART" THAT FOLLOWS? DOD .... ----------contir1Jed-----35-

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Density Chart I II II C r iterion MJttiplier Measurement I XII 0 .75 The mintm1111 mlllber of dwellings required under Crtterton 12 of this section. THE NlHIER OF PROPOSED DWELLING UNITS THAT WILL I E WITHIN: b .2 2000 feet of an .. hting or approved neighborhood shopping center. w c . I 650 feet of an exhting tranait atop. (f) d . 2 4000 feet of an existing or approved regional shoppl ng center. <( e .2 3500 feet of an exhting or r eserved neighborhood park, without havtng to crou an arterial street. co f . 2 4000 feet of an extHtng or reserved comnunity park or comnunt ty factli ty . g .2 3000 feet of a major el!1ll oyment center. h . 2 1.000 feet of a ch11d care center or school, meeting all the requir-nt5 of the compulsory educat to n laws of the State of Colorado I 1 " North" Fort Collins J . 1 The Central Business District Calculate the Quality Bonus on Point Chart A and multiply ttrnes 2 k I Calculate a a bonus for every 50 acres Included tn the project m Calculate the percentage of the total acres tn the project that are devoted to recreational use, enter 1 / 2 of that percentage as a bonus . If the applicant commits to p reserving permanent offsite open space that meets the n City ' s minimum requirements, c alculate the percentage of this open space acreage to the total development acreage, enter thts percentage u a bonus . (f) If A PART OF THE TOTAL DEVELOPMENT BUDGET IS 'TO BE SPENT ON NEIGHBORHOOD FACILITIES 0 WHICH ARE HOT OTHERWISE REQUIRED B Y CITY CODE. CALCULATE THE AVERAGE INVESTMENT ::) PER lliELLING UNIT OVER THE TOTAL PROJECT AND: Enter a 21 bonus for $ 100 per ur1t inveshrl tn public transit z p Enter a II bonus for every $100 per dwelling untt Invested tn other approved 0 facfltttes and services If a commitment 1s being made to develop a spectfted percentage of the total number q of dwlling untts for low Income farntltas, enter that percentlge as a bonus, up to CCI a Of 301 . If a c011111itrnent ts being 1111c!e to develop a specified percentage of the total nllllber of ctwelltng units for Type "A" and Type " B " handicapped housing u defined by the r Cit.Y of Fort Collins, calculate the bonus as follows : Type "AM -.5 times T'pe • A" units ota 1 units Type •s• 1.0 times "B" units oul unl ts In no can shall tht coneined bonus be greater than 301 . s If it can be d11110nstrated that the project wtll reduce non-renewable energy useage I either throug h tht appltcation of alternative energy systi!IIS or through c011111itttd energy conaervation IIIIISurea beyond that noi'WIIlly required by City Code, a 5S bonus lillY be earned for every 51 reduction i n ene rgy use . + 100 _j IV X Ill Subtotals. 0/o g D TOTAL UNITS IV Ill Q

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MAJOR BUILDING CODE INFORMATION-UBC 1979 Occupancies: (From table no. 5-A) Group: B, Division 2Retail Spaces, Restaurants, Offices Group R, Division 1Residential considered as apartment use Required separation between B-2 and R-1: 1-hour Group B2 Requirements : Fire resistanc e of ext erior wall: 1-hour less than 20ft. Total floor area of B-2 occupanc y = 35,000 s.f. Type of construct i on: Type II-F.R. Allowable area: 39,000 s.f. (Table 5 -c) Allowable height: 12 stories (Table 5-D) Group R1 Requirements: Fire resistance of exterior wall: 1-hour less than 5 ft. Total floor area of R-1 occupancy = 13,000 s.f. Type of construction: type III-1 hour Allowable area: 13, 500 s.f. (Table 5 -C) A llowable height: 4 stories Exit R equirements: (Ch. 33) Occupant load (Table 33-A) -Offices = 100 s.f./occupant •••••••••• 130occupants, 2 exits requ i red 36

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-Restaurants = 15s.f./occ ••••••••••••••••• 90 occ., 2 exits requ i red -Retail {Ground floor) = 30s.f./occ ••••••• 67 occ., 2 exits required -Dwelling = 300 s.f./occ ••• •••••••••••••• 2 occ. {for single units) 1 exit required 2.6 occ. {for couple units) 1 exit required Total width of exits: {in ft.) Offices = 2.6 ft.; min. 3'-o• Restaurant = 1.8 ft.; min. 3'-0" Retail = 1.3 ft.; min. 3'-0" Residential = 3'-0" min. Arrangements of exits: Tv10 exits required shall be placed a distance no less than one-half distance of overall diagonal dimension. Every exit shall discharge into public way or exit passage. Maximum distance to exit from any point shall not exceeH 150 ft. Stairways: Minimum stairway width; 44" P r ivate stairways from dwellings may be 30" wide rise and run; rise from 4" to run from 10" min. Landings; length equal to width of required stairway, but min. of 4'-0" for straight run stairs. No more than 12'-0" vertically between landings. 37

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38 Exit requirements for Group R-1 Occupancies: Every sleeping room shall have at least one operable window or exterior door approved for emergancy exit. Windows shall have min. net clear opening of 5.7 s.f., m in . height of 24", and min. width of 20", and sill not more than 44" from floor. Light: All habitable rooms of 10 s.f. of greater require min. glazing of 1/1 0 room floor area. Bathrooms require min. glazing of 1/20 floor area and must be operable. Ventilat i on: 2 a.c.h. in habitable rooms, 5 ach in bathrooms . II-F.R. eonstruction Reguirements: Type III-1 Hr Construction Reguirements Exterior walls 4 hr 4 hr I nterior bearing wall 2 hr 1 hr Exterior non-bearing 4 hr 4 hr Structura 1 frame 2 hr 1 hr Perminant partition 1 hr 1 hr Shaft enclosures 2 hr 1 hr floors 2 hr 1 hr Roofs 1 hr 1 hr

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DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION IN HISTORIC OLD TOWN (Copied with permission from Ft. Collins Planning office) Section 11-New Construction These guidelines a pply to all new buil dings and to the renovation of existing structures that are not designated as historic structures. Historic Imitation Versus Compatible Contemporary Context 39 29. Guideline: Design new buildings that avoid imitating the historic architecture of Old Town. Historic structures have a special value as original period pieces which represent the style and technology of their time. Building new structures next to these authentic "antiques" is a special problem. The new should be compatible with the o l d, but at the same time it should be distinquishable from the old, so we may accurately interpret the evolution of Old Town. Consider developing contemporary designs that creatively draw upon the important characteristics of the historic district and thus achieve buildings that are compatible with the area. Use the guidelines that follow to help you identify those characteristics you may use. Building Alignment and Height 30. Guideline: Maintain cornice alignment. Building heights need not match exactly, but some horizontal eleme nt should align with other cornices where feasible. 31. Guideline: Maintain approximately the facade heights established by existing buildings on the block {n new construction. Maintaining similar building heights along the street helps unify the entire block . New building may step up to 40 feet in the rear, if proven to be necessary.

