Citation
Phase II at Clear Creek office park, Wheat Ridge, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Phase II at Clear Creek office park, Wheat Ridge, Colorado
Creator:
Pyeatt, Keith V. G.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture
Committee Chair:
Long, Gary
Committee Members:
Holder, Davis
Dale, Curt

Record Information

Source Institution:
Metropolitan State University of Denver Collections
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Keith V. G. Pyeatt. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
PHASE II AT CLEAR CREEK OFFICE PARK WHEAT RIDGE, COLORADO
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the Requirements for the degree of
Master of Architecture
by
Keith V. G. Pyeatt
B. A., Brigham Young University, 1977
Fall Semester, 1984


LIST OF ADVISORS
Gary Long Davis Holder Curt Dale
Major Faculty Advisor Faculty Advisor Design Advisor
Partner - Anderson Architects


List of Figures List of Tables.
CONTENTS
i v v
Introduction......................................................... 1
Statement of the Problem............................................. 3
Man Made Systems Analysis............................................ 5
Natural Systems Analysis............................................ 13
| Climatological Data................................................. 21
Dayl i ghti ng Data................................................. 32
Site Photographs.................................................... 38
i Site Boundary Information........................................... 49
Zoning Ordinance Analysis........................................... 56
Building Code Analysis.............................................. 64
Plumbing Code Analysis.............................................. 83
Mechanical Information.............................................. 85
Geotechnical Analysis............................................... 87
Program.............................................................114
Bibliography........................................................119
Design Solution.....................................................120


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7
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12
14
15
16
17
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29
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39
44
52
53
54
55
FIGURES
Location Map..........................
Existing Land Use Plan................
Existing Site Use Plan................
Adjacent Land Use Plan................
Ci rculation..........................
Utilities.............................
Man Made Constraints Composite........
Topography............................
Hydrology.............................
Vegetation............................
Solar Exposure........................
Natural Systems Constraints Composite
On-Site Visual Quality................
Into Site Visual Quality..............
Heating and Cooling Chart.............
Solar Angles..........................
Directed Weather......................
Location of Photographs Offsite.......
Location of Photographs Onsite........
Final Plat of Site....................
Lot One...............................
Lot Two...............................
Lots Three and Four


TABLES
Table Page
1 Mean and Extreme Temperature Summary....................25
2 Daily, Monthly, and Annual Precipitation Data...........26
3 Mean and Extremes of Winds..............................27
4 Average Hourly Wind Speed and Direction.................28
5 Hourly Sunlight Availability............................33
6 Sunlight Availability by Standard Work Year.............34
7 Sky Illuminance for Predicting Energy savings...........35


INTRODUCTION
This project shall involve the design of a second building in a development known as Clear Creek Office Park. The project is an actual one which is to be completed at some time in the future, though iberties have been taken in order to create a more suitable thesis project.
The initial phase, completed in the fall of 1982, was the construction of a corporate office building to house the owner (KKBNA, ncorporated Consulting Engineers). That phase consisted of approximately 85,000 gross square feet of office space with associated surface parking which together utilize 3.24 of the site's total 8.03 acres.
For the purpose of this thesis, the second phase shall be approached as though the present owner had sold the unimproved portion of said development. This phase, therefore, shall include no work on that and used by KKBNA, Incorporated (ie: lots 3 and 4 of Kipling Ventures Subdi vision).
The site is in a rural setting, being within the city limits of Wheat Ridge, Colorado which is a west suburb of Denver. Located on a stream and a city greenbelt the site reflects the rural, natural theme Of the expanding business center activity occuring west of Denver's central business district.
To better facilitate planning potential in this project I have elected to incorporate an adjacent parcel of land and define several uses to occur on the ground floor of the building. The parcel of land, containing 0.79 acre, is presently vacant and offers frontage on an arterial street, which would otherwise not be available. The uses to


occur on the ground floor are: a bank, a restuarant, and office-support retail space.




STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
Though having separate owners and being separated by a street, the two phases are part of the same development. A strong central theme or parti, therefore, that will promote a single development identity is essential. Said identity should address the site and its rural surroundings. In the competitive field of leasing speculative office space, identity often plays a major role.
The central theme chosen is water, both becuase of association and flexibility. Water has an obvious association with the development's name, Clear Creek Office Park and can be used in a variety of ways. Water together with landscaped open space will be the major vehicle through which the development is unified.
All efforts to create said identity should be limited to the second phase site, though effecting both sites. Aside from minor landscaping alterations or additions other work on the KKBNA site is discouraged.
Identity is one major issue. Another major issue is cost. Due to the added expense for raised parking, all parking should be surface parking. Having a zoning height limitation of 50 feet, this new structure will be limited to three or four floors. A concrete superstructure is a viable alternative within these limits and money saved on the cost of the superstructure can be utilized for site improvements.
Several issues arise at the programming stage. Due to site constraints, most of the offstreet parking will be separated from the structure by a street. The sequence of entrance becomes critical as a result. Several different uses are to occur at the ground floor, each


of which requires identity and entrance. The major purpose of this phase two structure is office space and it should have one main entrance which is readily discernable. Aside from these issues are those related to the individual uses.
As mentioned previously, the major use will be speculative office space. This space should be flexible. It should allow for various tenant uses ranging from a single tenant to tenant divisions as small as 800 square feet.
The bank is to be a branch office having a twenty-four-hour banking machine. This branch office is small and intended to service local non-commercial banking needs.
The restaurant is intended to draw the business lunch crowd. Therefore the facility is sized to accomodate that anticipated volume. Its lunch menu will consist of sandwiches, specialty burgers, salads and possibly a small line of meat entrees. The dinner menu would offer a limited selection of meat and seafood entrees and salads, none of which would involve the preparation time nor the preparation facilities of a french cuisine. It is assumed that marketing research has indicated that sufficient office space exists within its expected marketing area to assure its success.
The retail space is limited to office-support uses, which would include such uses as travel agencies, copy centers, office supplies, etc. There shall be three independent retail spaces, one of 1,500 gross square feet and two of 1,000 gross square feet.
This constitutes the requirements for the design problem. The design solution should integrate these various parts into a single unified whole.


MAN-MADE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS


6
FIGURE 1 LOCATION MAP


7
FIGURE 2
EXISTING LAND USE PLAN
f- 1 k\\\\\\\\''l Residential-1 1* **. 4*» \ vl I Residential-2 lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
[Residential 3
Agricultural-1
| Commercial-1 t •!
Restricted Commercial Restricted Commercial-1 Planned Residential Development Planned Community Development
Source of information:
City of Wheat Ridge, Colorado Zoning Map - dated June, 1978


FIGURE 3
EXISTING SITE USE PLAN
W 44 th AVENUE
l
0 100 200
W 43rd AVENUE
o
Q.
*
r
LEGEND
Parki ng Grass
Disturbed Natural
Existing Structure Access Drive Vacant Land


FIGURE 4
9
ADJACENT LAND USE PLAN

Cormercial


FIGURE 5
10
CIRCULATION
W 44 th AVENUE
o
Q.
LEGEND
Streets or Drives
L
Equestrian / Pedestrian Path


FIGURE 6
UTILITIES
Water Line
Gas Line
Sanitary Sewer Line
Storm Sewer Line
K+PLtNO


FIGURE 7
12
MAN MADE CONTRAINTS COMPOSITE
LEGEND
Future Drive Existing Structure
Development Possibility at Great Cost
Good Development Possibility Development Possibility at More Cost


NATURAL
SYSTEMS
ANALYSIS


14
FIGURE 8 TOPOGRAPHY
W 44 th AVENUE


FIGURE 9
15
HYDROLOGY
--------Irrigation Ditch «-------Drainage Swale
Irrigation Pipe Direction of Surface Drainage Limits of 100-Year Flood Plain
*


FIGURE 10
16
VEGETATION
W 44 th AVENUE
l
r
o
Q.
*
LEGEND
Parking
Deciduous Trees Evergreen Trees
Grass
Disturbed Ground Existing Structure
iwsi
mm
SIM!
n
W 43rd AVENUE
CLEAR


FIGURE 11
17
SOLAR EXPOSURE
l
r
Excellent Solar Availability Moderate Solar Availability Poor Solar Availability


FIGURE 12
18
NATURAL SYSTEMS CONSTRAINTS COMPOSITE
LEGENO
Good
Moderate
Poor
Development Possibility Development Possibility Development Possibility
Existing Structure


FIGURE 13
ON-SITE VISUAL QUALITY
LEGEND

I
I_____________________________________
Good Visual Quality Moderate Visual Quality Poor Visual Quality
Existing Structure
KIPLING


FIGURE 14
OFF-SITE LOOKING INTO SITE VISUAL QUALITY
LEGEND
Good Visual Quality
Moderate Visual Quality Poor Visual Quality
Existing Structure
KIPLING


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA


22
NARRATIVE CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY
The City of Wheat Ridge, Colorado is just west of Denver and is part of the greater Denver metropolitan area. Because the two are contiguous and its availability, climatological data for Denver will be used.
Wheat Ridge enjoys much the same mild, sunny, semi-arid cliamte that prevails over much of the central Rocky Mountain region. The area's climate is tempered by two phenomena, its proximity to the mountains and its altitude. During the cold part of the year it recieves few of the extremely cold mornings of the high elevations as well as escaping most of the hot summer afternoons at lower altitudes. Extremely hot or cold weather is usually of short duration.
Air masses from at least four different souces influence the area's weather: arctic air from Canada and Alaska; warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico; warm dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air modified by its passage over coastal ranges and other mountains to the west.
The good climate results largely from the area's location at the foot of the east slope of the Rocky Mountains in the belt of the prevailing westerlies. During most summer afternoons cumuliform clouds so shade the area that temperatures of 90° or over are reached on an average of only 32 days of the year, and in only one year in five does the mercury very briefly reach the 100° mark.
,In the cold season the high altitude and the location of the mountains to the west combine to moderate temperatures. Invasions of cold air* from the north, intensified by the high altitude, can be abrupt


23
and severe. On the other hand, many of the cold air masses that spread southward out of Canada over the plains never reach the area's altitude and move off over the lower plains to the east. Surges of cold air from the west are usually moderated in their descent down the esat face of the mountains, and Chinooks resulting from some of these westerly flows often raise the temperature far above that normally to be expected at this latitude in the cold season. These conditions result in a tempering of winter cold to an average temperature above that of other cities situated at the same latitude.
In spring when outbreaks of polar air are waning, they ae often met by moist currents from the Gulf of Mexico. The juxtiposition of these two currents produces the rainy season in the area, which reaches its peak in May.
Situated a long distance from any moisture source, and separated from the Pacific source by several high mountain barriers, the area enjoys a low relative humidity, low average precipitation, and considerable sunshine.
Spring is the wettest, cloudiest, and windiest season. Much of the 37% of the annual total precipitation that occurs in the spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier period of that season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mild sunny weather that remove previous snow cover.
Summer precipitation (about 32% of the total), particularly in July and August, usually falls mainly from scattered local thundershowers during the afternoon and evening. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Clouds often form during early afternoon and cut off the sunshine at what would otherwise be the hottest part of the day. Many


24
afternoons have a cooling shower.
Autumn is the most pleasant season. Local summer thunderstorms are mostly over and invasions of cold air and severe weather are infrequent, so that there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are generally brief. Precipitation amounts to about 20% of the annual total.
Winter has the least precipitation accumulation, only about 11% of the annual total, and almost all of its snow. Precipitation frequency, however, is higher than in autumn. There is also more cloudiness and the relative humidity averages higher than in autumn. Weather can be quite severe, but as a general rule the severity doesn't last long.


TABLE 1
MEAN AND EXTREME TEMPERATURE SUMMARY (°F)
DENVER, COLORADO
Month Dai ly Maximum Dai ly Minimum Monthly Mean Record High Record Low
Jan 43.5 16.2 29.9 72 -25
Feb 46.2 19.4 32.8 76 -30
Mar 50.1 23.8 37.0 84 -11
Apr 61.0 33.9 47.5 85 -2
May 70.3 43.6 57.0 96 22
Jun 80.1 51.9 66.0 104 30
Jul 87.4 58.6 73.0 104 43
Aug 85.8 57.4 71.6 101 41
Sep 77.7 47.8 62.8 97 20
Oct 66.8 37.2 52.0 88 3
Nov 53.3 25.4 39.4 79 -8
Dec 46.2 18.9 32.6 75 -18
Annual 64.0 36.2 50.1 104 -30
Normals based on the period 1941-1970
Data Source: Department of Commerce, 1981


26
TABLE 2
DAILY, MONTHLY, AND ANNUAL PRECIPITATION DATA (inches)
DENVER, COLORADO
Total Precipitation Snow
Month Normal Monthly Maximum Monthly Mi nimum 24-hour Maximum 24-hour Maximum Monthly Maximum
Jan 0.61 1.44 0.01 1.02 12.4 23.7
Feb 0.67 1.66 0.01 1.01 9.8 18.3
Mar 1.21 2.89 0.13 1.48 16.3 29.2
Apr 1.93 4.17 0.03 3.25 17.3 28.3
May 2.64 7.31 0.06 3.55 10.7 13.6
Jun 1.93 4.69 0.09 3.16 0.3 0.3
Jul 1.78 6.41 0.17 2.42 0.0 0.0
Aug 1.29 5.85 0.06 3.43 0.0 0.0
Sep 1.13 4.67 T 2.44 19.4 21.3
Oct 1.13 4.17 0.05 1.71 12.4 31.2
Nov 0.76 2.97 0.01 1.29 15.5 39.1
Dec 0.43 2.84 0.03 1.38 11.8 30.8
Total 15.51 7.31 T 3.55 19.4 39.1
T Denotes a trace of precipitation
Normal based on record for the period 1941- 1970
Data Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, 1981


TABLE 3
MEAN AND EXTREMES OF WINDS
DENVER, COLORADO
Month Mean Wind Speed (mph) Prevai1i ng Di recti on Maximum Wind Speed Recorded (mph) Di rection Associated with Maxi mim
Jan 8.9 S 53 N
Feb 9.2 S 49 NW
Mar 9.9 S 53 NW
Apr 10.3 S 56 NW
May 9.5 S 54 SE
Jun 9.0 S 47 S
Jul 8.5 S 56 sw
Aug 8.2 s 42 sw
Sep 8.1 s 47 NW
Oct 8.1 s 45 NW
Nov 8.5 s 48 W
Dec 8.8 s 51 NE
Annual 8.9 s 56 SW
Data Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, 1981


TABLE 4
AVERAGE HOURLY WIND SPEED (mph) AND DIRECTION DENVER, COLORADO
Mountain Standard JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
Time Dir 1 mph 4 Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph Dir mph
AM 1:00 S 7.2 S 6.9 S 6.9 S 7.0 S 6.5 S 6.3 S 6.3 s 6.2 S 6.3 S 6.7 s 7.0 s 7.3 s 6.7
2:00 S 7.2 S 6.9 S 6.9 S 6.8 S 6.3 S 6.1 s 6.1 s 6.0 S 6.3 S 6.5 S 7.1 s 7.4 S 6.6
3:00 S 7.2 S 6.9 S 6.8 S 6.8 S 6.0 S 5.9 s 5.7 s 5.9 S 6.1 s 6.5 S 7.1 s 7.4 s 6.5
4:00 S 7.2 S 6.8 S 6.8 S 6.7 S 5.8 S 5.7 s 5.4 s 5.6 S 6.0 s 6.4 S 7.2 s 7.5 S 6.4
5:00 S 7.2 S 6.7 S 6.8 S 6.5 S 5.7 S 5.5 s 5.2 s 5.5 S 6.0 s 6.5 s 7.3 s 7.5 S 6.4
6:00 S 7.3 S 6.8 S 6.8 S 6.5 S 5.7 S 5.3 s 5.1 s 5.3 S 5.9 s 6.6 s 7.3 s 7.6 S 6.4
7:00 S 7.5 S 6.8 S 6.9 S 6.6 S 5.7 S 5.3 s 5.0 s 5.1 S 5.9 s 6.6 s 7.4 s 7.6 S 6.4
8:00 S 7.5 S 7.0 S 7.0 S 6.9 S 6.2 S 5.7 s 5.3 s 5.0 S 5.6 s 6.4 s 7.4 s 7.7 S 6.5
9:00 S 7.7 S 7.3 S 7.5 N 7.4 S 6.8 S 6.1 s 5.5 s 5.1 S 5.7 s 6.4 S 7.4 s 7.7 S 6.7
10:00 S 7.7 S 7.6 S 8.0 N 8.0 N 7.6 N 6.7 N 5.9 NE 5.4 S 5.9 s 6.5 S 7.1 s 7.7 S 7.0
11:00 S 8.0 S 8.2 N 8.7 NE 8.8 NE 8.3 NE 7.6 NE 6.5 NE 6.3 NE 6.5 NE 7.0 S 7.4 s 7.9 NE 7.6
12:00 S 8.3 NE 8.8 N 9.5 NE 9.4 NE 8.9 NE 8.3 NE 7.2 NE 6.9 NE 7.1 NE 7.6 S 7.8 s 8.1 NE 8.2
PM 1:00 S 9.1 NE 9.5 NE 10.2 NE 10.2 NE 9.6 NE 9.1 NE 7.9 NE 7.7 NE 7.8 NE 8.2 NE 8.4 s 8.6 NE 8.9
2:00 NE 9.3 NE 10.0 N 10.7 NE 10.6 NE 10.3 NE 9.6 N 8.6 NE 8.1 NE 8.1 NE 8.7 NE 8.5 N 8.7 NE 9.3
3:00 NE 9.5 NE 10.1 NE 11.0 NE 10.9 NE 10.6 NE 10.2 N 9.4 N 8.7 NE 8.6 NE 9.0 NE 8.6 NE 8.7 NE 9.6
4:00 N 9.1 NE 10.2 NE 11.2 NE 11 .2 NW 10.8 NE 10.5 N 9.6 N 9.1 N 8.8 NE 8.8 NE 8.5 N 8.3 NE 9.7
5:00 NE 8.4 NE 9.7 NW 11.1 NE 11.2 NE 10.8 N 10.5 N 9.7 N 9.3 NE 8.7 NE 8.5 NE 7.7 N 7.6 NE 9.4
6:00 NE 7.7 NE 8.3 N 10.1 N 10.6 NE 10.2 NE 10.1 SW 9.3 NW 8.6 N 8.0 NE 7.5 N 6.8 s 7.0 NE 8.7
7:00 S 7.3 N 7.2 N 8.7 NE 9.3 NE 9.3 NE 9.1 S 8.5 SE 7.7 N 7.2 NE 6.7 S 6.4 s 6.8 NE 7.9
8:00 S 7.1 S 6.7 N 7.8 N 8.4 NE 8.4 NW 8.0 S 7.7 S 7.1 S 6.7 S 6.3 S 6.7 S 7.0 S 7.3
9:00 s 7.1 S 6.9 S 7.1 SW 7.7 SW 7.7 S 7.3 S 7.2 S 6.6 S 6.3 S 6.4 S 7.0 S 7.1 S 7.0
10:00 s 7.1 s 6.8 S 6.9 S 7.4 S 7.1 S 6.8 S 6.8 S 6.6 S 6.4 s 6.6 S 7.2 S 7.2 s 6.9
11:00 s 7.2 s 6.8 S 6.9 S 7.1 S 6.8 s 6.7 S 6.7 S 6.4 S 6.5 s 6.8 S 7.1 S 7.3 s 6.9
12:00 7.1 s 6.9 S 6.9 S 7.0 S 6.7 s 6.5 s 6.5 S 6.3 S 6.3 s 6.8 s 7.1 s 7.2 s 6.8
1892 to 1930 1881 to 1950
Data Source: U.S. Weather Bureau


HEATING DEGREE DAYS BASE= 65° F COOLING DEGREE DAYS
FIGURE 15
HEATING & COOLING CHART, DENVER COLORADO
Data Source: U.S. Weather Bureau - 1941-1970, Denver


FIGURE 16
SOLAR ANGLES - DENVER, COLORADO
40° NL
CO
O
altitude angles


31
FIGURE 17
DIRECTED WEATHER DENVER, COLORADO


DAYLIGHTING DATA


TABLE 5
HOURLY SUNLIGHT AVAILABILITY DENVER, COLORADO
IIOUII, SOLAR JAN FED MAR
ol>:oo-og:oo 0.000 0.000 0.000
OG:00-07:00 0.000 . 146 . 792
07100-00:00 .621 .627 .005
OU:00-09:00 . 732 .642 .01 1
09:00-10:00 .764 .670 .843
10:00-11;00 .775 .750 .072
11 too-12:00 .010 .71 1 .029
12:00-0:00 . 039 .721 .709
0:00-1*4:00 . 054 .730 .745
14:00-15:00 .029 .716 .726
15:00-IG:00 . 031 .715 .704
1G:00-17:00 .736 .731 .693
17:00-10:00 0.000 .150 .679
IU:00-19:00 0.000 0.000 0.000
MUNI III Y AVERAGE .770 .610 .774
MGN1IILY FRAC 1 ION .779 .610 .735
MON! IIL Y AVil. HOURS Uf SUIJllGIII PER DAY (HR) 7.0 7.3 9.3
APR MAY JUN JUL AUU SEP
339 .036 .702 .075 .370 0.000
754 .004 .790 .094 .023 . 049
701 .790 .010 .911 .024 .022
755 .004 .010 .913 .030 .031
750 .706 .021 .096 .036 .046
764 .792 .023 .077 .052 .071
760 .796 .037 .064 .791 .066
734 .750 .794 .079 .754 .059
707 .717 .769 .014 .752 .061
675 .604 .774 .741 .710 .021
649 .649 .715 .641 .711 .797
623 .627 .694 .662 .724 .740
639 .610 .712 .756 .710 .774
227 .610 .699 .796 .335 0.000
654 .734 .774 .023 .717 .029
654 .669 .677 .720 .713 .746
9.2 10.3 10.0 1 1 .5 10.0 9.9
ANNUAL ANNUAL
OCT NOV DEC FRACTION HOURS
0.000 0.000 0.000 .537 90.3
.200 0.000 0.000 .672 107.5
.053 • .729 .752 .777 203.5
.060 .749 .790 .797 290.0
.064 .744 .772 .001 292.3
.051 .764 .704 .815 297.6
.047 .012 .010 .013 296.7
.052 .776 .822 .799 291.5
.060 .763 .045 .706 206.9
.054 * .748 .070 .764 270.7
.065 .747 .061 .741 270.3
.055 .760 .616 .723 263.8
.276 0.000 0.000 .502 162.4
0.000 0.000 0.000 .446 02.0
.760 .759 .814
.760 .721 .014
e.i 7.6 8.1
CO
CO


TABLE 6
SUNLIGHT AVAILABILITY BY STANDARD WORK YEAR DENVER, COLORADO
standard WORK YEAR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
07!00-16!00 .705 .644 .792 .732 .750 .795
07:oo-i7:oo .708 .652 .703 .722 .746 .786
07:00-10:00 .649 .610 .774 .716 .735 .780
07:00-19:00 .599 .564 .715 .678 .726 .774
00:00-16:00 .784 ’ .700 .792 .730 .753 .796
00:00-17:00 .779 .703 .782 .719 .740 .786
00:00-18:00 .708 .653 .773 .712 .729 .779
08:00-19:00 .649 .590 .708 .672 .720 .772
09:00-16:00 .804 .709 .790 .726 .748 .794
09:00-17:00 .796 .711 .779 .715 .735 .783
09:00-18:00 .717 .655 .769 .707 .723 , .776
09:00-19:00 .652 .596 .699 .663 .714 .769
annual
JUL AUd SEP OCT NOV DEC {SA_S)
843 .708 .842 .799 .683 .732 .760
827 .782 .834 .804 .690 .740 .756
821 .777 .829 .760 .632 .678 .730
819 .743 .765 .702 .584 .626 .691
837 .784 .842 .856 .759 .814 .707
820 . 778 .832 .856 .759 .814 .701
814 .773 .827 .803 .690 .740 .750
813 .736 .758 .736 .632 .678 .706
828 .779 .844 .857 .763 .821 .789
810 .773 .833 .856 .762 .821 .781
804 .768 .827 .798 .686 .739 .747
804 .728 .762 .726 .624 .672 .700


