Citation
Crow Canyon Center for American Archaeology : architecture as an heuristic device

Material Information

Title:
Crow Canyon Center for American Archaeology : architecture as an heuristic device
Creator:
Testa, Matthew M.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture
Committee Chair:
Prosser, John
Committee Members:
Decker, David

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Matthew Testa. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
CROW CANYON CENTER
for
AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY
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ARCHITECTURE AS AN HEURISTIC DEVICE
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ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING ^ AURARIA LIBRARY
An Architectural Thesis Presented to the
College of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Architecture
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atthew M. Testa Spring 1987


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The thesis of Matthew Testa is approved.
John Prosser, Committee Chairman
David Decker, Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver May 5,1987
Date Due
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank the people at the Crow Canyon Center for Archaeology, in particular Sandy Thompson and Roberta Leicester for sharing their beautiful site and their goals with me; Mike Mulhern and Tom Savory of the Mulhern Group and Bob Smith and Marcia Vallier of DHM for allowing me to use information already gathered for the preparation and design of the thesis; Paul Heath for all the time that he spent talking with me about people and how we learn; John Prosser for the way he can point out the thread that ties things together through the centuries and cultures; and finally, Dave Decker, for his help with this project and the time he has spent with me over the past couple years helping me to understand more about architecture and, when I needed reminding, that architecture is fun.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
Thesis Statement 1
Program Statement 18
Site Information 32
Spatial Analysis 37
Zoning Check 102
Building Code Check 103
Conclusion 117
Bibliography 119
Appendix A Design Project Drawing Reproductions
Appendix B Mechanical System Summary
Appendix C Lighting Summary & Diagram
Appendix D Typical Wall Section, Corridor Section and Building Material Summary


INTRODUCTION
Circumstances create the opportunity to explore architectural issues. In this ca they are as follows - first, the re-inhabiting of an historical site provides a motivati and rationale for using past architectural organization and imagery; second, an insi( into a previous culture might arise from responding to the same site conditions; thi how succesful can the marriage be of diverse architectural organization, style a technology?; fourth, as a student of architecture, what will be learned from t excercise that can be applied to future design problems?
The design statement used for the design project is as follows: Crow Canyon is a place for the study of the Anasazi culture and is significant because of context -historical, environmental and social. The architectural expression of this significance should embody qualities which tie the contemporary Center architecture to the past as re-inhabits a site in the land of the Anasazi.
The design opportunity is provided by a functional desire stated in the main body of the thesis statement. While the design statement is dealt with during the design process, the reasoning behind the desired functional quality is discussed in the main text of the thesis statement.


THESIS STATEMENT
This project is an effort to create an architecture that supports a number of processes that are occuring at the Archaeology Center. The Center is a permanent archaeological teaching and research campus. Professional and student participants will engage in the excavation, documentation, and survey of sites and the processing and curation of research specimens and records. Laboratory and display facilities are necessary to these processes and the size of participating groups requires that research facilities be sized to accomodate not only the process itself but the student groups. The remoteness of the excavation sites determines the Center's location and results in a level of isolation for the Center and tends to create an inward looking community. Participants and some staff will be housed at the Center. As well as taking part in the research activities of the Center, presentations, lectures and other activities are part of the educational program. The nature of the experience is a recreational instruction where the participant is actively seeking a rewarding experience exclusive of typical recreational activities and has already established an attitude for exploration and discovery of another culture and in turn will, intentionally or not, egage in reflecting on their own lifestyle, culture and role in society.
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The Center should succeed in three aspects.. One, it must succeed as a facility in terms of programmatic functions. It is a physical support facility for continuing excavations nearby, supplying basic living shelter requirements, specialized technical facilities and a display facility open to the daily visitor. Two, it is to be a physical expression of the philososphy that encourages the study of past people and cultures and consequentially provides information about contemporary and future societies. Three, it is the desire that the architecture be a heuristic device for the educational program pursued by the Center. The third desire is the architectural potential being investigated and discussed.
Unlike a city lot that someone occupies, the Center is leaving society and seeking he land where the Anasazi lived. The advantages and physical necessity of having a nearby support facility is the motivation for providing the facility. The opportunity for using the architecture for purposes beyond simple programmatic functions exists because it is re-inhabiting an Anasazi site. The isolation of a new community that exists for the sole purpose of studying the culture that previously existed on this site creates a unique situation for layering additional significance into the architecture. The participant in the educational program is a lay person who patronizes archaeology through the educational program instituted here, supporting both the professional research process here by providing labor as well as injecting money into the Center.
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Students are partaking in an actiivity that is initialized through an act of faith. Personal emotional experience is the primary vehicle for personal gain, in that, a positive emotional experience where the participant believes that he has contributed to a necessary process and has an enriching personal experience on which to reflect in the future and that will benefit him for the rest of his life.
The scholarly context within which this program is occuring is also of importance because the nature of archaeological research has changed in the last thirty years providing the opportunity for new experiences.
"During the 50's another significant shift in archaeological thinking occured. A group of archaeologists sparked by Walter Taylor and the anthroplogist Leweis Binford began posing a different set of research questions which focused on non-material culture. New archaeologists focused on the environmental system, the human biological system, and the cutural system. They became very interested in the way in which human beings adapted to their surrounding environment. They shifted from an inductive approach to a deductive approach. They designed their research based on a specific set of problem questions which they sought to prove or disprove through the analysis of the data gleaned from the site."
(Berger 1982:35).
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Re-enactment is a tool used for the testing of hypotheses. When we are trying to learn more about something we create a situation where we can repeat the processes or conditions that were present for the event we have in question. When necessary we produce a medium in which the test can be carried out. Models are made and studied. All of this is a practice of providing an environment that we control and where we can observe the processes performed.. The ultimate goal is usually to apply what we have learned elsewhere. Ideally we have a control and an experimental condition where we test one against the other.
Anthropologists have long gone to the "trouble" of creating new works of pottery, flint knapping, leather goods, weaving, structures, graves, metalwork, etc. by the methods utilized by the culture under study in an attempt to gain insight to the research at hand.
An archaeological group has built new Hopewell and Mississipian civilization graves by what they believe are the processes used by the culture to study the people, process and grave structure itself. In five to ten years after they have studied the process, they will uncover the grave constructed and then compare the model grave to real Mississipian graves excavated in various archaeological digs.
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The activity provides both the opportunity to study the process of mound building (that is, what were the techniques used), to observe people participating in the activity, and to discuss the experience. How many people does it take to build a dirt mound so high and so wide, using reed baskets and digging sticks with the dirt supply 100 yards from the mound site? Does this mound compare favaorably with ancient mounds discovered? Five or ten years from now when this control mound is excavated with the proper procedures, how do the features of the control mound compare to the features of the real mound? The values are obvious to the professional researcher. What can we gain as lay people participating in this experiment and will these people apply what has been learned to other applications?
A common type of historic information display today is the living museum concept. Williamsburg and Jamestown, Virginia; Mystic, Connecticut; Four Mile House, Colorado and similar institutions are examples of this type of information display. The situation allows two types of goals to be accomplished. One, the researcher can study newly created artifacts, devices, textiles and so on, that have been manufactured by the processes of that time period. Linen woven on an authentic loom from flax that was grown on the plantation and spun on a reproduction spinning wheel is atypical
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example of living museum fare. Clocks, furniture, metal objects and other items are made in front of the on-lookers very eyes, and yes, this is how it was done then, can you imagine living like that? The educational value is based on observation - see it done, touch it, smell, take pictures of it and buy a piece like it at the museum shop. For the daily visitor, the experience of performing the task is not part of the experience and a fleeting and perhaps erroneous impression is created. This description is not to demean the value of this sort of learning experience, but to show how very different the Center's experience will be.
The living museum experience is a shadow of a participation program.
The archaeological activities and research processes described previously are the types of activites that participants will have the opportunity to experience. The difference in the Center's activity sequence is that the participant is a lay researcher taking part in a delineated deductive process. As they engage in sometimes arduous and tedious physical labor in the American Southwest sun, they learn about the Anasazi culture, then instruction and discussion continues in the labs and during lectures. On another level concurrent with this intellectual pursuit, they are contemplating other aspects. When you are crouching in a space that is too small, next
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to a recent stranger, what crosses your mind as you consider the number of people who lived, so long ago, in this newly excavated "house".
While the archaeological value of these excercises is ample return for time and money expended, the opportunity exists to have the experience create an even greater impact.
Some type of catalyst or equivalent device would be needed to compound the benefits of an already full program. At the Center, the opportunity to learn is there, but devices to enhance, stimulate and encourage the discovery and investigative processes would bolster the educational program. Successful techniques usually involve making a personal impression. Architecture in this case is a vehicle for personal impressions. A way to bring the archaeological and anthropological experience into the everyday environmental experience of each participant is to make the architecture an extension of the information from the field. Providing a contemporary architecture that, as a living environment, is an extension of the field and lab experience and where the experiences are brought to mind, perhaps into focus, provides the opportunity to add another aspect to architecture. In this case, another programmatic function which is a heuristic tool. Not only can the Center be a satisfying, day- to- day architectural experience, but serve a programmatic function on a non-physical level.
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While evening lectures will provide a context for the day's learning to fit into, what tools can an educator use to re-enforce all the new lessons presented? Generally, one learns when the experience is sufficiently different to make a lasting impression. A convenient and effective vehicle in this case is the Center, which is a combined living and working environment, because while provision for the basic needs is universal, the way it is packaged is determined by culture. It is possible to say that to learn about another culture, participants will live the way that culture lived. It is not necessary to go to the extreme of replicating an entire culture to learn. That is not the intent or goal in this case. It is not desirable to make the participants uncomfortable, the goal is to "stir their pot", continue to peak their curiousity and cause them to reflect on new experiences.
The concept is to create an analogous architecture where the spaces carry cultural connotations and overtones through the space dimensions and organization of the spaces. The basis for creating a different experience is this: culture shapes architecture.
"people with very different attitudes and ideals respond to varied physical environments. These responses vary from place to place because of changes and differences in the
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interplay of social, cultural, ritual, economic, and physical factors. ...Because building a house is a cultural phenomenon, its form and organization are greatly influenced by the cultural milieu to which it belongs. ... the house became more than shelter for primitive man, and almost from the beginning 'function' was much more than a physical or utilitarian concept.
... If provision of shelter is the passive function of the house, then its positive purpose is the creation of an environment best suited to the way of life of a people - in other words, a social unit of space." (Rappaport 1969: 46).
If you house one culture in an architecture created by another, the experience will be sufficiently different to create a lasting impression "...virtually everything that man is and does is associated with the experience of space" (Hall 1966:171). When combined with instruction as to why the architecture is different, the environment stimulates the process of discovery, therefore, the architecture becomes the heuristic device.
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The archaeological processes and questions mentioned earlier have provided a method for understanding the Anasazi culture through their ruins. I am using the Mug House of Mesa Verde as an example from which to create the analogous environment [Fig. 1].
"In primitive societies, cooperative work groups and economic units affect the size and shape of dwellings and their relationships in a village layout. The archaeologist can often identify space clusters probably occupied by some of these units, and he may even be able to estimate their size... .Four levels of complexity are recognizable: (1) Clusters or suites of three to nine contiguous rooms with some adjacent outdoor space in an area or courtyard quite prbably represent household living quarters [Fig.2-4]. (2) Several households, or one unusually large household cluster, may share a single courtyard space and are called courtyard units [Fig.5-6]. (3) The total plan of the ruin further suggests a dual division, both on the layout of routes of access between the two parts and in the nature of construction seen in their kivas. (4) Finally Mug House forms the nucleus of a larger community,... ” (Rohn 1971: 31.)
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FIG. 1
(Rohn 1971: 28 - 29)