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32. Guideline: Maintain the alignment of storefronts at the top of the clerestory on existing buildings. 40 Reinforce the established horizontal patterns in Old Town by aligning the tops of new storefronts with existing ones. Materials and Color 33. Guideline: Maintain brick as the major building material. Many of the original building materials, especially brick and sandstone, have interesting colors and textures that are an asset. In addition, since these are often repeated along the street, they can contribute to the visual unity of the area. Brick is by far the predominant material for major buidling surgaces. The repetition of brick contributes to the visual continuity of the district. Use brick as a new building material when it is feasible. The Landmarks Preservation Commission may consider other materials when the dominance of brick in the area is not threatened. 34. Guideline: Develop a color scheme for the entire buil ding front that coordinates all the facade elements. Reserve the use of strong, bright colors for accents where you want to draw the customer's eye-such as to the sign, to ornamentation, and to the entrance. 35. Guideline: A maximum of three {3) colors is best for most cases, except where small amounts are used for trim. 36. Guideline: Background and accent colors should be consistent within separate buildings, or where unity in theme is desired. Facade Patterns 37. Guideline: Maintain the established pattern of building widths. Most buildings in Old Town have similar widths. New building should conform to this established pattern.

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Larger facade designs can be divided into segments to conform. 39. Guideline: Maintain or reinforce the existing pattern created by upper story windows. The upper story of your facade may have some details that can add interest to your building, if the upper and lower levels are coordinated in their design. Windows at the second story can be a key element in this regard. They can create a pattern that unifies the width of the building. If they line up with openings below, this unity can be even stronger. Other building elements may be designed to rna i nta in exis t ing window pattern . 39. G uideline: Maintain pattern of recessed entries on the street. 41 Entrances to most shops are recessed, to shelter the doorway and increase exp osure of the display windows. When repeated along a row of buildings, these recessed entrances create a strong pattern that contributes to the visual unity of the block. Building Setbacks 40. Guideline: Maintain the alignment of facades at the sidewalk edge. Preserve existing storefront lines on the street when developing new structures. If a new storefront must be set back from the sidewalk, use an arcade of columns, landscaping, or other devices to main-tain an edge at the sidewalk. Storefronts 41. Guideline: Maintain the pedestrian-oriented storefront format established by existing buildings on the street. The established pedestrian-oriented storefront format has large glass display windows and a recessed entrance at street level with a clerestory above. The new storefront should align with existing storefronts at the belt course, just above the clerestory. The traditional storefront eleme nts may be reinterpreted in new construction, but must fit the overall pattern. 42. G uideline: Maintain the alignment of storefront windows. Display windows are important elements because they line up at the same height down the street and thereby create a visual continuitv in buildina

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For you individually, display windows are also an effective means of advertising, especially when they complement and do not compete with the rest of the buil a ing facade. Remember that the displays should be well maintained. A well-designed display window will enhance the merchandise. 42 43. Guideline: Consider awnings to provide a three-dimensional quality to a flat facade. Coloraful awnings are both decorative and functional additions to your storefront. They can help draw attention to your shop entrance, and when they align with others in your block, they can strengthen visual unity. In general, an awning is more successful as a combination sign and weather control device than are horizontal canopeis. These canopies cut off the view of the upper part of the building. Therefore, sloped awnings are preferred; horizontal canopi es are strongly discouraged. Alley Entrances 44. Guideline: Develop new buildings with public access to commercial uses front and rear. Alley entrances to new buildings offer great potential for new storefronts and access to other commercial ventures. 45. Guideline: Enhance rear entrances with signs and lanscaping when feasible. As courtyards and alleys behind buildings are for public use, rear entrances will become visable commercial entrances. Signs and landscaping will enhance these areas. Architectural Details and Ornamentation 4 6. Guideline: Ornamentation is encouraged, but imitation o f historic detail is discouraged.

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43 Ornamentation on new buildings should help define and accentuate the major facade elements described earlier. New buildings that use imitations of historic ornamentation compete and detract from actual historic buildings in the district. Historic ornamentation is also difficult to imitate correctly. Security Devices 47. Guideline: Use security devices that will enhance the area. Security is a major concern in design, and it is possible to provide adequate protection while also respecting the character of the historic district. The most effective security measures are not phusical elements but community action and cooperation. However, some physical elements should be considered. Lighting and alarm systems are preferred because they will not alter the appearance of the storefront. 48. Guideline: Do not use permanently fixed bars on storefront windows Fixed bars on storefront windows disrupt the character of the historic district. Parking Lots and Structures 49. Guideline: Use landscaping, walls or fences to provide a buffer strip to parking areas. Open lots for parking break the continuity of the "wal111 that building facades create along the block. These gaps should be avoided when new lots are developed and old ones are upgraded. Provide buffer planting strips along the edge of parking lots to screen cars from the street. Include low shrubs and trees where feasible. ln large lots, include 11islands11 of plant materials to break up the paved area. These will also help to shade cars in summer. 50. Guideline: Maintain the characteristic pedestrian orientation at the sidewalk when developing parking structures. As parking demands increase in Old Town, new parking structures may be built. Parking garages are a new event in the history of the district that should continue the basic characteristics of the area.

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44 The most important factor is respect for the pedestrian-oriented storefront on the street level. Refer to the guidelines o n alignment of cornices and upper story window patterns as well. Section III--Design Guidelines for Signs Selecting a concept for your sign is one of the most important design decisi ons for your building, because it is such a prominent part of the business image. First, consider what type of signs will be appropriate: 1. Flush on the building 2. On the window 3. Projecting from the wall 4. Flags/banners hanging from the upper facade (if allowed by Cidy Code) 5. Awnings over the display window 6. Living signs--the real product on display 7. Symbol signs In terms of sign design, the important concerpt is to improve readability. In general, keep signs simple and place them where they can be seen. This usually means locating a sign on the upper portion of the facade, and, in particular, in display windows themselve s . Symbols as signs are encouraged because they add interest to the street, are quickly read, and are remembered better than written words. Here are quidelines that will help you develop a facade design concept: 51. Guideline: Align signs approximately with others on the block when feasible. Look at your building facade in relation to the adjacent stores and buildings. Could th ere be some overall order given to the signs? It may be possible for all signs within your building or block to line up. This can establish visual continuity along the storefronts, and at the same time, provide uniform sight lines for viewers. Alignment makes all signs more readable at a glance. In many situations aligning signs is just not possible. In these cases, look for other features to determine placement of your sign. Each store sign may relate directly to the store entrance in a similar fashion, or all signs may be placed in windows.

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45 Finally, ordering signs in this way creates a visual continuity that should be emphasized whenever possible. 52. Guideline: Your sign size should be subordinate to the other facade elements. In general, signs should not overpower the image of the facade as a single composition, and therefore the signs should be a part of the facade, not cover it. Use a smaller sign than permitted by the sign code. In gener al, one flush sign used in conjunction with one special sign-on glass, on the awning, or projecting--should be enough. Where several businesses are in one building, consider using a directory to consolidate many individual names. 53. Guideline : Select a sign design that is compatible in color and material with your facade and the street as a whole. Sign colors strongly influence the sign's readability. When sign colors compete from building to building, visual or perceptual clutter is created, making it harder to see individual businesses . Compatibility of sign colors and facade colors results in a more memor able impression. Light colored letters on a dark colored background are more readable than the reverse. Sign materials should be sympathetic to the facade materials, the image you wish to portray, and to the sign's wearability. 54. Guideline: Position signs so they will not obscure existing architectural details. Look at your building or store facade. Do any architectural details suggest a location, size or shape for your sign? These could be decorative bands, or brickwork panels indented in the face mater i al . ThA se f eatures can be emphasized by placing your sign to fit within them. 55. Guidelin e t Maintain all signs in good repair. Signs in disrepair portray a bad business image and cause the deterioration of the visual environment.