TABLE 7
SKY ILLUMINANCE FOR PREDICTING ENERGY SAVINGS
DENVER CO illuminance SKY CONDITION ORIENT AT ION CO Cl C2 C3 MEAN Q/0 MAX1MUI
( 0700-1600 ) OIMLCI CLEAR NORMAL 1.0426*02 -1.1096-03 3.0096*00 -3.9676-13 76010 9631 1
GLOUAL CLEAR NOR III 9.7 0 7 E * 0 1 6.4096*04 -6.7446-07 1.9756-1 1 10433 2.194 19000
GIOIIAL CLEAR NE/UW 1.2026*02 -7.41 IE-03 I.702E-07 -1.3526-12 160 2 4 3.530 50096
gi dual Cl E Ail EASI/WEST . 1.09'JE 10 2 -4.203E-03 8.02GE-00 -5.0716-13 29142 6. 1 2 U 73415
Gl (IIIA 1. Cl EAR st/sw 1.0256*02 -I.94/E-03 2.7J2E-0U -2.6196-13 30973 0.196 75014
glniial C l E All sou m 0.941E *0 1 -3.706E-04 -2.54GE-0U 1.0006-13 41732 0.776 70043
Dll 1 USE CLEAR VERI(CAL 9.71> 5 E t 0 1 3.7 R 1 £ - 0 3 -4.202E-0G 3.0206-10 4755 8297
Gl DUAL OVERCAST VEIII ICAL 0.432E»01 -7.0996-04 -S.29GE-07 I.59IE-I1 9420 10210
GiOIIAl CLEAR IIOII1 20111 AL 0.6SUE»0I -4.043E-05 -1.9016-00 1.0096-13 54666 6.740 100372
01f1 USE CLEA.I IIOII1 2011IAL 9.7GS6*0I 1.0916-03 -1.0706-00 3.7756-11 9510 16594
GLOUAL OVERCAST HORIZONTAL 6.432E«0 1 -4.7766-04 -1.9076-07 3.4366-12 16700 30363
( 0700-1700 ) UIIIECr ClEAn normal 1.0106*02-0.3106-04 3.1136-00 -3.4036-13 72623 9631 1
GIOIIAL CLEAR NOll III 0.6706*01 -4.4401-04 -5.3956-07 1.5966-1 1 10007 2.201 10000
GIOIIAL CLEAR IJ6/NW 1.1056*02 -7.476E-03 1.7716-07 -1.4406-12 15719 3.430 56096
GIOIIAL CLEAR EAST/WES! l.064E»02 -4.363E-03 U.6IGE-0U -6.4026-13 26916 6.073 73415
GIOIIAL CLEAR SE/SW 9.9616*01 -2.2956-03 * 3.72IE-00 -3.2656-13 35053 7.024 75UI4
GIOIIAL CLEAR SOUTH 9.0776*01 -9.GO7E-04 -9.1496*09 6.0936-14 30562 0.415 70043
DirrusE CLEAR VERTICAL 9.6446*01 3.030E-03 -4.040E*0fl 2.0506-10 4503 0297
GIOIIAL OVERCAST VERTICAL 9.2616*01 -2.6776-03 -3.2546-07 1.030E-11 0723 IU2IQ
GIOIIAL CLEAR MORI IOIII AL 9.4076*01 -2.1096-04 -I.705E-00 1.0096-13 51336 5.601 100372
DIFFUSE CLEAR IIOII 1 ZON 1 AL 9.6446*01 1.5156-03 -1.0106-00 3.6736-11 9165 16594
glqqal OVERCAST HORIZONIAL 9.2G16*0 1 -1.5466-03 -1.1716-07 2.2256-12 14539 30363
( o 0 c 1 a o o ) OIIICCI CLEAR NORMAL 9.6156*01 -0.2536-04 2.509E-00 -2.9096-13 67927 96311
GLOUAL CLEAR NOR III 9.1616*01 -5.2706-04 -4.9306-07 1.4516-1 1 9721 2.252 20 101
GIUUAL CLEAR IIE/NW 1.I02E»02 -7.240E-03 1.7496*07 - 1.4426-12 14574 3.377 56090
GlDUAL CLEAR EAS 1/WES T 1.0046*02-4.2606-03 0.5576*00 -6.367E-I3 24039 5.755 73415
GlOUAL CLEAR SE/SW 9.4226*01 -2.3566-03 4.0296-00 -3.4466-13 33031 7.654 75014
GIOIIAL CLEAR SOUTH 9.3326(01 -1 .|2 26-03 -2.0506*09 2.4156-14 35514 0.229 70U43
DIFFUSE clear VEHlICAL 0.1OUE *01 2.0I4E-03 -3.0926-00 2.0926-10 4316 0 29 7
GlDUAL OVERCAST VERIICAL 0.6G6E *01 -3.0206-03 -2.3016-07 7.3466-12 0020 10210
GLOIIAL CLEAR HORIZONTAL 9.1366*01 -4.326E-04 -I.IU9E-0U 7.36IE-I4 47564 6.510 1003/2
Dl1 FUSE CLEAR HORIZONTAL 9.1OUE *01 1.4576*03 -0.9U0E-07 3.6156-11 0632 16594
GLOUAL OVERCAST HORIZON IAI. 0.6666*01 -I.0I2E-03 -0.2046*00 1.5076-12 13366 30363
i 0700-1000 ) DIRECT CLEAR normal 0.9906*01 -0.3956-04 2.6396-00 -2.7716-13 62790 9631 1
GIOIIAL CLEAR NOR III 0.6526*01 -1.0066-03 -4.1296*07 1.2326-1 1 9019 2.260 20101
Gl OIIAL Cl EMI IIE/NW t.020E * 02 -G.7096*03 1.6246*07 - 1.3406*12 13463 3.373 5G09G
GIOIIAL Cl EAR EAS 1/WEST 0.2936*01 -3.9526*03 7.95IE-OU -5.9IUE-I3 22930 6.746 73415
GIOIIAL CLEAR SE/SW 0.7106*01 -3.I04E-03 3.7G0E-00 -3.2176-13 30500 7.64 1 76014
GlOUAL CLEAR SOUIII 0.6356*01 -1.0546-03 -2.1076*09 1.9036-14 32792 6.215 7 U 0 4 3
DIMUSE Cl EAR VERIICAL 0.6226*01 |.7006*03 -3.4046*06 2.6356-10 3992 0297
GIOUAI. OVERCAST VERIICAL 0.0006*01 -2.7006-03 -2.1246-07 6.7016-12 7403 10210
GLOUAL CLEAR HORIZONTAL 8.4546*01 -4.1306-04 -1.0696*00 6.63/6*14 43927 5.502 100372
DILI USE CLEAR HORIZONTAL 0.622E *0 1 0.9416*04 *0.7106*07 3. 1696*1 1 7003 16594
GLOUAL OVERCAST HORIZONTAL 0.0006*01 -1.6736-03 "7.6476*00 1.465E-12 12330 30363
CO
cn


lit IIVER .CO
( oaoo-iuoo )
( 000Q-I70Q )
( 0600-1000 )
( obqq-iuqo )
LLUMINANCE SHV CONDI 11011 ORIENT AT ION CO Cl C2 C3 MEAN G/0 MAXIMUM
OlliECV CLEAR NORMAL 1.OU1E•02 -I.326E-03 4.65UE-0U -4.656E-I3 601 SI 9631 1
Cl IIIIAL C L E All NOR III 9.U3SE*01 I.569E-03 -7.U95E-07 2.2G5E-I1 IOUSG 2.100 10006
Cl DUAL Cl EAll he/mi 1.247EI02 -U.OGOt-03 I.U49E-07 -1.44IE-I2 ISSG9 3. 135 53439
GlDUAL Cl f All EASr/wtsr 1.12»l£ *03 -4.465E-03 0.300E-0U -6.9221-13 20 1 SO 5.660 73415
CIUIIAL C L t All SE/SM I . OGGE »03 -2.3'JIE-OJ 4.IU9E-00 -3.U7IE-I3 40142 0.003 7SUI4
GlDUAL Cl EAll SUUIII I.002EI02 3.G03E-0I -4.539E-00 3. I5GE-I3 4SG07 9.104 70043
uii ruse CL £ AH VEllI IL'AL 1.00 <1E i 0 2 4.G99E-0J -4.677E-00 3.2IUE-I0 4‘JGG 0297
GlDUAL OVCIICAST vertical 9.U47EI0I I.43UE-03 -7.090E-07 2.3I2E-II 10277 10210
GlDUAL CL E All 110111 20111AL 9. OSOE *01 I.77UC-04 -2.3I9E-0U I. IU7E-I3 SU736 6.914 1003/2
01r f use CLEAR 110111 l OH 1 A L l.004£«03 3.3SOE-03 -1.I44E-00 4.022E-I1 9932 16594
GLOUAL OVEllCASt IIOR l JON IAL 0.64/E*0l 0.631 £-04 “2.U4OE-07 4.994E-I2 I712U 30363
oi liter Cl E All normal | .047EI02 -1 . I09E-03 3.009E-00* -3.U67E-I3 76010 9631 1
01 DUAL C l E All NOR III 0.707E«01 6.409E-04 -G.744E-07 1.07SE-I1 10433 2.194 10000
GIOUAL CLEAR NE/HW 1.203EI02 -U.OUSE-03 I.920E-07 -1.5S4E-I2 1 4 4 7 U 3.045 53439
GLUUAL Clear EAS I/WES r 1.OUGE «02 -4.615E-03 0.922E-00 -6.401E-13 2SU01 5.426 73415
GlOUAL Cl ear st/sw 1.011E * 02 -2.730E-03 6.I3IE-0U -4.457E-I3 * 3GS94 7.695 75014
GLOIIAL Cl l All SOUIII 9.94IEI0I -3.700E-04 -2.54GE-0U 1.uooE-13 41732 0.776 70043
DIHUSE CLEAR VERTICAL 9.765E *01 3.70 1 £-03 -4.2U2E-00 3.020E-I0 4755 0297
GIOUAL OVERCAST VCRlICAL 0.4 3 7 E » 0 1 -7.444E-04 “S.3U3E-07 1.62JE-I 1 942S 10210
CIOIIAL Cl E All 110111 JON 1 AL 0.65QE * 0 1 -4.043E-0S -I.9UIE-0U 1.0U9E-1 3 S4GG6 6.746 100372
DIFFUSE CLEAR IIOII1 ZONI AL 9.76SE« 01 |.09IE-03 -1.0/0E-06 3.77SE-I1 9510 16594
GLOUAL OVERCASr HORIZONTAL 9.437E*01 -4.46/E-04 -I.0JUE-07 3.S0GE-I2 15700 30363
oi liter CLEAR NORMAL U.U61Ei0 I -9.77IE-04 3.I73E-0U -3.377E-I3 7050 0 9631 1
Gl UIIAL CLEAR NOR III 9.240E10 1 4.4SBE-04 -6.IIIE-07 1 .7U1E-II 10002 2.249 20 101
GlDUAL CLEAR NE/NW 1.I34E«02 -7.U29E-03 I.9IIE-07 - I . 5 7 4 E “ I 2 13343 3.000 53439
GIOUAL CLEAR EAS I/WE S I 1.0 19E 102 -4.470E-03 8.030E-0U -6.3G3E-I3 23636 5.313 73415
GIOUAL CLEAR SL/SW 9.GU6E *01 -2.7&7E-03 6.33UE-00 -4.545E-I3 33440 7.519 75U14
GIOUAL . CLEAR SOUIII 9.340EI0I -6.9I9E-04 -I.7IIE-0Q I . 2 I 0 £ - I 3 30 1 19 0.569 7004 3
OlfFUSE clear VEllI ICAL 9.2G9E «01 3.5U/E-03 -4.207E-06 3.042E-I0 444Q 0 29 7
GlOUAL overcast VEllI ICAL 0.772E » 01 -I.394E-03 -4.I5IE-07 I.247E-II 0594 10210
GIOUAL CLEAR IIOII IZUNIAL 9.2G3E«0l -2.U9UE-04 -I.393E-0U 7.U44E-I4 50249 6.646 1003/2
DIFFUSE clear IIOII 1Z0NIAL B.2CpE«0l 1.793E-03 -1.052E-06 3 00JE-11 0097 16594
GLOUAL OVEllCASt IIOII 1 ZON 1 AL U.7 72E »0 1 -0.3G4E-04 -I.4U4E-07 2.G93E-I2 14323 30363
oi liter CLEAR NORMAL 9.IG4EI0I -9.79UE-04 3.070E-0U -3.IUUE-13 64794 0631 1
GlOUAL CLEAR NOR III U.GU2 E *01 -I.G39E-04 -5.I4GE-07 1.9201-11 9219 2.250 20101
GIOUAL CLEAR NE/HW l.042E»02 -7.20GE-03 I.7G2E-07 -1.454E-I2 12242 2.090 53439
GIOUAL CLEAR EAST/WEST 9.3GSE *01 -4.127E-03 8.I50E-00 -5.U7GE-I3 21677 5.305 73415
GLOUAL CLEAR SE/SW 0.90IE»0l -2.54UE-03 4.94/E-OQ -4.206E-I3 30671 7.506 75014
GIOUAL CLEAR SOUIII O.504E*0l -S.G25E-04 -I.520E-06 1.074E-I3 34953 0.654 70043
OlflUSE CLEAR VEllI ICAL 0.G21E•01 2.311E-03 -3.639E-00 2.G43E-I0 400G 0 297
GLOUAL OVERCAST VEllI ICAL U.0 4|E 10 1 -I.27UE-03 -3.U05E-07 1 . I43E-I1 70/0 102 10
GLOUAL CLEAR IIOII 1 ZONIAL U.604E t 0 I -2.0I3E-04 -I.247E-00 7.0I9E-I4 4G0U4 5.639 100373
Oil FUSE CLEAR IIOII | ZON 1 AL U.G7IEI0I | . IS5E-03 -9.097E-07 3.304 E- 1 1 0173 1659 4
GLOUAL OVERCAST IIOII I ZONIAL U.04 1 £ * 0 1 -7.G07E-04 -I.370E-Q7 2.4GUE-I2 13129 30363


DENVER .CO ( 0900*I COO )
( 0900-1700 )
( 0900*1000 )
( 0900*1900 )
ILLUMINANCE SKV curio III uij ORIENT A! ION CO Cl C2 C3 MEAN G/0 MAXIMUM
oiurc i Cl E All normal 1.0976*02 -|.6796*03 6.5006-00 -5.2596*13 02063 9631 1
C.l DUAL CLEAll NUN III 9.UG2E•01 2.5216-03 -B.5R5E-07 2.3046-11 11242 2.220 10006
GlDUAL CLEAll NE/NW 1 .23IE *02 -7.9G0E-03 1.5G9E-07 -0.2176*13 1351 1 2.660 43013
fit DUAL Cl E All easv/wfsi 1.I53E *02 -5.2456-03 1.04IE-07 -7.6GI6-I3 24505 4.040 60503
gioiial CLEAll SE/SW 1 .OUIE *02 *2.7996-03 5.0I3E-00 -4.2406*13 30470 7.500 75014
filUKU UlHiisI c t r aii SOU I II vfhdMi liilliiliol a.QGUE-04 *5.3446-00 3.3596-13 40439 9.567 70043
eiiMl s6il1S[*0fl 3;G0UEM3 mi mi
GlUOAL UvEilCASr VC II1 1 CAL fk. 6 J6E ♦ 0 1 3.26OE-03 -9.I49E-07 3.4616-11 10902 16218
Cl Oil A L CLEAll NON|7UNIAL 0.U37E * 0 1 3. |G4E*04 *2.3706*00 1 . 1016-13 61701 8.003 100372
UllfUSE CLEAN IIOII1 2 UNI AL 8.02UE»o 1 3.5176*03 *1 . 2066*00 4.5106*11 10126 16594
GLUOAL OVERCAST 1101112 UN 1 AL 9.6 31>E ♦ 0 1 I .8656-03 -3.2946*07 6.3156-12 18271 30363
U1 ME C 1 CLEAll NORMAL 1.0S2E *02 -1.3I0E-03 4.463E-00 -4.4266-13 77250 9631 1
giooal Cl £ All NUN III 9.635E*0l 1.3026*03 -7.1I5E-07 2.0036*11 10730 2.227 19008
Gl ClIIAL CLEAN NE/NW 1. 10 7 E «0 2 -0.I44E-03 1.774E-07 -1.1556-12 12527 2.600 43013
Gl OllAL CLEAll EASI/WESI 1. 1 06E * 02 -5.377E-03 1. I09E-07 -0.2536*13 22300 4.620 60503
GIOOAL CLEAN SE/SW 1.040E*02 -3.I29E-03 5.9GUE-00 -4.050E-13 347 14 7.205 75014
GlUOAL CLEAll SUUIII 0.6356*01 2.SO IE-05 -3.040E-00 1.0296*13 43019 0.095 70043
DIFFUSE CLEAll VElll ICAL 0.039E »01 5.75SE-03 -4.754E-0G 3.3456*10 4010 0297
GlUOAL OVEIICASI VEH1ICAL 8.3ISE *0 1 6.307E-04 -6.224E-07 1.679E-I1 9940 10210
GIOOAL CLEAH horizontal 9.G I6E * 0 1 S.0S7E-0S -1.9096-00 1.0026*13 56049 8.000 100372
OlfFUSE clean IIUII | 2 ON1 AL 9.6396*01 2.077E-03 -1 . 1 00 E-06 4.1016*11 9636 16594
GLUOAL OVEIICASI IION | 2Ull 1 AL 9.3156*01 3.7U4E-04 -2.2416*07 3.6276-12 16567 30363
DIIIECI CLEAN normal 9.091E«0I -1. I44E-03 3.G90E-0Q -3.7316-13 71153 9631 1
GLUOAL CLEAN NON III 9.131 £•01 fl. 0566-04 -8.3426-07 1.7706*11 10226 2.206 20 IU1
GlUOAL CLEAll NE/NW 1 . 1 IGEI02 -7.9G9E-03 1.0526-07 -1.3516-13 11473 2.564 43013
GlUOAL CLEAN EAS 1/WE SI 1.032E«02 -5.103E-03 1.0916-07 -8.1756*13 20269 4.530 60503
GlUOAL CLEAN SE/SW 9.70GE«0I *3.1I9E-03 8.1 I3E-00 -4.0Q0E-13 31441 7.027 75014
GlUOAL CLEAN SUUIII 9.0Q5C * 01 -2.579E-04 -2.0736-00 1 . 1706*13 39636 6.059 70043
01f FUSE CLEAN VElll ICAL 9.106E *01 6.3436*03 -4.6256-QG 3.3376*10 4474 0297
GlUOAL OVEHCASI VElll ICAL 0.596E«01 -3.2I3E-04 -4.7046-07 1.2596*11 0974 10 2 1 U
GLUOAL CLEAR IIOII |/ONI AL 9.I03E«0| -2.256E-04 -1.3416-00 6.7526*14 51772 5.7U6 100372
01fFUSE * CLEAN IION 1 2 ON 1 AL 0.lOGErOl 2.672E-03 -1 . I5GE-0G 4.1716-11 0940 16594
GLUOAL OVEIICASI IIUII 1 /Oil 1 AL 0.5966*01 -1.328E-04 -1.7226-07 2.720E-I3 14957 30363
OIOECI CLEAN NORMAL 0.I20E«0I -1 . I32E-03 3.5306-00 -3.4936*13 6476U 9631 1
GlUOAL CLEAN NUN III 0.G33E t 01 2.023E-04 -5.2G76-07 1.4906-1 1 9351 2.294 20 10 1
GlUOAL Cl E All NE/NW 1.0 I7E«02 -7.2U4E-03 1.7016-07 -1.2506-12 10442 2.561 43013
giooal CLEAll EAS1/WE ST 9.404E*0I -4.737E-03 9.9U9E-00 -7.4906*13 10430 4.523 60503
GlUOAL CLEAN SE/SW 0. 04BE+0 1 -2.050E-03 5.6156-00 -4.6056*13 20595 7.014 75014
G|UOAL CLEAll SUUIII 0.21 IE»01 -2.G62E-04 -1.0316-00 1.032E-13 30044 8.841 70043
Oil FUSE clean VERTICAL 0.4 ME * 0 1 3.7926-03 -3.9676-06 2.0/56*10 4077 0 297
GLUOAL OVEIICASI VElll ICAL 7.0106*01 -2.012E-04 -4.3496-07 1.1456-1 1 0150 10210
GlUOAL Cl EAR IIUII | /Ull f AL U.372E *0 1 *2.2226-04 -1 . IU0E-00 5.95 IE-14 47091 6.775 100372
OlflUSE clean IIUII 1 7 Ull1 AL 0.4146*01 1.096E-03 -8.9176-07 3.5946-11 0154 16594
GLUUAL UVEliC AS V IIUII | 2UNIAL 7.0106*01 *1.207E-04 -1.5066-07 2.4736*12 13597 30363


SITE PHOTOGRAPHS


FIGURE 18
LOCATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN OFFSITE LOOKING INTO SITE


40
Photogragh 1
Photogragh 2


Photograph 3
Photograpgh 4


42
I. ' f
Photograph 5
Photograph 6


43
Photograph 7
Photograph 8


44
FIGURE 19
LOCATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN ONSITE LOOKING OFFSITE
j
W 44 th AVENUE
o
a.
*
L
r


Photograph 9
Photograph 10


Photograph 11
Photograph 12


Photograph 13


48
pnotograph i4


SITE BOUNDARY INFORMATION


50
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF SITE
Commencing at the SE corner of the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 21, Township 3 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian; City of Wheat Ridge, County of Jefferson, State of Colorado; thence N 89°58' 52" E, 45.00 feet to the intersection of the west right-of-way line of Kipling Street and the south right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue, said point being the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; thence S 00°04'31" W, 345.59 feet along said west right-of-way line and parallel to the east line of
said Section 21; thence departing said right-of-way line N 89041'55" W,
54.84 feet; thence S 33°22'02" E, 65.41 feet; thence N 60°32'25" W, 377.09 feet; thence S 68°12,22" W, 150.00 feet; thence N 84047'38" W, 132.61 feet; thence N 00°17'45" W, 255.00 feet to a point on the south line of said NE 1/4; thence along said south line S 89°42'15" W, 198.46
feet; thence departing said south line N 00°08,01" W, 210.00 feet;
thence N 80°52'52" E, 68.86 feet; thence N 80°56119" E, 108.96 feet;
thence N 64°47129" E, 54.25 feet; thence N 60°57124" E, 90.25 feet;
thence N 48°05120" E, 86.42 feet; thence N 00°05'09" w, 189.90 feet more
or less to a point on the south right-of-way line of West 44th Avenue; thence along said right-of-way line S 89°42'57" E, 35.15 feet; thence departing said line S 00°00l31" W, 5.65 feet to the northwest corner of the Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1; thence S 00°00'31 W, 220.00 feet along the west line of said Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1 to the northwest corner of Lot 3 of said Subdivision; thence S 89°58'52" E,
222.50 feet along the north line of said Lot 3; thence S 00°00,31" W,
272.50 feet along the east line of said Lot 3 to a point on the north right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue; thence N 89058'52" W, 222.50 feet



to the southwest corner of said Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1; thence S 00o00'31" W, 50.00 feet along the west right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue; thence S 89058'52" E, 416.50 feet along the south right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; said parcel of land containing 8.03 acres more or less.


52
FIGURE 20
FINAL PLAT OF
KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION


53
FIGURE 21
LOT 1 OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION


54
FIGURE 22
LOT 2 OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION
S 89°42'57"E 35 15'


FIGURE 23
LOTS 3 AND 4
OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION


ZONING ORDINANCE ANALYSIS


57
ZONING ORDINANCE ANALYSIS
(/
The governing zoning ordinance is the updated portions of the Zoning Ordinance for the City of Wheat Ridge, Colorado which is dated 15 February 1980.
W
Lots 1, 3 and 4 are presently zoned Commercial-One (C-l). Lot 2 is presently zoned Commercial-One and Agricultural-One (A-l). That portion of lot 2 which is presently zoned A-l will be rezoned to C-l.
Topic Section Ref Description
Building height 18.C.1 The maximum building height is 50 feet.
Front setback 18.D.3 The front setback shall be 50 feet.
Side setback 18.D.4 The side setback shall be 50 feet if adjacent to a dedicated public street, otherwise, there is none required.
Rear setback 18.D.5 The rear setback shall be 10 feet for the first story and an additional 5 feet for each additional story thereafter.
Lot coverage 18.D.6 Not more than 85% of the gross lot area may be covered by structure or surfacing. That area not covered shall be landscaped.
Fences, walls and hedges 18.F.1 The maximum height of any fence, wall, hedge, or other structure is 42 inches when located within 55 feet of an intersection of street right-of-way lines.
Parking Space 27.1.A.1 A parking space shall average 300 square feet including the area to be utilized for ingress and egress.
Surfaci ng 27.1.A.2 Parking and driveway areas shall be surfaced with bituminous concrete or similar materials, unless otherwise approved by planning commission.
Parking islands 27.1.A.3 All islands shall be landscaped.


Access
27.1.A.4
Curb cuts 27.1.A.5
Parking buffer 27.1.A.6
Lighting for 27.1.A.7
parki ng
Location of 27.1.A.8
parking
58
Providing access to an arterial street may be required to provide acceleration and deceleration lanes. Vehicular access to any property shall be controlled in such a manner as to protect the traffic carrying capacity of the street upon which the property abuts as well as to protect the value of the adjacent property.
Vehicular entrances or exits shall be spaced at not less than 100 foot intervals; or shall be spaced at not less than 50 feet to the centerline of any intersecting street or nearer than 25 feet to any adjacent property line, except where it is possible one access point which will serve both adjacent properties or where adherence to these requirements would leave a parcel of property without vehicular access, in which case either or both of the setback requirements, or the spacing requirement may be reduced or enlarged so as to permit a single vehicular access point.
Curb cuts shall not be more than 30 feet in width when serving an individual property or 45 feet when serving more than one property and shall not in any instance be less than 12 feet.
Whenever parking lot boundary as required adjoins property zoned for residential use, a landscaped buffer area of 15 feet from said lot line shall be required, or the planning commission may approve a decorative wall in lieu of landscaping.
Any lighting used to illuminate any off-street parking area shall be so arranged as reflect the light away from any adjoining residences located in a residential zoning district.
The location of required off-street parking facilities shall be within 300 feet of the buildings they are intended to serve measured from the nearest point of the off-street parking facilities, and the nearest point of the building structure.