FIG. 2 - SUITE & AREAS
FIG.4- MULTI-LEVEL SUITE, BALCONY & AREA
(Rohn 1971:35) FIG 4


30 Suit 71.
FIG. 5 - COURTYARD ADJACENT TO SUITES & AREAS
(Rohn 1971:34)
38 Early Courtyard Unit B.


Having dealt with the organization which can be drawn into the new architecture, some of the physical attributes from Mug House should be considered. Rooms are relatively small, rectangular spaces, while areas and courtyards have no regular shape or size. Areas and courtyards are shaped by bordering rooms, retaining walls and specially built walls. Construction of the rooms was consistent in terms of shape, floor area and headroom. (Rohn 1971: 43). These features existed within the context of a natural environment that dictated where building could and could not take place resulting in the characteristic organic overall form of the entire form of villages and community.
This identification of spaces and organization provide a format readily adaptable to a the Center's housing and working areas. In the education program, participants are repeatedly divided into groups of ten to fifteen, in turn groups are combined to deal with various tasks.
"Thus any group of individuals who share the economic workload and occupy jointly one house or cluster of contiguous spaces that are well demarcated and into which outsiders do not freeely intrude may be called a
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household... .The primary criteria used in delimiting suites center around mutual accessibilty of their component spaces and relative isolation of these same spaces from other room blocks. Throughout the ruin, doorways tend to connect clusters of rooms and outdoor areas around one large nuclear area. " (Rohn 1971: 31).
With the program already organizing itself about small working groups, the group dynamic basis for fitting into the architecture exists from the outset. In a very short time, groups will have an identity based on duties, living area, etc. Organizing around nuclear areas also provides forums for social interaction on a structured basis. Associations betweeen groups based on relationship to specific common areas will develop.
"Rivalry and competition within a community are often organized and regulated by a division of community members into two groups." (Rohn 1971: 39).
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Although I cannot see why there should be rivalry, there could certainly develop some self-comparisons between groups as smaller groups are assigned to work together on one task while other groups tend to other tasks. There could also be some friendly competitions based on work or tasks accomplished. A more practical application in this project would be to use this as the method for separating the visiting researchers quarters from the participants.
Finally, there will be the opportunity for participants while reflecting upon their experience to establish some self-identity. "A community consists of persons who because of the proximity of their dwellings or because of various economic, social, and religious activities associate with one another on virtually a day-to-day basis. This means that communities can be recognized from geographical anad situational data." (Rohn 1971: 40). During their stay the participants and staff will view themselves as part of an identifiable community because of shared experience. This is the sort of impression that has a lasting effect.
Using the deductive process of study as the starting point (where information has led thinking from the general to the particular), a housing structure designed to reflect the
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Anasazi culture can be used to promote an inductive learning process where particulars, in this case the qualities of the pueblo architecture, can be drawn into general concepts.
"One of the premises inherited from the last century is that the mind and memory are somehow at odds with the body... The experience of our bodies, of what we touch and smell, of how well we are "centered," as dancers say, is not locked into the immediate present but can be recollected through time. The importance of memory as a part of our existence in the environment has frequently been denied in this century and by some is even now rather an embarassedly characterized as 'nostalgia' and dismissed again." (Bloomer 1977: x).
"Buildings and settlements are the visible expression of relative importance attached to different aspects of life and the varying ways of perceving reality." (Rappaport 1969: 47)
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Based on the role that architecture plays in every individual's life experience, it seems that it is an appropriate device to use in this case where the programmatic function is to study cultures. The end purpose of all study and research is to advance civilization through expanding the body of knowledge. Professional research and scholarly endeavors fullfill this need. In the case of the participants, there is the opportunity to send a personally interpreted knowledge derived from first hand experience immediately back into the mainstream of society. If we carry our experiences in our bodies due to three- dimensional experience, then hopefully some insight gained from this cultivated community will find its way into daily life as similar environments trigger memories. In the end, the cycling of this experience through memory and into the conscious will continually be an enriching experience, in part as a result of architecture.
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PROGRAM STATEMENT
The Crown Canyon Center for American Archaeology is a research and educational facility located near Cortez, Colorado immediately northwest of Mesa Verde National Park in the heart of the Four Corners region. As well as providing facilities for professional research activity, the Center provides programs for students ranging in age from eleven and up.
The Center conducts research in the Euroamerican historical record spanning 12,000 years in southwestern Colorado, the most prominent aspect of which is the Anasazi civilation that created the prehistoric pueblo architecture. Excavations and surveys will be as far ranging as Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona but the primary sites (Sand Canyon Pueblo and the Duckfoot Sites) are 15 miles and one mile away respectively, from the Center. Approximately 50 lay participants can be accomodated at a time under the current program.
Generally, the lay person interested in archaeology has no oportunity to
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participate in excavtions. Programs undertaken through the Center provide the opportunity to partake of this experience as well as other activites typically part of archaeological methodology and in the process enlarge their sense of the great diversity of human experience that is part of Colorado and Southwestern history.
Facilities required to fulfill the goals of the Center are a laboratory for processing and analyzing specimens, a museum to display specimens gathered by the Center and housing for the program participants.
MUSEUM
The museum will be the main public building catering to the daily visitors. It will also have spaces designed to facilitate the Center program activities, but it is the primary building for presenting the Center to the public which is also the Center's principle fund source. It is essential that
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the Center have a museum that explains what it does, how it does it and the results of that effort.
Crow Canyon is within 15 miles of the Mesa Verde National Park gate, so there is likelihood that the Center will be included on the agenda of tourists visiting the Four Corners area. Assuming an annual Mesa Verde visitor total of 650,000, an allowance should be made for 65,000 annual visitors to Crow Canyon. Allowing for an eight month season (240 days) and a seven hour day an average visitor per hour number is 38.69. Rounding up to 40 visitors and tripling that number for a peak capacity visitor rate, the Center should design for a capacity of 120 visitors at peak times.
Providing 4,000 square feet for exhibition space will allow a maximum of flexibility for curators and display design. Other spaces in the musuem such as the auditorium will also have visitors so that not all visitors at a peak time will be in the exhibit areas simultaneously.
The museum will also house the principle Center administrative offices, a reception area for fund raising and similar functions, and a museum shop.
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LABORATORY BUILDING
The Laboratory Building has a dual function . First, it provides the facilities required to conduct modern, regional-scale, archaeological research. This includes office space for staff, and spaces for processing, analysis, and curation of research specimens and records. The second function id to provide opportunities for program participants to share in the research process and/or to take part in other educational programs that can best be presented in the lab building. Student use in the laboratory building will take place primarily in the Specimen Processing and Analysis Labs, and these rooms must be sized to accomodate this use. A small conference/meeting room will also be available in the Laboratory Building.
Design of the spaces should never be too highly specilized or inflexible because as the programs evolve modification of spaces might be required.
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HOUSING
Housing must accomodate two categories of users: (1) visiting researchers and (2) program participants. A group housing or hostel type of housing would be appropriate for the program participants while apartments of some type would be necessary for researchers. A single dining hall for the entire housing complex will be required. Programs are usually a week long so that should be accounted for in sizing rooms, common areas and clothin storage space.
Visiting researchers will fall into two types, those with and those without families. Small apartments for a researcher with spouse or that can be shared by single researchers are in order, as are apartments with bedroom space to accomodate children.
The educational programs can handle up to 52 participants at a time. Group housing must allow for this as an ideal while realizing that it is not always possible to equaling balance head count between sexes. Some flexibility for odd numbers should be designed into the space.
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F ORGANIZATION CHART
^ = S^SoNAl/ TIME-


SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS
MUSEUM:
EXHIBIT SPACE 4000
LECTURE HALL/AUDITORIUM
(60 PEOPLE @ 10 SQ FT PER PERSON = 600 SQ FT SEATING PLUS 200 SQ FT ACTIVITY/LECTERN AREA 800 MEETING ROOM/CONFERENCE SEMINAR 285
MUSEUM SALES (STORE) 200
RECEPTION/HOSTING/KITCHENETTE 100
LOBBY 400
EXHIBIT PREP AREA/SHORT TERM STORAGE COLLECTION 400 OFFICE 250
subtotal 6785
JANITORIAL (2 FLOORS - 25 SQ FT/FL) 50
RESTROOMS 250
BUILDING SYSTEMS (estimate 5% typ. mech plus 2% special
systems electrical, security, fire detection) 7% 500
CIRCULATION 15% (for moving between areas)
15% of 4000 (seat of the pants) 1018
TOTAL MUSEUM BUILDING SPACE 8603
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diagram museum complex


LABORATORY : taken from specifications supplied by Crow Canyon
Specimen Processing Lab 450
Analysis/Teaching Lab 900
Lab Director's Office
Outer Office 100
Inner Office 150
Survey Room 140
Curation Space 600
Conference/Seminar Room 285
Archeology office/Research Complex
Permanent Staff Offices 450
Drafting/Copying Room 200
Computer Room 100
Studio/Darkroom 200
Temporary Staff Office 160
Service Spaces (inside)
Bathrooms 160
Janitorial Closet 24
Hallways 120
Stairways 60
Entryway//Foyer 100
BUILDING TOTAL 4145
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DIAGRAM LABORATORY COMPLEX
SEE.VICE-
7b
4


HOUSING:
LIST OF HOUSING COMPLEX SPACES:
LOBBY/ RECEIVING DESK 1 50
HOUSING OFFICE 150
LARGE COMMON AREA (20 SQ FT /PERSON * 25) 500
DINING HALL FOR CENTER 78 DINERS (6 TO TABLE)
100 SOW FT PER TABLE * 13 TABLES PLUS 200 1500
KITCHEN (estimate from hostel info) 350
READING ROOM w/ small library 400
HOUSEKEEPING AREA 150
COMMON AREAS HOUSING COMPLEX 320C
SINGLES' APT. (4)
SLEEPING AREA 180
STUDY 48
BATH 63
LIVING AREA 100
AREA OF ONE APARTMENT 391
TOTAL AREA FOUR APT.'S 1,564
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FAMILY APARTMENT (2)
2 BEDROOMS @ 180 ea. 360
BATH 63
LIVING ROOM 144
STUDY 48
AREA OF ONE APT. 615
TOTAL AREA FOR TWO APT.'S 1,230
GROUP OR HOSTEL DIVISION (4 groups @ 12 ea. plus counselor.)
Assume 6 to a room for 8 rooms plus sleeping apartment for counselor/leader.
SLEEPING AREA 2 @ 240 ea. 480
GROUP COMMON AREA 50
BATH 200
LEADER APT. 150
AREA OF ONE GROUP APT. 880
TOTAL AREA OF FOUR APT.'S 3520
HOUSING SUMMARY:
SINGLES APT.'S (4) 1,564
FAMILY APT.'S (2) 1,230
GROUP HOUSING 3,520
COMMON AREAS FOR HOUSING COMPLEX 3,200
TOTAL HOUSING AREA 9,514
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DIAGRAM HOUSING COMPLEX
LA&
AMD


PARKING (square feet)
VISITORS 120 with 3 per car 40 @ 350 14,000
PARTICIPANTS 25 car spaces @ 350 8,750
RESIDENT RESEARCHERS 12 @350 4,200
STAFF AND BUSINESS 15 @350 5,250
TOTAL AREA OF PARKING 32,200
TOTAL BUILDING SPACE SUMMARY: Museum 8,603
Laboratory Space 4,145
Housing 9,514
CROW CANYON CENTER BUILDINGS TOTAL 22,262
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SITE
Crow Canyon is west of Cortez in Montezuma County, State of Colorado, U.S. and is located at approximately latitude 37 degrees 22 minutes N. and longitude 108 degrees 38 minutes W at an elevation of 6200 feet. The property is 93 acres (roughly 1500 feet by 2700 feet) and is bounded on the north by County Road K. Mesa Verde is easily visible to the south and east from many parts of the property and Ute Mountain is visible from the west end of the property.
The property is covered with juniper, pinon pine and sagebrush. Some short grasses and other low growing vegetation complete the vegetation. The east end of the property is creek bottom bordered by a low cliff formation formed by the creek. The ground rises rapidly from the creek and becomes somethin of a plateau in effect, overlooking the creek bottom. From a small promontory, one can overlook the creek and through a small draw that frames part of Mesa Verde. In the upper parts of the property, vegetation is tall and dense enough to prevent one from viewing distance except from specific spots.
Wildlife crossing the property includes deer and elk, as well as many small ground rodents and hares.
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Materials found in the soil survey were grael base course, silty and sandy clays, clayey sands, shale, sandstone strata and sandstone bedrock. Following are excerpts from the investigation performed by Tech, Inc. of Farmington, NM.
SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS
The following materials were encountered by the test
borings:
1) GRAVEL BASE COURSE
2) SILTY AND SANDY CLAYS, CLAYEY SANDS, SHALE, AND
SANDSTONE STRATA
3) SANDSTONE BEDROCK
The Gravel Base Course, which was encountered at the ground
surface in Borings 1, 2, *4, and 7» averaged approximately 6
inches in thickness.
The soils encountered in all of the test borings were Clayey Sands and Sandy Clays. Shale was also encountered in several of the test borings. The test borings showed Sandstone Strata in varied degrees of thickness. The log of the test borings and the laboratory test results are shown in the attached sheets. According to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS), the soil in this strata classifies as SC-SANDY CLAYS.
No groundwater was encountered in the test borings.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
Considering the proposed construction and the subsurface conditions encountered, spread footings bearing on the natural soils should be suitable to support the proposed structure. The footings should be designed for a maximum allowable net bearing pressure of 2,000 pounds per square foot. If bearing on natural soil and if bearing on sandstone, 4,000 pounds per square foot. All exterior footings should be bottomed at least 32 inches below the finished exterior grade to protect against frost penetration.
Footings placed on other than sandstone and sized for the recommended bearing pressure could experience settlements on the order of 1/2 to 5/8 inch. Differential settlements should be on
the order of 1/4 inch.
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We recommend that continuous wall footings have a minimum width of 16 inches; and isolated spread footings have a minimum width of 24 inches. Continuous foundation walls should be
reinforced both top and bottom to allow spanning supported lengths of at least 5 feet.
It should also be noted that any excavation below a depth of approximately 4 feet below the existing ground surface may encounter sandstone.
We also recommend that for the structure, all foundations be placed entirely on soils or entirely on sandstone. This will prevent a condition of excess differential settlement which could occur if part of the foundation bears on soil and part on sandstone. Additionally, if all footings will bear on soil, probes should be taken to insure that at least 12 inches of soil exists between the bottom of the footing and the top of sandstone.
As the soil under the slabs or floor has low to moderately expansive potential, introduction of water under the slab may cause small results in movements of up to 1/4 inch. The following recommendations are made:
1. Remove the soil to a suitable sandstone strata and then use non expansive backfill under the slab. The compacted soil should have an allowable maximum bearing pressure of 3>000 pounds per square inch.
2. Design a structural floor with a crawl 3pace.
3. Eliminate pressured water lines under the slab.
4. Isolate the slab from the structure foundation system and provide architectural detailing that would accommodate the anticipated movements discussed above.
It is recommended that foundation excavation be inspected by a soils engineer and the excavation be deepened if loose or disturbed soils are encountered. Additionally, if the soil conditions are significantly different than those presented in this report, this firm should be contacted for verification and/or supplemental recommendations.
Thickened slab sections could be utilized below lightly loaded interior partitions provided that loads do not exceed 700 pounds per linear foot and provided that all fill is constructed according to the procedures presented herein. Slab sections should be thickened over a minimum width of 12 inches. The slab thickness and reinforcement shall be consistent with structural requirements.
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To reduce the potential for distress by differential foundation movements, all continuous footings, masonry, and stem walls should be reinforced. Masonry walls should be constructed using frequent grout cores on close spacing along with horizontal and vertical reinforcement to redistribute stresses in the event of minor differential movement. Frequent use of control joints at openings or other discontinuities is recommended to control cracking. Use 1/2 to 1 inch expanded styrofoam in all expansion joints to lessen the stresses caused by differential settlements.
LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES - FOUNDATION WALLS
Foundation walls are normally designed to be fairly rigid (un-yielding) and should therefore be designed for "at rest" lateral soil pressures.
Foundation wall backfill should consist of free-drainage Sands meeting the criteria specified in the "Sitework" section of this report. The fill material should be placed in 8 inch maximum loose lifts and compacted with light equipment to 90 percent of the maximum dry density at a moisture content within 2 percent of the optimum moisture content, as determined by the Standard Proctor Test (ASTM: D-698).
The following soil parameter should be used for foundation wall design.
Soil Unit Weight 120 lbs/cu ft
Active Earth Pressure Coefficient (Ka) 0.33
Passive Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) 3-0
At Rest Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) 0.50
Angle of Internal Friction 30
Cohesion 0
Coefficient of Sliding Friction
(foundation and earth) 0.4
Additional surcharge loads should be added, if appropriate.
(Dale 1985:2-4)
-35-