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46 56. Guideline: Indirect i llumination is recommended for signs. mounted on the front of your building that shine on your sign are called Light fixtures "indirect sources". glare on the street and signs become an These light a portion of the face of your building. Shield these fixtures to prevent and sidewalk. This type of lighting emphasizes the continuity of the building surface, integral part of the facade. 57. Guideline: Internal illumination may be acceptable under these conditions: When only the letters themselves--not tne background--are lighted, or when neon is used. In either case, the intensity of the light source should not overpower others on the street. Section IV--The Public Sector 59. Guideline: Preserve irregular building shapes and alley forms as a record of the historic site plan of Old Town. As a result of the intersection of the two street grids in Old Town, a few b u ildings have irregular floor plans--they are not rectangles. Some interesting exterior building shapes and alley forms result from this street plan. Enhancement of alleys is encouraged. These alley designs should help to dramatize the existing shapes and forms. 60. Guideline: Use contemporary street furniture of materials traditionally used for street furniture in the surrounding area. 61. Guideline: The placement of street furniture should function so as to serve the public. 62. Guideline: Do not use elaborate imitations of historic street furniture. Historically, street furniture in Old Town was sparse and simple. As pedestrian use increases in the area, a more intense development of street furniture is expected. While this is encouraged, take care to avoid misrepresenting the history of the street with elaborate imitations of historic designs.

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ECONOMIC DATA Ft. Collins economic goals and policies for the Old Town Area have been developed, reviewed and adopted by the City of Ft. Collins as a guide to the economic rejuvenation of Historic Old Town. Economic Policies: ( from Historic Old Town Area Plan) 47 -Historic Old Town shall be continued and enhanced as an economic and commercial center of the community. -Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall investigate private and public funding sources for revitalization of the area. -Historic Old Town and the City of Ft. Collins shall actively encourage local lending institutions to participate in loans to the area. -Historic Old Town shall promote a variety of businesses and shopping opportunities within Historic Old Town in order to promote a heal thy b usiness climate. -Historic Old Town shall encourage compatible businesses and services to locate in the area.

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48 GOALS: Economic Development "Develop and utilize as fully as possible the shopping, government, business offices, and cultural functions of the downtown as a focus for the redevelopment of the rest of the older city. -Provide continued support for redevelopment activities in the downtown area. -Encourage higher density housing which is consistent with the character of the neighborhood in the general downtown area. -Encourage location of .ajor retail, governmental, and financial institutions and other service functions in the downtown area. -Locate major cultural facilities such as the library, theatre, and the like in the downtown area." MARKET DATA: There has been no formal market study done in the Old Town Area to determine the supportable retail, office, and residential square footages, or what types of services and goos would be most economically feasible, Even so, there is currently a study being conducted by various groups as part of Old Town's revitalization plan. Earl Wilkinson, chairman of (D.D.A. ) the Downtown Development Authority says that "downtown will never again be a major shpping area, ••• Those days are gone. Other things will bring people back downtown, making it once again the vital core. W ilkinson is very enthused about the prospects for a return to economic prosperity. According to the D.D.A., the potential exists and money can be in a plan that encourages private development.

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49 For Old Town to survive, it must adapt through meetin g different needs of consumers than the shopping centers to the south, which cater to volume consumerism. Old Town must compliment rather than compete with other shopping centers. Chuck Mabry of the City P lanning Office envisions Old Town as ..... A people p lace ••• an attractive, comfortable center where consumers will come to browse and to find entertainment, where businesses and professional offices thrive, and w here people l ive ... (Denver Post, Aug. 13, 1981). A cornerstore of the authorities plan is cultural and entertainment facilities -theatres, restaurants, arcades, to bring peopl e to the area in the evening. In addition, the D.D.A. sees these activities coupled with one-of-a-kind shops, easy parking and pedestrian access, then people will probably stay awhile. A series of parking garages is planned to service the area. There is currently a large supply of office space in existing buildings, but it is undesirable and in generally poor condition. This is the case above most retail space in existing buildings along Jefferson street. Most of this space is vacant, but some is used for storage or office space. These spaces would make ideal lower-income housing units with a good view across Jefferson st. to the Poudre River. The second level location helps isolate the units above the noise and traffic along Jefferson. Similar conversions are already taking place in other areas adjacent to the site. Higher-income housing units are appropriate on the interior: ofthe site, provided they contain appropriate ameneties. Given the urban lifestyle of Old Town and m ix of people, the most likely residents would be professional people, single or married, but typically without children. This market would, in all probablility, desire this lifestyle and have the income to affort it.

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50 A m i xture o f units would be primarily one and two bedroom units with some efficiencies. In most units i t would be desirable to have a private studion space. The addition of residential space and other nighttime uses creates an important 24-hour place. In the office aspect of the plan, it was noted that attractive office space will help ent ice a solid core of professionals downtown. Several major banks have located downtown already. In addition to beautification plans and other improvements, the natural assets of the P oudre River would be brought out, thus eventually there could be public parks, nature trails and foot bridges amid the hustle and bustle do ntown. Political Implications: Separate owners of frontage buildings along Jefferson street own separate lots extending back through the site to the alley right-of-way. These separate owners of separate parcels, a cohesive development t hroughout the site becomes difficult. Conflicts may arise between owners of various parcels. In talking with some of these owners, some were enthused about the potential for m i xeduse development along the alleyway, while others opposed any kind of development. A closer look at the makeup of the existing business establishments and land use along Jefferson street may indicate reasons for support or opposition to new development. Current zoning for the parcel is 11C" (commercial district), which includes storage uses, retail and office uses and service uses. The existing uses along Jefferson street include all of these types of uses.

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51 The most supportive of new development are the small retail shop owners. Even so, they differed in opinion as to what the mexed use should include, as well as a concern for the parking problems that will accompany new dev elopment. Many of these shop owners have begun enthusiastcally upgrading their existing storefront facades in accordance with design guidelines for the area, and have tried to encourage adjacent businesses to do the same. Most reluctance to new development comes from auto service related businesses located along the southern portion of Jefferson street and corner of Linden street and Jefferson streets. Incompatability of these existing uses with proposed new development plans are in conflict with the goals and p olicies of the Area Plan to promote compatibility between land uses in Historic Old Town. In order to create compatible land uses, it is desirable that these incompatable businesses be relocated. Although no formal studies have been done, the future senario as indicated by area business people is that these businesses will eventually be forced to relocate as the area develops. Rising land costs will make selling their properties financially attractive and relocation more possible. In this light, future availability of these properties for other uses seems almost assured, thus enhancing the economic potential of the site. Compatable use will also allow a more cohesive development of the site. Financing Private financing is most encourage in Old Town. In the situation that exists on the site currently, it would be difficult for individual owners to fund any development; however, by pulling together in a joint partnership with a reputable developer as the managing partner, financing becomes much easier.

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52 This concept is currently being used in other areas of Old Town by Mitchell and Co. it allows property owners to commit all or part of their holdings into the association. Ray Chamberlain, Vice-President of Mitchell and Co., explains that property appraisals will make it possible to 11equalize investments" and that people can put dollars or buildings into the assoc i ation giving them a voice in decision-making. He admits, however, that 11given the number of people and government agencies involved, we don't expect to pull it off without any hitches at all ... Financial support from the Downtown Development Authority is also sought by developers in the form of tax-ir.crement income to help pay for public improvements such as burying utilities, installing street lights, resurfacing roads and alleyways, and providing parking. Socialogical Factors The Ft. Collins Historic Old Town 11Area Plan" developed by the Historic Old Town Planning Cormittee summarizes their socialogical goals as: "Provide housing and other services for all income levels in an adjacent to Historic Old Town with recognition of the special needs for elderly, low income, and handicapped persons ... (pg. 2 Area Plan) This statement is, while wellmeaning is somewhat limited in scope. The social implications of the Old Town involve more than housing an servies. It involves an understanding of peoples perception of Old Town as a market place, an entertainment place, a place to work and place to live. Thus, any development must be stimulated by a great variety of sensory impressions, rather than purely functional.