59
A parking facility shall not be more than 600 feet from the use it is intended to serve.
Building additi ons 27.1.A.9 Nothing in this section shall prevent the extension of, or an addition to, a building or structure into an existing parking area which is required for the original building or structure when the same amount of space taken by the extension or addition is provided by an enlargement of the existing parking area or an additional area within 300 feet of such building.
Floor area 27.1.A.11 In the case of offices, "floor area" shall mean the gross floor area used or intended to be used by tenants, or for service to the public as customers, patrons, or clients. It shall not include areas used principally for nonpublic purposes, such as storage, incidental repair, for show windows, for toilets or restrooms, for utilities.
Fractions 27.1.A.14 When units of measurements determining number of required parking spaces result in the requirement of a fractional space, any fraction shall require one parking space.
Parking for the 27.1.A.17 Parking shall be provided for the
handicapped handicapped at the rate of one per use, or two percent (2%) of the total parking spaces required, whichever is greater. Said spaces, shall be a minimum of 11 feet in width and shall be appropriately marked with a free standing sign using the standard uniform words and/or symbols that signify the space as parking for the handicapped only. Said parking space shall be located as near to the entrance of the use as practically possible and shall be so designed (unless it is impossible to do so) that circulation between the vehicle and the building entrance shall not involve crossing any area used for vehicular circulation. The total number of spaces provided for the handicapped shall be included


60
in the total number of parking spaces otherwise required by the ordinance.
Collective 27.1.A.18 Nothing shall be construed to prevent
provision the collective provision of off-street
parking parking facilities for two or more
buildings or uses, provided that the total of such off-street parking spaces supplied collectively shall not be less than the sum of the requirements for the various uses computed separately.
Plans for the construction of any such parking lot must be approved by the zoning administrator before construction is started. No such land shall be used for parking until approved by the zoning administrator.
Off-street loading 27.1 .B.2 Loading shall be provided at a rate deemed necessary by owner.
Off-street loadi ng 27.1.B.3 Loading spaces as required shall not be construed as supplying off-street parking space.
Number of off-street parking spaces requi red Table 27.1.C Business and professional offices require 1.0 space per each 300 square feet of gross floor area.
Small retail (less than 2,000 sq. ft.) requires 1.0 space per each 300 square feet of gross floor area.
Drive-in banks require 4.0 spaces per each teller window.
Drive-in restaurants require 1.0 space per each 100 square feet of gross floor area.
Landscaping plan 27.2.B A landscape plan is required to be submitted with the required Building Permit or development plan. Said plan shall be approved by the Director of Community Development in conjunction with the City Arborist. (The requirements of said plan are not included herein.)
Landscaped area requi rements 27.C.1 Any combination of two or more of the following: grass, flowers, shrubbery,
deciduous and coniferous trees, which shall be maintained in an orderly


61
Screening of parki ng
Landscapi ng requi rement
manner, and in addition, any combination of bark, rock, nonliving greenery, or ornamental object not exceeding 20% of the landscaped area may be used, in the event the nonliving area is to exceed 20%, approval must be obtained from the Planning Commission.
In no event shall the nonliving landscaped area exceed 50% of the total landscaped area.
The intent of this definition is not to waive any landscaping requirements, but to allow flexibility of wel 1 -designed landscaped areas of living and nonliving materials.
Coverage shall be determined for the projected growth after two full growing seasons.
27.2. C.2 If the lot area used for parking is
placed between the public right-of-way and the structure^), a screening of the parking area shall be established between the right-of-way and the parking area.
This view-obscuring screen shall be at least 36 inches but not to exceed 42 inches high and may be composed of live plantings, berms, or artificial structures as approved by the Planning Di vi sion.
27.2. C.5 Landscaping shall be installed only on
the property or portion of property to be developed or for which a building permit is applied.
For properties with existing development, landscaping in addition to existing landscaping shall be required on a percentage basis determined either according to square footage added, remodeled, or altered, or value added to the premises by proposed improvements, whichever is higher, up to the maximum required for that district. Existing valuation and valuation of proposed changes shall be based on Uniform Building Code valuation tables.
In cases where lot development character makes it impossible to meet percentage requirements for any particular yard due to location of


62
structures or required parking, Plannning Commission may approve a transfer or waiver of the requirements of affected areas to other areas of the site, provided however that the general intent of the landscape section is met.
Wherein the application of this ordinance would result in the loss of required parking spaces, the provisions of this subsection shall be waived by the Community Development Department without the necessity for a public hearing.
Landscaping 27.2.C.6 Any area of the lot not covered by
requirement building, parking, walkways, or
storage area, must be landscaped.
Planting requi rement
Planting requi rement
27.2. D.3(a) Required within the landscape setbacks
abutting public rights-of-way, one tree, deciduous or evergreen, for every 20 feet (or portion thereof) of street frontage.
This should not be construed to mean trees placed 20 feet on center.
27.2. D.3(b) In addition to trees required based
upon public street frontage, one tree or other shrub is required for every 1,000 square feet of lot area.
Landscaped buffer 27.2.0.3(c) a 12 foot landscaped buffer is
required where adjacent to a residentially zoned lot. This may be used to satisfy other landscaping requi rements.
Required 27.2.D.3(d) required landscaped areas shall be as
landscaped areas follows:
(1) A minimum of 10% of any required yard (setback) not fronting a public street, if used for parking or surfacing, shall be landscaped.
(2) A minimum of 5% of any required yard (setback) not fronting a public street, if not used for parking or surfacing, shall be landscaped.
(3) Provided that all such landscaping shall not be less in total than 10% of the gross lot area.


63
An area of not more than three feet of street right-of-way may be included in calculating the minimum 10% requirement if intended to be landscaped.
(4) Nothing contained in this section shall prohibit any landowner from landscaping in excess of the minimum requirements stated herein.


BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS


65
BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS
The governing building code is the 1982 edition of the Uniform Building Code.
Topic_______________Section Ref Description_________________________
Occupancy type Table 5-A B-2, Office building.
Type of construction Chp 18 Type 1 fire-resistive construction.
Fire resistance of exteri or wal 1 s Table 5-A Fire resistance of exterior walls shall be 1 hour where less than 20 feet of separation between structures.
Openings in exterior walls Table 5-A Not permitted where less than 5 feet of separation. Must be protected where there is less than 10 feet of separation between structures.
Maximum height of building Table 5-D The maximum height of the building is uniimited.
Access to water closets 511 (a) Each water closet stool shall be located in a clear space not less than 30 inches wide and have a clear space in front of the stool of not less than 24 inches.
Toilet rooms 511 (a) One required for each sex per floor.
Doorways to toilet rooms 511 (a) All doorways leading to toilet rooms shall have a clear and unobstructed width of not less than 32 inches.
Toilet room requi rement 511 (a) 1 A clear space of not less than 44 inches on each side of the doors which provide access to toilet rooms. Said distance shall be measured at right angles to the face of the door when in the closed position. Not more than one door may encroach into said 44 inch space.
Toilet room requi rement 511 (a) 2 A clear space within the toilet room of sufficient size to inscribe a circle with a diameter of not less


66
Toilet room requi rement
Water fountains
Atrium smoke-control system
than 60 inches.
Doors may encroach into said circle by not more than 12 inches when in any position.
511 (a) 3 For the handicapped a clear space of not less than 42 inches wide and 48 inches long in front of at least one water closet stool. No door shall encroach into space. When said water closet stool is within a compartment, entry to it shall be a clear width of:
a) 32 inches when located at the end or
b) 34 inches when located at the side.
Except for door swing, a clear unobstructed access not less than 48 inches in width shall be provided to toilet compartments designed for use by the handicapped.
511 (c) Where water fountains are provided, at
least one shall have a spout within 33 inches of the floor and shall have upfront, hand-operated controls.
When fountains are located in an alcove, said alcove shall be not less than 32 inches in width.
1715 (b) A mechanically operated air-handling
system shall be installed that will exhaust smoke either entering or developing within the atrium. Exhaust openings shall be located in the ceiling or in a smoke trap area immediately adjacent to the ceiling of the atrium. Supply openings sized to provide a minimum of 50% of the exhaust volume shall be located at the lowest level of the atrium.
When the height of the atrium is 55 feet or less, supply air may be introduced by gravity, provided smoke control is accomplished.
In atriums where tenant spaces above the second story are open to the atrium, supplemental air may be introduced at upper levels.


Atrium smoke-control system
Enclosure of Atriums
Enclosure of Atriums
67
The exhaust and supply system for the atrium shall operate automatically upon the actuation of the automatic sprinkler system within the atrium or areas open to the atrium or by the actuation of two or more smoke detectors required by this section.
The exhaust and supply equipment shall also be manually operable by controls designed for fire department use.
The smoke-control system may be separate or integrated with other air-handling systems. When the smoke-control mode is actuated, air-handling systems which would interfere with the smoke-control system shall be automatically shut down.
1715 (b) The atrium smoke-control system shall
exhaust the following quantities of air:
1. For atriums having a volume of not more than 600,000 cubic feet, including the volume of any levels not physically separated from the atrium, not less than 6 air changes per hour nor less than 40,000 cfm. A lesser cfm is acceptable if it can be shown by test that smoke will not migrate beyond the perimeter of the atrium.
2. For atriums having a volume of more than 600,000 cubic feet, including the volume of any levels not physically separated from the atrium, not less than 4 air changes per hour.
1715 (c) Atriums shall be separated from
adjacent spaces by not less than 1-hour fire-resistive construction.
Exception:
** Open exit balconies are permitted within the atrium.
1715 (c) Openings in the atrium enclosure other
than fixed glazing shall be protected by tight-fitting doors which are maintained automatic closing by


Enclosure of Atri urns
Atrium Exit Travel Distance
68
actuation of a smoke detector, or self-closi ng.
Fixed glazed openings in the atrium enclosure shall be equipped with fire windows having a fire-resistive rating of not less than 3/4-hour, and the total area of such openings shall not exceed 25% of the area of the common wall between the atrium and the room into which the opening is provided.
Excepti on:
2. In occupancies other than Group R, Division 1, the tenant space may be separated from the atrium by a wired, tempered or laminated glass wall, subject to the following:
A. The glass be protected by a sprinkler system equipped with 135°F. heads. The sprinkler system shall completely wet the entire surface of the glass wall when actuated. Where there are walking surfaces on both sides of the glass, both sides of the glass shall be so protected.
B. The glass shall be in a gasketed frame so installed that the glazing system may deflect without breaking (loading) the glass before the sprinkler system operates.
C. Obstructions such as curtain rods, drapery traverse rods, curtains, drapes or similar materials, shall not be installed between the sprinkler and the glass.
1715 (c) The separation between the tenant
space and the atrium as specified within Exception 2 may be omitted on a maximum of 3 floor levels, provided the remaining floor levels are separated as specified herein.
1715 (d) When a required exit enters the atrium
space, the travel distance from the doorway of the tenant space to an enclosed stairway, horizontal exit, exterior door or exit passageway shall not exceed 100 feet.


69
Atrium Occupancy 1715 (f)
Separation
Exception
Standby Power 1715 (g)
Atrium Opening Table 17-B And Area
Fire resistive Table 17-A requi rements for building elements
The vertical portion of the occupancy separation which is adjacent to the atrium may be omitted between a Group B, Division 2 Occupancy office or sales area.
The smoke-control system for the atrium and the smoke-control system for the tenant space are to be provided with standby power as required in Section 1807 (i).
3-4 stories in height require a minimum area of 400 sq. ft. and a minimum clear opening of 20 feet (the latter dimension being the diameter of an inscribed circle whose center falls on a common axis for the full height of the atrium).
Exterior bearing walls............4 hour
Interior bearing walls............3 hour
Exterior nonbearing walls.........4 hour
Structural frame..................3 hour
Permanent partitions..............1 hour
Shaft enclosures..................2 hour
Floors............................2 hour
Roofs.............................2 hour
Fire resistive requi rement
Seismic Risk
Design wind speed
Design floor live load
1803 (a) Exterior nonbearing walls may be of
one-hour construction where unprotected openings are permitted and two-hour construction where fire protection of openings is required.
Fig 1, Chp 23 Seismic zone 1 which is minor risk of damage; distant earthquakes may cause damage to structures with fundamental periods greater than 1.0 second; corresponds to intensities V and VI of the Modified Mercalli Scale of 1931.
Fig 4, Chp 23 Fastest mile speed recorded at 33 feet above ground is 80 miles per hour and of associated with an annual probability of 0.02.
Table 23-A 50 psf Uniform load.
2000 lb Concentrated load placed upon 2304 (c) any 2 1/2 feet square otherwise
unloaded floor which would produce stresses greater than those caused by


70
Design roof live load
Partition loads
Snow loads
Occupancy load factor
Determination of occupancy load
Exits required
Width of fire exits
the uniform load required therefor.
Table 23-C For roof with a rise of less than 4 inches per foot; Method 1 requires for a tributary area for any structural member:
0-200 s.f. = 20 psf 201-600 s.f. = 16 psf over 600 s.f. = 12 psf
2304 (d) Add an additional 20 psf uniform load to all other loads.
2305 (d) 30 psf (determined locally).
Table 33-A Offices = 100 s.f. per person.
3302 (a) All portions of the building shall be presumed to be occupied at the same time.
Table 33-A 3303 (a) 2 exits minimum required (other than elevators) where there are at least 30 occupants. The number of exits required from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows:
1. 50% of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and below, when said story below exits through the level under consideration.
2. 25% of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story.
The maximum number of exits required for any story shall be maintained until egress is provided from the structure.
3303 (b) To determine the total width of exits in feet take the total occupant load served and divide it by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits.


Arrangement
exits
Distance to exits
71
The total exit width required from any story of a building shall be determined using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of the floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows:
G
1. 50% of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and below, when a story below exits through the level under consideration.
2. 25% of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story.
The maximum exit width required from any story of a building shall be maintained.
3304 (e) In computing the exit width required
the net dimension of the exitway shall be used.
of 3303 (c) If only 2 exits are required, they
shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than 1/2 of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exits.
Exception:
** When exit enclosures are provided as a portion of the required exit and are interconnected by a corridor conforming to the requirements for corridor construction the exit separations may be measured along a direct line of travel within the exit corridor. Enclosure walls shall be not less than 30 feet apart at any point in a direct line of measurement.
When three or more exits are required, they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked the others will be available.
3303 (d) The maximum distance of travel from
any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building shall not exceed 150 feet.


Exits through adjoining rooms
Exit door swing
Exit door width & height
Exit door leaf width
Exit special doors
Floor level at
3303 (e)
3304 (b)
3304 (e)
3304 (f) 3304 (g) 3304 (h)
72
Said distance may be increased to 200 feet if the building is equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout.
These distances may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within a corridor, complying with t requirements for exit corridors.
Rooms may have one exit through an adjoining or intervening room which provides a direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor, exit enclosure or until egress is provided from the building, provided the total distance of travel does not exceed that permitted by other provisions.
Exits shall not pass through store rooms, rest rooms, closets or spaces used for similar purposes.
Exit doors shall swing in the direction of exit travel when serving an area having an occupant load of 50 or more.
Double-acting doors shall not be used as exits when any of the following conditions exist:
1. The occupant load served by the door is 100 or more.
2. The door is part of a fire assembly.
3. The door is part of a smoke- and draft-control assembly.
4. Panic hardware is required or provided on the door.
Every exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and 6 feet 8 inches in height.
A single leaf of an exit door shall not exceed 4 feet in width.
Revolving, sliding and overhead doors shall not be used as required exits.
Regardless of the occupant load, there


73
doors
Additional doors
Corridor width
Corridor height
Corri dor projections
3304 (j)
3305 (b) 3305 (c)
3305 (d)
shall be a floor or landing on each side of a door.
The floor or landing shall be not more than 1/2 inch lower than the threshold of the doorway.
When doors open over landings, the landing shall have a length of not less than than 5 feet.
Exception:
** When the door opens into a stair of a smokeproof enclosure, the landing need not have a length of 5 feet.
When additional doors are provided for egress purposes, they shall conform to all provisions for exits and corri dors.
Exception:
** Approved revolving doors having leaves which will collapse under opposing pressures may be used in exit situations, provided:
1. Such doors have a minimum width of 6 feet 6 inches.
2. At least one conforming exit door is located adjacent to each revolving door.
3. The revolving door shall not be considered to provide any exit width.
Every corridor serving an occupant load of 10 or more shall not be less 44 inches in width.
Corridors shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
The required width of corridors shall be unobstructed.
Excepti on:
** Handrails and doors, when fully opened, shall not reduce the required width by more than 7 inches.
Doors in any position shall not reduce


74
the required width by more than one half.
Access to exits 3305 (e)
Changes in 3305 (f)
elevation
Construction of 3305 (g) wal 1 s
Construction of 3305 (g) ceilings
Door openings 3305 (h) 1
Openings other 3305 (h) 2 than doors
Other nonstructural projections such as trim and similar decorative features may project into the required width 1 1/2 inches on each si de.
When more than one exit is required, they shall be so arranged that it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for dead ends not exceeding 20 feet in length.
When a corridor is accessible to the handicapped, changes in elevation of the floor shall be made by means of a ramp, except as provided for doors previously in Section 3304 (h).
Walls of corridors serving areas having an occupant load of 30 or more shall be of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
Ceilings serving said areas shall be not less than that required for one-hour fire-resistive floor and roof system.
When corridor walls are required to be of one-hour fire-resistive construction, every door opening shall be protected by a tight-fitting smoke- and draft-control assembly having a fire-protection rating of not less than 20 minutes when teste in accordance with U.B.C. Standard No. 43-2 without the hose stream test.
Interior openings for other than doors or ducts shall be protected by fixed, approved 1/4 inch-thick wired glass installed in steel frames.
The total area of all openings, other than doors, in any portion of an interior corridor shall not exceed 25% of the area of the corridor wall of the room which it is separating from the corridor.
For duct openings refer to Section


4306
75
Stairway width
Stair rise and run
Stair landings
3306 (b) Stairways serving an occupant load of
50 or more shall be not less than 44 inches in width.
Stairways serving an occupant load of 49 or less shall be not less than 36 inches in width.
Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 shall be not less than 30 inches in width.
Handrails may project into the required width a distance of 3 1/2 inches from side of the stairway.
Other nonstructural projections such as trim and similar decorative features may project into the required width 1 1/2 inches on each side.
3306 (c) The rise of every step in a stairway
shall be not less than 4 inches nor greater than 7 1/2 inches.
The run shall be not less than 10 inches as measured horizontally between the vertical planes of the furthermost projection of adjacent treads.
The largest tread run within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch.
The greatest riser height within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch.
Exceptions:
1. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 and stairways to unoccupied roofs may be constructed with an 8-inch maximum rise and 9-inch minimum run.
2. Where the bottom riser adjoins a sloping public way, walk or driveway having an established grade and serving as a landing, a variation in height of the bottom riser of not more than 3 inches in every 3 feet of stairway is permitted.
3306 (g) Every landing shall have a dimension
measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 feet when the stair has a straight run.


Distance between 3306 (i) 1andi ngs
Handrails 3306 (j)
Exterior stairway 3306 (1) protection
Interior stairway 3306 (m) construction
76
A door swinging over a landing shall not reduce the width of the landing to less than 1/2 its required width at any position in its swing nor by more than 7 inches when fully open.
Exception:
** Stairs serving an unoccupied roof are exempt from these provisions.
There shall not be more than 12 feet vertically between landings.
Stairways shall have handrails on each si de.
Handrails shall be placed not less than 30 inches nor more than 34 inches above the nosing of treads.
They shall be continuous the full length of the stairs and except for private stairways at least one handrail shall extend not less than 6 inches beyond the top and bottom ri sens.
Ends shall be returned or shall terminate in newel posts or safety termi nals.
The handgrip portion of handrails shall be not less than 1 1/4 inches nor more than 2 inches in cross-sectional dimension or the shape shall provide an equivalent gripping surface.
Handrails projecting from a wall shall have a space of not less than 1 1/2 inches between the wall and the handrai1.
All openings in the exterior wall below or within 10 feet, measured horizontally, of an exterior exit stairway serving a building over 2 stories in height shall be protected by a self-closing fire assembly having a 3/4-hour fire-protection rati ng.
Interior stairways shall be constructed as previously specified. All required interior stairways which extend to the top floor in any building 4 or more stories in height shall have, at the highest point of


Stairway to roof Stairway headroom
Ramps
Ramp width Ramp slope
Ramp landings
the stair shaft, an approved hatch openable to the exterior not less than 16 square feet in area with a minimum dimension of 2 feet.
3306 (o)
3306 (p)
Table 33-A
3307 (b) 3307 (c)
Excepti on:
** The hatch need not be provided on smokeproof enclosures or on stairways that extend to the roof with an opening onto that roof.
In every building 4 or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface, unless the roof has a slope greater than 4 in 12.
Every stairway shall have a headroom clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches.
Such clearances shall be measured vertically from a plane parallel and tangent to the stairway tread nosing to the soffit above at all points.
Access by means of a ramp must be provided for the physically handicapped to the floor closest to grade.
The width of ramps shall be as required for stairways.
The slope of ramps required by Table 33-A shall be not steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal.
The slope of other ramps shall be not steeper than 1 vertical to 8 hori zontal.
3307 (d) Ramps having slopes steeper than 1
vertical to 15 horizontal shall have landings at the top and bottom, and at least one intermediate landing shall be provided for each 5 feet of rise. Top landings and intermediate landings shall have a dimension measured in the direction of ramp run of not less than 5 feet.
Landings at the bottom of ramps shall have a dimension in the direction of ramp run of not less than 6 feet.
Doors in any position shall not reduce the minimum dimension of the landing


Ramp handrails 3307 (e)
Ramp 3307 (f)
construct!' on
Horizontal exit 3308 (a)
Horizontal exit 3308 (b) openings
Horizontal exit 3308 (c) discharge areas
Stairway, Ramp & 3309 (b)
escalator enclosure construction
Openings into 3309 (c) enclosures
to less than 42 inches and shall not reduce the required width by more than 3 1/2 inches when fully open.
Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have handrails as required for stairways, except that intermediate handrails shall not be required.
Ramps shall be constructed as required for stairways.
A horizontal exit may be considered as a required exit when conforming to the provisions of Chapter 33.
A horizontal exit shall not serve as the only exit from a portion of a building, and when 2 or more exits are required, not more than 1/2 of the or total number of exits or total exit width may be horizontal exits.
All openings in the 2-hour fire-resistive wall which provides a horizontal exit shall be protected by a fire assembly having fire-protection rating of not less than 1 1/2 hours.
Such fire assembly shall be automatic closing as provided in Section 4306 (b) upon actuation of a smoke detector.
A horizontal exit shall lead into a floor area having capacity for an occupant load not less than the occupant load served by such exit.
The capacity shall be determined by allowing 3 square feet of net clear floor area per ambulatory occupant and 30 square feet per nonambulatory occupant.
Enclosure walls shall be of not less than 2-hour fire-resistive construction in buildings more than 4 stories in height.
There shall be no openings into exit enclosures except exit doorways and openings in exterior walls.
All exit doors in an exit enclosure shall be protected by a fire assembly


79
Extent of end osure
Barri er
Use of space under stair
Exit courts Exit court width
3309 (d)
3309 (e)
3309 (f)
3311 (a) 3311 (b)
having a fire-protection rating of not less than 1-hour where 1-hour shaft construction is permitted and 1 1/2 hours where 2-hour shaft shaft construction is required.
Doors shall be maintained self-closing or shall be automatic closing by actuation of a smoke detector as provided for in Section 4306 (b).
Stairway and ramp enclosures shall include landings and parts of floors connecting stairway flights and shall also include a corridor on the ground floor leading from the stairway to the exterior of the building.
Enclosed corridors or passageways are not required from unenclosed stai rways.
Every opening into the corridor shall comply with the requirements of Section 3309 (c).
Excepti on:
** In office buildings classed as a Group B, Division 2 Occupancy, a maximum of 50% of the exits may discharge through a street-floor lobby, provided the required exit width is free and unobstructed an the entire street floor is protected with an automatic sprinkler system.
A stairway in an exit enclosure shall not continue below the grade level exit unless an approved barrier is provided at the ground-floor level to prevent persons from accidentally continuing into the basement.
There shall be no enclosed usable space under stairways in an exit enclosure, nor shall the open space under such stairways be used for any purpose.
Every exit court shall discharge into a public way or exit passageway.
Exit court minimum widths shall be determined in accordance with provisions of Section 3303 based on the occupant load and such required


80
Number of exits 3311 (c)
Exit court 3311 (d)
construction &
openings
Exit passageway 3312 (a) construction
Detailed require- 3312 (b) ments
Exit illumination 3313 (a)
width shall be unobstructed to a height of 7 feet, except for projections permitted in corridors by Section 3305.
The minimum exit court width shall be not less than 44 inches.
When the width is reduced from any cause, the reduction shall be affected gradually by a guardrail at least 3 feet in height and making an angle of not more than 30 degrees with the axis of the exit court.
Every exit court shall be provided with exits as determined by Section 3303.
When an exit court serving a building or portion thereof having an occupant load of 10 or more is less than 10 feet in width, the exit court walls shall be a minimum of 1-hour fire-resistive construction for a distance of 10 feet above the floor of the court, and all openings therein shall be protected by fire assemblies having a fire-protection rating of not less than 3/4 hour.
The walls of exit passageways shall be without openings other than the required exits and shall have walls, floors and ceilings of the same period of fire resistance as required for the walls, floors and ceilings of the building served with a minimum of 1-hour fire resistive construction. Exit openings through the enclosing walls of exit passageways shall be protected by fire assemblies having a 3/4-hour fire-protection rating.
Except for construction and opening protection as specified in Subsection (a) above, exit passageways shall comply with the requirements for corridors as specified in Section 3305.
Exits shall be illuminated at any time the building is occupied with light having intensity of not less than 1 footcandle at floor level.
Fixtures required for exit


81
Exit illumination 3313 (b) 1 power supply Separate branch ci rcuits
Exit illumination 3313 (b) 2 power supply Separate sources of power
Exit signs 3314 (a)
Skylights 3401
illumination shall be supplied from separate circuits or sources of power where these are required by Subsection (b).
The power supply for exit illumination shall be provided by 2 separate branch circuits of the normal premises wiring system, unless an emergency system is installed, where the occupant load served by the exiting system exceeds 300.
One of the required circuits shall supply only fixtures used for exit illumination or exit signs.
The other circuit may supply current to other outlets.
The power supply for exit illumination shall normally be provided by the premises wiring system.
In the event of its failure, illumination shall be automatically provided from an emergency system where the occupant load served by the exiting system exceeds 500.
Emergency systems shall be supplied from storage batteries or an on-site generator set and the system shall be installed in accordance with the requiremnets of the Electrical Code.
Exit signs shall be installed at required exit doorways and where otherwise necessary to clearly indicate the direction of egress when the exit serves an occupant load of 50 or more.
Excepti on:
** Main exterior exit doors which obviously and clearly are identifiable as exits need not be signed when approved by the building official.
All skylight frames shall be constructed of noncombustible materi al s.
All skylights shall be designed to carry all tributary roof loads as specified in Section 2305.
All skylights, the glazing of which is set at an angle of less than 45


Penthouse and roof structures
Penthouse area
Prohibited uses of penthouses
Penthouse constructi on
3601 (a) 3601 (b)
3601 (c)
3601 (d)
82
degrees from the horizontal, shall be mounted at least 4 inches above the plane of the roof on a curb constructed as required for the frame.
No penthouse or other projection above the roof shall exceed 12 feet in height above the roof.
The aggregate area of all penthouses and other roof structures shall not exceed 33 1/3% of the area of supporting roof.
No penthouse, bulkhead or any other similar projection above the roof shall be used for purposes other than shelter of mechanical equipment or shelter of vertical shaft openings in the roof.
Roof structures shall be constructed with walls, floors and roof as required for the main portion of the building.
Exceptions:
1. On type 1 buildings, the exterior walls and roofs of penthouses which are 5 feet or more from an adjacent property line may be of 1-hour fire-resistive noncombustible construction.
2. Enclosures housing only mechanical equipment and located at least 20 feet from adjacent property lines may be of unprotected noncombustible constructi on.


PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS


84
PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS
The governing plumbing code is the 1982 edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code.
Topic________________Section Ref_____Description_____________________
Plumbing fixtures 910
requi red
Plumbing fixtures Appendix C
requi red
Where local codes do not indicate the number of plumbing fixtures required, use the minimums established in Appendix C of this code.
WATER CLOSETS (fixtures/persons) Male Female
1 : 1-15 1 : 1-15
2 : 16-35 2 : 16-35
3 : 36-55 3 : 36-55
Over 55 add 1 fixture for each
additional 40 persons.
URINALS (fixtures/persons)
1 : 50
LAVATORIES (fixtures/persons) Male Female
1 : 40 1 : 40
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 1 : 75
There shall be a minimum of 1 drinking fountain per occupied floor.


MECHANICAL INFORMATION


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The information here is extracted from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. Standard No. 62-73 which is the standards for Natural and Mechanical Ventilation. ASHRAE Standard No. 62-73 is dated February, 16, 1973.
Space Utilization
Estimated
persons/
1000 sq. ft. floor
area. Use Required ventilation air,
only when cubic feet per minute per
design oc- human occupant
cupancy is
not known Minimum Recommended
General Office Space 10 15 15-25
Conference Rooms 60 25 30-40
Drafting Rooms, Art Rooms 20 7 10-15
Diazo Printing Rooms 20 7 10-15
Computer Rooms 20 5 7-10
Keypunching Rooms 30 7 10-15
Public Rest Rooms * 100 15 20-25
* A prominant local mechanical engineering firm uses 2 cfm/sq.


GEOTECHNICAL ANALYSIS


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SOIL AND FOUNDATION INVESTIGATION PROPOSED KKBNA OFFICE BUILDING NORTH KIPLING STREET AT • CLEAR CREEK JEFFERSON COUNTY, COLORADO
Prepared for:
KKBNA
7456 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80226
Job No. 20,331
May 2, 1980


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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONCLUSIONS 83
SCOPE 83
PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION 83
SITE CONDITIONS 83
SUBSOIL CONDITIONS 84
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS 86
FLOOR SLABS 87
UNDERDRAIN SYSTEM 88
SURFACE DRAINAGE 88
PAVEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS 89
MISCELLANEOUS 90
FIG. 24 - LOCATION OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 91
FIGS. 25 and 26 - LOGS OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 92
FIGS. 27 through 29 - SWELL-CONSOLIDATION TEST RESULTS 94 FIGS. 30 through 33 - GRADATION TEST RESULTS 97
TABLE 1 - SUMMARY OF LABORATORY TEST RESULTS 101


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CONCLUSIONS
(1) The proposed office building should be founded with straight-
shaft piers drilled into bedrock designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of 40,000 psf.
(2) Existing fill at the site will require removal and compacted
replacement for floor slab and pavement support. Portions of the existing fill are suitable for reuse.
SCOPE
This report presentsthe results of a soil and foundation investigation for the proposed KKBNA office building to be located west of Kipling Street and north of Clear Creek, Jefferson County, Colorado. The report presents the recommended typr foundation, allowable bearing pressures, water table conditions and other soil-related design and construction details.
PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION
We understand that a 4 to 5-story office building will be constructed at the site. Specific building details, such as location, type construction, floor elevations and loads have not been finalized. Depending on the subsoil conditions, it is contemplated to construct a shallow basement floor for storage purposes.
SITE CONDITIONS
The site, at the time of our investigation, was vacant as was the adjoining property to the west and northwest. A single-story story residence is located north of the site along Kipling Street which borders the property on the east. Clear Creek is located


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directly north of the site and carried a considerable flow. As indicated by the site plan furnished, portions of the site are located within the flood plain of the creek. Regional slope in the area is down to the south and east. The ground surface at the site is comprised of two levels.
The western one-half appears to represent the original ground surface. This area is fairly flat and slopes gently down to the east with a maximum difference in elevation on the order of 2 feet. Elevation differential between this surface and Clear Creek is on the order of 4 feet. Fill placement in the western portion of the site has interrupted local drainage of this eastern sector, resulting in ponding and marshy conditions.
The eastern portion of the property, in which fill placement has been performed, is fairly flat and slopes gently down to the southeast. Maximum difference in elevation across the filled area is on the order of 2 feet with 4 to 10 feet of local relief observed along the moderately steep slopes on the west and adjacent to Clear Creek respectively. Numerous pieces of concrete, asphalt and other debris were observed scattered across the ground surface.
Vegetative cover at the site consists of weeds, grasses and diciduous trees.
SUBSOIL CONDITIONS
Subsoil conditions at the site were investigated by drilling 11 exploratory test holes within the proposed building areas. Three hand auger holes were drilled in the western portion of the site to


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determine subsoil conditions for pavement recommendations. The approximate locations of the test holes are shown on Fig. 1. Graphic logs are presented on Figs. 2 and 3. The subsoil conditions are quite erratic in regard to depth of fill, engineering properties, depth to bedrock and water table conditions.
Generally, the subsoils consist of 1 to 6 feet of man-placed fill overlying 0 to 3 feet of medium stiff, highly plastic clays and 0 to 6.5 feet of fairly clean sand and gravel. The sand and gravel stratum is medium dense to very dense and locally shows numerous cobbles. Interstratified claystone and sandstone bedrock occurs at depths 6.5 to 13 feet below the ground surface.
The fill sections encountered consisted of erratic mixtures of clay, silt and granular soils with small to considerable amounts of brick, asphalt, concrete and other debris. Standard penetration resistance testing performed in the fill also indicates erratic subsurface conditions.
Results of swel1-consolidation tests, presented on Figs. 4 through 6, indicate the upper clay is moderately to highly compressible under moderate loads. The claystone bedrock is slightly to moderately expansive while the sandstone bedrock will consolidate. Gradation analyses of the fill and underlying granular soils are presented on Figs. 7 through 10.
Free water was encountered in all the test holes at the time of drilling. The holes drilled in the building area showed water at depths of 6 to 14 feet, while water was encountered in the parking area


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holes at depths 0 to 2.5 feet. Stabilized water table is at approximate elevation 5355 feet.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
We have considered several foundation types for the proposed office building. In view of the erratic subsoil conditions and anticipated loads, we recommend straight-shaft piers drilled into bedrock for building support. The following design and construction details should be observed:
(1) Piers should be designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of
40.000 psf and a skin friction of 4,000 psf for that portion of pier in bedrock.
(2) All piers should be designed for a minimum dead load pressure of
10.000 psf based on pier end area only.
(3) All piers should penetrate a minimum of 6 feet into the unweathered bedrock.
(4) Piers should be adequately reinforced their full length to resist tension.
(5) Piers should be properly cleaned and dewatered prior to placement of concrete. Free water was encountered both in the overburden soils and the bedrock. In areas where water is encountered inthe granular overburden soil, casing of the pier hole may be required to prevent caving and facilitate concrete placement. Where water is encountered within bedrock,
pumping or other mechanical means may be required to dewater the pier holes. In no case should concrete be placed in more than


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6 inches of water. Considering overburden soils, water levels and bedrock hardness, a large capacity pier drilling rig is recommended. Some difficulty may be encountered in drilling through the cobbles. The driller should be aware of such possibility.
FLOOR SLABS
The man-placed fill encountered is not suitable for support of floor slabs. The construction of a shallow basement will remove much of the existing fill. We suggest that the basement be placed at approximate elevation 5360 feet. Consideration should be given to the flood plain elevation in the floor elevation selection. All existing fill beneath the slab should be removed and replaced witha compacted, nonexpansive, granular soil. The clay soils encountered are susceptible to pumping when subjected to repeated heavy loads such as excavating or compacting equipment. If such a situation occurs during construction, it will be necessary to remove any disturbed soil prior to fill or slab placement. Portions of the existing fill appear to be suitable for reuse as underslab fill. Material over 6 inches in diameter and any deleterious material should be removed prior to fill placement. Fill placed for floor slab support should be compacted to at least 95% standard Proctor density (ASTM D698) at or near optimum moisture content.
A minimum 4 inches of free draining gravel should be placed
beneath the slab.


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UNDERDRAIN SYSTEM
Considering the subsoil and water table conditions, we recommend that the lower floor be protected by an underdrain system. Seasonal water table fluctuations in this area anticipated to be on the order of 2 to 3 feet. The underdrain should consist of a drain tile installed in a gravel-fi11ed trench placed at least 2 feet below the lower floor slab sloped to a sump where water can be removed by pumping or suitable gravity outflow. In addition, several lateral drains will be required to shorten the flow path.
SURFACE DRAINAGE
The following drainage precautions should be observed during construction and maintained at all times after the buildings has been completed:
(1) Excessive wetting or drying of the foundation excavation should be avoided during construction.
(2) Backfill around the building should be moistened and compacted to at least 90% standard Proctor density.
(3) The ground surface surrounding the exterior of the building should be sloped to drain away from the building in all directions. A minimum slope of 6 inches in the first 10 feet is recommended.
(4) Roof downspouts and drains should discharge well beyond the limits of all backfi11.


Full Text

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PHASE II AT CLEAR CREEK OFFICE PARK WHEAT RIDGE, COLORADO An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the Requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture by Keith V . G. B. A., Brigham Young Un1versity, 1977 Fall Semester, 1984

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LIST OF ADVISORS Gary Long Davis Holder Curt Dale Major Faculty Advisor Faculty Advisor Design Advisor Partner -Anderson Architects

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CONTENTS List of Figures •• i v List of Tables ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• v Introduction..................................................... 1 Statement of the Problem ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3 Man Made Systems Natural Systems Analysis •• Analysis. 5 13 Climatological Data •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 21 Daylighting Data ••• Site Photographs ••••••••••••••••• 32 38 Site Boundary Information .•.•..•....................•............ 49 Zoning Ordinance Analysis. Building Plumbing Code Analysis •••• Code Analysis ••• 56 64 83 Mechanical Information ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 85 Geotechnical Analysis •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 87 Program ......•..•.••...•............................•....•....... 114 Bibliography ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 119 Design Solution •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 120

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Figure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 FIGURES Page Location Map.. • . • . • . . • . . . . . . . . . • • • • . • • . . • • . . . . • . . . . . . . . 6 Existing Land Use Plan ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 7 Existing Site Use Plan •• Adjacent Land Use Plan •• 8 9 Ci rcul ati on •...........•..........•.......•..•....•.... 10 Utilities •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ll Man Made Constraints Composite ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 12 Topography ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 14 Hydrology ••.•..•......•.•......•.••......•..•....••.... 15 Vegetation ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 16 Solar Exposure ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• !? Natural Systems Constraints Composite •••••••••••••••••• l8 On-Site Visual Quality ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• l9 Into Site Visual Quality ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 20 Heating and Cooling Chart •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 29 Solar Angles ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 30 Directed Weather ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 31 Location of Photographs Offsite •••••••••••••••••••••••• 39 Location of Photographs Onsite ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 44 Final Plat of Site ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 52 Lot One •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 53 Lot Two •••••••••••••••••••••• ••• 54 Lots Three and Four ••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••• 55

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Table 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 TABLES Page Mean and Extreme Temperature Summary ••••••••••••••••••• 25 Daily, Monthly, and Annual Precipitation Data •••••••••• 26 Mean and Extremes of Winds ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 27 Average Hourly Wind Speed and Direction •••••••••••••••• 28 Hourly Sunlight Availability ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 33 Sunlight Availability by Standard Work Year •••••••••••• 34 Sky Illuminance for Predicting Energy savings •••••••••• 35

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INTRODUCTION I This project shall involve the of a second building in a evelopment known as Clear Creek Office Park. The project is an actual •ne which is to be completed at some in the future, though iberties have been taken in order to create a more suitable thesis J roject. The initial phase, completed in the fall of 1982, was the •onstruction of a corporate office building to house the owner (KKBNA, ncorporated Consulting Engineers). That phase consisted of pproximately 85,000 gross square feet of office space with associated urface parking which tQgether utilize 3.24 of the site's total 8.03 cres. For the purpose of this thesis, the second phase shall be approached s though the present owner had sold the unimproved portion of said ' evelopment. This phase, therefore, shall include no work on that and used by KKBNA, Incorporated (ie: lots 3 and 4 of Kipling Ventures ubdivision). The site is in a rural setting, being within the city limits of heat Ridge, Colorado which is a west suburb of Denver. Located on a tream and a city greenbelt the site reflects the rural, natural theme f the expanding business center activity occuring west of Denver's entral business district. To better facilitate planning potential in this project I have lected to incorporate an adjacent parcel of land and define several ses to occur on the ground floor of the building. The parcel of land, ontaining 0.79 acre, is presently vacant and offers frontage on an rterial street, which would otherwise not be available. The uses to 1

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occur on the ground floor are: a bank, a restuarant, and office-support ret a i 1 space. 2

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STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM Though having separate owners and being separated by a street, the two phases are part of the same development. A strong central theme or parti, therefore, that will promote a single development identity is essential. Said identity should address the site and its rural surroundings. In the competitive field of leasing speculative office space, identity often plays a major role. The central theme chosen is water, both becuase of association and flexibility. Water has an obvious association with the development's name, Clear Creek Office Park and can be used in a variety of ways. Water together with landscaped open space will be the major vehicle through which the development is unified. All efforts to create said identity should be limited to the second phase site, though effecting both sites. Aside from minor landscaping alterations or additions other work on the KKBNA site is discouraged. Identity is one major issue. Another major issue is cost. Due to the added expense for raised parking, all parking should be surface parking. Having a zoning height limitation of 50 feet, this new structure will be limited to three or four floors. A concrete superstructure is a viable alternative within these .limits and money saved on the cost of the superstructure can be utilized for site improvements. Several issues arise at the programming stage. Due to site constraints, most of the offstreet parking will be separated from the structure by a street. The sequence of entrance becomes critical as a result. Several different uses are to occur at the ground floor, each 3

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of which requires identity and entrance. The major purpose of this phase two structure is office space and it should have one main entrance which is readily discernable. Aside from these issues are those related to the individual uses. As mentioned previously, the major use will be speculative office space. This space should be flexible. It should allow for various I tenant uses ranging from a single tenant to tenant divisions as small as 800 square feet. The bank is to be a branch office having a twenty-four-hour banking machine. This branch office is small and intended to service local non-commercial banking needs. The restaurant is intended to draw the business lunch crowd. Therefore the facility is sized to accomodate that anticipated volume. Its lunch menu will consist of sandwiches, specialty burgers, salads and possibly a small line of meat entrees. The dinner menu would offer a limited selection of meat and seafood entrees and salads, none of which would involve the preparation time nor the preparation facilities of a french cuisine. It is assumed that marketing research has indicated that sufficient office space exists within its expected marketing area to assure its success. The retail space is limited to office-support uses, which would include such uses as travel agencies, copy centers, office supplies, etc. There shall be three independent retail spaces, one of 1,500 gross square feet and two of 1,000 gross square feet. This constitutes the requirements for the design problem. The design solution should integrate these various parts into a single unified whole. 4

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MAN-MADE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

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FiGuRE 1 LOCATION MAP 6

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FIGURE 2 EXISTING LAND USE PLAN Residential-! Residential-2 11111111111111 Residential-3 Source of information: ..
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8 FIGURE 3 EXISTING SITE USE PLAN l W 44th AVENUE LEGEND -Existing Structure Parking Access Drive Grass Vacant Land Disturbed Natural

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9 FIGURE 4 ADJACENT LAND USE PLAN l W 44th AVENUE LEGEND Residential Grazing City Park Land Cornn e rc i a l

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W 44th AVENUE FIGURE 5 CIRCULATION fen w z ...J :lo:: LEGEND CJ Streets or Drives (!) z ...J a.. :lo:: l Equestrian I Pedestrian Path 10

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W 44th AVE UE ---------Water Line FIGURE 6 UTILITIES len w z ....J :X: LEGEND Sanitary Sewer Line 11 l Gas Line Storm Sewer Line

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FIGURE 7 MAN MADE CONTRAINTS COMPOSITE W 44th AVENUE LEGEND (!) z ...J a.. :.c l c===J Good Development Possibility c===J Future Drive 12 Deve 1 opment Possibility at More Cost • Existing Structure Development Possibility at Great Cost

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NATURAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

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FIGURE 8 TOPOGRAPHY W 44th uo DD 64 . AVENUE 14 l

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W 44th AVENUE FIGURE 9 HYDROLOGY 1(f) .............. \ • • ---. '\_ LEGEND (.? z ...J a.. ::.:: l Irrigation Ditch Swale -----I rri gati on Pipe Direction of Surface Drainage Limits of 100-Year Flood Plain 15

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FIGURE 10 VEGETATION W 4 4 t h AVENUE LEGEND I Parking I Deciduous Trees -I Evergreen Trees -Grass (!) z .....J a.. ::.::: Disturbed 16 l Ground Existing Structure

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W 44t h AVENUE FIGURE 11 SOLAR EXPOSURE LEGEND z ...J a.. :X:: l Excellent Solar Availability Moderate Solar Availability Poor Solar Availability 17

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18 FIGURE 12 NATURAL S YSTEMS CONSTRAINTS COMPOSITE l W 44th AVENUE LEGEND Good Development Possibility Moderate Development Possibility Poor Deve 1 opment Possibility -Existing Structure

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FIGURE 13 ON-SITE VISUAL QUALITY w. 44th AVENUE 0 50 100 200 LEGEND Good Moderate Poor Existing 19 l Visual Quality Visual Quality Visual Qua 1 ity Structure

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20 FIGURE 14 OFF-SITE LOOKING INTO SITE VISUAL QUALITY l W. 44th AVENUE 0 50 100 200 LEGEND Good Visual Qua 1 ity Moderate Visual Quality Poor Visual Qua 1 ity Existing Structure

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CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA

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22 NARRATIVE CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY The City of Wheat Ridge, Colorado is just west of Denver and is part of the greater Denver metropolitan area. Because the two are contiguous and its availability, climatological data for Denver will be used. Wheat Ridge enjoys much the same mild, sunny, semi-arid cliamte that prevails over much of the central Rocky Mountain region. The area•s climate is tempered by two phenomena, its proximity to the mountains and its altitude. During the cold part of the year it recieves few of the extremely cold mornings of the high elevations as well as escaping most of the hot summer afternoons at lower altitudes. Extremely hot or cold weather is usually of short duration. Air masses from at least four different souces influence the area•s weather: arctic air from Canada and Alaska; warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico; warm dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air modified its passage over coastal ranges and other mountains to the west. The good climate results largely from the area•s location at the foot of the east slope of the Rocky Mountains in the belt of the prevailing westerlies. During most summer afternoons cumuliform clouds so shade the area that temperatures of 90 or over are reached on an average of only 32 days of the year, and in only one year in five does the mercury very briefly reach the 100 mark • .In the cold season the high altitude and the location of the to the west combine to moderate temperatures. Invasions of /I cold from the north, intensified by the high altitude, can be abrupt

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23 and severe. On the other hand, many of the cold air masses that spread southward out of Canada over the plains never reach the area's altitude and move off over the lower plains to the east. Surges of cold air from the west are usually moderated in their descent down the esat face of the mountains, and chinooks resulting from some of these westerly flows often raise the temperature far above that normally to be expected at this latitude in the cold season. These conditions result in a tempering of winter cold to an average temperature above that of other cities situated at the same latitude. In spring when outbreaks of polar air are waning, they ae often met by moist currents from the Gulf of Mexico. The juxtiposition of these two currents produces the rainy season in the area, which reaches its peak in May. Situated a long distance from any moisture source, and separated from the Pacific source by several high mountain barriers, the area enjoys a low relative humidity, low average precipitation, and considerable sunshine. Spring is the wettest, cloudiest, and windiest season. Much of the 37% of the annual total precipitation that occurs in the spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier period of that season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mild sunny weather that remove previous snow cover. Summer precipitation (about 32% of the total), particularly in July and August, usually falls mainly from scattered local thundershowers during the afternoon and evening. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Clouds often form during early afternoon and cut off the sunshine at what would otherwise be the hottest part of the day. Many

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24 afternoons have a cooling shower. Autumn is the most pleasant season. Local summer thunderstorms are mostly over and invasions of cold air and severe weather are infrequent, so that there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are generally brief. Precipitation amounts to about 20% of the annual total. Winter has the least precipitation accumulation, only about 11% of the annual total, and almost all of its snow. Precipitation frequency, however, is higher than in autumn. There is also more cloudiness and the relative humidity averages higher than in autumn. Weather can be quite severe, but as a general rule the severity doesn't last long.