The climate is a temperate one with the greatest problem arising from wet soil. This determines when a dig can continue and generally keeps the field season between April and November, however a good rain or snow can close down the excavation at any time.
The daily maximum mean temperature (all degrees in F) is 64.6, daily minimum mean 33.4, monthly 49.0. Extremes in temperature are a record 101 degrees with a record -27. Mean number of days (for maximum) 90 degrees and above - 32, 32 degreees and below -11; mean number of days (for minimum) 32 degrees and below -178, 0 degrees and below - 8. The mean yearly precipitation is 12.58. (For more detailed precipitation information see following table.)
CORTEZ.CO J7° 11' N 10»° J«' W *177 TT
TLMftRA 11 R7 < *F ) Ml UHTAT10N TOTALS (INC.III
MIAMI VXIRfMKS J MIAN VL'Mtl . - P'H R *3 h : i a ti 2, 3 a I si 3 > Sun*. mi t M* AN NV M8f 0 01 Da /I
MONTH ! ► s u *3 it ► c b ■ 3 o X Z o - 2 5 >- ► 5 o ►. | W m } ► i ii " 1 T; Ml *i! ~si >■ i 1 11 n 5 t! !e ss •% } i I I o ■ s S f 1 i 3
JA* M.l 14. 1 17.1 41* 71 11 114 41 11 10 .17 i.ii 37 .10 12 07 t, 7 to • 4 37 II. 0 7 1 11 0
«■ «!,! l«.4 11.4 44 14 21 l|4 11 20 17 i .11 1.47 42 .It 42 01 4.7 10.1 M |1.0 77 11 0
MAR II.• II.• M.l 14 44 It •1 11 4 17 .tl 1.74 71 1.01 *♦ 1* t . 4 41.1 11 II.0 7 7 11 0
AIR M.l >0.4 44. T 40* 47 10 • 11 4 1* .tl t.40 17 1.14 • 1 II l.t 17.0 T 7 10.0 77 07 7
MAY U.O M.4 tl 11 17 17 47 1 1 .14 t.ll >7 1.11 !» 01 .1 1.0 41 0
JVM • ».* • 7.0 100 1* 71 It 14 7 0 .41 1.44 41 .17 1» 1» .0
JULY M.l f * . t 101 M 1 1 4|* 70 t 14 0 1.1* 4.04 17 1.14 >7 14 .0 0
AUG 14.1 11.1 It 41 1 1 • 4* 41 1* 0 1.44 4.40 17 1.11 11 l* .0 0
itrr M.l 44. T tl. II 4 14 * 71 11 1 !.!• 1.14 1 4 l.lt 3 4 It .1 1.0 4 1 0
OCT IM 14.4 • 4* 6 1 1 14 70 24 11 1.1* 4.14 72 1.41 31 01 .1 1.0 43 1.0 41 17 7
MOV II.1 II.f 11 11 II -1 11 11 14 .44 1.14 4* 1.41 4* 14 4.7 11.0 71 |*.0 1» 1* 0
OCC M.l | 11.1 40* 4* 21 •14 41 It 10 i.M 1.40 ll 1 • IT 1* 11 tt.t It.! 47 II. • 71 10 0
2UI OCT tut ell Ml
YTAR • 4.1 1. l_±i | ... ill ll’-L’"' 11! r 1 " 1 " LI” i | 11.M | .... HI I 111 1 l* | *4.1 L’l i ?:.! L” ll’ "J_ t
♦ AtiO OH tARLIf R DAftl
(Ruffner 1980:103)
-36-


FOUR CORNER AREA
UTAH
COLORADO
SANDlCANYON
CROW CANYO CENTER
MESA VERDE NATIONAL P
ARIZONA
NEW MEXICO
iTION COURTESY OF DHM
CROW CANYON CENTER
LOCATION MAP


AERIAL VIEW SOUTH ACROSS PROPERTY
•WMBnl>4<
CANYOfl CENTEF
TRATION COURTESY OF DHM i
7gt r\
>■ >•• Ti *■* i5,.


SPATIAL ANALYSIS
(ALPHABETICAL ORDER)
-37-


ANALYSIS/TEACHING LAB
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS IS A "CLEAN" LAB, PAPER RECORDS AND CLEAN SPECIMENS ARE HANDLED AND STORES HERE. USED YEAR-ROUND BY STUDENTS, RESEARCHERS AND STAFF.
UP TO 30 STUDENTS AT FOLDING TABLES MOVEABLE PARTITION TO DIVIDE ROOM IN TWO

J-A£>
&
4


900 sq ft
TY
'SIS AND DOCUMENTATION ECIMENS, DEMONSTRATIONS, JRES
F MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, )SCOPES.
\GE UNTIL CURATION &
& REMARKS
; FOLDING TABLES DING CHAIRS
75 LIN. FT. OF 18" SHELVING ,GE SPACE FOR MICROSCOPES, CTORS, BALANCES, CALIPERS, ' COLLECTIONS
FT. 12" SHELVES FOR SUPPLIES LIN. FT. BOOKSHELVES FOR \NUALS AND REFERENCES
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
I RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
1 MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
1 OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN I NONE
1 OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS _ REQUIRED
1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
I SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY FT00£- PLUMBING RRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY i! NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
L SPECIAL
r NONE
'j NORMAL
SPECIAL
I NONE
YES
NO
u YES
1 NO
YES
NO


CENTER / MUSEUM OFFICES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
9
THE CENTER DIRECTOR AND STAFF IS HERE AS WELL AS THE STAFF RELATED DIRECTLY TO THE MUSEUM.
A HIGHER QUALITY HERE IS APPROPRIATE FOR PUBLLIC IMAGE.



250 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE ft£>UC_ -rc> ofHct: £>ur urvur F^GM-TFfe^ PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL TA^ UGtfnNiG REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY circuits &e_v\Fls> lz2oV ^opiei^ PLUMBING FIRE DETECRON FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LARGE COMMON AREA
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE GATHERING PLACE FOR THE CAMPUS PARTICIPANTS. EVERYONE WANDERS IN AND OUT, A PLACE TO MEET FOR GOING SOMEWHERE.


500 sq ft
ITY
INFORMAL, SOCIAL MG PLACE
& REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
1 1 PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT TO 4 O-MFUS | NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


COMPUTER ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
A VERY UTILITARIAN, EFFICIENT WORK STATION
DURABLE AND EASILY CLEANED ADJACENCIES NOT TOO IMPORTANT
e&'r OF
OFFICF-


100 sq ft
lTY
.E USER OF MICRO COMPUTER
5 & REMARKS
)H FOR EASE OF SERVICE AND )LING OF CABLING
ACCESS ZONE I PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
W MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT I NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
» DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS V NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC OX)UkLG> ELECTRICITY CA'fiCU IT NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
fl YES
NO
YES
I NO


CONFERENCE / SEMINAR
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS SERVES AS THE LAB'S IN-HOUSE MEETING AREA
INFORMAL, FOLDING TABLES FOR VERSATILITY, MULTI-PURPOSE HANDLE UP TO 20 PERSONS IN MEETINGS, CLASSES, PRESENTATIONS CAN BE FAIRLY ISOLATED


285 sq ft
IVITY
kSSROOM, PRESENTATIONS DRMAL
:S & REMARKS
)K BOARD
JECTION SCREEN
M. FT., 12" DEEP BOOKSHELVES
>ING TABLES


CURATION SPACE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
STORAGE OF ARTIFACTS FOR UP TO 10 YEARS.
SOME RESEARCH WILL OCCUR HERE, SO SOME ACCOMODATION SHOULD BE MADE FOR PEOPLE TO WORK.
PROVIDE DESK AND WORK TABLE
LA£>


600 sq ft
ITY
lRILY high grade storage -
=?E, STABLE ENVIRONMENT
1 & REMARKS
. FT. OF 36" SHELVING, 12-SHELVES
;TABLE
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
t RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE L LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 'J NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
1 TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS L NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC HWlfaoNMfcUT' ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
â– ] NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 i SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
L YES
L NO


DINING HALL
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
PARTICIPANTS EAT HERE 2 - 3 TIMES A DAY.
MEETINGS AND GATHERINGS IN EVENINGS RECREATION; ALMOST A COMPLETE MULTI-PURPOSE. INFORMAL, RELAXED FOR LARGE GROUPS.
STAFF AND INVITED GUESTS EAT HERE TOO
ft)&U C_


1,500 sq ft
IVITY
ING/MEETINGS
REATION
ES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
P PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
P GREAT
VIEW OUT 16 MESA $ (doMMOM m NONE
| OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN IrE&A doYAtAO^X I NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
| DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
I TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS Cc^TTROU a NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
9 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
i NONE
YES
NO
YES
l i NO
YES
NO


DRAFTING / COPYING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
TWO SEPARATE AREAS MUST BE CREATED
COPIER AREA WILL NOT CHANGE MUCH ONCE SET UP DRAFTING AND SUPPLIES WILL CHANGE SOME (FLEXIBILITY) ADJACENCY NOT TOO IMPORTANT


200 sq ft
'ITY
S & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
1 RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT J NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
i DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC CoPlpf2, ELECTRICITY (£ZO\J Fee copied PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY !J NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
fj SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
I SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
I YES
NO
1 YES
NO


EXHIBIT PREPARATION
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
OPEN FLEXIBLE SPACE WITH ROOM TO STORE SUPPLIES AND SPECIMENS.
WORK BENCH AND DESK OR DRAWING BOARD ROOM.
A MODERATELY DIRTY ROOM. ALLOW GOOD CLEANING WHILE SAFEGUARDING SPECIMENS.




ITY
.L SHOP FOR DESIGNING AND )ING EXHIBITS.
\J TERM STORAGE OF SPEC-3 BEING PREPPED FOR EXHIBIT DR RETURN TO PERMANENT AGE.
> & REMARKS
100M WILL BE USED MOSTLY JG THE OFFSEASON WHILE ARING NEXT SEASON'S IT.
400 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE V PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
1 GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL REQUIRED
NEEDS 1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
/^ILTTY no ARTIFICIAL ^-Hsrr cmD>. TYPICAL
1 SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
UIA\T c SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC NORMAL
'post 1 SPECIAL
NONE
ELECTRICITY NORMAL
fl SPECIAL
NONE
PLUMBING NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
FIRE DETECTION 1 YES
NO
FIRE SUPPRESSION 1 YES
NO
SECURITY 1 YES
NO


EXHIBIT SPACE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS IS THE PRINCIPLE PUBLIC SPACE FOR DAILY VISITORS. IT WILL BE A CHANGING DISPLAY OF THE CENTER'S WORK AND IN SOME WAYS IS THE OBLIGATION TO THE PUBLIC FROM THE CENTER AND IN MANY WAYS IS THE PRIMARY PUBLIC RELATIONS TOOL IMAGE AND CREDIBILITY ARE DESIGN ISSUES.
NATURAL LIGHT IS ESSENTIAL.