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53 People, in chasing alternatives, intuitively select variety. An important concept to keep in mind concerning new development in Old Town. The development must also satisfy people s sense for adventure, for everchanging scenes and unexpected elements. The Old Town Area provides a setting for this to occur. Urban legibility projects to people a rich mental image of an urban space, both in sensory and emotional qualities, thus giving spaces a personality. According to Kevin Lynch, people use five basic elements to form a mental image of urban space; !)Pathways {pedestrian/vehicular/bike etc) 2)Districts (Old Town/New Town/Suburb) 3)Edges (termination of Old Town district) 4)Landmarks (corner buildings) S)Modes (Plazas, centers of activity) Time can a\so be used to create an image of security. The proposed development will attempt to create a 24-hour space. This has some important socialogical implications. Not only does it create a setting for daily social interation in the market areas, it should also create a sense of community within the project. This sense of community enhances security, as people help look out for one another, reducing crim e rates, because someone is always present.

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54 Future Development Future development in the area related to the site will attempt to provide for these elements. The "Old Town Center" project is planned to be one of the largest preservation developments in the nation. 01 d Town center is planned as a multi-purpose center i ncorpera ting a mix of entertainment, corrmercia 1, residential, recreational, and retail activities, while providing an atmosphere of delight and enjoyment. The focus of the project is the new plaza at the intersection of Linden and Walnut streets. fhe plaza is large enough to accomidate exibits, art performances, and outdoor public events. This is in contrast to a series of smaller public spaces between allies using them as a secondary circulation system developed exclusively for predestrians.

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55 OLD TOWN CENTER PLAN 1 New Parking Structures 2 New Floor Space 3 Central Plaza 4 Alleys & Courtyards 5 Special Gateway Entrance

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ENTRY CONCEPT SMALL COURTYARD ADJACENT SITE CREATES ACTIVITY NODE 56

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CLIMATIC DATA: Narrative Description Radiation Data -Wind Data Temp./D.D./Precip. Relative Humidity Interpolated Collection Sheet Graphic Presentation CLIMATE ANALYSIS: -Summary "Climate" Program Analysis I -Meari Temp. vs Diurnal Range Analysis II Bioclimatic Chart Analysis III DESIGN RESPONSES CLIMATIC SITE ANALYSIS: 57

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58 CLIMATIC DATA Climatic data was collected from the primary sources; the Auraria library and Colorado climatology office in Ft. Collins. Library data was difficult to come by, though most of the required data was available from Ft. Collins. Temperature, degree days and precipitation data are f rom the "S;ummary of Climatic Data for Ft. Collins". Solar radiation was available from "Colorado s 'olar R adiation Data", However only average daily values for each month were available, and only for four years of record. Fortunatly this is measured data for horizontal sur f aces, global radiation in metric or U.S. units. W ind data was available "Solar R adiation Data" wind summary. Although a monthly breakdown of wind direction was not available, the wind summary both seasonal and daily discriptions of wind activity as well as an annual wind rose. Relative humidity information was totally unavailable. Humidity data was generated through interpolation of availa ble data for Denver and Cheyenne. Since both areas have roughly similar humidity levels, the generated for Ft. Collins should be fairly close to what actually exists.

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CLIMATIC SUMMARY Ft. Collins is located in north central Colorado near the foothills on the eastennslope of the Rocky Mountains. The climate is characterized by moderate tempertures, light precipitation, 59 and light winds inter upted occasionally by strong chinook winds. The average monthly temperature varies from 27.5F in January to 71.3F in July. Winter temperatures are moderated by the sporadic occurrences of warm chinook winds. The average annual precipitation is about 15 inches, most of which falls during th e growing season. Afternoon thundershowers occure quite frequently during the summer months but they are usually quite light. Seasonal snowfall averages about 46 inches, but persistent snowcover is unusual. March is typically the snowiest month. DESCRIPTION OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA Measurements of solar radiation have been made since 1975 in support of research activities at the Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science. Instrument calibrations are performed annually at the National Calibration Facility in Boulder and maintenance is performed regularly. Some problems with the data storage/recovery system has resulted in some missing data, but the overall data quality is excellent.

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FORT COLLINS ELEVATION 5279 fEET MSL LATITuDE DEG 3S LONGITUDE 105 UEG OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA -COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY, UEPARTMlNT Of ATMOSPHlR!C INSTRUMENTATION •• EPPLEY PRECISION SPECTRAL PYRANOMETER SOLAR RADIATION DATA AVERAGE DAILY TUTAL HEHISPHtHIC R A D IATIO N ON A SUHfACl, MAy 1975-NOVEHBER 1978, .. TILTED SURFACE RADIATION DATA •• CALCULATED fROM THE HORIZONTAL UATA USING THE MlTHUU DlV!SlU bY LIU AND JORDAN (1960), VALID SOUTH-FACING SURFAClS, REFLECTIVITY= 0,2 'LIMATIC DATA --ALL DATA COLLECTED AT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSIT Y CAMPUS wEATHlH STATION• TEMPERATURE ANU AVERAGES ARE FOR THE 19Sl•l970 PERIO D , DEGREE DAY AvERAGES bASED UN uATA, MEAN •lNU FROM DATA, AVERAGE STATION AT ELEvATION d AStU ON SOLAR RADIATION JAN FEB MAR APH MAY JUN JUL AUG SEI' Ol.T NOV OEC 60 ANN r{lCOHU (YlAHS) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • HEMISPHERIC (KwH/SQM/OAy) HEMISPHERIC 5,84 !II SO 6.!12 2163 6.26 1 9t! 4 5.b0 177 5 4 ,!!4 !53b 2,43 n o 2.16 bt>6 ... -.::, " 0,1 44.7 i!7,0 175 i!S 1.b 2 I,Utl u. 0 • 1 4,6 4,9 1\41!,) tl't7,tl ,bi' 5.C:J S,b1 5,b7 4,b3 3,611 4,14 4,38 3,'16 1!7.0 73.0 64o9 51,0 49.7 37.1 3"" l3.? 11.0 -17.0 417 0 A34 0 lo 14 o SS 2o5 s.3 5 . 9 'l47ol 3.71 4.34 4,7? 7J,O 4),7 30.4 1 1. 0 -I 1. 0 1076 0 .36 4,9 5,9 tl4b,? 1410 4 b , O 20 20 20 lO i!O 30 30 ?0 20 65 7 1