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TABLE 1 MEAN AND EXTREME TEMPERATURE SUMMARY (F) DENVER, COLORADO Daily Daily Monthly Record Month Maximum Minimum Mean High Jan 43.5 16.2 29.9 72 Feb 46.2 19.4 32.8 76 Mar 50.1 23.8 37.0 84 Apr 61.0 33.9 47.5 85 May 70.3 43.6 57.0 96 Jun 80.1 51.9 66.0 104 Jul 87.4 58.6 73.0 104 Aug 85.8 57.4 71.6 101 Sep 77.7 47.8 62.8 97 Oct 66.8 37.2 52.0 88 Nov 53.3 25.4 39.4 79 Dec 46.2 18.9 32.6 75 Annual 64.0 36.2 50.1 104 Normals based on the period 1941-1970 Data Source: Department of Commerce, 1981 25 Record Low -25 -30 -11 -2 22 30 43 41 20 3 -8 -18 -30

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26 TABLE 2 DAILY, MONTHLY, AND ANNUAL PRECIPITATION DATA (inches) DENVER, COLORADO Total Precipitation Snow Monthly Monthly 24-hou r 24-hou r Monthly Month Normal Maximum Minimum Maximum Maximum Maximum Jan o. 61 1.44 o. 01 1.02 12.4 23.7 Feb 0.67 1.66 0.01 1.01 9.8 18.3 Mar 1.21 2.89 0.13 1.48 16.3 29.2 Apr 1.93 4.17 0.03 3.25 17.3 28.3 May 2.64 7. 31 0.06 3.55 10.7 13.6 Jun 1.93 4.69 0.09 3.16 0.3 0.3 Jul 1. 78 6.41 0.17 2.42 0.0 0.0 Aug 1.29 5.85 0.06 3.43 0.0 o.o Sep 1.13 4.67 T 2.44 19.4 21.3 Oct 1.13 4.17 0.05 1.71 12.4 31.2 Nov 0.76 2.97 0.01 1.29 15.5 39.1 Dec 0.43 2.84 0.03 1.38 11.8 30.8 Total 15.51 7. 31 T 3.55 19.4 39.1 T Denotes a trace of precipitation Normal based on record for the peri ad 1941-1970 Data Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, 1981

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27 TABLE 3 MEAN AND EXTREMES OF WINDS DENVER, COLORADO Maximum Direction Month Mean Wind Prevailing Wind Speed Associ a ted with Speed (mph) Direction Recorded (mph) Maximim Ja n 8.9 s 53 N Feb 9.2 s 49 NW Mar 9.9 s 53 NW Apr 10.3 s 56 NW May 9.5 s 54 SE Jun 9.0 s 47 s Jul 8.5 s 56 sw Aug 8.2 s 42 sw Sep 8.1 s 47 NW Oct 8.1 s 45 NW Nov 8.5 s 48 w Dec 8.8 s 51 NE Annual 8.9 s 56 sw Data Source: u.s. Department of Commerce, 1981

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TABLE 4 AVERAGE HOURLY WIND SPEED (mph) DENVER, COLORADO Hountatn JAN FEB MAR APR HAY JUN JUL Standard Time Dtr 1 •Ph 2 Dlr •Ph Dlr •Ph D1r •ph Dir •ph D1r a ph D1r a ph AM 1 : 00 s 7.2 s 6.9 s 6.9 s 7.0 s 6.5 s 6 . 3 s . 6.3 2:00 s 7.2 s 6.9 s 6.9 s 6.8 s 6.3 s 6.1 s 6.1 3:00 s 7.2 s 6.9 s 6.8 s 6.8 s 6.0 s 5.9 s 5.7 4:00 s 7.2 s 6.8 s 6.8 s 6.7 s 5.8 s 5.7 s 5.4 5 : 00 s 7.2 s 6.7 s 6.8 s 6.5 s 5.7 s 5.5 s 5.2 6:00 s 7.3 s 6.8 s 6.8 s 6.5 S 5.7 s 5.3 s 5.1 7:00 s 7.5 s 6.8 s 6.9 s 6.6 s 5.7 s 5.3 s 5.0 8 :00 s 7.5 s 7.0 s 7.0 s 6.9 s 6.2 s 5.7 s 5.3 9 : 00 s 7.7 s 7.3 s 7.5 N 7.4 s 6.8 s 6 . 1 s 5.5 10: 00 s 7 . 7 s 7.6 s 8.0 N 8.0 H 7.6 H 6.7 H 5.9 11:00 s 8.0 s 8.2 H 8.7 HE 8.8 HE 8.3 HE 7.6 HE 6.5 12:00 s 8.3 HE 8.8 H 9.5 HE 9.4 HE 8.9 HE 8.3 HE 7.2 PH I :00 s 9.1 HE 9.5 HE 10.2 HE 10.2 HE 9.6 HE 9.1 HE 7.9 2 :00 HE 9 . 3 HE 10.0 H 10.7 HE 10.6 HE 10.3 HE 9.6 H 8.6 3:00 HE 9.5 HE 10.1 HE 11.0 HE 10.9 HE 10.6 HE 10.2 N 9 . 4 4 :00 N 9 . 1 HE 10.2 HE 11.2 HE II. 2 NW 10.8 HE 10.5 N 9 . 6 5 :00 HE 8.4 HE 9.7 NW 11.1 HE II .2 NE 10.8 N 10.5 H 9.7 6:00 NE 7.7 HE 8.3 N 10.1 N 10.6 HE 10.2 NE 10.1 SW 9.3 7:00 s 7.3 N 7.2 H 8.7 HE 9.3 HE 9.3 HE 9.1 s 8.5 8 00 s 7 .I s 6.7 H 7.8 N 8.4 HE 8.4 NW 8.0 s 7.1 9 00 s 7.1 s 6.9 s 7 .I SW 7.7 SW 7.7 s 7.3 s 7.2 10 00 s 7 .I s 6.8 s 6.9 s 7.4 s 7 .I s 6.8 s 6.8 11 00 s 7.2 s 6.8 s 6.9 s 7.1 s 6.8 s 6.7 s 6.7 12 00 7.1 s 6.9 s 6 . 9 s 7.0 s 6.7 s 6.5 s 6.5 1892 to 1930 1881 to 1950 Data Source: u.s. Weather Bureau AND DIRECTION AUG SEPT ocr D1r •Ph D1r •Ph D1r •Ph s 6.2 s 6.3 s 6.7 s 6.0 s 6.'3 s 6.5 s 5.9 s 6.1 s 6.5 s 5.6 s 6.0 s 6.4 s 5.5 s 6.0 s 6.5 s 5.3 s 5.9 s 6.6 s 5.1 s 5.9 s 6.6 s 5.0 s 5.6 s 6.4 s 5.1 s 5.7 s 6.4 HE 5.4 s 5.9 s 6.5 HE 6.3 HE 6.5 HE 7 .o HE 6.9 HE 7.1 HE 7.6 HE 7.7 HE 7.8 HE 8.2 HE 8.1 HE 8.1 HE 8.7 N 8.7 HE 8.6 HE 9.0 H 9.1 N 8.8 HE 8.8 N 9.3 HE 8.7 HE 8.5 NW 8.6 H 8.0 HE 7.5 SE 7.7 N 7.2 HE 6.7 s 7 .I s 6.7 s 6.3 s 6 . 6 s 6.3 s 6.4 s 6.6 s 6.4 s 6.6 s 6 . 4 s 6 . 5 s 6.8 s 6.3 s 6.3 s 6 . 8 NOV DEC Dtr mph Dtr s 7.0 s s 7.1 s s 7 .I s s 7.2 s s 7.3 s s 7.3 s s 7.4 s s 7.4 s s 7.4 s s 7.1 s s 7.4 s s 7.8 s HE 8.4 s HE 8.5 N HE 8 . 6 HE HE 8.5 N HE 7.7 N N 6.8 s s 6.4 s s 6.7 s s 7.0 s s 7.2 s s 7.1 s s 7.1 s a ph 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.7 7.9 8.1 8.6 8.7 8 . 7 8.3 7.6 7 .o 6.8 7.0 7 .I 7.2 7.3 7.2 ANNUAL D1r a ph s 6.7 s 6.6 s 6.5 s 6.4 s 6.4 s 6.4 s 6.4 s 6.5 s 6.7 s 7.0 HE 7.6 HE 8.2 HE 8.9 HE 9.3 HE 9.6 H E 9.7 HE 9.4 HE 8 . 7 HE 7.9 s 7.3 s 7.0 s 6.9 s 6.9 s 6 . 8 N o:>

PAGE 34

(f) >-<{ 0 w w a:: (!) w 0 (!) z ::::i 0 0 u LL. 0 I() CD II w (f) <{ m (f) 0 w w a:: (!) w 0 (!) z 1-<{ w :I: FIGURE 15 HEATING & COOLING CHART, DENVER COLORADO 200 NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS NORMAL COOLING DEGREE DAYS Data Source: U.S. Weather Bureau 1941-1970, Denver 29

PAGE 35

FIGURE 16 SOLAR ANGLES -DENVER, COLORADO co G) 0 ::3 120 105 9 o . o EAST Data Source : oo SOUTH bearing angles -w 0

PAGE 36

FIGURE 17 DIRECTED WEATHER DENVER, COLORADO 31

PAGE 37

DA YLIGHTING OAT A

PAGE 38

llllUII, SOLAR o6:uoo t:oo o t: oo-oo: oo ou:oo-o9:oo ou:uo-to:oo ro:oo-tt:oo II : llO-11 :00 t2:oo-tJ:oo t1:ou-ts:oo 15 100-tG:ou tli:0017 :00 11 1oo-to:oo M l iNIIIlY AVERAGE l \ u>lliiLV IllY I.VU . IIOUftS Of S UIIIIGIII PEn OAY (1111) fED MAR 0.000 0 .000 o .ooo o.ooo .116 .792 .621 .627 .805 • 732 .Btl • .670 .843 .715 .750 .on .0111 .711 .029 .OH .121 .709 .054 .730 .02!1 . "IIG .72G .031 .715 .704 ,13b .731 ,693 o .ooo .150 .679 u.ooo o.ooo o .ooo .71U .610 .774 .179 .610 .735 ' / ,11 7.3 ll. 3 TABLE 5 HOURLY SUNLIGHT AVAILABILITY DENVER, COLORADO APN ,339 ,754 • '/01 ,755 • '/58 ,764 ,760 ,734 .101 ,675 ,649 ,623 ,639 ,654 MAY .UJ6 .790 .804 .706 .792 .796 .758 • 71 ' / .604 .649 .627 .618 .618 . 7:14 .669 IO. J . .1U2 .790 .810 .Bill .811 .813 .UJ1 .794 .769 .7'14 .715 .694 • 111 .699 ,671 10 . 8 , U7!i .OU4 • 1111 .Oil ,U06 ,017 ,064 ,079 .814 .141 .641 .662 ,756 .79G ,013 .HO 11.!i AUil .3"/6 .823 .8H .830 .838 .791 .754 .752 .110 .711 .110 .:135 .717 • 713 10.0 SEP o .ooo .849 .831 ,846 .811 .866 .859 .061 .821 .797 .740 .774 o.ooo . 81!1 .746 !1.9 OCT NOll o .ooo .208 o.ooo .853 • .729 .860 .1<4!1 ,064. .7-44 .851 .764 ,847 .IIU ,852 .176 ,060 .763 ,054 .748 .065 .7H .855 .760 .276 o.ooo 0.000 o .ooo ,760 .7U .760 .721 11. 1 7.11 DEC o.ooo o .ooo .752 .798 .772 .784 .810 ,822 ,845 .878 ,861 .116 o.ooo o.ooo ... 4 .1114 1.1 AIWUAL FRACTION • 537 .872 .717 .7!17 .801 .815 .813 .799 .788 .764 .141 .723 .582 .448 AIINUAL HOURS 90,3 187.5 203. 5 290. 8 292.3 296.7 291.5 286.9 270. 7 270.3 263.8 162.4 82.0 w w

PAGE 39

STANDARD WOHI\ YEAR JAN fEB MAR 07:00-16 00 .705 ,644 .792 07:00-17 00 .700 .652 .703 07:00-10 00 .649 .610 .774 0 '1: 00-I 9 00 .599 ,564 .715 oo:oo-16 00 .764 .700 .792 00 00-17 00 .779 • 703 .782 Oil 00-111 00 .700 .653 • 7 '/3 00 00-19 00 .649 .598 .708 09 00-16 00 .1!04 .709 .790 09 00-17 00 .796 • 711 .719 09 00-10 00 .717 .655 .769 09 00-19 00 .652 .596 .699 TABLE 6 SUNLIGHT AVAILABILITY BY STANDARD WORK YEAR DENVER, COLORADO APR MAY JUN JUL AUQ SEP OCT .732 .758 .795 .843 .7UO .042 .799 .722 .746 .766 .an .702 .834 .804 .716 .735 .160 .821 .777 .829 .760 .678 .726 .774 .819 .743 .765 .702 .730 . • 753 .796 .037 .704 .842 . • 856 .719 .740 • 786 . • 820 .718 .832 . . • 856 .712 .729 .779 .814 .773 .027 .803 .672 .720 .772 .813 .736 .758 .736 .726 ,748 .794 .828 .779 .044 .an .715 . • 735 .783 .810 .773 .833 .856 .707 .723 .776 .804 .760 .827 .798 .663 .714 .769 .004 .728 .762 .726 ANNUAl NOV DEC (SA_S) ,683 .732 .760 .690 .740 .756 .632 .678 .730 ,584 .626 .691 . • 759 .814 .767 ,759 .814 .701 • 690 .740 .750 .632 .678 • 706 ,763 .821 • 789 .762 .821 .781 ,686 .739 • 747 ,624 .672 .700

PAGE 40

TABLE 7 SKY ILLUMINANCE FOR PREDICTING ENERGY SAVINGS UENVEA .co SKY CUIIUitiOtl OllllUIAIIOII co Cl C:l C3 ( 0700-lliOO I OllllCt CLEAII 1.01lfl02 -I. IO!IE -03 3.00!IE-OO -3.!167-13 C.UIUAL CLEAII tiUIIIII !1.70'/EtOI 6,40!1-04 -6.744-07 1.975-11 C.IIIIIAI: CLEAII 1. 202E t 02 -7.411-03 1.702-07 -1.35lf-12 lillliiAL Cl(AII USI/• -4.203-03 8 .016-011 -!>.071-13 GIIIIIAL CIAII St:/Sl" 1 .015 -1.91'/f-OJ 2.7Jlf-OO -2.61\lf-IJ GltiiiAl l:lfAII sou Ill 0 .!141 -3.706-04 -2.516-00 1.1100-13 Dill USE ClEAII Vfiiiii:Al 9 .1tiSEt01 3 . 7111 -03 -4.2U2E-OO 3.010-10 GIOIIAl OVfiiCASI VEIIIICAL 9 .4J2EIOI -1. -04 -5.296-07 1.591-11 GIOIIAL ClfAII 11011 IZUUIAL 0.65U(101 -4.043-05 -1.901-0Q I.OO!JE-Il OllfiiSf ClEA•I IIOIIIZDIIIAL 9,'/65[101 1,091-0l -I. 070-00 3.775-11 GLOIIAL OVEIICASt IIUIIIZOUIAL -4. 711>f-04 -I. 807f-07 3.436-12 ( 0700-1700 I UIIIECI CIEAII tllliiUAL 1.010Et02 -O.liUE-04 3.113-00 -3.40](-ll GIIIU4L CLEAII trOll Ill 9.!>111 -4.4411[-04 -5.3!15-07 1.596-11 GLOIIAL CLEAII U(/NW 1.165ft0l . 4'/bE-03 1.771-07 -1.410f-12 GLIIIIAL CLEAII fASI/IIESt 1 .061(102 -4.363-03 0.616-0U -IL40a-13 lilDIIAl ClEAII 5/511 11.!161(101 3.721-00 -].265-ll GIOIIAL ClfAII sou Ill 0.117"/EIOI -!I.G07f-04 -11.149(-09 6 .0!1JE-14 DiffUSE ClEAII VEIIIICAL 3.0JOE-Ol -4.040[-08 2.050[-10 GIOIIAL OVERCASt VEiliiCAl 11.2GictOI -2.577-03 -l.l54f-07 1.030-11 GLUIIAl CLEAII IIOIIIZIIII I Al 9.407 -2.1119-04 -1.7050Q 1.009-ll Oil FUSE Cl(AII IIOIIIZONIAL 1.515-0l -1.010(-00 l .li7JE-11 GlOOAl OVERCASt IIOIIIZUIJIAl 0,21HEtOI -1.546-03 -l.111f-01 2.225-12 ( 0700-1000 I llliiEC I ClEAR 9.615[101 -8 .15lf-04 2.509-0Q -2.909-13 GLOUAI. CLEAI . I 11011111 9. lUI 10 I -5.270-04 -4.9JOE-07 1.451-11 GIUUAl ClEAR IIE/1111 I.IOl -1.240-0] 1.149-01 -1.44lf-12 GlllOAl CLEAII USI/WEsr I. 004 -4.260E-Ol -6.367{-13 GI.OUAL CLEAII Sf/SH -1.356E-Ol 4.019-00 -3.411.iE-13 GLOIIAL ClfAII SOli Ill 8 .33lE101 -1.12lf-Ol -2.050-09 2.415-14 U I HUH Cl(AII VEHIICAl O .IOIIEIOI 2.014f-03 -l. U!llf-00 2.U9H-IO GIUIIAL V(ll II CAL O .UGI.i[IOI -3.1110E-OJ -2.JOif-07 7.311lf-ll GLOIIAL CLEAII I IIlii llOIH AL 9 .1l6EtOI -4. 31GE -114 7.3UIE-14 OIIIUSE ClfAII IIOIIIZOIIIAL O.IOUftOI 1.451f-Ol -0.9UOE-07 3.615[-11 GlOIIAL OV[IICASI IIOIIIZUIIIAI. 0.666EtOI -l.llllE-03 -0.204-011 ( 0700-1!100 ) CLEAR IIUIIMAL 0.!190(101 -0.]95-04 2.53!1E-OO -2.771-ll GIUIIAl Cl[Ail II() IIIII 0.652EIOI -1.006-0] -4. 129-07 1.2JH-II GIOIIAL CI(AII 11/tlll 1.020Et02 -6.70!1-03 I .621-07 -I.J40E-Il (;I UIIAL Cl [All EASI/WEST 0 ,29)(101 -].tl52f-03 7;051-011 -!i.910f-ll GIOIIAL Sf I 0.71UEtOI -2.104-0l l . 7GUE-OO -J.217E-Il GIOIIAL CLEAII sou Ill O ,GJSE101 -I.054f-Ol -l.IUH-09 I.UOJ(-14 Ill II USE Cl.(AII VEil I I CAl 0.612EIOI 1 .1UOE-Ol -3.101(-06 2 .635-IU Gl OUAI. OVEOCASI VfiiiiCAl O .OOOE10I -2.7110-0l -2.121-07 G.'/IIIE-12 GLCIIIAL I IIIII I ZOIIIAL 0.451[101 -4.13UE-04 -I .069-00 O.GJH-14 Dill USE ClfAII IIOIIIZIIIH Al 0 .li22E to I 0.!111-04 -0.710-07 3 .1G9E-11 GLOUAL OVEUCASt IIOIIIliiiiiAL 0,000 -I.G13E-Ol -7.64'/E-oo 1,41i6E-Il IIEAN 0/0 76010 104JJ 2 . 1!14 16024 3 .53U 2!1142 6. 1211 3U97l 0. l!lli 41732 0.716 4755 9420 54666 !;,748 8510 16700 716ll 100117 :1.20 I 15719 3.430 26910 IL U7l 35053 7.0H 311562 0.415 4503 11723 lii3JQ 5.&01 91G5 1453!1 67!127 97H 2.251 14514 3.371 24039 5,755 3JOJI 7.654 0.2211 4JIO UOlll 475li4 6.510 Olill 13361i 61790 !1019 2.280 131li) J,J7) 22\130 6 .74G 30500 1 .611 3l791 &.21:i 3!192 1403 4)917 5.502 7UUl 12330 11.\liiiUII !16311 1!18110 56096 73415 75UI4 711111] 81!11 10210 100]72 16594 30363 96JII IUOUO 560QQ 73415 751114 700U 8197 10210 100372 165!14 3036] !16311 20101 56098 13415 75014 7UII4J 0191 111210 100312 165U4 3031i3 !16311 20101 5GO!JG 73415 7tilll4 0197 10118 100372 30363 w U1

PAGE 41

UCilV II ,co lllU:AIIIAIIIOE 51\Y COIIIII I lOll on I Ull A liON co ( 111100-lllOO ) OIIIECI ClEAR IIOIIMAL I.OUIEIOl CIIHIAL ClEAII 11011111 UIIIIIAl Cl EAII 11(/1111 I.HH 102 CllliiAl CIEAII fASJ/WfSI I. I111E I 02 liiUIIAl Cl(AII S(/51 1 1.061iE oO:I CICIIIAL CIEAII suu Ill 1.002(101 lliii'USE I:LEAII VEIIIII:Al I.004fl01 CLUUAL OVEIICIISI VEIIIII:AL 8 .6'1'/EtOI ClUOAl CLEAII 11011120111Al 9.050(1111 OJrl USE ClEAII IIOIIIZUNIAl 1.004 CLOIIAL OVEIICASI IIOIIIlUHIAL 8.64'1EIOI OU00-1700 lllllfCI CIEAII 1.041(101 OIUIIAL CLfAII NO IIIII 0.7U1EIOI GIOIIIIl ClEAII Hf/1111 I. :IOJf I 01 CLOIIU CLEAII USI/WESI I.OU6fl01 CIOIIAL CIEAII Sf/SW I.Ol1Et01 CLOUAL CI(AII SOU III 0.911 011 fUSE ClEAR VEIIIICAL 9.71i5EIOI CIOIIAl OVfiiCASI VEUIICAL 0.431ftOI CIOIIAl CLHII IIOIIIZOtll Al 0 .650ftOI PH ruse CUAII 11011 llOIII Al 9.765 CLOIIAL UVEIICASI IIUUJZOIIIAL II. 437f10I ( 01100-IDOO ) OIIIECI CLEAR IIOIII.IAL U.061EIOI CIUIIAL ClfAII NUll Ill !l.l40Et01 CIOIIAL Cl\11 IIE/NW l.ll4E10l CIIIIIAL CLEAII USI/WESI I.OI\1[101 GLOUAl CLEAII St/511 9.6U6EtOI CIOIIAL CI.EAII sou Ill 9.340(101 DiffUSE CLEAII VfllliCAl CIOUAL OVEIIC ASI VEil I I CAl 0.71UIOI CIGOIIl ClfAII IIOUilUIII AL 9.263 Clfl\11 IIOIIIZONIAL 9.2fi,!)E101 ClUOAL OVEIICAST IIOIIIZOtll AL 11.77UIOI 01100-IUOO OllllCI Cl fAll 0. 164 I lilltiiAL ClfAII 11011111 U.t.UUtOI CLOUAl CLEAII tlf/IIW 1.04lE101 GlllltAL CHilli fASI/WESI 9.Jii5E161 CLOIIAL CLEAII SE/SW 0.!101(101 CI[AII sou Ill 0 .504 IIIII USE ClfAII VEil I I CAL O.Gll CliiiiAl OVEIICAST VEIIIICAl U.041EtOI CLUUAl ClfAII IIUIIIZOIIIAL 0.601 Oil FUSE CLEAH 11011 lONIAL O.llliEtOI GLDUAL OVEIICASI IIOIIIlOUIAL U.041f10I Cl Cl Cl .32fiE-03 4.650(-00 -4.656-13 I. 5U!IE-Ol -7. 11!15-07 l .l65E-II -U.060E-03 I. 04!Jf-07 -1.441E-Il -4.465[-03 0.300(-011 -5.!U2f-13 -:1.3!Jif-Ol 4. IU!JE-00 -3.1171(-13 3 .60JE-O I -4.5l!IE-00 3 .156[-ll 4.6!10(-0J -4. 511f-OO 3 .1111(-10 1 . 4311-03 -l.O!IOE-07 2. :un-11 I .170(-04 -2.31!JE-OO I.IIIH-13 2.3!.0[-03 -1.144( 4 .022[-11 O.UIE-04 -2.040(-07 4.11!14-12 . -1.109E-OJ 3.00!JE-OO -3.U6H-13 II. 40!1E-04 .744E-07 1.015E-II -U.095E-Ol 1 .920(-07 -1.554(-12 -4.615-03 0.!121(-00 -6.401(-13 -2.730-0J li.IJIE-00 -4.45'JE-IJ • -3.701iE-04 I .OOOE13 3 .701-0J -4 .111lf-OO 3 .010-10 -7 0 444-04 -5.JIIlf-07 I ;61JE-II -4.043(-05 -I.!IOIE-00 I.OO!IE-13 1.091-03 -1.010E-06 3. 775-1 I -4.46'1-04 •I. DJUE-07 3 .506(-ll -9.771-04 3 0 173-00 -3.317-13 4.4511-04 -6.111(07. 1.704-11 -7.Ul!I-OJ 1.911 E-07 -1.514(-12 -4.470-0l 8. OJOE-011 -6.363-13 -l. 751E-OJ li.J3UE-OO -6.111!1-04 -1.711-00 l .liOE-IJ 3 .5U1f-03 -4.lOH-06 3 .04)-10 -1.394-03 -4.151-07 I .14'/f-11 •l.U!IIIE-04 •I. J9l-OO 7 . 1144-14 I .7!13-03 -I.05lf-06 J .OuJ[-11 -0.364E-04 -1.4UU-D7 l.li93f-12 -0.7911-04 3.070[-00 -l.IUU-13 -1.!.3904 -5.146-01 1.510[-11 -1.:t0GE-Ol I .7GH-07 -1.454(-11 -4 0 127-0J 0.150-00 -5.076(-13 -l.54UE-03 .. 0 04'1 -00 -4.lOGE-13 -5.1i15E-04 I. 0'14-13 :1.311-03 -3.039-00 :1.64)(-10 -I. 27UE-OJ -3.U05E-07 l.l4lf-ll -2.013-04 -I .l4'/E-OO 1 .019-14 I. a55E-03 -9 0 0")7-07 3.J04-11 -7.6111E-04 -I .3'/0E-07 2 . 41iUE-12 &lUll G/11 80151 I0115(i l . 1116 3 . I J5 20150 5 . 61i0 40142 0.0113 45607 8.1114 1!Jii6 IU177 50736 6.014 11110 76010 104ll 2 . 194 144711 3.045 151101 5.4l6 31i594 7.6!15 41731 0.716 4755 !J4l5 54666 5.748 9510 15700 70500 10001 2.149 13343 3.000 13636 5.313 33440 7.519 )11119 0.5611 4440 115!14 50149 6.6411 110!17 14ll3 64794 !lll9 1 .156 11l42 :1.096 :11671 5 .305 30671 7 .506 34!153 6.654 40UG 711/0 460114 5.1ll!l U11J 131l!l MAJIUIUiol !IIlli I 111006 7l415 751114 7111141 lllH 111110 1003"11 165!J4 3036:1 91i311 111111111 !:1343!1 13415 751114 71111U 111!17 !OliO IOOl'/1 )Ul63 9631 I lOIIII 53419 73415 751114 7004l Ul!17 I IIllO 1003'12 165!14 311363 06311 201111 5JU9 73415 7111143 112n IUllll I 00312 lli5H J03Gl w m