4000 sqft
TIVITY
ople viewing exhibits, e issue is circulation, strict access to other areas while Dwinf staff freee access after hours.
ES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
J PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
I GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN j NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
1 TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS £OMH3DL_ 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY FLOD^L CUTVET PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION lOM. tx^r,ty Fboes=>. ALARR. I NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
I NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
j NONE
YES
1 I NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


FAMILY APARTMENT
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THESE APARTMENTS ARE AN ATTEMPT TO ACCOMODATE RESEARCHERS W/ FAMILIES WHO MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE BE ABLE TO PARTICIPATE. IN EXCHANGE THEY BECOME PART OF THE HOUSING COMPLEX POPULATION
PROVIDE A PROVACY TO HELP MAINTAIN THE NUCLEAR FAMILY. EAT AT DINING HALL HOWEVER
Geoop


ITY
’AIN FAMILY I.D.
> & REMARKS
615 sqft
ACCESS ZONE 1 PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
) REQUIRED
VIEW IN f NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL \ k d REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS '1 NORMAL
â–¡ SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY l. NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
i ’ NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
YES
NO
1 YES
NO
YES
r NO


GROUP APT/HOSTEL
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THIS AREA SHOULD INCORPORATE AS MANY ASPECTS AS POSSIBLE OF ANASAZI ORGANIZATION AND SENSE OF SIZE.
GROUPS COME & GO ON A WEEKLY BASIS AND AS GROUPS STAY IN CLOSE PROXOMITY TO ONE ANOTHER MOST OF THE TIME
ATTENTION SHOULD BE GIVEN A SENSE OF PRIVACY AND CARE GIVEN TO EFFECTS OF SPACE ON TIGHT GROUPINGS


eaunit 1460 sq ft
'IVITY
EPING, BATHING SMALL )UP CONVERSATION
ES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE E PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE J LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
OPTIONAL
I REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS J NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC 111 &AETH ELECTRICITY an iu PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
IJ SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
— NONE
] NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
1] YES
NO
YES
M NO
L YES
l J NO


HOUSEKEEPING AREA
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
UTILITY SPACE - LAUNDRY AND SUPPLIES FOR CLEANING AND UPKEEP FOR INTERIORS


150 sq ft
TIVITY
N LAUNDRY
DRE EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
ES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE I PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE I LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT iJ NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
f DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
i: TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC EXHAUST to outside ELECTRICfTY ZTOH T& 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
PLUMBING NONE
NORMAL
! SPECIAL
1 NONE
FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY YES
NO
YES
t NO
i YES
NO


HOUSING OFFICE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE HDQTRS FOR HOUSING & THE INFORMATION SPOT FOR PARTICIPANTS
SOMEONE USUALLY ON DUTY TROUBLE SHOOTING STARTS HERE


150 sq ft
rITY
RAL OFFICE
HASING, SCHEDULING
IMATION
3 & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE I PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
I OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
1 TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS J NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY t NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
I SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
K YES
NO
1 YES
NO


KITCHEN
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
EFFICIENCY AND ESAY CLEANING
GOOG SIMPLE FOOD TO BE SERVED IN QUANTITY
AHEAD OF MEAL PREP - NEED STORAGE
OFF SEASON, ANYONE MIGHT COOK - MAKE ACCESIBLE


350 sq ft
TIVITY
OKING FOR GROUPS AND FOR CEPTIONS HOSTED BY CENTER
& REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE I PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT NONE
1 OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN • NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS I NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC D10SZT CooliMG ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
f 1 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
I YES
NO


LAB BATHROOMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
JUST ENOUGH W.C.'S AND URINALS TO HANDLE FIELD CREWS NO SHOWERS, HOUSING IS CLOSE BY


160 sq ft
ITY
> & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE

VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
I
1
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO


LAB DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
MAKE 2 SPACES - OUTER 100 SQ FT FOR GENERAL
INNER 150 SQ FT STORAGE OF CRITICAL DOCUMENTS
THE OUTER SPACE WILL BE THE LAB HEADQUARTERS


250 sq ft
VITY
IERAL OFFICE WORK AND RAGE OF CRITICAL RECORDS 'DOCUMENTS
:S & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE f PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT it) ue> fl • NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
1 NO
YES
NO
1 YES
NO


LECTURE/AUDITORIUM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
THE "SHOWCASE" PRESENTATION AREA. LECTURES DURING THE DAY TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC, MAJOR EVENING PRESENTATIONS TO PARTICIPANTS.
CONSIDER KIVA-LIKE DESIGN INFLUENCE.
PRIMARY ACCESS FROM LOBBY, PROVIDE SERVICE ACCESS.


800 sq ft
rITY
JRES, PRESENTATIONS, ECTOR SHOWS
> & REMARKS
EW IN, OUT - IT MIGHT BE NICE EE THE SPACE FROM THE LOBBY ART OF THE EXHIBIT AREA.
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
I PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN I NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
1 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
1 SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS ()UAMFLLfTE3> XOICfe NORMAL
ft SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
ft NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
YES
NO
ft YES
NO
ft YES
NO


LOBBY / RECEIVING DESK
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
PARTICIPANTS CHECK IN & OUT SCHEDULES AND INFO POSTED MAIN ENTRANCE TO HOUSING COMPLEX


150 sq ft
ITY
>& REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
I
PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT
t2££DGmz£L E3LtT
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN
FblMTT^. _______
ILLUMINATION
NEEDS
NATURAL
ARTIFICIAL
NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
NORMAL
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION
SECURITY
NORMAL
i
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
slight mu?
*
NO
YES
NO


MECHANICAL & SYSTEMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
A SYSTEM W/ FLEXIBLE CAPABILITIES IS NEEDED DUE TO DIVERSE SPACES TO BE SERVED.
EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE KEPT OUT OF SIGHT.
EITHER HERE OR SOMEWHERE TANKS AND GAUGE EQUIPMENT FOR FIRE SUPPRESSION.
ALARM PANELS FOR SECURITY AND FIRE.

S PUBUC


500 sq ft
ITY
ED ACCESS FOR PREVENTING 'ENANCE AND MONITORING 3E & SECURITY SYSTEMS.
3 & REMARKS
7% of assigned
ACCESS ZONE | PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE fl LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT I NONE
OPTIONAL
1 REQUIRED
VIEW IN | NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL uoftr REQUIRED
1 DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS vie^noM. 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING pyjy\gj WcPriO^Y RRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
f NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
| SPECIAL
% NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
1 NO


MEETING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
HIGH APPEARANCE W/O EXTRAVAGANCE BOARD MEETINGS AND OTHER CENTER BUSINESS
RECEIVING OF VIP'S
LOCATE ONE LEVEL REMOVED FROM MOST PUBLIC SPACE

Ko^T
Tb&uc
Z


285 sq ft
ITY
INGSOF BUSINESS TYPE.
'IDE MODERATE PRESENTATION .ITIES.
SIDEBOARD FOR SERVING.
5 & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE
VIEW OUT
VIEW IN
ILLUMINATION NATURAL
NEEDS
ARTIFICIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS
SYSTEMS HVAC
ELECTRICITY
PLUMBING
FIRE DETECTION
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
i PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
NONE
OPTIONAL
r REQUIRED
r i NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
M DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
r SPECIAL
u NORMAL
SPECIAL
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
I
\
L!


MUSEUM SALES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
LOCATE AT LOBBY SO THAT TRAFFIC LEAVING ANY FUNCTION MUST PASS BY.
GOOD CIRCULATION A MUST, SHOULD NEVER SEEM SO CROWDED AS TO DETER POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS.

^xrr


200 sq ft
rITY
AGE AND SALE OF MOMENTOS .ITERATURE TO DAILY DRS AND PARTICIPANTS.
5 & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
| RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN P NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL » REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
I UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION “SUPEPYl^okl X)oeBSSIRITY PteuB^. 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
P NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
| YES
NO
• YES
NO


PERMANENT STAFF OFFICES
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
MADE UP OF THREE OFFICES - EACH TO BE QUIET, WORKING/WRITING AREAS
PROVIDE DESK, SIDE CHAIRS, LAYOUT TABLE, FILING CABINETS, COMPUTERS, BOOKSHELVES FOR PERSONAL LIBRARIES
"TO
&r UHb


JTY
' AREA FOR PERSONAL WORK. ED ACCESS
3 & REMARKS
450 sq ft
ACCESS ZONE L PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN c NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 1 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
UNDESIRABLE
’j TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS i NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION NORMAL
SPECIAL
l NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
i SPECIAL
NONE
YES
FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
'J


PUBLIC RESTROOMS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
SERVICEABLE AND DURABLE W/O BEING SHODDY


2 @ 100 ea
200 sq ft
MTY
S & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 1 NONE
OPTIONAL
9 REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL 9 REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
9 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS | NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY &PI- PLUMBING CAPPED RRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 9 NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
ft NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
YES
| NO
i YES
NO
YES
NO


READING ROOM
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
QUIET, GENEROUS COMFORT AND ONE OF THE FEW MORE PRIVATE AREAS AMPLE SEATING W/ VARIETY FOR SINGLES, COUPLES AND SMALL GROUPS AVOID "LIBRARY" FEEL
LOCATE SO IT IS AWAY FROM CROWD BUT NOT ISOLATED


400 sq ft
/ITY
ING AND SMALL QUIET TALK
S & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
RESTRICTED
0 PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT 9 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN NONE
1 OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ofr & DESIRABLE
0 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS SB&i ouierr 1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY NORMAL
SPECIAL
1 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
NORMAL
1 SPECIAL
NONE
YES
NO
f YES
NO
1 YES
NO


RECEPTION / KITCHEN
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
"OFFICIAL" FUNCTIONS, FUND RAISERS TO BE HELD HERE.
SOME LIMITED ACCESS TO OTHER AREAS DESIRABLE, BASICALLY THE SERVING AREA FRO FUNCTIONS, PEOPLE WILL ALSO ROAM.


100 sq ft
TIVITY
IOMARILY PREP OF THINGS TO kPPEN IN DINING HALL KITCHEN. IIS KITCHEN TO FACILITATE IVING IN SPIFFIER DIGS.
FES & REMARKS
ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE
1 RESTRICTED
PUBLIC
FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE 1 LITTLE
MODERATE
GREAT
VIEW OUT i NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
VIEW IN 9 NONE
OPTIONAL
REQUIRED
ILLUMINATION NATURAL NEEDS ARTIFICIAL $ REQUIRED
DESIRABLE
9 UNDESIRABLE
TYPICAL
SPECIAL
ACOUSTIC NEEDS f NORMAL
SPECIAL
SYSTEMS HVAC a/c ftrSS ELECTRICITY PLUMBING VAST FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 9 NORMAL
SPECIAL
NONE
1 NORMAL
SPECIAL
9 NONE
NORMAL
SPECIAL
9 NONE
YES
I NO
YES
NO
fl YES
NO


"SINGLES" APARTMENTS
SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES
NEITHER THE HILTON NOR A MONK’S CELL
THE SPACE IS TO PROVIDE ANOTHER LEVEL OF PRIVACY FOR VISITING RESEARCHERS - GET AWAY FROM THE LAB, OFFICE, COMMON AREAS, AND PARTICIPANTS
FOR SINGLETONS, COUPLES & SHARED BACHELOR DIGS (ARCHAEOLOGY JOKE).


Full Text

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) l 7 CROW CANYON CENTER for AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY ARCHITECTURE AS AN. 'HEURISTIC DEVICE ""-: '1 . . ' '-" , . . ..,. _ ... " . . .. , ARCHITECTURE & PLANNIN ' AURARJA LIBRARY . . An ArchiteCtural Thesis Presented to the College of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver . . ...... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture atthew M. Testa Spring 1987

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I U18700 7263081

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t( : 4 Ji • 0' I The thesis of Matthew Testa is approved. 'l John Prosser , Committee Chairman David Decker, Principal Advisor University of Colorado at Denver May 5, 1987 Date D U e

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/Jr-fJ LL:J l19o A7r;._ 1987 --;;;61

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the people at the Crow Canyon Center for Archaeology , in particular Sandy Thompson and Roberta Leicester for sharing their beautiful site and their goals with me ; Mike Mulhern and Tom Savory of the Mulhern Group and Bob Smith and Marcia Vallier of OHM for allowing me to use informat ion already gathered for the preparation and design of the thesis; Paul Heath for all the time that he spent talking with me about people and how we learn ; John Prosser for the way he can point out the thread that ties things together through the centuries and cultures; and finally , Dave Decker, for his help with this project and the time he has spent w i th me over the past couple years helping me to understand more about architecture and, when I needed reminding, that architecture is fun.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface Thesis Statement Program Statement Site Information Spatial Analysis Zoning Check Building Code Check 18 32 37 102 103 Conclusion Bibliography Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D 117 119 Design Project Drawing Reproductions Mechanical System Summary Lighting Summary & Diagram Typical Wall Section, Corridor Section and Building Material Summary

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INTRODUCTION Circumstances create the opportunity to explore architectural issues. In this ca : they are as follows first, the re-inhabiting of an historical site provides a motivati and rationale for using past architectural organization and imagery; second, an into a previous culture might arise from responding to the same site conditions; thi how succesful can the marriage be of diverse architectural organization, style a technology?; fourth, as a student of architecture, what will be learned from t excercise that can be applied to future design problems? The design statement used for the design project is as follows: Crow Canyon is a place for the study of the Anasazi culture and is significant because of context historical, environmental and social. The architectural expression of this significance should embody qualities which tie the contemporary Center architecture to the past as re-in habits a site in the land of the Anasazi. The design opportunity is provided by a functional desire stated in the main body of the thesis statement. While the design statement is dealt with during the design process, the reasoning behind the desired functional quality is discussed in the main text of the thesis statement.