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• .. J?" IIJ'HHLY ::LI"'ATIC DHA fURf : JLLI'lS CJ:..OJRADJ f lJR YEAB 11J31-1979 SUSSfAflJN 53:>05 UlVISilH 4 61 LATITUDE 40 35 LJ"'GII'IID!:: -1)5 5 ELEVHIJN 5000 F'EET • MAR JH JUL fiUG SE:P o: r wv lH-iLY •I:; P. 'iAXJ"'J"' f!::lo4P (F) AVE:. 4). 5 44.4 50.3 :.:>. 3 &9.3 B . 2 85.!1 83.& 75. 5 . &5. 1 5il .IJ 43. 6 52 . 3 M )(. 52.2 5H.9 bU.4 :;;i . 3 7b . 3 8 7. 5 91.2 87. 8 82. 0 71 .1:1 53 . 9 5b.8 1 )3 11J51 1 1H& 1934 !955 1 954 1937 1941! 195:> 1H9 1 IJ5" 1 1954 I'll 2 • 7 32.5 39.9 5:>. 9 57 . 8 71. 1 79. 5 807 0 64.9 50. 9 43.0 30. 0 59 .!j 1 9 37 1942 D57 1935 1945 1950 197 1965 1 H 7 11J32 1 :}51 YEARS )f RE:CJRiJ B . 4'1 . 4. 5 3 0 .11 3&. 8 15. 6 55.11 &5.0 71.2 b9. 0 60.4 49. 9 36.9 3 . o 41:1.2 I.7 EA<{ 1137 1942 19&5 IH5 1945 1950 1950 1152-1H.l 1951 YE:AilS JF RE:CJFO 49. 49 . 49 . B . 49 . 49. 49. B . 49 . 411. 4t:l. DAYS (tillS:: 55F') AVE. 1171.4 ilb7.8 511.9 273 1 67.1 6.5 14. 7 161.3 461 . 4 i14:>. 7 1 0 7 3 . 7 bU&. 4 15.15 1233 1165 743 3 5 1 5 42 41 357 753 1:>41 1316 7lJ. 3 y BS2 195:. 19b5 1157 1957 1951 1972 1964 1965 1961 1972 M1N. 658 606 372 153 0 0 0 52 31 3 572 Rb4 5631 y 1:153 1951 1972 1954 1914 1977 1976+ 1973• 1963 19b3 1957 1:154 YE:fiRS JF RECJHO 29 . 29. 29 . 21. 2 29 . 29. 29. B . 1.9 . 29 . B . )IIYS oHU( fEMP ::;n O=l 1::) 90F' AVE. o.o o.o o.o o.o . o 4 . 1 9.2 5.7 1.4 o.o o . o o . o 20.5 MCIX. :J 0 0 0 1 1 0 23 15 6 0 u J 45 EB JH8 1943 1948 1J48 1969 1955 1954 1960 1960+ 194a 1HB 1':14t:l 11&0 t.l I . • :> 0 0 0 0 :> 3 1 0 0 0 0 b 'I':: 197h 1979 • I"J79t 1:179 + 1972t 1970• 1977 1975• 19B+ lH'l+ 197':1t 19b7 )f ECJRJ 31. 3 I • 31 • 31 . 31 . 32. 31 . 31. 32. 31 . 31 . 31 . 31 • )f\YS /'Ill X fE:MP L!:SS JR ) 32F AVE:. 8 . 5 4.5 3.2 • 5 . o o.o o . o ' . 0 . 0 o . o • 2 2.4 s . o 24 . 4 M I\ X . }1 I 2 9 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 13 39 y:;l\1{ 1:l79t 19B 19b5+ 1)59 1954 194il 1948 1948 1948 19b:} 1 :152 1':172 M 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1155t 1977 t 1<)79+ 1J79t 1979+ 19Ht 1979+ 1979• 1979• 197h 1 71+ 195 7 1 95 3 Jf RECJRO 32 . 31 . 32. 31 • 31 • 31. 31 . 31 • 31. 31 . 32. 32 . 31 . JI\YS fE:I'IP LESS DR :::J 32F' AVE:. 30.3 2 6 . 7 2&.9 13.3 2.2 o . o o . o o . o 1.0 11.5 25 . 2 3 0 . 3 1&11.3 MIIX. 31 2':1 31 21 b 0 0 0 6 23 3U 3 1 lt:l':l EA-{ 196h 19&8 1979• 194il 1948 11J41! 1965 195l 1 H 9 + 1979t ld 23 21 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 3 27 1411 19 71 t 19 7 I 1974• 1)78 1977+ 197H 1979+ 1979t 1979+ 1974+ 117 4 + 197'1 t !HI YEt!RS JF HE:CJHO 32 . 32. 32. 32. 32. 31 . 31 • 31 . 31 . 32. 32. 3"J. 3 1 • H:MP LESS JR :;J 0 F' AVE. 5. 3 2 . 4 1.0 • 2 o.o o.o o.o o . o o . o o . o . 6 7.3 11 • 8 MIIX. I 5 1 1 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2 2b 1i162t 195S 1948 1159 1948 194il 1948 1948 1948 194il 1 19n 1948 :> 0 0 0 0 i) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 EB 1977+ 197':1• 1J79 t 1979+ 197h 1979+ 1979t 1979+ 19B• 117il+ H71> YE:fiRS )f RECJR:> 32 . 3 2 . 32. 31 . 31. 31 . 31 . 31. 3 1 . 31 . 32. 31 . 31. ;-iE:Sf ( F J 1'::'1f' &a 75 8U 83 90 1 0 2 1 02 99 95 87 79 75 EAR fl'l:> 197113 0t19771:Jt19b927+195423 195411 19&9 0 8 195905+19670 3 19H:l6 193911 YEARS JF RECJHD 4:1. 4 49. 49. 41. B . 49 . 49. 49. 41. 49. 49 . ::s r ( F') T!:.I\P -32 41 -31 10 22 B 40 39 2 1 6 1 7 -30 liND LlAV19b21 0 1:15101 1'H3Ub 19480 b 194713 195208 19&43 0+197119 194817 1951:12 1932t:l YEARS Jf RECJHC> 4 9 . 4:1. 4'1. 49 . 49 . 49. 49. 49. 41 . 49 . 4 9 . PREPARED BY : C O LJRADJ CE l'E H JF Af'IJSP s:H C O LJRADJ SfAJ'E: JHV rY fDRf :o 8 (303) 4 91 !lHS