PAGE 42

UUIV[II ,CD SKY COIIUI I IOU DRIEHIAIIOII co Cl C:l CJ MEAII G/0 MAliiMUU I 0900IGOO I DIIICCI ClfAII 1.097fl02 -1.57\IE-OJ 6.500E-OU -5.15!1-ll 010GJ !IGlll CillliiAL Cl[AII 111111111 U .UG1EIOI l.!i11E-OJ -B. SU!iE -07 l .J04f-ll 11142 2 .110 IU006 GIIJU4l ClEAII Hf/IIW 1.1JIE102 -7.91iOE-OJ 1.5G9E-07 0 .11H-IJ ll511 2.6GO 4]01] GIUUAl ClfAII EASI/WESI l.l!>lfo01 -5.145[-0J 1.041-07 -7.GGIE-IJ 14505 4 .010 li050l GIIJIIAl CL(AII SE/514 I.ODifoOl -1.7!1!.1(-0J 5.01JE-OO -4.l40E-IJ JU410 7.50U 75014 HHII SOUIH a.oau-04 3.3!>9EIJ 4U4l9 8.567 70U4l Ul llg vein r u a :liOU,::IC eee1 om GlUOAL OVfiiCASt \IEUIII!AL 10 I 3.26Ut-O 2.401-11 IGU02 111210 G l OIIAl CHAII IIOIIIlOIIIAL ll.lll1E 10 I J ,lli4E ,J70E-UO I.IOIE-13 &1101 1.003 100372 111 rrusE ClfAII IIOIIIZUIHAL 11.0111 I J ,511E-Ol I.206E-OO 4 ,610f•ll 10116 16594 GLIIOAL OV[IU;ASJ IIOIIIZOIIIAL ll.li31iEtOI 1.&55-03 •J,294E li.JI5E IU71 30363 01100-1'/00 OlllfCI ClEAII HOIIIAAL 1.051Et0l I.JIOE-OJ 4 .463[-08 -4.42GE-IJ 17150 06311 GIUIIAL CIEAII flU IIIII 9.1iJ!iftOI I.JOH-03 -7.115 -07 l ,003f.ll 10730 2.227 190110 GHIIIAl ClEAII NE/HW 1.1111Eo01 -O.I41E-Ol I .7HE-07 -I. 1!'>5E-11 125H 2.600 4JU1l GIOIIAL ClfAII USI/WEH 1.106E102 -5.371E-03 I. IO!l-07 -11.15JE-Il 12300 4 .620 60503 GIOIIAL ClfAII Sf/514 I. 040( I 02 -l. 119E-Ol 5 ,U&UE-OO -4.050f.•IJ 34714 7.205 75014 GllliiAl CLfAII SOUl II 9 . Gl!if tO I 2 .501-05 -3,040E-OO t .Ol!IE-13 430111 11.0115 701143 DiffUSE CLfAII VEIIIICAL o .Ul!JftOI 1i .755E-Ol -4.754E-08 3 .345-10 40111 OlH GIIJIIAL OVEIICASJ VEil I I CAl 9 .315EoOI & .307E-04 -6.1l4E-07 1.679E-II 11940 10210 GlOIIAL ClEAN IIOIIIlOIHAL 9.616E•OI 5. U51f-05 -I. OO!If -00 I.OOH-13 56049 1.900 100312 01 ffUS E ClfAII IIOIIIl 0111 A L 9 .G39EtOI 2 .017-0l -I.IOUE-06 4.101-11 9636 lti594 GliiOAL DVEIICASJ IIOAilONIAL 8.l15EtOI 3.704[-04 -2.241l-07 l.62H-U 16561 30363 ' 0900-1000 I DIIIECI ClEAN NOll MAL 9 ,0!11Et0 I -1.144-0J 3.090[-011 l.Uif-IJ 71153 96311 GUIIIAL ClEAII Nlllllll 9.131Et01 u.ossE-04 -8.341-01 1 .nuE-11 lOll& 2 .200 10101 GIU04L CLEAII HE/1111 I. IIGEt02 -7,9G!IE-03 1.051-07 -1.351[-12 I I 473 2 .564 4l01l GlOIIAL ClEAII EASf/WESJ J.Ol2Et02 -5. IDlE-OJ I.O!IIE-07 -8. 175-IJ 20169 4. !>30 G050l GUIUAL ClEAII Sf/SW 11.70GEtOI J.II!If-Ol I .IIJE-011 -4. 00UE -Il 31441 7.017 75014 Gl UIIAL ClfAII 51}11111 !l.005Eo01 -2.579-04 -2. 01JEOO 1.110E-Il l'J636 II.U59 701143 Dl I fUS E ClEAII VEIIIICAL 9 . 106EIOI 6 .343E-03 -4.615E-OG l .lJH-10 4414 Ul97 GllliiAL OVEIICASI VEIII J CAL 0 .5!Jijft01 -2.11JE-04 -4.704-07 1.15!1E II U914 IOliU GLO IIAl ClEAR 11011 llOIII AL O.ID3Et01 -1.256E-04 -I.J41f.OU 6 .751-14 lil1ll 5 .706 100311 Dlf fUSE CLEAII IIOIIIZO :i I AL O.IDGEtOI 2 .G72E-Ol -I.I!>GE-OG 4.171-11 11940 165'j4 GLOUAL OVEIICASI IIOIIIlOUIAL 0.5UGft01 -1.320-04 -1.71lE-07 :1.710E-12 14!157 30363 ' I OIIIECI CLEAII llOniJAL 0.120 -1.132-0:J 3.5JOE-OO -J.4!1JE-IJ 64180 9631 I GI UIIAL ClfAII NO IIIII U .!i3Jfo01 l .OllE-04 5 .1GH-07 1 .490[11 11351 2 .294 10101 GIUCAL ClfAII Hf/IIW 1.011Et01 -7.:104-0J 1.701-07 -I .150E-11 10441 2 .561 4JUI3 GIOIIAL CLEAII EASI/WEST 9 .404[101 -4. 73'/E-03 9 .00!1(-00 -7.4'jOf-IJ 10430 4.513 60503 GIIIUAL CLEAII SE/SW 0 .040Et01 -2.050E-OJ 5.615 -0U -4.505-13 211595 7.014 751114 GIIIOAL ClfAil SOUl II O .lllftOI -2.662-04 -1.031E-OII I .Ollf-IJ 311044 11.841 7UU4l DHfUS E ClEAII VfllriCAl 0.414EIOI J.71l2f-Ol -3.!167-06 :I.Ul5E-10 4017 Ul!17 G L OUAl OVEIICAST VEIIIICAl 7 .U15EoOI .011-04 -4. 34UE -Ol 1.145[-11 U150 !OliO GI O IIAl CIEAII lllllllliiiiiAL U .ll1E•OI -2 .l2le -04 I . IU O E -00 47091 6.176 IOOJ1l DlfiUH CLEAII IIIJIIIlUIIIAL 8 .414EIOI I . O!lt.if -Ol -9. !11'/E -07 l .6!14f-11 Ol:.i4 IG5H GLOUAL UVEIICASI II OIIIlOIII Al 1 .1liSftOI -1.20'/f-04 -1.51i6f-01 2 .41JEIl llSII1 30]6) w .......

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SITE PHOTOGRAPHS

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FIGURE 18 LOCATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN OFFSITE LOOKING INTO SITE W 44th AVENUE uo 1-(/) D D w z ..J DD ::.:: 50 0 100 200 -. . . ---__:!-===-39 l (.!) ..J a. ::.::

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40 Photogragh 1 Photogragh 2

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41 "::"'11...-Photograph 3 --... ---.--....... .::_'# Photograpgh 4

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42 Photograph 5 Photograph 6

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43 --------Photograph 7 Photograph 8

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W 44th AVENUE 200 FIGURE 19 LOCATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN ONSITE LOOKING OFFSITE len w z ...J 44 l

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45 Photograph 9 Photograph 10

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46 Photograph 11 Photograph 12

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47 ----

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48 . • . ... .. ..

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SITE BOUNDARY INFORMATION

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50 LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF SITE Commencing at the SE corner of the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 21, Township 3 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian; City of Wheat Ridge, County of Jefferson, State of Colorado; thence N 89' 52" E, 45.00 feet to the intersection of the west right-of-way line of Kipling Street and the south right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue, said point being the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; thence S 00'31" W, 345.59 feet along said west right-of-way line and parallel to the east line of said Section 21; thence departing said right-of-way lineN 89'55" W, 54.84 feet; thence S 33'02" E, 65.41 feet; thence N 60'25" W, 377.09 feet; thence S 68'22" W, 150.00 feet; thence N 84'38" W, 132.61 feet; thence N 00'45" W, 255.00 feet to a point on the south line of said NE 1/4; thence along said south lineS 89'15" W, 198.46 feet; thence departing said south line N 00'01" W, 210.00 feet; thence N 80'52" E, 68.86 feet; thence N 80'19" E, 108.96 feet; thence N 64'29" E, 54.25 feet; thence N 60'24" E, 90.25 feet; thence N 48'20" E, 86.42 feet; thence N 00'09" W, 189.90 feet more or less to a point on the south right-of-way line of West 44th Avenue; thence along said Mght-of-way lineS 89'57" E, 35.15 feet; thence departing said line s 00'31" w, 5.65 feet to the northwest corner of the Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1; thence S 00'31 W, 220.00 feet along the west line of said Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1 to the northwest corner of Lot 3 of said Subdivision; thence S 89'52" E, 222.50 feet along the north line of said Lot 3; th. ence S 00'31" W, 272.50 feet along the east line of said Lot 3 to a point on the north right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue; thence N 89'52" W, 222.50 feet

PAGE 56

to the southwest corner of said Kelly Subdivision Filing No. 1; thence S 00131" W, 50.00 feet along the west right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue; thence S 89152" E, 416.50 feet along the south right-of-way line of West 43rd Avenue to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; said parcel of land containing 8 .03 acres more or less. 51

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FIGURE 20 FINAL PLAT OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION WEST 44TH AVENUE U N P LATTED ZONED C 1 PllO ZONED A-i LEGEND "-I• "' ,_, "•I • ' ' .._-'''-" • _,._ • ll-U-a IIICI'fiCI JO ca..c....o l-O:.UUIC'1 _,. ua.u MnON .......,. .,..,. .. • ntlf t......n -wa ""'' """' t'OU ,.. • •t.e:ooru ...a. .. "'' .. 1000 '"'on ...... ,. .-,. ••w• _,. .. ,.,. .. ""• .,.,_...., w co-.-. 1ow:11 •-• ""-nM n .A&JI ftO. .-... ..._" • n. an•K.At..,. -LOTS 4 ZONED C-1 LOT 2 ZOt.ED C 1
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FIGURE 21 LOT 1 OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION I I I I I I I I I -., I ..: 1 "' I ., I I "' 1 N I I "ol S "' : 1 ' 131 , .... 1 I ;;; N l o I ';;;I I ol "' I ' c • ' .-. =-" J. c 1 . • . ; , ) 0 ;jLJ: . . :: J Nq. ZONED I I' I I I I LOT 1 .39 ACRES c-1 S tJ8 FiL_HJG LCT 3 (111 .,.,-----, I .-...! /' ", I I / \ I I VACATED PORTION \ I L __ 5 0 . co ' ' ZZZ .50' o ., ,.; .... N ;;; o 0 0 "' ZONED C-1 f
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FIGURE 22 LOT 2 OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION THE IRRIGATION D I TCH IS TO BE RELOCATED ONLY WITH THE APPRO.'AL CUELLETE IRR I GATION DITCH CO. ,--ZONED 1 I • • CENTERLINE OF OUELLET IRRIGATION OrTCH . I I 2 STREE T OEOICA TION C-1 I t .62 ACRES---------a N . . . 0 ., a t I I I I r--1 I .., "' ,..; a "' lt . ;;; a 0 a a "' "' ... "' "' "' ... a: .. ... ' E a: .. 54

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\ \ FIGURE 23 LOTS 3 AND 4 OF KIPLING VENTURES SUBDIVISION IJ.l .lf' LOTS 1,3, 4 ZONED C 1 LOT 2 ZONED C-1 and A 1 " > 0 a • &z• .. qe• "'. 150 00 4L•I3&n' Tl l 73,,4' CL •llZ.07' ..... " n TIUJ ,OINT 0' 8(G,H NON __________ 1 t(/ UTiliTY 8 Ofi! ..... AO( l r '-, LOT 4 I "'• "" o .ro """" I .... N I),O' >Z'W 1 .... 5S.H' I : w I ',, ' : M>z• ,.,.,.., .. w ' .. ;j;•.;,•o1 • n on 100 '"' SCAL[ 1• • SO' 45.00' S[ COlt KC II .. ... 0 . 0 U1 U1

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ZONING ORDINANCE ANALYSIS

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57 ZONING ORDINANCE The governing zoning ordinance is the upoated portions of the oning Ordinance for the City of Wheat Ridge, ' Colorado which is dated 15 February 1980. Lots 1, 3 and 4 are presently zoned C p mmercial-One (C-1). Lot 2 is presently zoned Commercial-One and Agricultural-One (A-1). That ortion of lot 2 which is presently zoned A-1 will be rezoned to C-1. opic uilding height rant setback ide setback ear setback ot coverage Fences, walls and hedges Parking Space u rfaci ng Parking islands Section Ref 18.C.1 18.D.3 18.D.4 18.D.5 18.D.6 18.F.1 27 .l.A.1 27 .l.A.2 27 .l.A.3 Description The maximum building height is 50 feet. The front setback shall be 50 feet. The side setback shall be 50 feet if adjacent to a dedicated public street, otherwise, there is none required. The rear setback shall be 10 feet for the first story and an additional 5 feet for each additional story thereafter. Not more than 85% of the gross lot area may be covered by structure or surfacing. That area not covered shall be landscaped. The maximum height of any fence, wall, hedge, or other structure is 42 inches when located within 55 feet of an intersection of street right-of-way 1 i nes. A parking space shall average 300 square feet including the area to be utilized for ingress and egress. Parking and driveway areas shall be surfaced with bituminous concrete or similar materials, unless otherwise approved by planning commission. All islands shall be landscaped.

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Access Curb cuts Parking buffer Lighting for parking Location of parking 27 .l.A.4 27 .l.A.5 27.1.A.6 27.1.A.7 27.1.A.8 58 Providing access to an arterial street may be required to provide acceleration and deceleration lanes. Vehicular access to any property shall be controlled in such a manner as to protect the traffic carrying capacity of the street upon which the property abuts as well as to protect the value of the adjacent property. Vehicular entrances or exits shall be spaced at not less than 100 foot intervals; or shall be spaced at not less than 50 feet to the centerline of any intersecting street or nearer than 25 feet to any adjacent property line, except where it is possible access point which will serve both adjacent properties or where adherence to these requirements would leave a parcel of property without vehicular access, in which case either or both of the setback requirements, or the spacing requirement may be reduced or enlarged so as to permit a single vehicular access point. Curb cuts shall not be more than 30 feet in width when serving an individual property or 45 feet when serving more than one property and sha 11 not in any instance be 1 ess than 12 feet. Whenever parking lot boundary as required adjoins property zoned for residential use, a landscaped buffer area of 15 feet from said lot line shall be required, or the planning commission may approve a decorative wall in li.eu of landscaping. Any lighting used to illuminate any off-street parking area shall be so arranged as reflect the light away from any adjoining residences located in a residential zoning district. The location of required off-street parking facilities shall be within 300 feet of the buildings they are intended to serve measured from the nearest point of the off-street parking facilities, and the nearest point of the building structure.

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Building additions Floor area Fractions Parking for the handicapped 27 .l.A.9 27.l.A.ll 27.l.A.14 27.1.A.17 A parking facility shall not be more than 600 feet from the use it is intended to serve. 59 Nothing in this section shall prevent the extension of, or an addition to, a building or structure into an existing parking area which is required for the original building or structure when the same amount of space taken by the extension or addition is provided by an enlargement of the existing parking area or an additional area within 300 feet of such building. In the case of offices, 11fl oar . area 11 shall mean the gross floor area used or intended to be used by tenants, or for service to the public as customers, patrons, or clients. It shall not include areas used principally for nonpublic purposes, such as storage, incidental repair, for show windows, for toilets or restrooms, for utilities. When units of measurements determining number of required parking spaces result in the requirement of a fractional space, any fraction shall require one parking space. Parking shall be provided for the handicapped at the rate of one per use, or two percent (2%) of the total parking spaces required, whichever is greater. Said spaces _ shall be a minimum of 11 feet in width and shall be appropriately marked with a free standing sign using the standard uniform words and/or symbols that signify the space as parking for the handicapped only. Said parking space shall be located as near to the entrance of the use as practically possible and shall be so designed (unless it is impossible to do so) that circulation between the vehicle and the building entrance shall not involve crossing any area used for vehicular The total number of spaces provided for the handicapped sha 11 be included

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Collective provision parking Off-street 1 oadi ng Off-street loading Number of offstreet parking spaces required Landscaping plan . Landscaped area requirements in the total number of parking spaces otherwise required by the ordinance. 60 27.1.A.18 Nothing shall be construed to prevent the collective provision of off-street parking facilities for two or more buildings or uses, provided that the total of such off-street parking spaces supplied collectively shall not be less than the sum of the requirements for the various uses computed separately. Plans for the construction of any such parking lot must be approved by the zoning administrator before construction is started. No such land shall be used for parking until approved by the zoning administrator. 27.1.B.2 Loading shall be provided at a rate deemed necessary by owner. 27.1.8.3 Loading spaces as required shall not be construed as supplying off-street parking space. Table 27.1.C Business and professional offices require 1.0 space per each 300 square feet of gross floor area. 27.2.B 27.C.1 Small retai 1 (less than 2,000 sq. ft.) requires 1.0 space per each 300 square feet of gross floor area. Drive-in banks require 4.0 spaces per each teller window. Drive-in restaurants require 1.0 space per each 100 square feet of gross floor area. A 1 andscape p 1 an is required to be submitted with the required Building Permit or development plan. Said plan shall be approved by the Director of Community Development in conjunction with the City Arborist. (The requirements of said plan are not included herein.) Any combination of two or more of the following: grass, flowers, shrubbery, deciduous and coniferous trees, which shall be maintained in an orderly

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Screening of parking Landscaping requirement 27.2.C.2 27.2.C.5 manner, and in addition, any combination of bark, rock, nonliving greenery, or ornamental object not exceeding 20% of the landscaped area may be used. in the event the nonliving area is to exceed 20%, approval must be obtained from the Planning Commission. In no event shall the nonliving landscaped area exceed 50% of the total 1 andscaped area. 61 The intent of this definition is not to waive any landscaping requirements, but to allow flexibility of welldesigned landscaped areas of living and nonliving materials. Coverage shall be determined for the projected growth after two full growing seasons. If the lot area used for parking is placed between the public right-of-way and the structure(s), a screening of the parking area shall be established between the right-of-way and the parking area. This view-obscuring screen shall be at least 36 inches but not to exceed 42 inches high and may be composed of live plantings, berms, or artificial structures as approved by the Planning Division. Landscaping shall be installed only on the property or portion of property to be developed or for which a building permit is applied. For properties with existing development, landscaping in addition to existing landscaping shall be required on a percentage basis determined either according to square footage added, remodeled, or altered, or value added to the premises by proposed improvements, whichever is higher, up to the maximum required for that district. Existing valuation and valuation of proposed changes sha 11 be based on Uniform Building Code valuation tables. In cases where lot development character makes it impossible to meet percentage requirements for any particular yard due to location of

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Landscaping 27.2.C.6 requ i rement Planting 27.2.D.3(a) requirement Planting 27.2.D.3(b) requirement Landscaped buffer 27.2.D.3(c) Required 27.2.D.3(d) 1 andscaped areas 62 structures or required parking, Plannning Commission may approve a transfer or waiver of the requirements of affected areas to other areas of the site, provided however that the general intent of the landscape section is met. Wherein the application of this ordinance would result in the loss of required parking spaces, the provisions of this subsection shall be waived by the Community Development Department without the necessity for a public hearing. Any a rea of the 1 ot not cove red by building, parking, walkways, or storage area, must be landscaped. Required within the landscape setbacks abutting public rights-of-way, one tree, deciduous or evergreen, for every 20 feet (or portion thereof) of street frontage. This should not be construed to mean trees placed 20 feet on center. In addition to trees required based upon public street frontage, one tree or other shrub is required for every 1,000 square feet of lot area. a 12 foot landscaped buffer is required where adjacent to a residentially zoned lot. This may be used to satisfy other landscaping requirements. required landscaped areas shall be as follows: (1) A minimum of 10% of any required yard (setback) not fronting a public street, if used for parking or surfacing, shall be landscaped. (2) A minimum of 5% of any required yard (setback) not fronting a public street, if not used for parking or surfacing, shall be landscaped. (3) Provided that all such landscaping shall not be 1 ess in total than 10% of the gross lot area.

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63 An area of not more than three feet of street right-of-way may be included in calculating the minimum 10% requirement if intended to be landscaped. (4) Nothing contained in this section shall prohibit any landowner from landscaping in excess of the minimum requirements stated herein.

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BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS

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65 BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS The governing building code is the 1982 edition of the Uniform Building Code. Topic Section Ref Occupancy type Table 5-A Type of Chp 18 canst ruction Fire resistance Table 5-A of exterior walls Openings in Table 5-A exterior walls Maximum height Table 5-D of building Access to 511 (a) water closets Toilet rooms 511 (a) Doorways to 511 (a) toi 1 et rooms Toi 1 et room 511 (a) 1 requirement Toilet room 511 (a) 2 requirement Description B-2, Office building. Type 1 construction. Fire resistance of exterior walls shall be 1 hour where less than 20 feet of separation between structures. Not permitted where less than 5 feet of separation. Must be protected where there is less than 10 feet of separation between structures. The maximum height of the building is unlimited. Each water c 1 oset stool sha 11 be located in a clear space not less than 30 inches wide and have a clear space in front of the stool of not less than 24 inches. One required for each sex per floor. All doorways leading to toilet rooms shall have a clear and unobstructed width of not less than 32 inches. A clear space of not less than 44 inches on each side of the doors which provide access to toilet rooms. Said distance shall be measured at right angles to the face of the door when in the closed position. Not more than one door may encroach into said 44 inch space. A clear space within the toilet room of sufficient size to inscribe a circle with a diameter of not less

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Toi 1 et room requirement Water fountains Atrium smokecontrol system 511 (a) 3 511 (c) 1715 (b) than 60 inches. Doors may encroach into said circle by not more than 12 inches when in any position. 66 For the handicapped a clear space of not less than 42 inches wide and 48 inches long in front of at least one water closet stool. No door shall encroach into space. When said water closet stool is within a compartment, entry to it shall be a clear width of: a) 32 inches when located at the end or b). 34 inches when located at the side. Except for door swing, a clear unobstructed access not less than 48 inches in width shall be provided to toilet compartments designed for use by the handicapped. Where water fountains are provided, at least one shall have a spout within 33 inches of the floor and shall have upfront, hand-operated controls. When fountains are located in an alcove, said alcove shall be not less than 32 inches in width. A mechanically operated air-handling system shall be installed that will exhaust smoke either entering or developing within the atrium. Exhaust openings sha 11 be 1 ocated in the ceiling or in a smoke trap area immediately adjacent to the ceiling of the atrium. Supply openings sized to provide a minimum of 50% of the exhaust volume shall be located at the lowest level of the atrium. When the height of the atrium is 55 feet or less, supply air may be introduced by gravity, provided smoke control is accomplished. In atriums where tenant spaces above the second story are open to the atrium, supplemental air may be introduced at upper levels.

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Atrium smokecant ro 1 system Enclosure of Atri urns Enclosure of At ri urns 1715 (b) 1715 (c) 1715 (c) 6 7 The exhaust and supply system for the atrium shall operate automatica l ly upon the actuation of the automatic sprinkler system within the atrium or areas open to the atrium or by the actuation of two or more smoke detectors required by this secti on. The exhaust and supply equipment shall also be manually operable by controls designed for fire department use. The smoke-control system may be separate or integrated with other air-handling systems. When the smoke-control mode is actuated, air-handling systems which would interfere with the smoke-contro l system shall be automatically shut down. The atrium smoke-control system shal l exhaust the following quantiti es o f air: 1. For atriums having a volume of not more than 600,000 cubic feet, including the volume of any levels not physically separated from the atrium, not less than 6 air changes per hour nor less than 40,000 cfm. A lesser cfm is acceptable i f it can be shown by test that smoke will not migrate beyond the perimeter of the atrium. 2. For atriums having a volume of more than 600,000 cubic feet, including the volume of any levels not physically separated from the atrium, not less than 4 air changes per hour. Atriums shall be separated from adjacent spaces by not less than 1-hour fire-resistive construction. Exception: ** Open exit balconies are permitted within the atrium. Openings in the atrium enclosure other than fixed glazing shall be protected by tight-fitting doors which are maintained automatic closing by

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Enclosure of Atri urns Atrium Exit Travel Distance 1715 (c) 1715 (d) actuation of a smoke detector, or self-closing. 68 Fixed glazed openings in the atrium enclosure shall be equipped with fire windows having a fire-resistive rating of not less than 3/4-hour, and the total area of such openings shall not exceed 25% of the area of the common wall between the atrium and the room into which the opening is provided. Exception: 2. In occupancies other than Group R, Division 1, the tenant space may be separated from the atrium by a wired, tempered or laminated glass wall, subject to the following: A. The glass be protected by a sprinkler system equipped with 135F. heads. The sprinkler system shall completely wet the entire surface of the glass wall when actuated. Where there are walking surfaces on both sides of the glass, both sides of the glass shall be so protected. B. The glass shall be in a gasketed frame so installed that the glazing system may deflect without breaking (loading) the glass before the sprinkler system operates. C. Obstructions such as curtain rods, drapery traverse rods, curtains, drapes or similar materials, shall not be installed between the sprinkler and the glass. The separation between the tenant space and the atrium as specified within Exception 2 may be omitted on a maximum of 3 floor levels, provided the remaining floor levels are separated as specified herein. When a required exit enters the atrium space, the travel distance from the doorway of the tenant space to an enclosed stairway, horizontal exit, exterior door or exit passageway shall not exceed 100 feet.