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THESIS STATEMENT This project is an effort to create an architecture that supports a number of processes that are occuring at the Archaeology Center. The Center is a permanent archaeological teaching and research campus. Professional and student participants will engage in the excavation, documentation, and survey of sites and the processing and curation of research specimens and records. Laboratory and display facilities are necessary to these processes and the size of participating groups requires that research facilities be sized to accomodate not only the process itself but the student groups. The remoteness of the excavation sites determines the Center's location and results in a level of isolation for the Center and tends to create an inward looking community. Participants and some staff will be housed at the Center. As well as taking part in the research activities of the Center, presentations, lectures and other activities are part of the educational program. The nature of the experience is a recreational instruction where the participant is actively seeking a rewarding experience exclusive of typical recreational activiities and has already established an attitude for exploration and discovery of another culture and in turn will, intentionally or not, egage in reflecting on their own lifestyle, culture and role in society. -1-

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The Center should succeed in three aspects . . One, it must succeed as a facility in terms of programmatic functions. It is a physical support facility for continuing excavations nearby , supplying basic living shelter requirements, specialized technical facilities and a display facility open to the daily visitor. Two, it is to be a physical expression of the philososphy that encourages the study of past people and cultures and consequentially provides information about contemporary and future soc i eties. Three , it is the desire that the architecture be a heuristic device for the educational program pursued by the Center. The third desire is the architectural potential being investigated and discussed. Unlike a city lot that someone occupies, the Center is leaving society and seeking he land where the Anasazi lived . The advantages and physical necessity of having a nearby support facility is the motivation for providing the facility. The opportunity for using the architecture for purposes beyond simple programmatic functions exists because it is re-inhab i ting an Anasazi site . The isolation of a new community that exists for the sole purpose of studying the culture that previously existed on this site creates a unique situation for layering addi tional significance into the architecture . The participant in the educational program is a lay person who patronizes archaeology through the educational program instituted here, supporting both the profess i onal research process here by providing labor as well as injecting money into the Center. -2-

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Students are partaking in an actiivity that is initialized through an act of faith. Personal emotional experience is the primary vehicle for personal gain, in that , a positive emotional experience where the participant believes that he has contributed to a necessary process and has an enriching personal experience on which to reflect in the future and that will benefit him for the rest of his life. The scholarly context within which this program is occuring is also of importance because the nature of archaeological research has changed in the last thirty years providing the opportunity for new experiences. "During the SO's another significant shift in archaeological thinking occured. A group of archaeologists sparked by Walter Taylor and the anthroplogist Leweis Binford began posing a different set of research questions which focused on non-material culture . New archaeologists focused on the environmental system, the human biological system, and the cutural system. They became very interested in the way in which human beings adapted to their surrounding environment. They shifted from an inductive approach to a deductive approach. They designed their research based on a specific set of problem questions which they sought to prove or disprove through the analysis of the data gleaned from the site." (Berger 1982:35). -3-

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Re-enactment is a tool used for the testing of hypotheses. When we are trying to learn more about something we create a situation where we can repeat the processes or conditions that were present for the event we have in question. When necessary we produce a medium in which the test can be carried out. Models are made and studied. All of this is a practice of providing an environment that we control and where we can observe the processes performed.. The ultimate goal is usually to apply what we have learned elsewhere. Ideally we have a control and an experimental condition where we test one against the other. Anthropologists have long gone to the "trouble" of creating new works of pottery, flint knapping, leather goods, weaving, structures, graves, metalwork, etc. by the methods utilized by the culture under study in an attempt to gain insight to the research at hand. An archaeological group has built new Hopewell and Mississipian civilization graves by what they believe are the processes used by the culture to study the people, process and grave structure itself. In five to ten years after they have studied the process, they will uncover the grave constructed and then compare the model grave to real Mississipian graves excavated in various archaeological digs. -4-

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The activity provides both the opportunity to study the process of mound building (that is, what were the techniques used), to observe people participating in the activity, and to discuss the experience. How many people does it take to build a dirt mound so high and so wide, using reed baskets and digging sticks with the dirt supply 100 yards from the mound site? Does this mound compare favaorably with ancient mounds discovered? Five or ten years from now when this control mound is excavated with the proper procedures, how do the features of the control mound compare to the features of the real mound? The values are obvious to the professional researcher. What can we gain as lay people participating in this experiment and will these people apply what has been learned to other applications? A common type of historic information display today is the living museum concept. Williamsburg and Jamestown, Virginia; Mystic, Connecticut; Four Mile House, Colorado and similar institutions are examples of this type of information display. The situation allows two types of goals to be accomplished. One, the researcher can study newly created artifacts, devices, textiles and so on, that have been manufactured by the processes of that time period. Linen woven on an authentic loom from flax that was grown on the plantation and spun on a reproduction spinning wheel is a typical -5-

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example of living museum fare. Clocks, furniture, metal objects and other items are made in front of the on-lookers very eyes, and yes, this is how it was done then, can you imagine living like that? The educational value is based on observation see it done, touch it, smell, take pictures of it and buy a piece like it at the museum shop. For the daily visitor, the experience of performing the task is not part of the experience and a fleeting and perhaps erroneous impression is created. This description is not to demean the value of this sort of learning experience, but to show how very different the Center's experience will be. The living museum experience is a shadow of a participation program. The archaeological activities and research processes described previously are the types of activites that participants will have the opportunity to experience. The difference in the Center's activity sequence is that the participant is a lay researcher taking part in a delineated deductive process. As they engage in sometimes arduous and tedious physical labor in the American Southwest sun, they learn about the Anasazi culture, then instruction and discussion continues in the labs and during lectures. On another level concurrent with this intellectual pursuit, they are contemplating other aspects. When you are crouching in a space that is too small, next -6-

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to a recent stranger, what crosses your mind as you consider the number of people who lived, so long ago, in this newly excavated "house". While the archaeological value of these excercises is ample return for time and money expended, the opportunity exists to have the experience create an even greater impact. Some type of catalyst or equivalent device would be needed to compound the benefits of an already full program. At the Center, the opportunity to learn is there, but devices to enhance, stimulate and encourage the discovery and investigative processes would bolster the educational program. Successful techniques usually involve making a personal impression. Architecture in this case is a vehicle for personal impressions. A way to bring the archaeological and anthropological experience into the everyday environmental experience of each participant is to make the architecture an extension of the information from the field. Providing a contemporary architecture that, as a living environment, is an extension of the field and lab experience and where the experiences are brought to mind, perhaps into focus , provides the opportunity to add another aspect to architecture. In this case , another programmatic function which is a heuristic tool. Not only can the Center be a satisfying, daytoday architectural experience, but serve a programmatic function on a non-physical level. -7-

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While evening lectures will provide a context for the day's learning to fit into, what tools can an educator use to re-enforce all the new lessons presented? Generally, one learns when the experience is sufficiently different to make a lasting impression. A convenient and effective vehicle in this case is the Center, which is a combined living and working environment, because while provision for the basic needs is universal , the way it is packaged is determined by culture. It is possible to say that to learn about another culture, participants will live the way that culture lived. It is not necessary to go to the extreme of replicating an entire culture to learn. That is not the intent or goal in this case. It is not desirable to make the participants uncomfortable, the goal is to "stir their pot", continue to peak their curiousity and cause them to reflect on new experiences. The concept is to create an analogous architecture where the spaces carry cultural connotations and overtones through the space dimensions and organization of the spaces. The basis for creating a different experience is this: culture shapes architecture. "people with very different attitudes and ideals respond to varied physical environments. These responses vary from place to place because of changes and differences in the -8-

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interplay of social, cultural, ritual, economic, and physical factors . ... Because building a house is a cultural phenomenon, its form and organization are greatly influenced by the cultural milieu to which it belongs. . .. the house became more than shelter for primitive man, and almost from the beginning 'function' was much more than a physical or utilitarian concept. ... If provision of shelter is the passive function of the house, then its positive purpose is the creation of an environment best suited to the way of life of a people -in other words, a social unit of space." (Rappaport 1969: 46). If you house one culture in an architecture created by another, the experience will be sufficiently different to create a lasting impression " ... virtually everything that man is and does is associated with the experience of space" (Hall1966: 171 ). When combined with instruction as to why the architecture is different , the environment stimulates the process of discovery, therefore, the architecture becomes the heuristic device. -9-

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The archaeological processes and questions mentioned earlier have provided a method for understanding the Anasazi culture through their ruins. I am using the Mug House of Mesa Verde as an example from which to create the analogous environment [Fig. 1 ]. "In primitive sociteties, cooperative work groups and economic units affect the size and shape of dwellings and their relationships in a village layout. The archaeologist can often identify space clusters probably occupied by some of these units, and he may even be able to estimate their size .... Four levels of complexity are recognizable: (1) Clusters or suites of three to nine contiguous rooms with some adjacent outdoor space in an area or courtyard quite prbably represent household living quarters [Fig.2-4]. (2) Several households, or one unusually large household cluster, may share a single courtyard space and are called courtyard units [Fig.S-6]. (3) The total plan of the ruin further suggests a dual division, both on the layout of routes of access between the two parts and in the nature of construction seen in their kivas. (4) Finally Mug House forms the nucleus of a larger community, ... "(Rohn 1971: 31.) -10-

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UPPER LEDGE ...... t4 23 Louur and upprr ldtr of Hou.sr. I I I I I . '' FIG. 1 ( Rohn 1971: 28 29 )

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Sui tt 10/ 1 . FIG. 3SUITES & AREA (Rohn 1971 : 33) FIG 2 & 3 Sui tr FIG . 2 SUITE & AREAS IJ 37/t 11. l7/t J# Arti.u'l ,_trwf_ 31/1. 0 , tt H ..., FIG.4-MULTI-LEVEL SUITE , BALCONY & A REA (Rohn 1971 : 35) FIG 4

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KEY PLAN 38 Etu/y Caurtrard Uni t B . 30 Sw. l4 71. F I G . 5 COURTYARD ADJACENT TO SUITES & AREAS ( Rohn 1971: 34) 0 'tlJ KIVA B 0 1 ' ' • l • "" iiiiiiiiiC:"" t= ( Rohn 1

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Having dealt with the organization which can be drawn into the new architecture, some of the physical attributes from Mug House should be considered. Rooms are relatively small, rectangular spaces, while areas and courtyards have no regular shape or size. Areas and courtyards are shaped by bordering rooms, retaining walls and specially built walls. Construction of the rooms was consistent in terms of shape, floor area and headroom. (Rohn 1971 : 43). These features existed within the _ context of a natural environment that dictated where building could and could not take place resulting in the characteristic organic overall form of the entire form of villages and community. This identification of spaces and organization provide a format readily adaptable to a the Center's housing and working areas. In the education program, participants are repeatedly divided into groups of ten to fifteen, in turn groups are combined to deal with various tasks. "Thus any group of individuals who share the economic workload and occupy jointly one house or cluster of contiguous spaces that are well demarcated and into which outsiders do not freeely intrude may be called a -13-

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household .... The primary criteria used in delimiting suites center around mutual accessibilty of their component spaces and relative isolation of these same spaces from other room blocks. Throughout the ruin, doorways tend to connect clusters of rooms and outdoor areas around one large nuclear area. " (Rohn 1971: 31 ) . With the program already organizing itself about small working groups, the group dynamic basis for fitting into the architecture exists from the outset. In a very short time, groups will have an identity based on duties, living area, etc. Organizing around nuclear areas also provides forums for social interaction on a structured bas i s . Associations betweeen groups based on relationship to specific common areas will develop. "Rivalry and competition within a community are often organized and regulated by a division of community members into two groups . " (Rohn 1971: 39) . -14-

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Although I cannot see why there should be rivalry, there could certainly develop some self-comparisons between groups as smaller groups are assigned to work together on one task while other groups tend to other tasks. There could also be some friendly competitions based on work or tasks accomplished. A more practical application in this project would be to use this as the method for separating the visiting researchers quarters from the participants. Finally, there will be the opportunity for participants while reflecting upon their experience to establish some self-identity. "A community consists of persons who because of the proximity of their dwellings or because of various economic, social, and religious activities associate with one another on virtually a day-to-day basis. This means that communities can be recognized from geographical anad situational data." (Rohn 1971 : 40). During their stay the participants and staff will view themselves as part of an identifiable community because of shared experience. This is the sort of impression that has a lasting effect. Using the deductive process of study as the starting point (where information has led thinking from the general to the particular) , a housing structure designed to reflect the -15-

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Anasazi culture can be used to promote an inductive learning process where particulars, in this case the qualities of the pueblo architecture, can be drawn into general concepts. "One of the premises inherited from the last century is that the mind and memory are somehow at odds with the body ... The experience of our bodies, of what we touch and smell, of how well we are "centered," as dancers say, is not locked into the immediate present but can be recollected through time. The importance of memory as a part of our existence in the environment has frequently been denied in this century and by some is even now rather an embarassedly characterized as 'nostalgia' and dismissed again." (Bloomer 1977: x). "Buildings and settlements are the visible expression of relative importance attached to diffrerent aspects of life and the varying ways of perceving reality." (Rappaport 1969: 47) -16-

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Based on the role that architecture plays in every individual's life experience , it seems that it is an appropriate device to use in this case where the programmatic function is to study cultures. The end purpose of all study and research is to advance civilization through expanding the body of knowledge. Professional research and scholarly endeavors fullfil! this need. In the case of the participants, there i s the opportunity to send a personally interpreted knowledge derived from first hand experience immediately back into the mainstream of society. If we carry our experiences in our bodies due to threedimensional experience, then hopefully some insight gained from this cultivated community will find its way into daily life as similar environments trigger memories. In the end, the cycling of this experience through memory and into the conscious will continually be an enriching experience, in part as a result of architecture. -17-

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PROGRAM STATEMENT The Crown Canyon Center for American Archaeology is a research and educational facility located near Cortez , Colorado immediately northwest of Mesa Verde National Park in the heart of the Four Corners region. As well as providing facil i ties for professional research activity , the Center prov i des programs for students ranging in age from eleven and up. The Center conduds research in the Euroamerican historical record spanning 12,000 years in southwestern Colorado, the most prominent aspect of wh ich is the Anasazi civilation that created the prehistoric pueblo architecture. Excavations and surveys will be as far ranging as Utah , New Mexico , and Arizona but the primary sites (Sand Canyon Pueblo and the Duckfoot Sites) are 15 miles and one mile away respectively, from the Center. Approximately 50 lay participants can be accomodated at a time under the current program . Generally, the lay person interested in archaeology has no oportunity to -18 -

PAGE 27

participate in excavtions. Programs undertaken through the Center provide the opportunity to partake of this experience as well as other activites typically part of archaeological methodology and in the process enlarge their sense of the great diversity of human experience that is part of Colorado and Southwestern history. Facilities required to fulfill the goals of the Center are a laboratory for processing and analyzing specimens, a museum to display specimens gathered by the Center and housing for the program participants. MUSEUM The museum will be the main public building catering to the daily visitors. It will also have spaces designed to facilitate the Center program activities, but it is the primary building for presenting the Center to the public which is also the Center's principle fund source. It is essential that -19-