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Jf frlLY DATA f D i FORT : OLLINS CJLJRAD:J LAflfUDE • 40 35 • 1JS 5 .. ('" .: ... '. POR 1931 • 5000 fEET -SURSfATIJN 53J05 MAR APR JJ' J U L o:r 'JV DE: (TN ) AVE. .98 1.81 2.78 1.81 1.40 1.48 1.22 1.06 .55 .44 MAX. 1.17 1t26 3.3B 5.50 7.06 6.31 StBti 7.39 7.35 6.70 1.52 1962 19j[ 1961 1942 1961 19t7 1951 1938 1942 1973 0 . 0 0 .J2 . 0 1 .22 . 0 1 . O S 0 .00 . 0 3 . 0 1 0 . 0 0 J .OO o.uo 1 973+ 1966 IJ5 5 1974 1933 1939 1960 1932 1934+ 1959+ YEARS Jf Ri.:CJRD 49. 4:1. 49. 49. 49. 49. 4 9 . 4:1. 49. DAILY (IN) .85 1.26 2.18 3.21 3.54 4.43 3.06 1.62 1.57 1.26 A NJ JAfl962JB 197918 19570 2 196113 194904 197725 195103 197117 195105 197920 197531 YEAHS Jf HECJHJ 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 31. 32. 32. 32. 32. 'frlLY (lN ) AVE. 6.8 6.2 10.7 6.5 1.5 .o 0.0 0 . 0 .5 2.6 5.1 fi.2 MAX. 1Y.7 15.6 32.6 34.1 .5 0 . 0 0 . 0 15.0 14.7 20.7 1971 1931 1970 1945 1 97B 1947 1 9 31 1931 1 9 71 1979 0 . 0 O. u 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0 . 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 J.O 1934+ 197)t 1 96b 1J69t 1977+ 1979 + 1979+ 1979 + 1973+ YEAHS J f RECJ!D 49. B. 47. 49. 48. 4.S. 49. 49. 49. 47. 49. rsr SNuw ;RND IN (lN) 13 9 17 18 4 0 0 0 10 12 14 ANO 0AY19620B 195608+195614 195702 197910+ 0 0 0 197117 196912 197920 197929+ YEARS Jf RE:CJRJ 30. 23. 30. 20. 30. 32. 32. 32. 32. B. 2H. 27. JR 0.1 I N AVE. 2.1 1.9 4.3 4.8 6.0 5.1 4.8 4.3 3.3 2.9 2.3 t.B MAX. 9 7 11 10 12 15 lb 14 10 9 8 1948 1943 1951 1 953+ 1952+ 1950 1951 1 450 1952 1951 MIN. 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1977+ 1977t 196b 1 974 1971 1963 1960 1 47H t 197&t 1977+ YEARS Jf 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 32. 31. 32. JAYS PRE:IP JR 0.5 IN AVE. .1 .0 .5 1.0 1.5 1.1 .7 .7 .8 .2 1 1 3 4 5 5 3 3 4 3 2 1969t 1943 1961 1971 1961+ 1 9b1 1969 1973 194H M I N . ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979+ 1979+ 1978+ 1970 t 1977+ 1977+ 1979 + 1 9 7 Ht 1979 + 1977+ 197B t YEARS Jf RECJRv 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. 31. GAYS EJ 1.0 I N AVE. 0.0 0.0 .1 .3 .B .3 . 2 .2 .0 .2 .o 0.0 MAX. 0 0 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 J 194a 1979t 1971 1978+ 1979t 1961 1471 194H M J N . 0 0 0 0 0 J 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979 t 1979t 1978t 197Bt 1977+ 197at 1979 t 197 9 + 1 9 7 9 t 197B t 1979+ Jf REC)Hu 31. 31 . 31. 31. 3]. 31 . 31. 31 . 31. 31. 31. 31. 4 62 A . I N 14.3b .?il,42 1.34 H6b 49. 46.8 107.2 1979 13.7 1 ;,34 44. 43.9 110 H51 .l1 19 71 31. 7.6 1H9 2 19o6 t 3 I • <1.1 6 1 9 7 9 + 0 B72t 31. 3ER J f GAt S Alfi rlAI L AVE. O.D o .o o .o .o .o o.o . o o . u 1956 0 1 9 7 9 t 24. u.u o.o u 1955 0 19Bt H. o.o o.o .1 MAX. J W:.A:J. 1956 M l N . J Y::A:J. 1979+ YEARS J f HECJHu 23 •• : SfAflONS Jp DAYS AVE. JH EJ 1 MIN. Y ::AR YEARS Jf RECJRD 12.9 24 1963 3 1955 1 4. 0 0 1955 1956 0 0 1 9Ht 1979+ H. 24. .O'f ALL 5.9 18 196 S 0 1974+ 1 5. 1 3 1963 0 1966 15. 1 1 D 1 1J64 195R 1962 0 0 0 0 1979+ 1979+ 1979+ 24. 24 . 24. 24. i'lL 1.7 5 1975+ 0 1978+ 15. • 1 2 1979 0 1977+ 15. o.o 0 1963 0 1979+ 1 7. o.o 0 1963 0 1 9 7 9 + 17. TH..:SE o . o 0 19n3 0 1 9 7 'It 1 7. 0 1'156 0 1479+ 24. DATA MAY JT • 2 3 1971 0 197Yt 17. 1.2 8 u 1'173+ 1 7. 0 0 1 1956 19Sb 0 0 0 23. 24. 2.2. a::. u.:P r A r 1 5.0 1b 1379 0 H71+ I 7. 8.9 22 1 197'1+ 1 j. 37.6 o2 1\163 .l6 1974 7 • : COLJR A DJ CE f E H Jf HIC C OLJRADJ SfAfE HSirr rOHf COLLI'S, :a (303) 4 9 1

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WIND SUMMARY Summary period: January 1954 December 1963. Summary based on 42,510 o b servations , 12 observations per day at 2-hour intervals. Location: Colorado State University main campus weather station. Ground elevation 5004 feet. Anemometer height: 65 feet 1/54 " 12/63 (above ground} Seasonal vatiations: Average wind ' speeds vary from about 5 mph in August to 8 mph in April . Although average wind speeds are quite light, strong W-N W winds (downslope winds) occur occasionally particularly during winter and early spring. There is a distinct \ ' diurnal variation in wind Annual Wind Rose "-.,_ ' ...._....._ ' ' ' ' "" ............... -----N s -/ / / 63 direction throughout the year with NNW winds prevailing at night while SE winds prevail during the day. mph 1-7 8 1 2 13-18 I 19-24 I 25-3 8 39+ _ _,

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• & LA TITUDI: 0 3r71 tl .. ELEVA nON: 1?/lfZ/ ?l: JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC MEAN TOT DAILY SOL. J.eJ 6"",e4-"' 'i'o!!l!r& -=sen :2., b % SUNSHINE (p(p Cpr1 (p{p 60( '11 '70 6Z btl--I DD HEAT lf7J 1 ,.; r;JiO t,7 lbl 4-bl h4-lf# DD COOL --'J-Jg'1 rY3 f-?1 IMEAN MAX. 1-.# JO. -z.. 15". 7 A!J,1 'P-h. z. ;2t:l,q ::28.7 I!J. /IJ. -s-&,,f lb.8 --:;, tJ . 1 :::z.. i i?.J t.:? ?) 1-t?..:; ,:;,!3 ?.7 -,,, Of.CJ MIN. jp,g -15.1 l/1. I -4.Cf 5,7 t0.4-1-z.A l.'t. I DAYS PRECIP .,fz I 94 / . J I /,;.;-I . e:jt7 ) I . "z. 1.08 I, I q.. . /4-.i.Pb MAX RAIN J. 17 r.cj) 7 . /lb_ 5".Cb ! ..,,.,.., 'Z..V'I I.-52 RAIN . 44. /.81 1.81 t . .fO 1 .18 ' tZ. / .tlb Jth3_h RAIN . o5' , o-, tJ ,tJ tJ:o _-1_, '!> i-cr: • OZ. . tl/ . z z .01 tt?.O • I!) l /J.O STORM lj .Z: ltJ, 1 q,,5' I I.;-0 t:J 0 ' Z.{, b, I "'1: #,9 RH MAX -57 p(p '?tJ ?IJ b'1 IP'Z-s-q (pO RH MIN f.t3 4f-1-.... ..., tq ?8 44 5"/ DIRECTION 1-..lw 1-l\J 1--lL.d 1'-iw ,,J h -":) w Nw PREVAIL SPEED (p,(p "l,-5" 4-.t, 4-.4 c fYJP H . ., -5".t:'l 5;C) tt:J,CJ SECOND. SPEED % CALM ** FORMULA FOR CALCULATING NEUTRALITY: PASSIVE BUILDINGS + OTHER BUILDINGS Tn=23.9 + 0.295 {2))2 ) WHERE: Tn = TEMP. OF NEUTRALITY • MEAN MONTHLY OUTDOOR TEMP.

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I I I m J I I if!P-=/'t?rl ht?-+ Pf, & fi!W ;. 0'61 tl, 4-t9p 1?' t-t. ----+-----l-----4----+----t M -+---+------11-----1-----f-Y----1-----t------1----1------+---1-----+----J-----1------1-----------+----i I} ----------------f-----------------+----+-----1----b + MJ>-}1(, -t' 0 .J. • , _ ... ' i> r;.;; ' '---

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ANALYSIS OF CLIMATIC DATA "CLIMATIC " PROGRAM: Judging by some of the des: ign recommendations of the program, the climate would be classified as 66 a hot arid climate. It calls for reducing exposure to the sun by orienting the building along and East-West axis. This doesn't make sense, as an Eas t-West axis would expose the broad side to South increasing exposure. Many of the recommendations, however, are quite applicable to an area with a large diurnal swing; compact planning large mass walls and heavy roof. MEAN TEMP. VS DIURNAL RANGE: A computer analysis of diurnal ranges in Ft. Collins was available from the "Colorado climatology office". It shows the requency of diurnal ranges and begins to give an overall picture of the climate. The values shown represent the number of days throughout the entire period of record that falls within a particular diurnal range for a given mean temperature. A concentration of high frequency occurs at a mean temperature of about 58 F to about72F and a diurnal range from (I) 130F to (I) 20 Fa. Summers seem to be where the greatest numbers lie. This pattern would indicate a good potential for night radiation for cooling, as well as storage mass to flatten the diurnal range.