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69 Atrium Occupancy 1715 (f) Separation The vertical portion of the occupancy separation which is adjacent to the atrium may be omitted between a Group B, Division 2 Occupancy office or sales area. Exception Standby Power 1715 (g) The smoke-control system for the atrium and the smoke-control system for the tenant space are to be provided with standby power as required in Section 1807 (i). Atrium Opening Table 17-B 3-4 stories in height require a minimum area of 400 sq. ft. and a minimum clear opening of 20 feet And Area (the latter dimension being the diameter of an inscribed circle whose center falls on a common axis for the full height of the atrium). Fire resistive Table 17-A Exterior bearing walls •••••••••• 4 hour Interior bearing walls •••••••••• 3 hour Exterior nonbearing walls ••••••• 4 hour Structural frame •••••••••••••••• 3 hour Permanent partitions •••••••••••• ! hour Shaft enclosures •••••••••••••••• 2 hour Floors •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2 hour Roofs ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2 hour requirements for building elements Fire resistive requirement Seismic Risk Design wind speed Design floor 1 i ve 1 oad 1803 (a) Exterior nonbearing walls may be of one-hour construction where unprotected openings are permitted and two-hour construction where fire protection of openings is required. Fig 1, Chp 23 Seismic zone 1 which is minor risk of damage; distant earthquakes may cause damage to structures with fundamental periods greater than 1.0 second; corresponds to intensities V and VI of the Modified Mercalli Scale of 1931. Fig 4, Chp 23 Fastest mile speed recorded at 33 feet above ground is 80 miles per hour and of associated with an annual probability of 0.02. Table 23-A 50 psf Uniform load. 2000 lb Concentrated load placed upon 2304 (c) any 2 1/2 feet square otherwise unloaded floor which would produce stresses greater than those caused by

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Design roof 1 i ve 1 oad Partition loads Snow loads Occupancy load factor Determination of occupancy 1 oad Exits required Width of fire exits Table 23-C 2304 (d) 2305 (d) Table 33-A 3302 (a) Table 33-A 3303 (a) 3303 (b) the uniform load required therefor. For roof with a rise of less than 4 inches per foot; 70 Method 1 requires for a tributary area for any structural member: 0-200 s.f. = 20 psf 201-600 s.f. = 16 psf over 600 s.f. = 12 psf Add an additional 20 psf uniform load to all other loads. 30 psf (determined locally). Offices = 100 s.f. per person. All portions of the building shall be presumed to be occupied at the same time. 2 exits minimum required (other than elevators) where there are at least 30 occupants. The number of exits required from any story of a building sha 11 be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows: 1. 50% of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and below, when said story below exits through the level under consideration. 2. 25% of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story. The maximum number of exits required for any story shall be maintained until egress is provided from the structure. To determine the total width of exits in feet take the total occupant load served and divide it by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits.

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Arrangement of exits Distance to exits 3304 (e) 3303 (c) 3303 (d) 71 The total exit width required from any story of a bui 1 ding sha 11 be determined using the occ upant load of that story plus the pe"tentages of the occupant loads of the floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows: c 1. 50% of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and below, when a story below exits through the level under cons fderation. 2. 25% of the occupant load in the story i nmedi ately beyond the first adjacent story. The maximum exit width required from any story of a building shall be maintained. In computing the exit width required the net dimension of the exitway shall tle used. If only 2 exits are required, they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than l/2 of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between ex its. Exception: ** When exit enclosures are provided as a portion of the required exit and are interconnected by a corridor conforming to the requirements for corridor construction the exit separations may be measured along a direct line of travel within the exit corridor. Enclosure walls shall be not less than 30 feet apart at any point in a direct line of measurement. When three or more exits are required, they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked the others will be available. The maximum distance of travel from any point to a n exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building shall not exceed 150 feet.

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Exits through adjoining rooms Ex it door swing Exit door width & height Exit door 1 eaf width Exit special doors Floor level at 3303 (e) 3304 (b) 3304 (e) 3304 (f) 3304 (g) 3304 (h) 72 Said distance may be increased to 200 feet if the building is equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout. These distances may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within a corridor, complying with t requirements for exit corridors. Rooms may have one exit through an adjoining or intervening room which provides a direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor, exit enclosure or until egress is provided from the building, provided the total distance of travel does not exceed that permitted by other provisions. Exits shall not pass through store rooms, rest rooms, closets or spaces used for similar purposes. Exit doors shall swing in the direction of exit travel when serving an area having an occupant load of 50 or more. Double-acting doors shall not be used as exits when any of the following conditions exist: 1. The occupant load served by the door is 100 or more. 2. The door is part of a fire assembly. 3. The door is part of a smoke-and draft-control assembly. 4. Panic hardware is required or provided on the door." Every exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and 6 feet 8 inches in height. A single leaf of an exit door shall not exceed 4 feet in width. Revolving, sliding and overhead doors shall not be used as required exits. of the occupant load, there

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doors Additional doors Corridor width Corridor height Corridor projections 3304 (j) 3305 (b) 3305 (c) 3305 (d) shall be a floor or landing on each side of a door. 73 The floor or landing shall be not more than 1/2 inch lower than the threshold of the doorway. When doors open over landings, the landing shall have a length of not less than than 5 feet. Exception: **When the door opens into a stair of a smokeproof enclosure, the landing need not have a length of 5 feet. Wh.en additional doors are provided for egress purposes, they shall conform to all provisions for exits and corridors. Exception: ** Approved revolving doors having leaves which will collapse under opposing pressures may be used in exit situations, provided: 1. Such doors have a minimum width of 6 feet 6 inches. 2. At least one conforming exit door is located adjacent to each revolving door. 3. The revolving door shall not be considered to provide any exit width. Every corridor serving an occupant load of 10 or more shall not be less 44 inches in width. Corridors shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling. The required width of corridors shall be unobstructed. Exception: **Handrails and doors, when fully opened, shall not reduce the required width by more than 7 inches. Doors in any position shall not reduce

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Access to exits Changes in elevation Construction of walls Construction of ceilings Door openings Openings other than doors 3305 (e) 3305 (f) 3305 (g) 3305 (g) 3305 (h) 1 3305 (h) 2 the required width by more than one half. Other nonstructural projections such as trim and similar decorative features may project into the required width 1 1/2 inches on each side. When more than one exit is required, they shall be so arranged that it 74 is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for dead ends not exceeding 20 feet in length. When a corridor is accessible to the handicapped, changes in elevation of the floor shall be made by means of a ramp, except as provided for doors previouslj in Section 3304 (h). Walls of corridors serving areas having an occupant load of 30 or more shall be of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction. Ceilings serving said areas shall be not less than that required for one hour fire-resistive floor and roof system. When corridor walls are required to be of one-hour fire-resistive construction, every door opening shall be protected by a tight-fitting smoke-and draft-control assembly having a fire-protection rating of not less than 20 minutes when teste in accordance with U.B.C. Standard No. 43-2 without the hose stream test. Interior openings for other than doors or ducts shall be protected by fixed, approved 1/4 inch-thick wired glass installed in steel frames. The total area of all openings, other than doors, in any portion of an interior corridor shall not exceed 25% of the area of the corridor wall of the room which it is separating from the corridor. For duct openings refer to Section

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Stairway width Stair rise and run Stair 1 andi ngs 3306 (b) 3306 (c) 3306 (g) 75 4306. Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or more shall be not less than 44 inches in width. Stairways serving an occupant load of 49 or 1 ess sha 11 be not 1 ess than 36 inches in width. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 shall be not less than 30 inches in width. Handrails may project into the required width a distance of 3 1/2 inches from side of the stairway. Other nonstructural projections such as trim and similar decorative features may project into the required width 1 1/2 inches on each side. The rise of every step in a stairway shall be not less than 4 inches nor greater than 7 1/2 inches. The run shall be not less than 10 inches as measured horizontally between the vertical planes of the furthermost projection of adjacent treads. The largest tread run within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch. The greatest riser height within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch. Exceptions: 1. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 and stairways to unoccupied roofs may be constructed with an 8-inch maximum rise and 9-inch minimum run. 2. Where the bottom riser adjoins a sloping public way, walk or driveway having an established grade and serving as a landing, a variation in height of the bottom riser of not more than 3 inches in every 3 feet of stairway is permitted. Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 feet when the stair has a straight run.

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Distance between 3306 (i) landings Handrails 3306 (j) Exterior stairway 3306 (l) protection Interior stairway 3306 (m) construction 76 A door swinging over a landing shall not reduce the width of the landing to less than 1/2 its required width at any position in its swing nor by more than 7 inches when fully open. Exception: **Stairs serving an unoccupied roof are exempt from these provisions. There shall not be more than 12 feet vertically between landings. Stairways shall have handrails on each side. Handrails shall be placed not less than 30 inches nor more than 34 inches above the nosing of treads. They sha 11 be continuous the fu 11 length of the stairs and except for private stairways at least one handrail shall extend not less than 6 inches beyond the top and bottom risers. Ends shall be returned or shall terminate in newel posts or safety terminals. The handgrip portion of handrails shall be not less than 1 1/4 inches nor more than 2 inches in crosssectional dimension or the shape shall provide an equivalent gripping surface. Handrails projecting from a wall shall have a space of not less than 1 1/2 inches between the wall and the handrail. All openings in the exterior wall below or within 10 feet, measured horizontally, of an exterior exit stairway serving a building over 2 stories in height sha 11 be protected by a fire assembly having a 3/4-hour fire-protection rating. Interior stairways shall be constructed as previously specified. All required interior stairways which extend to the top floor in any building 4 or more stories in height shall have, at the highest point of

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Stairway to roof 3306 (o) Stairway headroom 3306 (p) Ramps Table 33-A Ramp width 3307 (b) Ramp slope 3307 (c) Ramp landings 3307 (d) the stair shaft, an approved hatch openable to the exterior not less than 16 square feet in area with a minimum dimension of 2 feet. Exception: 77 ** The hatch need not be provided on smokeproof enclosures or on stairways that extend to the roof with an opening onto that roof. In every building 4 or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface, unless the roof has a slope greater than 4 in 12. Every stairway shall have a headroom clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches. Such clearances shall be measured vertically from a plane parallel and tangent to the stairway tread nosing to the soffit above at all points. Access by means of a ramp must be provided for the physically handicapped to the floor closest to grade. The width of ramps shall be as required for stairways. The slope of ramps required by Table 33-A shall be not steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall be not steeper than 1 vertical to 8 hori zonta 1 • Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have landings at the top and bottom, and at least one intermediate landing shall be provided for each 5 feet of rise. Top landings and intermediate landings shall have a dimension measured in the direction of ramp run of not less than 5 feet. Landings at the bottom of ramps shall have a dimension in the direction of ramp run of not less than 6 feet. Doors in any position shall not reduce the minimum dimension of the landing

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Ramp handrails 3307 (e) ( Ramp 3307 (f) construction Horizontal exit 3308 (a) Horizontal exit 3308 (b) openings Horizontal exit 3308 (c) discharge areas Stairway, Ramp & 3309 (b) escalator enclosure construction Openings into 3309 (c) enclosures 78 to less than 42 inches and shall not reduce the required width by more than 3 1/2 inches when fully open. Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have handrails as required for stairways, except that intermediate handrails shall not be required. Ramps shall be constructed as required for stairways. A horizontal exit may be considered as a required exit when conforming to the provisions of . Chapter 33. A horizontal exit shall not serve as the only exit from a portion of a building, and when 2 or more exits are required, not more than 1/2 of the or total number of exits or total exit width may be horizontal exits. All openings in the 2-hour fireresistive wall which provides a horizontal exit shall be protected by a fire assembly having fireprotection rating of not less than 1 1/2 hours. Such fire assembly shall be automatic closing as provided in Section 4306 (b) upon actuation of a smoke detector. A horizontal exit shall lead into a floor area having capacity for an occupant load not less than the occupant load served by such exit. The capacity shall be determined by allowing 3 square feet of net clear floor area per ambulatory occupant and 30 square feet per nonambulatory occupant. Enclosure walls shall be of not less than 2-hour fire-resistive construction in buildings more than 4 stories in height. There shall be no openings into ex it enclosures except exit doorways and openings in exterior walls. All exit doors in an exit enclosure shall be protected by a fire assembly

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Extent of enclosure Barrier Use of space under stair Exit courts Exit court width 3309 (d) 3309 (e) 3309 (f) 3311 (a) 3311 (b) having a fire-protection rating of not less than 1-hour where 1-hour shaft construction is permitted and 1 1/2 hours where 2-hour shaft shaft construction is required. 79 Doors shall be maintained self-closing or shall be automatic closing by actuatlon of a smoke detector as provided for in Section 4306 (b). Stairway and ramp enclosures shall include landings and parts of floors connecting stairway flights and shall also include a corridor on the ground floor leading from the stairway to the exterior of the building. Enclosed corridors or passageways are not required from unenclosed stairways. Every opening into the corridor shall comply with the requirements of Section 3309 (c). Exception: ** In office buildings classed as a Group B, Division 2 Occupancy, a maximum of 50% of the exits may discharge through a street-floor lobby, provided the required exit width is free and unobstructed an the entire street floor is protected with an automatic sprinkler system. A stairway in an exit enclosure shall not continue below the grade level exit unless an approved barrier is provided at the ground-floor level to prevent persons from accidentally continuing into the basement. There shall be no enclosed usable space under stairways in an exit enclosure, nor shall the open space under such stairways be used for any purpose. Every exit court shall discharge into a public way or exit passageway. Exit court minimum widths shall be determined in accordance with provisions of Section 3303 based on the occupant load and such required

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Number of exits 3311 (c) Exit court 3311 (d) construction & openings Exit passageway 3312 (a) construction Detailed require-3312 (b) ments Exit illumination 3313 (a) 80 width shall be unobstructed to a height of 7 feet, except for projections permitted in corridors by Section 3305. The minimum exit court width shall be not less than 44 inches. When the width is reduced from any cause, the reduction shall be affected gradually by a guardrail at least 3 feet in height and making an angle of not more than 30 degrees with the axis of the exit court. Every exit court shall be provided with exits as determined by Section 3303. When an exit court serving a building or portion thereof having an occupant load of 10 or more is less than 10 feet in width, the exit court walls shall be a minimum of 1-hour fireresistive construction for a distance of 10 feet above the floor of the court, and all openings therein shall be protected by fire assemblies having a fire-protection rating of not less than 3/4 hour. The walls of exit passageways shall be without openings other than the required exits and shall have walls, floors and ceilings of the same period of fire resistance as required for the walls, floors and ceilings of the building served with a minimum of 1-hour fire resistive construction. Exit openings through the enclosing walls of exit passageways shall be protected by fire assemblies having a 3/4-hour fire-protection rating. Except for construction and opening protection as specified in Subsection (a) above, exit passageways shall comply with the requirements for corridors as specified in Section 3305. Exits shall be illuminated at any time the building is occupied with light having intensity of not less than 1 footcandle at floor level. Fixtures required for exit

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Exit illumination 3313 (b) 1 power supply Separate branch circuits Exit illumination 3313 (b) 2 power supply Separate sources of power Exit signs 3314 (a) Skylights 3401 81 illumination shall be supplied from separate circuits or sources of power where these are required by Subsection (b). The power supply for exit illumination shall be provided by 2 separate branch circuits of the normal premises wir ing system, unless an emergency system is installed, where the occupant load served by the exiting system exceeds 300. One of the required circuits shall supply only fixtures used for exit illumination or exit signs. The other circuit may supply current to other outlets. The power supply for exit illumination shall normally be provided by the premises wiring system. In the event of its failure, illumination shall be automatically provided from an emergency system where the occupant load served by the exiting system exceeds 500. Emergency systems shall be supplied from storage batteries or an on-site generator set and the system shall be installed in accordance with the requiremnets of the Electrical Code. Exit signs shall be installed at required exit doorways and where otherwise necessary to clearly indicate the direction of egress when the exit serves an occupant load of 50 or more. Exception: ** Main exterior exit doors which obviously and clearly are identifiabl e as exits need not be signed when approved by the building official. A 11 skylight frames sha 11 be constructed of noncombustible materials. All skylights shall be designed to carry all tributary roof loads as specified in Section 2305. All skylights, the glazing of which i s set at an angle of less than 45

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Penthouse and roof 3601 (a) structures Penthouse area Prohibited uses of penthouses Penthouse construction 3601 (b) 3601 (c) 3601 (d) 82 degrees from the horizontal, shall be mounted at least 4 inches above the plane of the roof on a curb constructed as required for the frame. No penthouse or other projection above the roof shall exceed 12 feet in height above the roof. The aggregate area of all penthouses and other roof structures shall not exceed 33 1/3% of the area of supporting roof. No penthouse, bulkhead or any other similar projection above the roof shall be used for purposes other than shelter of mechanical equipment or shelter of vertical shaft openings in the roof. Roof structures shall be constructed with walls, floors and roof as required for the main portion of the building. Exceptions: 1. On type 1 buildings, the exterior walls and roofs of penthouses which are 5 feet or more from an adjacent property line may be of 1-hour fireresistive noncombustible construction. 2. Enclosures housing only mechanical equipment and located at least 20 feet from adjacent property lines may be of unprotected noncombustible construction.

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PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS

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PLUMBING CODE ANALYSIS The governing plumbing code is the 1982 edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code. Topic Section Ref Plumbing fixtures 910 required Plumbing fixtures Appendix C required Description Where local codes do not indicate the number of plumbing fixtures required, use the minimums established in Appendix C of this code. WATER CLOSETS (fixtures/persons) Male 1 1-15 2 : 16-35 3 : 36-55 Over 55 add 1 additional 40 Female 1 1-15 2 : 16-35 3 : 36-55 fixture for each persons. URINALS (fixtures/persons) 1 : 50 LAVATORIES (fixtures/persons) Male Female 1 : 40 1 : 40 DRINKING FOUNTAINS 1 : 75 There shall be a minimum of 1 drinking fountain per occupied floor. 84

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MECHANICAL INFORMATION

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The information here is extracted from the American Society of " \ Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. Standard 86 No. 62-73 which is the standards for Natural and Mechanical Ventilation. r ASHRAE Standard No. 62-73 is dated February, 16, 1973. Space Utilization General Office Space Conference Rooms Drafting Rooms, Art Diazo Printing Rooms Computer Rooms Keypunching Rooms Public Rest Rooms * Rooms Estimated persons/ 1000 sq. ft. floor area. Use only when design oc cupancy is not known 10 60 20 20 20 30 100 Required ventilation air, cubic feet per minute per human occupant Minimum Recommended 15 15-25 25 30-40 7 10-15 7 10-15 5 7-10 7 10-15 15 20-25 * A prominant local mechanical engineering firm uses 2 cfm/sq. ft.

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GEOTECHNICAL ANALYSIS

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SOIL AND FOUNDATION INVESTIGATION PROPOSED KKBNA OFFICE BUILDING NORTH KIPLING STREET AT CLEAR CREEK Job No. 20,331 JEFFERSON COUNTY, COLORADO Prepared for: KKBNA 7456 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80226 88 May 2, 1980

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89 TABLE OF CONTENTS CONCLUSIONS 83 SCOPE 83 PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION 83 SITE CONDITIONS 83 SUBSOIL CONDITIONS 84 FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS 86 FLOOR SLABS 87 UNDERDRAIN SYSTEM 88 SURFACE DRAINAGE 88 PAVEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS 89 MISCELLANEOUS 90 FIG. 24 LOCATION OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 91 FIGS. 25 and 26 LOGS OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 92 FIGS. 27 through 29 SWELL-CONSOLIDATION TEST RESULTS 94 FIGS. 30 through 33 -GRADATION TEST RESULTS 97 TABLE 1 SUMMARY OF LABORATORY TEST RESULTS 101

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CONCLUSIONS (1) The proposed office building should be founded with straightshaft piers drilled into bedrock designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of 40,000 psf. (2) Existing fill at the site will require removal and compacted replacement for floor slab and pavement support. Portions of the existing fill are suitable for reuse. SCOPE This report presentsthe results of a soil and foundation investigation for the proposed KKBNA office building . to be located west of Kipling Street and north of Clear Creek, Jefferson County, Colorado. The report presents the recommended typr foundation, allowable bearing pressures, water table conditions and other soil-related design and construction details. PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION We understand that a 4 to 5-story office building will be constructed at the site. Specific building details, such as location, type construction, floor elevations and loads have not been finalized. Depending on the subsoil conditions, it is contemplated to construct a shallow basement floor for storage purposes. SITE CONDITIONS The site, at the time of our investigation, was vacant as was the adjoining property to the west and northwest. A single-story story residence is located north of the site along Kipling Street which borders the property on the east. Clear Creek is located 90

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directly north of the site and carried a considerable flow. As indicated by the site plan furnished, portions of the site are located within the flood plain of the creek. Regional slope in the area is down to the south and east. The ground surface at the site is comprised of two levels. The western one-half appears to represent the original ground surface. This area is fairly flat and slopes gently down to the east with a maximum difference in elevation on the order of 2 feet. Elevation differential between this surface and Clear Creek is on the order of 4 feet. Fill placement in the western portion of the site has interrupted local drainage of this eastern sector, resulting in ponding and marshy conditions. The eastern portion of the property, in which fill placement has been performed, is fairly flat and slopes gently down to the southeast. Maximum difference in elevation across the filled area is on the order of 2 feet with 4 to 10 feet of local relief observed along the moderately steep slopes on the west and adjacent to Clear Creek respectively. Numerous pieces of concrete, asphalt and other debris were observed scattered across the ground surface. Vegetative cover at the site consists of weeds, grasses and diciduous trees. SUBSOIL CONDITIONS Subsoil conditions at the site were investigated by drilling 11 exploratory test holes within the proposed building areas. Three hand auger holes were drilled in the western portion of the site to 91

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determine subsoil conditions for pavement recommendations. The approximate locations of the test holes are shown on Fig. 1. Graphic logs are presented on Figs. 2 and 3. The subsoil conditions are quite erratic in regard to depth of fill, engineering properties, depth to bedrock and water table conditions. Generally, the subsoils consist of 1 to 6 feet of man-placed fill overlying 0 to 3 feet of medium stiff, highly plastic clays and 0 to 6.5 feet of fairly clean sand and gravel. The sand and gravel stratum is medium dense to very dense and locally shows numerous cobbles. Interstratified claystone and sandstone bedrock occurs at depths 6.5 to 13 feet below the ground surface. The fill sections encountered consisted of erratic mixtures of clay, silt and granular soils with small to considerable amounts of brick, asphalt, concrete and other debris. Standard penetration resistance testing performed in the fill also indicates erratic subsurface conditions. Results of swell-consolidation tests, presented on Figs. 4 through 6, indicate the upper clay is moderately to highly compressible under moderate loads. The claystone bedrock is slightly to moderately expansive while the sandstone bedrock will consolidate. Gradation analyses of the fill and underlying granular soils are presented on Figs. 7 through 10. Free water .was encountered in all the test holes at the time 92 of drilling. The holes drilled in the building area showed water at depths of 6 to 14 feet, while water was encountered in the parking area

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holes at depths 0 to 2.5 feet. Stabilized water table is at approximate elevation 5355 feet. FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS We have considered several foundation types for the proposed office building. In view of the erratic subsoil conditions and anticipated loads, we recommend straight-shaft piers drilled into bedrock for building support. The following design and construction details should be observed: (1) Piers should be designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of 40,000 psf and a skin friction of 4,000 psf for that portion of pier in bedrock. (2) All piers should be designed for a minimum dead load pressure of 10,000 psf based on pier end area only. (3) All piers should penetrate a minimum of 6 feet into the unweathered bedrock. (4) Piers should be adequately reinforced their full length to resist tension. (5) Piers should be properly cleaned and dewatered prior to placement of concrete. Free water was encountered both in the overburden soils and the bedrock. In areas where water i s encountered inthe granular overburden soil, casing of the pier hole may be required to prevent caving and facilitate concrete placement. Where water is encountered within bedrock, pumping or other mechanical means may be required to dewater the pier holes. In no case should concrete be placed in more than 93

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\ 6 inches of water. Considering overburden soils, water levels and bedrock hardness, a large capacity pier drilling rig is r recommended. Some difficulty may be encountered in drilling the cobbles. The driller should be aware of such possi bi 1 ity. FLOOR SLABS The man-placed fill encountered is not suitable for support of floor slabs. The construction of a shallow basement will remove much of the existing fill. We suggest that the basement be placed at approximate elevation 5360 feet. Consideration should be given to the flood plain elevation in the floor elevation selection. All existing fill beneath the slab should be removed and replaced witha compacted, nonexpansive, granular soil. The clay soils encountered are susceptible to pumping when subjected to repeated heavy loads such as excavating or compacting equipment. If such a situation occurs during construction, it will be necessary to remove any disturbed soil prior to fill or slab placement. Portions of the existing fill appear to be suitable for reuse as underslab fill. Material over 6 inches in diameter and any deleterious material should be removed prior to fill placement. Fill placed for floor slab support should be compacted to at least 95% standard Proctor density (ASTM 0698) at or near optimum moisture content. A minimum 4 inches of free draining gravel should be placed beneath the slab. 94

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UNDERDRAIN SYSTEM Considering the subsoil and water table conditions, we recommend that the lower floor be protected by an underdrain system. Seasonal water table fluctuations in this area anticipated to be on the order of 2 to 3 feet. The underdrain should consist of a drain tile installed in a gravel-filled trench placed at least 2 feet below the lower floor slab sloped to a sump where water can be removed by pumping or suitable gravity outflow. In addition, several lateral drains will be required to shorten the flow path. SURFACE DRAINAGE The following drainage precautions should be observed during construction and maintained at all times after the buildings has been completed: (1) Excessive wetting or drying of the foundation excavation should be avoided during construction. (2) Backfill around the building should be moistened and compacted to at least 90% standard Proctor density. (3) The ground surface surrounding the exterior of the building should be sloped to drain away from the building in all directions. A minimum slope of 6 inches in the first 10 feet is recorrmended. (4) Roof downspouts and drains should discharge well beyond the limits of all backfill. 95

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PAVEMENT RECOMMENDATIONS A shallow ground water condition was encountered in the area presently proposed for parking. This condition is partially due to poor surface drainage. It will be necessary to improve the surface drainage conditions, elevate the parking area and provide adequate subsurface drainage prior to paving. The paved surface should be placed at least 2 feet above the free water level. Prior to fill placement, the existing topsoil and vegetation should be removed. Fill placed for pavement support should consist of soils similar to the on-site natural sands and gravels. A satisfactory pavement section placed on this fill would be 2 inches of asphaltic concrete and a base course section of 6 inches. Areas of the pavement subjected to heavy actual traffic, such as refuse trucks, should be designed with a minimum asphaltic concrete thickness of 3 inches and base course section of 6 inches. The fill encountered on the western portion of the site, in its present condition, is not suitable for pavement support. We recommend removal and compacted replacement of at least 3 feet of fill beneath paved areas. Fi 11 replacement and compaction shou 1 d extend beyond pavement edges at least 5 feet. Most of the fill encountered during this investigation should be suitable for reuse under pavement. We anticipate pavement sections similar to those presented above. However, due to the variable nature of the existing fill, it will be necessary to perform additional testing upon fill replacement to provide pavement recommendations. 96