PAGE 28

the Center have a museum that explains what it does, how it does it and the results of that effort. Crow Canyon is within 15 miles of the Mesa Verde National Park gate, so there is likelihood that the Center will be included on the agenda of tour i sts visiting the Four Corners area. Assuming an annual Mesa Verde v i s i tor total of 650,000 , an allowance should be made for 65 , 000 annual visitors to Crow Canyon . Allowing for an eight month season (240 days) and a seven hour day an average visitor per hour number is 38.69. Rounding up to 40 visitors and tripling that number for a peak capacity visitor rate , the Center should design for a capacity of 120 visitors at peak times. Prov i ding 4 , 000 square feet for exhibition space will allow a maximum of flexibil ity for curators and display design. Other spaces in the musuem such as the auditorium will also have v i sitors so that not all visitors at a peak time will be in the exhibit areas simultaneously. The museum will also house the principle Center administrative offices , a reception area for fund raising and s i m i lar funct i ons, and a museum shop. -20-

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LABORATORY BUILDING The Laboratory Building has a dual function . First , it provides the facilities required to conduct modern , regional-scale , archaeological research . This includes office space for staff, and spaces for processing , analysis, and curation of research specimens and records. The second function id to provide opportunities for program participants to share in the research process and/or to take part in other educational programs that can best be presented in the lab building. Student use in the laboratory building will take place primarily in the Specimen Processing and Analysis Labs , and these rooms must be sized to accomodate this use. A small conference/meeting room will also be available in the Laboratory Build ing. Design of the spaces should never be too highly specilized or i nf l exible because as the programs evolve modification of spaces might be required. 21-

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HOUSING Housing must accomodate two categories of users: (1) visiting researchers and (2) program participants. A group housing or hostel type of housing would be appropriate for the program participants while apartments of some type would be necessary for researchers. A single dining hall for the entire housing complex will be required. Programs are usually a week long so that should be accounted for in sizing rooms , common areas and clothin storage space. Visiting researchers will fall into two types, those with and those without families. Small apartments for a researcher with spouse or that can be shared by single researchers are in order, as are apartments with bedroom space to accomodate children. The educational programs can handle up to 52 participants at a time. Group housing must allow for this as an ideal while realizing that it is not always possible to equaling balance head count between sexes. Some flexibility for odd numbers should be designed into the space. -22-

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r l I I GANIZATION CHART I -----I l s OFtlCE. I tea. I s t. 1 1

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SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS MUSEUM: EXHIBIT SPACE 4000 LECTURE HALL /AUDITORIUM (60 PEOPLE @ 10 sa FT PER PERSON = 600 Sa FT SEATING PLUS 200 Sa FT ACTIVITY/LECTERN AREA 800 MEETING ROOM/CONFERENCE SEMINAR 285 MUSEUM SALES (STORE) 200 RECEPTION/HOSTING/KITCHENETIE 1 00 LOBBY 400 EXHIBIT PREP AREA/SHORT TERM STORAGE COLLECTION 400 OFFICE 250 JANITORIAL (2 FLOORS 25 sa FT/FL) RESTROOMS subtotal 6785 50 250 BUILDING SYSTEMS (estimate 5% typ. mech plus 2% special systems electrical, security, fire detection) 7% 500 CIRCULATION 15% (for moving between areas) 15% of 4000 (seat of the pants) 1018 TOTAL MUSEUM BUILDING SPACE 8603 -24-

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DIAGRAM MUSEUM COMPLEX txHierr PE:E.F EXH-IBIT ...... SALES ,... AJDIT.

PAGE 34

LABORATORY : taken from specifications supplied by Crow Canyon Specimen Processing Lab Analysis/Teaching Lab Lab Director's Office Outer Office Inner Office Survey Room Curation Space Conference/Seminar Room Archeology office/Research Complex Permanent Staff Offices Drafting/Copying Room Computer Room Studio/Darkroom Temporary Staff Office Service Spaces (inside) Bathrooms Janitorial Closet Hallways Stairways Entryway//Foyer BUILDING TOTAL -26450 900 100 150 140 600 285 450 200 100 200 160 160 24 120 60 100 4145

PAGE 35

DIAGRAM LABORATORY COMPLEX 000::... ..._ __ __, m r----, I : .,._..___ lr4 .......... : C.URAfl=.J ____ j..-.. OfT1CES, I I

PAGE 36

HOUSING: LIST OF HOUSING COMPLEX SPACES: LOBBY/ RECEIVING DESK 150 HOUSING OFFICE 150 LARGE COMMON AREA (20 sa FT /PERSON* 25) 500 DINING HALL FOR CENTER 78 DINERS (6 TO TABLE) 1 00 saw FT PER TABLE * 13 TABLES PLUS 200 1500 KITCHEN (estimate from hostel info) 350 READING ROOM w/ small library 400 HOUSEKEEPING AREA 150 COMMON AREAS HOUSING COMPLEX 3 2 0 C SINGLES' APT. (4) SLEEPING AREA STUDY BATH LIVING AREA AREA OF ONE APARTMENT TOTAL AREA FOUR APT.'S -28180 48 63 100 391 1,564

PAGE 37

FAMILY APARTMENT (2) 2 BEDROOMS@ 180 ea. BATH LIVING ROOM STUDY AREA OF ONE APT. TOTAL AREA FOR TWO APT.'S GROUP OR HOSTEL DIVISION (4 groups @ 12 ea . plus counselor.) Assume 6 to a room for 8 rooms plus sleeping apartment for counselor/leader. SLEEPING AREA 2@ 240 ea. GROUP COMMON AREA BATH LEADER APT. AREA OF ONE GROUP APT. TOTAL AREA OF FOUR APT.'S HOUSING SUMMARY: SINGLES APT.'S (4) FAMILY APT.'S (2) GROUP HOUSING COMMON AREAS FOR HOUSING COMPLEX TOTAL HOUSING AREA -29360 63 144 48 615 1,230 480 50 200 150 880 3520 1,564 1,230 3 , 520 3,200 9,514

PAGE 38

DIAGRAM HOUSING COMPLEX

PAGE 39

PARKING (square feet) VISITORS 120 with 3 per car 40 @ 350 PARTICIPANTS 25 car spaces@ 350 RESIDENT RESEARCHERS 12@ 350 STAFF AND BUSINESS 15 @ 350 TOTAL AREA OF PARKING TOTAL BUILDING SPACE SUMMARY: Museum Laboratory Space Housing CROW CANYON CENTER BUILDINGS TOTAL -3114,000 8,750 4,200 5,250 32,200 8 ,603 4,145 9,514 22,262

PAGE 40

SITE Crow Canyon is west of Cortez in Montezuma County, State of Colorado, U.S. and is located at approximately latitude 37 degrees 22 minutes N. and longitude 108 degrees 38 minutes W at an elevation of 6200 feet. The property is 93 acres (roughly 1500 feet by 2700 feet) and is bounded on the north by County Road K. Mesa Verde is easily visible to the south and east from many parts of the property and Ute Mountain is visible from the west end of the property. The property is covered with juniper, pinon pine and sagebrush. Some short grasses and other low growing vegetation complete the vegetation. The east end of the property is creek bottom bordered by a low cliff formation formed by the creek. The ground rises rapidly from the creek and becomes somethin of a plateau in effect, overlooking the creek bottom. From a small promontory, one can overlook the creek and through a small draw that frames part of Mesa Verde. In the upper parts of the property, vegetation is tall and dense enough to prevent one from viewing distance except from specific spots. Wildlife crossing the property includes deer and elk, as well as many small ground rodents and hares. -32-

PAGE 41

Materials found in the soil survey were grael base course, silty and sandy clays, clayey sands , shale, sandstone strata and sandstone bedrock. Following are excerpts from the investigation performed by Tech, Inc. of Farmington, NM. SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS The following borings: materials were encountered by the test 1) GRAVEL BASE COURSE 2) SILTY AND SANDY SANDSTONE STRATA 3) SANDSTONE BEDROCK CLAYS, CLAYEY SANDS, SHALE, AND The Gravel Base Course, which was encountered at the ground in 1, 2, 4, and 7, averaged approximately 6 inches in thickness. The soils encountered in all.of the test borings were Clayey Sands and Sandy Clays. Shale was also encountered in several of the test borings. The test borings showed Sandstone Strata in varied degrees of thickness. The log of the test borings and the laboratory test results are shown in the attached sheets. According to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS), the soil in this strata classifies as SC-SANDY CLAYS. No groundwater was encountered in the test borings. FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS Considering the proposed construction and the subsurface -conditions encountered, spread footings bearing on the natural soils should be suitable to support the proposed structure. The footings should be designed for a maximum allowable net bearing pressure of 2,000 pounds per square foot. If bearing on natural soil and if bearing on sandstone, 4,000 pounds per square foot. All exterior footings should be bottomed at least 32 inches below the finished exterior grade to protect against frost penetration. Footings placed on other than sandstone and sized for the recommended bearing pressure could experience settlements on the order of 1/2 to 5/8 inch. Differential settlements .should be on the order of 1/4 inch. -33-

PAGE 42

We recommend that continuous wall footings have a minimum width of 16 inches; and isolated spread footings have a minimum width of 24 inches. Continuous foundation walls should be reinforced both top and bottom to allow spanning supported lengths of at least 5 feet. It should also be noted that any excavation below a depth of approximately 4 feet below the existing ground surface may encounter sandstone. We also recommend that for the structure, all foundations be placed entirely on soils or entirely on sandstone. This will prevent a condition of excess differential settlement which could occur if part of the foundation bears on soil and part on sandstone. Additionally. if all footings will bear on soil, probes should be taken to insure that at least 12 inches of soil exists between the bottom of the footing and the top of sandstone. As the soil under the slabs or floor has low to moderately expansive potential, introduction of water under the slab may cause small results in movements of up to 1/4 inch. The following recommendations are made: 1. the soil to a suitable sandstone strata and then use non expansive backfill under the slab. The compacted soil should have an allowable maximum bearing pressure of 3,000 pounds per square inch. 2. Design a structural floor with a crawl space. 3. Eliminate pressured water lines under the slab. 4. Isolate the slab from the structure foundation system and provide architectural detailing that would accommodat e the anticipated movements discussed above. It is recommended that foundation excavation be inspected by a soils engineer and the excavation be deepened if loose or disturbed soils are encountered. Additionally, if the soil conditions are significantly different than those presented in this report, this firm should be contacted for verification and/or supplemental recommendations. Thickened slab sections could be utilized below lightly loaded interior partitions provided that loads do not exceed 700 pounds per linear foot and provided that all fill is constructed according to the procedures presented herein. Slab sections should be thickened over a minimum width of 12 inches. The slab thickness and reinforcement shall be consistent with structural requirements.

PAGE 43

To reduce the potential for distress by differential foundation movements, all continuous footings, masonry, and stem walls should be reinforced. Masonry walls should be constructed using frequent grout cores on close spacing along with horizontal and vertical reinforcement to redistribute stresses in the event of minor differential movement. Frequent use of control joints at openings or other discontinuities is recommended to control cracking. Use 1/2 to 1 inch expanded styrofoam in all expansion joints to lessen the stresses caused by differential settlements. LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES FOUNDATION WALLS Foundation walls are (un-yielding) and should lateral soil pressures. normally designed to be fairly rigid therefore be designed for "at rest" Foundation wall backfill should consist of free-drainage Sands meeting the criteria specified in the "Sitework" section of this report. The fill material should be placed in 8 inch maximum loose lifts and compacted with light equipment to 90 percent of the maximum dry density at a moisture content within 2 percent of the optimum moisture content, as determined by the Proctor Test (ASTM: D-698). The following soil parameter should be used for foundation wall design. Soil Unit Weight Active Earth Pressure Coefficient (Ka) Passive Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) At Rest Earth Pressure Coefficient (Kp) Angle of Internal Friction Cohesion Coefficient of Sliding Friction (foundation and earth) 120 lbs/cu ft 0.33 3.0 0.50 30 0 0.4 Additional surcharge loads should be added, if appropriate. (Dale 1985: 2-4) -35-

PAGE 44

The climate i s a temperate one with the greatest problem ar ising f rom wet soil. Thi s determines w h e n a d i g ca n con tinu e and ge n erally keeps t h e f i eld season between April and November, however a good rain o r snow ca n c l ose dow n t he excavat ion at any time. The daily max i mum mean temperature (all degrees i n F) i s 64 . 6 , daily m i n i m u m mea n 33 . 4 , monthly 49.0. Extr emes in tempera t ure are a reco r d 10 1 de gr ees with a record 27 . Mean number o f days (for max i mum) 90 deg rees and above 32 , 32 d e greees a n d below11; mea n numb er o f da y s ( f or m[ni mum ) 32 deg r ees and below 178 , 0 degrees and be low8 . The mea n yearly prec i p i tation is 12.58 . (For more de t a i led p r ec i p i tat i o n information see follow ing table . ) CORTEZ. CO 11511111 1177 JFT --------tt.MHitA lltU: t 'f, fUC.:IPITAnnH TOTI.U UN<:! NLAN1 rxnr.-.us """" .. ... n . "" < cif :z ;: '"" .,,, ,., , :t7.7 .,. " " .. ,,. ... ... , " . u.• .. .. II ... .,. ..... tt 0 • 11.1 11 , 1 ,. .. " . . ,.,. ... . u . l ... " .. • -SNO • , \ -. • .1'11'\!_ ---,..n .,.,.,. E .. f-[ a 3 ... 1i i < :l ... \.. •'I._ ... b ... • .. < • t • . • • • 1 f-. , \J • " . . " , ... H o f '' 1o. • , , 10 0 '1 If I ... ,,., u " u O t . . ' lo. J -. " . . . , " • " . . " , t ••• . . , . . . . '' ' " . • • u • . . . t.•e 11 loU U11 a . ' u . o 1 r r r 1 . ; "'(;'I; 2 I . i I 5 :F ; < , . 1 •' !: 0 l -f II ,o U J l I 0 0 ' u.o 1J \1 • 0 3 ,. .... ,, " • • 0 "' t t . O n Ot I t NAY u.o ,., .. "' " " n " " I • • I • ... ' " 11 . . " J t O l .I ' ' " )liN ... . .,, 0 u . r IO O .. ,, " ,. 1 • • • • .. , t.u .. " " ' ' . . JULY' . . . , , . . . ll.' 101 II II •I• 10 I " • • • ), \J . ... ,, \." " " . . AUC . . . ' ", ... . .. .. " ... .. ,, • • 0 • . ... • • 1 0 " ... , , ,. . . n n 1t.l ' ., . o ... " . , .. " " I • I • ,_,. .... .. t.lt , . II • I ' . OCT ' ' ' ... . "' 70 H • • II 0 , , , . .. ,. " . . . , 1t O l ' ' . . """ u . • II, I ... . _ , Htl • I " • ... .... . . l o U . . " . . ' 11.0 ... , ., . . II .I II. I .... • . 10 • ' " I.U II loll ,. II I I. I ,. . ' J.....__l..-.-L---.... t AI_, ON ! .UU,. DAT U (Ruffn e r 1980: 1 03) -36-