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67 BIOCLIMATIC CHART The bioclimatic chart is the only graphic representation of a climate and its comfort requirements. Ft. Coll ins is a temperate/cool climate with a large d iurnal range. This provides cool summer nights and hot summer days and cold winters. Humidity is almost always within the comfort range, not to dry and not to humid. Summers are infrequently above the comfort zone in shaded areas. Daytime breezes along the Poudre are generally from the southeast and nightime breezes are generally from the Northwest. There is little precipitation and lots of sunshine throughout the year to help counteract the lower temperatures with the suns radiation.

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' ex:> \0 ..Jr ...... 110 ... , ... . ... ... ... _ .. _ 60 5(J 30 \/Jt-Tt/"?1 y.ltr}l ?:l-IWJM"l;:: 14..J. ! ,., b ) 100

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69 DESIGN RESPONSES According to the bioclimatic chaa t (OLGAY) sun is always preffered in the morning hours throughout the year, thus morning activities should be oriented to the South and Southeast. Sun should be excluded from middle June to about late August, and during m id-morning to very late afternoon. The large diurnal swing and low relative humidity are helpfull in both summer and winter, and indicate that heavy mass walls are a benificial responses to flatten the diurnal range. Mass heat storage walls, trombe walls and insulated roofs would be recommended to make use of solar radiation and protect from cold winter. Neutral colors outside. Southern orientation of daytime use and protection from strong N orthern winds is desirable in winter The b ioclimatic chart does not indicate a great need for evaporative cool ing and air movement. Southeast bree zes should be used for summer coolin g light colored materials oriented to reflect light inside during winter and a way during summer is desirable, as is a compact plan. Shade devices must be flexi ble due to the unpredictable nature of Colorado weather. Perminant shading devices may be used particularly for the hot afternoons during summer months.

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---I I --.STREE.T ISTD BIC DLD T IN \ , __ PLI RINB Ill __ ,------------------------(, ..,_ __ l

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-------------

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SITE VIEWS ADJACENT BUILDINGS TO NORTHWEST TO REMAIN ADJACENT 2-STORY BUILDINGS TO THE NORTHEAST TO REMAIN & BE INTEGRATED WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT. FIRST FLOOR RETAIL, SECOND FLOOR STUDIOS & RESIDENTIAL UNITS. 73

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--. SITE ENTRY SEQUENCE 1 1) WALNUT STREET ENTRY 74 2) EXISTING PARKING TO BECOME A PRIMARY ENTRYWAY TO SITE 3) ENTRY INTO MIDDLE OF SITE

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SITE ENTRY SEQUENCE #2 1) PINE STREET ENTRANCE / ENTRY SEQUENCE #3 1) WALNUT STREET ENTRANCE I 75 2) UTILITIES TO BE BURIED, ALLEY BECOMES A PEDESTRIAN EXPERIENCE, SERVICE & FIRE ACCESS 2) SPACE ADJACENT TO ALLEY BECOMES A COUTYARD

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SITE ENTRY SEQUENCE #4 , 1) LINDEN STREET ENTRY: EXISTING BUILDINGS ALONG LINDEN STREET ARE OR WILL BE RENOVATED 2) PEDESTRIAN & SERVICE ALLEYWAY; TO BE LANDSCAPED WITH UTILITIES BURIED . 3) ALLEYWAY TO BECOME PRIMARY ACCESS TO NEW RETAIL. OFFICE. ENTERTAINMENT AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT (RIGHT OF ALLEY) 76

PAGE 78

7w a -ro at? --r0JH 00 0

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GENERAL PROGRAM P ROGRAM REQUIREMENTS AND OBJECTIVES The basic objective of the program is to give the main characteristics of various spaces and to outline performance requirments for th ese spaces. Performance are based on satisfying the main objective of an integrated mixed-use development where each use is mutually supportive of the other. Most of the requirements have been documented though Christopher Alexander's Pattern Language. Approximate space allocations have been determined though either a source or an educated guesstimate. These area requirements are generally for the individual use rather than the commulative, a rea of that use throughout the project. Space requirements are subject to modification throughout the design development phase of the thesis. GENERAL SPACE DETERMINATIONS FOR PRIMARY MIXED-USES Site land area = 27951 s.f. 11% min. open space = 3,069 s.f. 10% circulations space = 2,790 s.f. 27,951 5,859 = 2 2 t000 (•) s.f. ground level building area Typical retail shop: 25 by 80 = 2000 s.f. average 18,729 = 9 shops 2,000 r Restaurant/Cafe; Figures @ 1650 s.f., 2 of them = 3,300 s.f. total including outdoor seating Office@ second level: approx. 13,000 s.f. gross floor area 77

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Residential @third level: approx. 11,000 s.f. gross floor area 5 single units: @ 600 s.f./unit = 3000 s.f. 10 couples units: @ 800 s_f./unit = 8,000 s.f. PROGRAM FOR RETAIL SHOP SPACES SPACES Enterance Display Areas PERFORMANCE RE UI REMENTS Entry space must be easily identifiable and oriented to pedestrian traffic, it must serve as a transition point between pedestrian activity on the street and shopping activities inside. in keeping with Old character, entries should be set back from pedestrian ath Prominant, flexible display areas for goods and services oriented to the pedestr ia n, on raises platforms. S h ould be able to look beyond display into store activity. rovision for open air diSplay and canopies o r si milar shelter for shoppers and protection of goods from sun rain etc. 78 APPROX. AREA 30 sf/ea 70 sf/ea

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SPACES Storage Small private office Restroom & Utility Employee Parking PERFORMANCE Sales area flexible so that goods can be arranged any way suitable to the owner, includes activities such, a s checkout, display, demonstration, etc., Must be easily accessable by storage areas, high ceilings & clerestory lighting where possible to keep with Town Character. Size varies with shop, from 15% to 20% of gfa. Provide I shelves for stockiQg merchendise or service items. Must be accessable to sales area and delivery entry. May require large doors to service bulk items, high cielings desired. Ebokeeping, files, paperwork, etc. • located in an incons_Q_icuous part of the sh o_p_ Sink, and toilet is all that is needed, plus a separate closet for storing janitoria 1 supplies. include ' a service sink. I Delivery of goods to store, with direct access to storage Not veiwed from pedestrian areas. Placed on "service side" • Provided for off-site 79 APPROX. AREA 1600 sf/ea 375 to 625 sf/ea 100 sf/ea 50 sf/ea

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PROGRAM FOR RESTAURANT/CAFE SPACES SPACES Street Cafe Inside Spaces Public restroom PERFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS Must a busy path, and be open to the street, yet intimate place with several rooms opening to a busy path. A place where people sit with a drink and relax in public. Provide chairs, tables, sitting walls or steps, canvas roof for shade and coler. Extend the chairs and tables into the ath. Provide several inside spaces with a variety of games fire, chairs, tables etc. Allows people to be more private than the street cafe, should also serve as a connection between outdoor activit nodes. Simple foods and drink. Not much preparation space requiered. Contains a counter, microwave oven, refridgerator,and storage area. Accessable to eating Men; 3 Urinals, 2 toilets, 3 lavatories Women; 4 toilets, 4 lavatories APPROX. AREA 350 sf/ea 700 sf tota 1 0Jlv 80 --100 to aao sf I ea 200 sf/ea 150 sf/ea 150 sf/ea