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The bituminous surface should be a central plant mix asphaltic concrete and aggregate base course that meets Colorado State Highway Class 6 requirements. The base course should be compacted to at least 100% standard Proctor density. MISCELLANEOUS This report has been prepared in accordance with generally accepted soil and foundation engineering practices in this area for use by the client for design purposes. The conclusions and recommendations submitted in this report are based upon the data obtained from the exploratory holes drilled at the indic ated on the exploratory hole plan. The nature and extent of variations between the exploratory holes may not become evident until excavation is performed. If, during construction, soil, rock and ground water conditions appear to be different from those described herein, t h i s office should be advised at once so that re-evaluation of the recommendations may be made. We recommend on-site observation of excavations and foundation bearing strata by a soil engineer. CHEN AND ASSOCIATES, INC. Signed by Roger L. Barker Reviewed by Fu Hau Chen, P.E. 97

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FIGURE 24 LOACTION OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 12 • TEST HOLE LOCATION APPROXIMATE LIMITS OF FILL 98

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Sl6S Sl60 SJSS SlSO Slloo SJJS .)f'l 11 I Hole 9 fi.•SJO.o• Hole 10 u :-sJ6l. s• 916. )0/6 ,)916 ll/ll -100 ri•N' 8/11 00.6 -100 ll•SI rl•l6 ..J.-90/6 SO/I Hole 11 fi.•SJ4l.o• Hole IZ li,•SJ6l,O' 19/6,1)/6,16/6 )6/6,1ool) '"" Hole fJ fi,•SJ6o.s• . 0 ' • . ..... . j ZOO•I -100•) Hole lit fi,•SJ60.S' 0 .... ti . -loo-1 SJ6S 5)60 SJSS SlSO SllS I ffi r5(l fill, tllty to chyey und •nd gr.-vel to t.ndy ct.-,, occetlonel to contlder•ble bdd., concrete end ••ph•lt plecu, t
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SI6S SJ6o SISS SISO •10, Ill Hole I DD•IOS.8 0 -100 ...... SO/Z Hole J Mole ) 10/6,7/6,1/6 -IOO•IS Sill wc-8o.6 OO•SI. I ...!.. 10/6,11/6 LL•S8 S0/6 60/6 11(. 8 Do-111.8 Hoi• It II, 16/6 6/6,11/6 =l;J t ]so" wc-16.6 00.7 Hoi• S 11.,0' IS/II wc-6 . 8 -100 Hoi• ' S0/6 11(. 8 -100 1 PI•H' ..... '4! ] 70/6 00.1 J 70/1 Hole 7 Hoi• 8 t: 1 • • s1oa..o• t: I .•SJOa..o• I0/6,"6,6/6 11/6,16/6, lb/6 S0/6 11/6,1]/6, 80/) 11( . 6 -IOO•ll S0/5 80/6 FIG . 26 LOGS OF EXPLORATORY HOLES 516S SJ6o SHS Sl50 SJI.S SJ4l ....... C> C>

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101 cllcu au 0 . 1 1.0 1 0 100 APPLIED PRESSUREk:st //20,331 SWELL-CONSOLIDATION TEST RESULTS '27 Fig . ______ _

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102 chen an<.l associates, inc. Mo•sturo Contont • 12. 9 lJU't,.UIII Dry Unu We oght • I 19. 2 pet Claystone bedrock Hole 6 at depth 0 I 'll bnstlJ o e L I s J n nder d l.. ci -c: 0 t--t-t-r-c:_ v I UIJ.Ofl wett i I I I I i oil on ... .. a. a 2 u 3 0 . 1 c: 0 , , ... .. a. E 0 u 0 1 2 3 5 6 7 -I I I 0 . 1 1/20,331 I t-r---... "\i)...J I I I I II I I l l II I 1 i I I I I II I I 10 100 APPLIED PRESSUREkst Mo1sture Content 1 8 . 6 percent Dry Umt We tgnt :11 99.2 pet Sampl e ot: Sandstone bedrock From: Ho1e 8 at depth 13'-0" A di 1 i< n cr urt t--( ........ p e isure d1 e t 4 wjtt n I ---1--I I I I II I I I "' I I I I 11 p..__ f\ I II 1\ I I I I I '\)!> I 1.0 10 100 APPLIED PRESSUREkst SWELL-CONSOLIOA TION TEST RESULTS Fig ._.....:2=-::B __

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103 chen and associat.::s, inc. l MOt!tluro C uncont -3 t , . 9 l)UfCUrll Ory Untt We•gnt -: 80.6 pel Sample ol. Sa ndy c I .JY I From: H o l e 10 at deoth 6 ' -0" 0 c No I I 11 wetti I i m o • reme t n o -1--v I I I I r--.. r--., I; "' "' qj L.. c. E 2 0 u 3 4 I' I II II! I "" I II I I I I II I I Ill I ' I I j l II I 0 . 1 1.0 1 0 100 APPLIED PRESSURE ksf Motsture Content percent Dry U n•t Wetgnt z pel Sampt e ot F r om : II I I II I I I II I I I I II II I I I I I I 0 . 1 1.0 10 100 APPL IED PRESSUREk sf //20,331 SWELL-CONSOLIDATION TEST RESULTS F ig. 29

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chen and associates, inc. HYOROYETER ANAL Y SI S S I E V E ANAl 14 HA 7...-A 100 10 10 10 0 WI ...,, 1 ... I N '?OQ .,,., U S T ANUAHQ S [Mit.::.O ... ' tO c• UUI u:J/ U/4 I
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chen and associa tcs, inc. HYnROMETER ANALYSIS SIEVf ANI\l yc-;15 '100 90 "" 10 " TtiO .. ,., z ::; .. JO 20 10 0 "'" WJ U1. u.J/ U14 1411 r.t 1.11 1 :,W, 4 IIi 1 . 1 ,. 1 ' "' tt"7 2U DIAMETER OF F'ARTICLE I N MILLIMETERS 0-AY TO SU.T GRAVEl 60 SAND 4 0 "" SILT AND CLAY 0 liOUID LIMIT F'LASTICITY INDEX "" SAMF>LE OF Sundy gruve I FROM Hole 5 at depth MVOROMETER ANALYSIS SIEVE ANALYSIS J I ME AEAOINGS US STANOARtJ SEAlES 7 4 f' t M 1 HR ''MIN ... IN 1,0 MIN 19 t.tiN 4 M I N I MIN '?1'10 '100 ' !ttl '40 '10 'lfl ' " ,. ,•,r;-I W .. .. 70 0 . .. " :;'" .. Jll 10 10 0 1 0 10 ro 10 .. 1 0 )l) 0 .. "'"' z ..,() :; .. 1 0 .. .. 100 001 002 ..,. ""' 011 Q.J7 07t 141 297 1 11 Clll 4 16 t 52 Ul 1 ll1 76 2 \z;" N O CLAY TO SILT GRAVEl 0 ... LIQUID LIMIT 042 20 151 DIAMETER OF F'ARTICLE IN Milli METERS SAND 69 "" Sll T AND ClAY F'LASTICITY INDEX 31 "' 'So SAMF>LE OF Sandstone-c I aystone bedrock FRO M Hole 8 at depth 105 #20,331 GRADATION TEST RESULTS F ig. __ ......_ ____ _

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106 chen and associates, inc. ._.YOAOMETER ANALYSIS SIEVE ANALYSIS lt.,_t. H(.JtoUINU:. U :t !ItT AHUAHU !llt.Hit.!ll \,.\.tAU :.OUV.._.II,, Ut'l,.NI,.,u.,. l• I tit .,0 . . ... .. '"" 0 • o "" ... 70 )Jl n " ... ; .. .., ! u .. : ..... ! "" 1 0 20 .. 00 ... 0 ..... ""' '' ... . . ' ,. ' '"' U/1 ;tJOO .011 ,.,_, .014 . 141 'a/ 1.18 J 04t 20 ' " DIAMETER OF PARTICLE IN MILLIMETERS Cl..AY TO SU,.T GRAVEL. 41 ' SAND 55 ' SIL.TANDCLAY 4 L.IOUID LIMIT PlASTICITY INDEX SAMPLE OF Sand and grave 1 f i 11 FROM Hole 9 ilt depth 21-0" HYDROMETER ANAL VSIS TAHOAAO SRIU 14 ..... 7 .... 4', M I N M I N GO MIN It MIN 4 WIN 10 .. 10 10 20 "" 10 .uot .WI .074 . 14i .ltl ,)80 1 .11 l.ll 4 . 1 . . _ , HI. I ""' 00 042 20 DIAMETER OF PARTICLE I N MILLIMETERS CLAY TO SILT 1---,,.,,N,-E .. GRAVEL. 0 SAND 92 ' SIL.T AND CLAY 8 LIQUID L IMIT PlASTICITY INDEX SAMPLEOF Slightly silty sand FROM Hole 13 at depth 1.51 #20,331 GRADATION TEST RESULTS Fig.---=3'-=2 ___ _

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aud a!>!>Ociatcs, inc. MYOHQMETER ANAL SIEV E ANAL Y!iiS 10 70 lD 20 1C -. 011 031 01-t . 1 &8 .287 041 1.11 Jl • . ,. DIAMETER OF PARTICLE IN MILliMETERS CI.A Y TO sn. T GRAVEl ]0 SAND 28 'II> SilT AND ClAY liOUIO liMIT PlASTICITY INDEX 18 . 1 '"" 2 ... . , -r;--• o 10 lD 6 60U :!. .. 1 0 10 ... •oo 1ll' ,., 1"2 SAMPlE OF Sandy 9 rave I FROM Hole 14 at depth "VDROMETER ANAl VSIS S IEVE ANAlYSI S 2• ..... f ""'" ... ... , ... 1\ ....... 10 10 " ! .. lO ... 10 " ..... # 20,331 r.o0 WIN 11 WIN 4 MIN I ... IN ) '100 .,ct, .. ..w, .&.AN J.ll" .u:u JJ/4 ...... :.twl . • w I. It t.l :Je "''' v . w CLA'f'TOSILT GRAVEl. LIOUIO LIIAIT SAMPLE OF OtJ 2 . 0 DIAMETER OF PARTICLE IN .. llliMETERS SANO .. SII.T AND ClAY PlASTIClTY INOEX FROM GRADATION TEST RESULTS 10 20 1-1 •• ... F i g 3 107

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HOLE DEPTH (fEET) I 4.0 2 18.0 3 1.0 6 0 4 12.0 5 8.0 6 4.0 9 0 8 13.0 9 2.0 10 I o 6.0 13 I. 5 2 0 14 1.0 CHEN AND ASSOCIATES Job No. 20,331 .... TABLE I SUMMARY OF LABORATORY TEST RESULTS NATURAL NATURAL DRY ATTERBERG LIMITS UNCONfiNED TRIAXIAL SHEAR TESTS ll OU I 0 PLASTICITY C OMPRESSIVE DEVIATOR CONF I NING PASSING MOISTURE DENSITY NO. 200 SOIL TYPE ("I.) (Per 1 Lilli T IHDO STRENGTH STRESS PRESSU RE (%) (• t.) (PSf) {P Sf) (P SF) SIEVE 19.4 105.8 18 Clafj-)1sand and grave 16.8 Ill. 8 Clavstone bedrock 4.9 15 C l avev s and and Qrave: t 1lT so 6 53 2 58 24 Ql Slightly sandy clay 16 6 113 '7 12 100 Clavstone 6 8 0 Sandy qrave l 2.8 NP 8 Fill 12' 9 119 2 Claystone bedrock 18.6 99. 2 31 San dstone bedrock 1.4 4 Sand and gravel f iII c; 4 NP 20 F i l I 34.9 80.6 52 26 70 Sandy clay 8 Slightl:t silt:t s a n d 3 SIJQhtly silty sand 2 Sandy gravel ' 1 I ,_. 0 co

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109 November 3, 1980 Subject: Underdrain System, Proposed KKBNA Office building, North Kipling Street at Clear Creek, Jefferson County, Colorado. KKBNA 7456 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80226 Attention: Mr. Neil Dunbar Gentlemen: Job No. 20,331A We have reviewed our original soil report and a site drawing provided to us on October 29, 1980, in order to develop criteria for a building underdrain system. The results of our investigation and our conclusions and recommendations are presented below. We conducted the original soil and foundation investigation at the subject office building under Job No. 20,331 dated May 2, 1980. PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION: The proposed five-story building will be located in the southeast corner of the property in the vicinity of Test Holes 1 through 11 of our original report. The garden level floor slab will be placed at approximate elevation 61. We understand that the water surface for the 100-year flood will reach elevation 63.5. In order to protect the lower level of the proposed building against the flood waters of Clear Creek, an underdrain system will be installed beneath the structure and a dike will be constructed around the perimeter of the building at the ground surface. UNDERDRAIN ALTERNATIVES: Three alternative approaches to the building underdrain system were developed and discussed with you in a meeting

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on October 31, 1980. The alternate systems are as follows: (1) Place the building on an impervious soil fill which extends to sufficient depth to resist the hydrostatic uplift pressure of the flood stages on Clear Creek. This alternate would include an underslab gravel layer and a perimeter drain system. (2) Place the building on a clean, granular fill material which has a permeability equal to the underlying stream bed materia ls. This alternate would include a series of underdrains and laterals with sufficient capacity to keep the ground water level beneath the floor slab during flood stage. (3) Construct an impermeable barrier around the building near its perimeter. This impermeable barrier would extend into the upper bedrock surface and would attempt to provide a positive cutoff for ground water in the stream bed. The barrier could be constructed as a slurry wall or an impermeable soil dike utilizing earthmoving equipment. The impermeable barrier alternative would be combined with an underslab layer of gravel and an underdrain system consisting of perimeter drains supplemented by some laterals. Alternate 1 appears to be the most economical solution. Alternate 2 requires a very expensive system due to the relatively high permeability of the natural stream bed materials and the underslab fill. We calculated the requirements for 20-foot center to center drain spacings across the entire building footprint and a total pump capacity of approximately 4,500 gallons per minute when the ground water elevation reached 63.5. Alternate 3 appears to be more expensive than Alternate 1 110

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111 because of the volume of earth required to construct an impervious dike with construction equipment and the cost of slurry wall e \ construction. In addition, it also appears that this alternative would require a somewhat larger underdrain system than Alternate 1 because of the greater potential for ground water seepage to reach the underslab area. Alternate 1 appears to be the most feasible solution. Placing an impervious fill beneath the building area results in a significant decrease in the amount of water which must be pumped from beneath the building. However, there is a potential that hydrostatic uplift could lift the impervious clay fill during flood stage. This could occur if ) the water in the stream bed rose rapidly and exerted hydrostatic pressure on the base of the fill before saturation occurs and the hydrostatic head on the top of the fill is reduced by pumping. This disadvantage can be overcome by placing sufficient impervious fill beneath the floor slab to resist the uplift with a reasonable factor of safety until the water surface overtops the dike and hydrostatic pressures are equalized. RECOMMENDATIONS: The proposed lower level may be protected against the flood stages of Clear Creek by placing 6 inches of clean gravel beneath the floor slab and an impervious, nonexpansive caly fill material to elevation 56. The fill should extend beyond the building limits a minimum of 10 feet. The dike surrounding the building should be constructed of the same nonexpansive, impervious soil utilized beneath the building. The clay fill beneath the building should extend below the dike. Utilizing this configuration and the fill specifications given

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below, we calculate that the factor of safety against uplift of the clay layer beneath the floor slab will be approximately 1.25 when the water level in the creek is at elevation 63.5. A factor of safety of 1 is estimated for a creek elevation of 66. When the water surface overtops the dike and collects within the building, the uplift force is stabilized. The nonexpansive, impervious clay soil utilized beneath the building should contain at least 70% passing U.S. No. 200 sieve and should have a liquid limit of less than 30 and a placticity index of approximately 10. The fill should be compacted to at least 95% standard Proctor density within 2% of the optimum moisture content. All fill should be approved by the soil engineer and tested prior to placement. The soil should not contain concentrations of organic matter or other deleterious substances. The underdrain system should consist of periferal drains and a single lateral parallel to the long building dimension on both ends of the building. A 6-inch layer of free-draining gravel should be placed beneath the floor slab and connected to the peripheral and lateral drains. Both the peripheral and lateral drains should lead to multiple sumps. We understand that sumps are planned in the stair-wells and the elevator shaft. we have estimated the following flows in gallons per minute per foot of drain at three water surface elevations: Water Surface Elevation 5361 5363 Flow in Gallons Per Minute Per Foot of Drain .012 .028 112

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5365 .05 The drain lines should consist of drain tile surrounded by a minimum of 12 inches of free-draining gravel. The free-draining gravel should contain less than 5% passing through U.S. No. 200 sieve. Both the peripheral and lateral drains should be a minimum of 6 inches in diameter. The drain lines should be placed at least 2 feet below the finished floor level and graded to the sumps at a minimum slope of 1%. If you have any questions concerning this information, please contact our office. Sincerely, CHEN AND ASSOCIATES, INC. Signed by: David M. Jubenville, P.E. 113

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PROGRAM

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PROGRAM FOR BANK SPACE REQUIREMENTS: Lobby •••••••••••••••••••••••• 1,000 Sq. Ft. Lounge •••••.•••••••••••••••.• 500 Teller Area •••••••••••••••••• 600 Officer Area ••••••••••••••••• 600 Conference Room •••••••••••••• 400 Office ••••••••••••••••••••••• 200 Vault •••••••••••••••••••••••• 200 24-Hour Transaction Machine.. 40 TOTAL 3 ,540 Sq. Ft. SPACE DESCRIPTIONS LOBBY: 115 This space serves multiple functions. Primarily circulation space, it also provides customer storage space at the teller desk. A station for check writing must also be provided i n this space. Primary Space Adjacency: Teller Area, Lounge, Officer A rea LOUNGE: This space serves as an area where customers may sit while waiting to see an officer, or rest. Primary Space Adjacency: Lobby, Entrance TELLER AREA: This space must provide four teller stations. I n addition t o the teller stations there must be space provided to p l ace 3 0 linear feet of file cabinets. Primary Space Adjacency: Lobby, Vault OFFICER AREA: This space must provide for four of ficer stations. Thi s space needs t o be readily available to the c ustomer. P rimary Space A djacency: Lobby

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116 CONFERENCE ROOM: In addition to being a conference room, this space will also serve as an employee coffee area. A wet bar area, therefore must be provided which can be closed when desireable. Primary Space Adjacency: Office, Officer Area OFFICE: An executive suite. Primary Space Adjacency: Conference Room, Officer Area VAULT: Both a cash and safe deposit vault. Primary Space Adjaceny: Teller Area

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PROGRAM FOR RESTAURANT SPACE REQUIREMENTS: Entrance.............. 120 Sq. Ft. Bar Area •••••••••••••• 450 Dining Area ••••••••••• 3,730 Service Station ••••••• 100 Kitchen ••••••••••••••• 1,000 Rest Room, Men's •••••• 100 Rest Room, Women's •••• 100 T 0 TAL -:::-5 ---:, 6=o=o -:S:.-q-. -::F:-:-t-. SPACE DESCRIPTIONS ENTRANCE: 117 This space is restaurant space. nor as a lounge. traffic. to serve as an entry and a transition space into the This space is not intended to serve as storage space The reservation desk is to be located here to control Pr-imary Space Adjacency: Bar Area Secondary Space Adjacency: Rest Rooms, Dining Area BAR AREA: The bar area serves not only the bar function but also is intended to be the storage space for those waiting to be seated to dine. Primary Space Adjacency: Secondary Space Adjacency: DINING AREA: Entrance, Dining Area Rest Rooms Maximize available wall seating as the selected seating arrangement should strive for privacy. Primary Space Adjacency: Secondary Space Adjacency: SERVICE STATION: Bar, Service Station, Kitchen Entrance, Rest Rooms This space should be so located as to maximize its service area and yet be unobtrusive. It is a high use area. Primary Space Adjacency: Secondary Space Adjacency: KITCHEN: Dining Area Kitchen This space requires direct access to the outside via service doors. Primary Space Adjacency: Secondary Space Adjacency: Dining area, Outside Service Station

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118 REST ROOMS (Each) Secondary Space Adjacency: Dining Area, Bar Area

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Mazria, Edward. The Passive Solar Energy Book. Emmaus: Rondale Press, 1979. Standards for Natural and Mechanical Ventilation. New York, N. Y.: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1973. Uniform Building Code. Whittier, Ca.: International Conference of Building Officials, 1982. Uniform Plumbing Code. Los Angeles, Ca.: International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials, 1982. 119

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. DESIGN SOLUTION

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E><.P06UFZe fc:::>Jt, /' -......""' "-.: ... T.l E TO P"""TH

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. _______ ______:._ _______ . ___ _ 44TH AVENUE 0 D o DO CITY O F IIHEAT RIDGE OPEN S PACE PHASE TWO AT ClEAR CRIEEK. PARK. SITE PLAN e A THESIS PR.OJECT BY K.EJTH PYEATT FAll SEMESTER. 1984

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':>'f: : Jl 1 uf'l. ClEAR C? EEK OfBClE PAR! A THESI S PRO J ECT BY KEITH PYEATT FALL SEMESTER 1984 LEGEND TEHAHT SPACE OITitAHC[ ELIECTRICAL TtlfPHOH .WOTOII ELEVATOR (QUIP BOILER ROOM LOBBY t OFFICEA AMA tO COfFEE II Off"te 12 CCH'EREHCE I) TLLU AREA 1$ 24•..ouft lANK II RETAIL SPACE 17 MA I L II MEN' S SHOWER It WOMEN'S SHOWER 20 MfCHAHICAL 2 1 COLD STORAGE 22 KITCI'IEN 2:3 WAlTER STATION 24 MN ' S RESTROOM WOMEN' S MSTROOW l6 IUJt U OffiNG AREA 21 SOtVICE / TRASH

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TYPICAL SECOND AND 1liiRD FLOOR PLAN GROSS AREA OF TYPICAL FLOOR • 1!> oe• sa FT. NET AREA OF T Y PICAL FLOOR • 12. sa• sa FT. EFFICIENCY OF TYPIC A L F LOOR • 813l SATISFACTION OF BUILDING CODE 1/2 OF BUILDING" S OVERALL DIAGONAL DIMENSION • 117 Fl DISTANCE OF FIRE EXIT SEPARATION • 117 Fl EXIT \IJDTH REQUIRED• FROM THJAD FLOOR • 2 . 6 FT. FROM SECOND FLOOR • 3 . S FT. FROM FJRST FLOOR • • . 6 FT. PHASE TWO A T CLEAR CREEK OfHCE PARK A THESIS PROJECT BY K.EITH PYEATT FAll SEMESTER 1984

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... PLAZA ELEVATION 43RD STREET ELEVATION PHME TWO AT ClEAR CREEK OffHCE PARK r . .L ...... J. A THESIS PR.OJECT BY K.BTH PYEATT FAll SEMESTER. 1984

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WEST ELEVATION PHASJE TWO AT CLEAR CR.!EEK OffllC!E PARK ... ..:. A THESIS PROJECT BY I<.EJT H PYEATT FAll SEMESTER 1984

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ELEV • 43'-4" o I ' ! i EL Ev • 41'-4" lk 0o0 I [•;, ! ' 0 0 I ! 3-LAMP PARABOLIC REFLECTOR FIXTURE rl SUPPLY OUCT ' \liTH OOUBLE BALLAST I BOX 0 BOX PHOTOCELL CONTROLLED j ;l: .. \liTH HOT-IIATER COIL FOR REHEAT ,._y TO UTILIZE NATURAL DAYLIGH T 3-LAMP PA FIXTURE II I.:::><::J II RABOLI C REFLECTOR I ITH SINGLE BALLAST r CORRIDOR < .,,. ;fo :JSI..-1 I II t: i i ! ! I i i :0, 1 j •froo i ! I ! ! I i i i -+=J I J l 'lllfl] RIOR ZONE EXTERIOF so-s 1o-p TENANT SPACE -I I 10'-0" 12'-Q" PHASE TWO AT CLEAR CREEK OfFllCE PARK : EL EV • 28'-0" / : I ' I l i i SHELF " ! I jDOUBLE GLAZING i I ON SOUTH TO PROTECT FROM SOLAR EXPOSUR E ;r EL EV • 14'-8" ... o•J ' .. .. o l., 0 0 . 0 ...... t ••• .:. •• !/ T I i i I ARCADE i i i i ELE v • o-o UJ A THESLS PR.OJECT BY K.EITH PYEATT FAll SEMESTER. 1984

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I i """'''"" ' PARTITION LAYOUT LEGEND IWfl..f ,,. llfnttU REFLECTED CEIUNG PLAN PHASE TWO AT ClEAR CREEK PARK IIIII ..,_,IU.IU Uollll&ll IUMI Aoi!IHIH , .... WCII WfUC LMINCNIM 1e II'W.l llJIAIIIItloCC IIIILlhllOII CCILI .. VM!l IIMU .U IJII Ml"*" Alii "-'*"-' INTERIOR ZONE Hllftl' ,......_u .. rucr•"s'""' lflfllll-_liALUII ,,., ..... , •• , . .... WI[ UlftiUfWI tW1't.f EXTERIOR ZONE .... IC lttlUI.IIJIUIIII.I W\111-..l.....U.I .... IICCl.l ... IMUU """Lltt,.fll-..n .. , ..... ,_.,... , • ..._.ICN'MILift A THESIS PROJECT BY KEITH PYEATT FALL SEMESTER. 1984