PAGE 45

.. . . • . . . . . . UTAH COLORADO . . [/i ? SAND CANYON : :::: :::-:-:-:::: PUEB L -------cRowf coRrEz-. ! ......................... ................. .. ...................... ............. L ................ . . . . . . . . ARIZONA; . ; ... ... . . . -ITION COURTESY OF OHM NEW MEXICO CROW CANYON CENTER LOCATION MAP

PAGE 47

SPATIAL ANALYSIS (ALPHABETICAL ORDER) -37 -

PAGE 48

ANALYSIS I TEACHING LAB SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THIS IS A "CLEAN" LAB, PAPER RECORDS AND CLEAN SPECIMENS ARE HANDLED AND STORES HERE. USED YEAR-ROUND BY STUDENTS, RESEARCHERS AND STAFF. UP TO 30 STUDENTS AT FOLDING TABLES MOVEABLE PARTITION TO DIVIDE ROOM IN TWO

PAGE 49

TV 'SIS AND DOCUMENTATION ECIMENS, DEMONSTRATIONS, JRES F MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, >SCOPES. \GE UNTIL CURATION & REMARKS : FOLDING TABLES DING CHAIRS 75 LIN. FT. OF 18" SHELVING .GE SPACE FOR MICROSCOPES, CTORS , BALANCES, CALIPERS, . COLLECTIONS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN NEEDS FT . 12" SHELVES FOR SUPPLIES ACOUSTIC NEEDS LIN. FT. BOOKSHELVES FOR \NUALS AND REFERENCES SYSTEMS ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION 900 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 50

CENTER I MUSEUM OFFICES SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES , . THE CENTER DIRECTOR AND STAFF IS HERE AS WELL AS THE STAFF RELATED DIRECTLY TO THE MUSEUM. A HIGHER QUALITY HERE IS APPROPRIATE FOR PUBLLIC IMAGE. I : r .. o-rHESR. I I I M USE=U AM 'D I

PAGE 51

250 sq ft riVITY ACCESS ZONE PRIVATE OFFICE -ro offict:: RESTRICTED u tt\11 rWv\ PUBLIC FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE UTILE MODERATE GREAT VIEW OUT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED & REMARKS VIEW IN NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED ILLUMINATION NATURAL REQUIRED NEEDS DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE ARTIAOAL TYPICAL LlGtmrJ.G SPECIAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS NORMAL SPECIAL SYSTEMS HVAC NORMAL SPECIAL NONE ELECTRICITY NORMAL C112a.>l1S SPECIAL toe_ 1 V cot'l t::R. NONE PLUMBING NORMAL SPECIAL NONE ARE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY . YES NO

PAGE 52

LARGE COMMON AREA SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THE GATHERING PLACE FOR THE CAMPUS PARTICIPANTS. EVERYONE WANDERS IN AND OUT, A PLACE TO MEET FOR GOING SOMEWHERE. --

PAGE 53

lTV INFORMAL, SOCIAL \JG PLACE ; & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARllAOAL HVAC ELECTRiaTY 500 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE PLUMBING NORMAL SPECIAL NONE ARE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY . YES NO

PAGE 54

COMPUTER ROOM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES A VERY UTILITARIAN, EFFICIENT WORK STATION DURABLE AND EASILY CLEANED ADJACENCIES NOT TOO IMPORTANT I

PAGE 55

'lTV ACCESS ZONE .E USER OF MICRO COMPUTER FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT 100 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED ) & REMARKS VIEW IN NONE FOR EASE OF SERVICE AND >LING OF CABLING ILLUMINA TlON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARllAOAL SYSTEMS HVAC CCOUUG ELECTRiaTY OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMA L SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL OR_ SPECIAL Q'iOJlT NONE PLUMBING NORMAL SPECIAL NONE ARE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY YES NO

PAGE 56

CONFERENCE I SEMINAR SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THIS SERVES AS THE LAB'S IN-HOUSE MEETING AREA INFORMAL, FOLDING TABLES FOR VERSATILITY , MULTI-PURPOSE HANDLE UP TO 20 PERSONS IN MEETINGS , CLASSES, PRESENTATIONS CAN BE FAIRLY ISOLATED ' . Mal. -1 ofF teE-

PAGE 57

' IVITY ACCESS ZONE 1SSROOM, PRESENTATIONS )RMAL FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT :s & REMARKS VIEW IN ;K BOARD JECTION SCREEN ILLUMINATION NATURAL \l. FT., 12" DEEP BOOKSHELVES NEEDS liNG TABLES ARllAOAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRIOTY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 285 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 58

CURATION SPACE SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES STORAGE OF ARTIFACTS FOR UP TO 10 YEARS. SOME RESEARCH WILL OCCUR HERE, SO SOME ACCOMODATION SHOULD BE MADE FOR PEOP L E TO WORK. PROVIDE DESK AND WORK TABLE I I I

PAGE 59

lTV HIL Y HIGH GRADE STORAGESTABLE ENVIRONMENT I & REMARKS . FT. OF 36" SHELVING, 12" SHELVES :TABLE ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS NATURAL ARTIAaAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRiaTY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY. 600 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 60

DINING HALL SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES PARTICIPANTS EAT HERE 2-3 TIMES A DAY. MEETINGS AND GATHERINGS IN EVENINGS RECREATION; ALMOST A COMPLETE MULTI-PURPOSE. INFORMAL, RELAXED FOR LARGE GROUPS. STAFF AND INVITED GUESTS EAT HERE TOO \ \

PAGE 61

'IV lTV lNG/MEETlNGS :REATION ::s & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURilY 1,500 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 62

DRAFTING I COPYING ROOM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES TWO SEPARATE AREAS MUST BE CREATED COPIER AREA WILL NOT CHANGE MUCH ONCE SET UP DRAFTING AND SUPPLIES WILL CHANGE SOME (FLEXIBILITY) ADJACENCY NOT TOO IMPORTANT I CQJ\Ef?-_

PAGE 63

fiTY S & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINA llON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARTlAOAL HVAC ELECTRICITY fb\tJE:.E-(Z1D'J P) Foe c.oPle:R-PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 200 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONA L REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABL E UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 64

EXHIBIT PREPARATION SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES OPEN FLEXIBLE SPACE WITH ROOM TO STORE SUPPLIES AND SPECIMENS. WORK BENCH AND DESK OR DRAWING BOARD ROOM. A MODERATELY DIRTY ROOM. ALLOW GOOD CLEANING WHILE SAFEGUARDING SPECIMENS. 7

PAGE 65

'lTV .L SHOP FOR DESIGNING AND )lNG EXHIBITS. n TERM STORAGE OF SPEC-S BEING PREPPED FOR EXHIBIT )R RETURN TO PERMANENT : AGE. ) & REMARKS WILL BE USED MOSTLY JG THE OFFSEASON WHILE !\RING NEXT SEASON'S IT. ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS NATURAL r o ARTIROAL mu CdiD. ACOUSTIC NEEDS u SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 400 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRAB L E UNDESIRAB L E TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 66

EXHIBIT SPACE SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THIS IS THE PRINCIPLE PUBLIC SPACE FOR DAILY VISITORS. IT WILL BE A CHANGING DISPLAY OF THE CENTER'S WORK AND IN SOME WAYS IS THE OBLIGATION TO THE PUBLIC FROM THE CENTER AND IN MANY WAYS IS THE PRIMARY PUBLIC RELATIONS TOOL. IMAGE AND CREDIBILITY ARE DESIGN ISSUES. NATURAL LIGHT IS ESSENTIAL. .._ _ cF

PAGE 67

TIVITY ople viewing exhibits. e issue is circulation. strict access to other areas while )Winf staff freee access after hours. S & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL 4000 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE ARE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO YES NO

PAGE 68

FAMILY APARTMENT SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THESE APARTMENTS ARE AN ATTEMPT TO ACCOMODATE RESEARCHERS W/ FAMILIES WHO MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE BE ABLE TO PARTICIPATE. IN EXCHANGE THEY BECOME PART OF THE HOUSING COMPLEX POPULATION PROVIDE A PROVACYTO HELP MAINTAIN THE NUCLEAR FAMILY. EAT AT DINING HALL HOWEVER l / / I I I /c;gwp HoUC:SlMG,

PAGE 69

lTV "AIN FAMILY I. D. ; & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIRCtAL HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION 615 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO SECURITY YES NO

PAGE 70

GROUP APT I HOSTEL SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THIS AREA SHOULD INCORPORATE AS MANY ASPECTS AS POSSIBLE OF ANASAZI ORGANIZATION AND SENSE OF SIZE. GROUPS COME & GO ON A WEEKLY BASIS AND AS GROUPS STAY IN CLOSE PROXOMITY TO ONE ANOTHER MOST OF THE TIME ATTENTION SHOULD BE GIVEN A SENSE OF PRIVACY AND CARE GIVEN TO EFFECTS OF SPACE ON TIGHT GROUPINGS 1', ,, ' ' ' T

PAGE 71

"IVITY EPING, BATHING SMALL >UP CONVERSATION ::s & REMARKS ea unit 1460 sq ft ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARTIFIOAL SYSTEMS HVAC D\a:cT lli ELECTRiaTY GFl PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 72

HOUSEKEEPING AREA SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES UTILITY SPACELAUNDRY AND SUPPLIES FOR CLEANING AND UPKEEP FOR INTERIORS , H-D 11\LG .-.& c.Ea \ \ -

PAGE 73

TIVITY N LAUNDRY )RE EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES ES & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINA llON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARllFiaAL SYSTEMS HVAC 10 ELECTRICITY Z2DY WOeh PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY . 150 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONA L REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 74

HOUSING OFFICE SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THE HDQTRS FOR HOUSING & THE INFORMATION SPOT FOR PARTICIPANTS SOMEONE USUALLY ON DUTY TROUBLE SHOOTING STARTS HERE offid=:-.._ _____ ...

PAGE 75

'lTV RAL OFFICE HASING, SCHEDULING lMATION S & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIROAL HVAC ELECTRiaTY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 150 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 76

KITCHEN SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES EFFIC I ENCY AND ESAY CLEANING GOOG SIMPLE FOOD TO BE SERVED IN QUANTITY AHEAD OF MEAL PREP NEED STORAGE OFF SEASON , ANYONE MIGHT COOKMAKE ACCESIBLE I fb'SI , -

PAGE 77

TIVITY OKING FOR GROUPS AND FOR CEPTIONS HOSTED BY CENTER ES & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARTlFIOAL SYSTEMS HVAC -Hotl:S Dl et::er .a<.\-\AUST ELECTRIOTY 12D \D PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 350 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 78

LAB BATHROOMS SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES JUST ENOUGH W.C.'S AND URINALS TO HANDLE FIELD CREWS NO SHOWERS, HOUSING IS CLOSE BY D D<:J,:::_ l eA-r11 I ,, .. 1 " i , ,_

PAGE 79

lTV ; & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINAllON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIAOAL HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY . 160 sq tt PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 80

LAB DIRECTOR'S OFFICE SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES MAKE 2 SPACES-OUTER 100 SQ FT FOR GENERAL INNER 150 SQ FT STORAGE OF CRITICAL DOCUMENTS THE OUTER SPACE WILL BE THE LAB HEADQUARTERS

PAGE 81

lVI TV IERAL OFFICE WORK AND RAGE OF CRITICAL RECORDS I DOCUMENTS :s & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIROAL HVAC ELECTRiaTY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 250 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 82

LECTURE I AUDITORIUM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THE "SHOWCASE" PRESENTATION AREA. LECTURES DURING THE DAY TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC, MAJOR EVENING PRESENTATIONS TO PARTICIPANTS. CONSIDER KIVA-LIKE DESIGN INFLUENCE. PRIMARY ACCESS FROM LOBBY, PROVIDE SERVICE ACCESS.