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PROGRAM FOR PUBLIC OUTDOOR SPACE SPACE Sma 11 Promenade (alleyway) Small Service Road PERFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS Attract people down it by providing activity nodes every 150 ft •• Provide a variety of activities serving as destination s (e.g. ice cream parlors,, offices t o . create centers of activit • Concentrate compatible facilities at path intersections to draw people together. activities concentrated, about 45'by 60' and providing essential elements of sitting space, food landscaping, water. If too big, it loses and feels deserted. Not see n by public pedestian path. Can delivery vehicals to serve shops arid other facilities. one-way circulation about 10' wide and min. 13' haight clearance. 81 APROX. AREA n/a n/a 3000 sf max. 2500 sf

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PROGRAM FOR OFFICE SPACES SPACE Flexible 6ffice Space . . r---,__J • • . . . . . . . , (jo .. • • # • . .. Reception area Rest rooms eirculation PERFORMANCE R E UIREMENTS Users need to be able to create a homelike envi ronment, with the possiblity to mix a variety of room sizes, wall heights, windows etc., to suit any situation,and of course • natural light. Thus create wings of open space with free standing columns positioned around ed es to define half rivate and Arrange m ent of welcoming things at entrance (e.g. fireplace, food, coffee} • Position receptionist to pysically greet people, and of course plenty of natural 1 i ht. Workspace enclosure must be at least 60 sf of wall space, w ith8 ft. min open space in front. Provide arran ements for view out Central locations in main portions of building, adjacent exits , but give inconspicuous entries if possiple. Men; 4 urinals, 3 toilets, 3 lavatories (2 restrooms) Women 6 urinals 4 lavatories Non-leasable; 10 % max. of G.F.A., includes stairs up. 82 12100 sf (net leasable area) 150 sf/ea 60 sf min. 175 sf/ea 700 sf tota 1 1300 sf

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PROGRAM FOR LIVING UNITS 83 Two basic t ypes of living units are provided; studio type for single people geared toward professoonal people, and married couples without children or very young children. PROGRAM FOR BOTH UNITS (COMMON USES REGARDLESS OF UNIT TYPE) SPACE Parking Entrance transition Roof Garden JRFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS To be marketable, on-site parking is necessary, so provide one space per unit only, favor alternative modes of transportation. The "car connection" should be pos;itive, thus create a room for the car and integrate it with the buildin • graceful transition from parking or pulic paths to entrance. M arked by changes inlight, direction, sound , levels and perhaps gateways and trellised walk or cano Make use of roof areas adjacent living spaces for pr i vate outdoor space. Provide trellises, built in sitting areas • and garden boxes, etc. APPROX. AREAS 10 by 20 space 200 sf/space 1200 sf 100 sf/ea

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PROGRAM FOR SINGLE PEOPLE SPACE Main Living Area Bed Alcove I r :JJij PERFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS One-room cottage studio space with large and small alcoves around it for sitting, cooking, working, bathing, sleepin g , dressing, and bulk storage eountry s tyle, large enough to integt.ate with living space. Locate stove, sink, and counter around the edge and prov ide for a large table and variety of chairs,and as always, natural lig hting. Concentrate bathtub, toilet,. shower and basin in single tiles area, with private access, give access to outdoor ard e n Small alcove with p lenty of light and window to outside activity and shelving space No need for Bedrooms-Provide an individual bed alcove off non-sleeping functions with a lower ceiling than the rest of unit, provide some storage r f? \/'(:;-/ f 84 APPROX. AREA 250 sf 120 sf 80 sf roo --4-0"" sf 60 sf

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SINGLE PEOPLE CONT1D SPACE Dressing Room PROGR A M FOR COUPLES SPACE Couples Realm , -. Pt--P'1 -: Private realm PERFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS Pro vide dressing room between bed and bath area at least six ft. in diameter, six linear feet of closet space and six feet of open shelf, 2 drawers and a mirror. provide morning sun. :.! 85 APPROX. AREA 60 sf Tota 1 ••••••• >StrSf/unit bC; O PERFORMANCE RE UIREMENTS Provide distinct common areas shared by couple which includes areas to sit, the bed wi: t h morning sun, dressing roo m , bathin g room, central living and kitchen area. The provision of a small a1cove for each person at op posite ends of the intimacy gradient for private work or contemplation ; a place to be al o ne. APPROX. AREL 2 @ 40 sf 80 sf total

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COUPLES UNIT CONT'D. SPACE Bedroom area _....... ty')_flU.ltl-l<1 '" .... i Main Living Area Kitchen Bathing Dressing Room PERFORMANCE Separate bedroom area with special meaning. Create intimacy with low ceiling or canopy with the space shaped to it, provide m orning sun. locate adja cent to dressing, bath, and private roof garden •• See Program for Sin gles See program for Singles Same as Program for Sin gles , but provide 2 basins Same as Program for Singles, but provide 2 closets APPROX AREA 150 sf 275 sf 120 sf 90 sf 70 sf total •••••••. •• 785 sf/Unit 86

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WORK SCHEDULE FOR THESIS SEMESTER-SPRING 1982 TASK GENERATION OF ALTERNATIVE DESIGN CONCEPTS SELECTION OF PREFFERED ALTERNATE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PRESENTATION TIME 3 WEEKS 1 WEEK 9 WEEKS 3 WEEKS DATE OF COMPLETION FEB. 10, FEB. 17 APRIL 21 EXACT DATE TO BE DETERMINED

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Alexander, Christopher and Ishikawa, Sara and Silverstein, Murray et. al. A Pattern Langu age. New York: Oxford University Press, 1977. of Land and Zonin ). Spencerport: General Cole, Barbara A. and Winter, Nore V. et. al. Good Neighbors Building Next to History, State Historical Society of Colorado, 1980. Design Guidelines for Historic Old Town Fort Collins. Ft. Collins: Planning Department of Ft. Collins, 1981. "Fort Collins Planning Old Town Renovation," The Denver Post. (September 28, 1981), p, 8C. Kemper, Alfred. Architectural Handbook,New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1979. Mabry G. C. et. al. Land Development Guidance System. City of Fort Collins: 1981. Old Town Fort Collins, Colorado Area Plan. Historic Old Town Planning Committee, 1980. "Revived Downtown Ft. Collins Goal," The Denver Post. (August 13, 1981). Uniform Building Code. Whittier: International Conference of Building Officials, 1979.

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DESIGN

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JEFFERSON ST. J LEVEL Of\IE RETAIL & SITE PLAN I1-f1.-J ... r;======="""'f z LLl a z ...J

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i '---l " "' --n --n --LEVEL TWO OFFICES I . I I I I ...___ ____ __.)

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----"--..,._ ... ..__._. -/ ------'---...,.,.,.._ Hilt" ----!1----+ ,_,. UNIT I LEVEL THREE RESIDENTIAL f1-fl.JOD UNIT 2

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JEFFERSON STREIT ELEVATION PINE STREET ELEVATION ALLEY ELEVATION

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SECTION A SECTION B

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. ..._ it: -;.e;":!Eo f S!C?-'"' . . ... l.'f? ...... k.c",.......... .. '#14.C.. ... """"' 'tC ---.,.,.,...... I i ••• ..,._6. .... , ......... ,!, _, ..,, =-"' ,J'..I""""' .... ;:z: .g. '=Mc'?-....:0 .,_ ....,-_,. ..... "'*--"" _.....__ .... .. J:. .. ........ ...... ......... .... ..... fiotc.&J O""'f.. ,.:J!:E. ..... """"....,...Go. ..... _ ......... eoc:. ""*""' 1".:::::' ........... -.,..;QJ.o40Jf' MECHANICAL SYSTEM t / I"-f-I ' WALL SECTION