PAGE 83

11TY ACCESS ZONE URES, PRESENTATIONS, ECTOR SHOWS FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT ) & REMARKS VIEW IN :wIN, OUT-IT MIGHT BE NICE EE THE SPACE FROM THE LOBBY ILLUMINATION NATURAL ART OF THE EXHIBIT AREA. NEEDS ARTlAOAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION 800 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 84

LOBBY I RECEIVING DESK SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES PARTICIPANTS CHECK IN & OUT SCHEDULES AND INFO POSTED MAIN ENTRANCE TO HOUSING COMPLEX l-Oet:>Y ..... 1 ' -

PAGE 85

150 sq ft 'lTV ACCESS ZONE PR I VA TE REST RIC TE D PUBLIC FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE LITILE MODERAT E GR E A T VIEW OUT NO NE OPT IONAL l'ZP a IT REQUIRED ) & REMARKS VIEW IN NON E 11\.lSI.Dt::.-4 OPTI O N A L R E QUIR E D ILLUMINATION NATURAL REQUIR E D NEEDS DES I RAB LE UNDES I RAB LE ARTIAOAL TYPICA L SPEC I A L ACOUSTIC NEEDS N OR M A L SPECIA L SYSTEMS HVAC NORMAL SPEC IA L NO NE ELECTRICITY NORMAL SPEC IAL NON E PLUMBING NORMAL SPEC I A L NON E ARE DETECTION Y E S NO FIRE SUPPRESSION Y E S NO SECURITY Y E S t-..\I G w.L-7 NO

PAGE 86

MECHANICAL & SYSTEMS SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES A SYSTEM WI FLEXIBLE CAPABILITIES IS NEEDED DUE TO DIVERSE SPACES TO BE SERVED. EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE KEPT OUT OF SIGHT . EITHER HERE OR SOMEWHERE TANKS AND GAUGE EQUIPMENT FOR FIRE SUPPRESSION . ALARM PANELS FOR SECURITY AND FIRE. / I / css:.uer N / ; / / MLPt=l.JM / PtJ!UC.. /

PAGE 87

'lTV :o ACCESS FOR PREVENTING I ENANCE AND MONITORING 1E & SECURITY SYSTEMS. ) & REMARKS 7/o of assigned ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS NATURAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS ISO\.A"!D4 SYSTEMS HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING S !klK.. ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY . 500 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 88

MEETING ROOM . SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES HIGH APPEARANCE W/0 EXTRAVAGANCE BOARD MEETINGS AND OTHER CENTER BUSINESS RECEIVING OF VIP'S LOCATE ONE LEVEL REMOVED FROM MOST PUBLIC SPACE I I I I I I L..c:t)bY

PAGE 89

lTV "INGS OF BUSINESS TYPE. riDE MODERATE PRESENTATION .ITIES . SIDEBOARD FOR SERVING. ) & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIFIOAL HVAC ELECffilaTY 285 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIR E D REQUIR E D DESIRAB L E UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIA L NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPEC I AL NON E PLUMBING NOR M AL 1----il--------i SPECIAL NON E FIRE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY. YES NO

PAGE 90

MUSEUM SALES SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES LOCATE AT LOBBY SO THAT TRAFFIC LEAVING ANY FUNCTION MUST PASS BY. GOOD CIRCULATION A MUST, SHOULD NEVER SEEM SO CROWDED AS TO DETER POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS.

PAGE 91

fiTY ACCESS ZONE : AGE AND SALE OF MOMENTOS .ITERATURE TO DAILY FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE )RS AND PARTICIPANTS. :; & REMARKS VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTlAOAL HVAC ELEClRiaTY 200 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE PLUMBING NORMAL SPECIA L NONE FIRE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO YES NO

PAGE 92

PERMANENT STAFF OFFICES SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES MADE UP OF THREE OFFICES-EACH TO BE QUIET, WORKING/WRITING AREAS PROVIDE DESK, SIDE CHAIRS, LAYOUT TABLE, FILING CABINETS, COMPUTERS, BOOKSHELVES FOR PERSONAL LIBRARIES

PAGE 93

'lTV -AREA FOR PERSONAL WORK. ::o ACCESS ) & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTlAOAL HVAC ELECTRIOTY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY. 450 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 94

PUBLIC RESTROOMS SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES SERVICEABLE AND DURABLE W/0 BEING SHODDY

PAGE 95

fiTY S & REMARKS 2@ 100 ea ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINA TlON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARllROAL SYStBMS HVAC 0\e:c::\ ELECTRiaTY &Fl PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 200 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 96

READING ROOM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES QUIET, GENEROUS COMFORT AND ONE OF THE FEW MORE PRIVATE AREAS AMPLE SEATING W/ VARIETY FOR SINGLES, COUPLES AND SMALL GROUPS AVOID "LIBRARY" FEEL LOCATE SO IT IS AWAY FROM CROWD BUT NOT ISOLATED I K.m:HE:ll ,..... C-D t-.1

PAGE 97

/lTV lNG AND SMALL QUIET TALK S & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL HVAC ELECTRICITY 400 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE PLUMBING NORMAL ...... SPECIAL NONE ARE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY YES NO

PAGE 98

RECEPTION I KITCHEN SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES "OFFICIAL" FUNCTIONS, FUND RAISERS TO BE HELD HERE. SOME LIMITED ACCESS TO OTHER AREAS DESIRABLE, BASICALLY THE SERVING AREA FRO FUNCTIONS, PEOPLE WILL ALSO ROAM.

PAGE 99

TIVITY tOMARIL Y PREP OF THINGS TO 1PPEN IN DINING HALL KITCHEN . l iS KITCHEN TO FACILITATE IVING IN SPIFFIER DIGS. rES & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL ARllAOAL SYSTEMS HVAC HIG\t Ajc. fb"SS lf:>Lt::-ELECTRiaTY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 100 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQU I RED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 100

"SINGLES" APARTMENTS SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES NEITHER THE HILTON NOR A MONK'S CELL THE SPACE IS TO PROVIDE ANOTHER LEVEL OF PRIVACY FOR VISITING RESEARCHERSGET AWAY FROM THE LAB, OFFICE, COMMON AREAS, AND PARTICIPANTS FOR SINGLETONS , COUPLES & SHARED BACHELOR DIGS (ARCHAEOLOGY JOKE). / / / / / / / I I I

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TIVITY SIC LIVING QUARTERS rHOUT KITCHEN. EAT AT liNG HALL rES & REMARKS FOR SOLAR APPLICATIONS MUCH AS POSSIBLE IN HOUSING ea unit 391 sq ft ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTIAOAL HVAC ELECTRiaTY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 102

SPECIMEN PROCESSING LAB SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THE RECEIVING ROOM FOR SPECIMENS. 1012 STUDENTS AT A TIME ARE HERE UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 1 OR 2 STAFF PROVIDE 2 WORK STATIONS W/ SINKS (4 DBL SINKS PER STATION) IT IS A "DIRTY" LAB AND SHOULD HAVE EASILY CLEANED SURFACES LOADING DOCK & OVERHEAD DOOR REQ'D GOOD ACCESS TO ANALYSIS LAB

PAGE 103

:TIVITY ST STOP FOR SPECIMENS )UGHT FROM FIELD CLEANING, AND DRYING OF :CIMENS. TES & REMARKS ITED USE OF HCL. VIDE FOE ACID STORAGE RK STATIONS ACID-RESISTANT MBING ACID RESISTANT Y AND/OR EYE SHOWER ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATlON NEEDS NATURAL ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS HVAC r:f.=:. t=6 K\ D lBi::. Gf=\ ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION 450 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 104

STAFF RESTROOMS SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES NICE QUALITY IN THESE ROOMS. RESTRICT ACCESS TO STAFF AND OFFICIAL GUESTS. I

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TIVITY TES & REMARKS 2@ 25 ea ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTlAOAL HVAC Dle;:c:r ELECmlaTY GF\ . PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY 50 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

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STUDIO I DARKROOM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES THE COMPLETE FACILITY IN-HOUSE FOR PHOTO DOCUMENTATION OF ARTIFACTS. SHOOT AND DEVELOP. USED YEAR-ROUND OUTER ROOM IS STUDIO, INNER IS DARK ROOM. SfU"DIO

PAGE 107

TIVITY fES & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINA TlON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS NATURAL SYSTEMS HVAC 1)::.. lWoM ELECTRICITY PLUMBING ARE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY. 200 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC UTILE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONA L REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 108

SURVEY ROOM SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES A ROOM THAT TAKES CARE OF ALL ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH SURVEY TRULY UTILITARIAN. THE ROOM WILL HANDLE FIELD CREWS, EQUIPMENT, RECORDS AND PAPERWORK OFFICE AREA W/ DRAFTING TABLE, MAP CASE, ETC. l -

PAGE 109

r1rv lNG AREA FOR SORTIES E SURVEY EQUIPMENT & tRDS :E FOR SURVEY ARCHAEOLO-:; & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATlON NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL HVAC ELECTRICITY PLUMBING FIRE DETECTION FIRE SUPPRESSION SECURITY . 140 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE YES NO YES NO YES NO

PAGE 110

TEMPORARY STAFF OFFICE SPACE QUALITY AND GUIDELINES SHARED OFFICE SPACE PROVIDE BARE NECESSITIES4 DESKS, 1 WORK TABLE, FOUR FILING CABINETS AND BOOKSHELVES

PAGE 111

VI TV FOR WORK, NEEDS TO BE r :oR MEETINGS :S & REMARKS ACCESS ZONE FLEXIBILITY OF SPACE VIEW OUT VIEW IN ILLUMINATION NEEDS ACOUSTIC NEEDS SYSTEMS NATURAL ARTlFIOAL HVAC ELECTRiaTY 160 sq ft PRIVATE RESTRICTED PUBLIC LITTLE MODERATE GREAT NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED NONE OPTIONAL REQUIRED REQUIRED DESIRABLE UNDESIRABLE TYPICAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NORMAL SPECIAL NONE NORMAL SPECIAL NONE PLUMBING NORMAL 1--11-------1 SPECIAL NON E FIRE DETECTION YES NO FIRE SUPPRESSION YES NO SECURITY . YES NO

PAGE 112

ZONING CHECK There is no zoning for Montezuma County Colorado .

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Project JJuae Ag(.ME:oLo Gl CAl Locatio a eooN.n'; co loe&'P (blEt?.. 02s;; .. :rEzJ Code Chect By lh 0 TESF'-:-Section 0 l&n. l.Wa /t>-6 A Fire zoae J.. '3f!? Occupa.ncy classification E.: 2-lSec -a clo 8 , 'P 0 ;) I . Prillciple ---------------Others (specify) S.:---G-?:! ) \ L D f r-::> -u n/a. • 0-r-il' A I--I l , (2eA \C.:._;. S E-2-lt--L'!:) fl l__ Coastructioa type 1yPe.. )f. 1--t-tvue-{e EiE..ltezS Jbflrt 6 df j 1 H tJ (. t. t10 -R rr._:,yv; Occupaacy sepa.ra.tioas requifed 6 to hours to hours to hours to hours to hours Cha.n&eS ill OCCUpaJlcy Q llaxiaua a.lloYable floor area 4 tf;-pt? {v ?kr'..() n /a. I If adjacent to open area on tvo or more s i des 50 b n /a. If over one story qcqo fan If sprillklered ________ ...... ______ ?:::J Increases for fire separations 1

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4-6 M•xi•ua alloY&ble hei1ht ----------AJ Feet _________ _______ til Stories 4 AI / I ? Towers . spires. steeples -------------E Fire resistaa.ce or enerior yaJJ.s (see occupancy & constructio . North Z.. tf-e.-..C. 5 R South --------------------' 1 'I ___________________ __ " West _____ , _ , _______________ __ Setbacks requiring protection of openings in exterior valls C North --------------------South -------------------. . .. • Location within city I location 011 property Use or Public Property Doors prohibited from swinging into city property? _____ __ Restrictions on marquees . canopies . etc . ------------Other projections-----------------Wi.ndoYs required i.D. rooas fJrrf Enclosed or semi-enclosed courts-size rqd . ----------n/ . I ----=:r:L Ventilation requireaent.s oPI3JA-:5t..&-eEO J. n/ JJAfi)llAk 1/&;Nf O f tA : 6 c.--fu-. I -Jo'8L C l e.t:.U0"TED f ? lliniaua ceili1ll hei&hLS i.D. rooas n n/ 2 j l

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1/--A 1/1 lliai.aua noo.r &.rea or .rooas ---------_,E) Fire .resistive requi.reaea-------------n/a Exterior beari4g walls ___ __________ hrs Interior beari4g valls ___ _,_1 __________ hrs Exterior non-beari4g valls _ __._ ___________ hrs -. : ... Structural frame _____ __________ h rs Permanent partitions ( f::ie-WCQD ot) hrs Exit corridor walls ---------------h rs Vertical openi4gs ----------------hrs : hrs Roofs _________ _________ _ h rs Exterior doors --------'-----------hrs _____ ..;.. 1 _________ _ hrs Bas i s Actual Load \• ( 1\. 'K ! . (I)P (J "" .... ' .... ./

PAGE 116

' ' ...... Minimum vidth of exits -------------tl 1 , ... J, l ._3 \ 1 Exit separation arrangement k '81 ?A r . _ rrt:J '< ! \ a tri r v /(' .<=..i t . r / _:"'1 , -;/" Maximum allowable travel distance to exit -r? / 1 . A 0 . , r < With sprinklers _ __,"-------------1 n Exit sequence (through adjoiJling or accessory areas) ---n /'( ___ . r ... < .1/ L--f,Y<>.0-::,;;-:1 .... j(-1/f!_, ' d--r 2. f._ k:o u,t< ;_ ;y.:::; OC-!Jp :;;_s .P . r Eiil doors a /' A 7 V .::J 'if j !'"'/ '11 .. -"" ' / n I I I L Minimum width & height -------Maximum leaf width _..;..A-.J,.., :..::b;...' _ ' ----------Width required for number of occupants --------Dead end corridors length __ 1..::/;....11 _________ _ 4

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\I tl II :2 "X)! e ,, ::2 30 & 1 ' II z.-."5 I \ . OpeniJlgs ?rr t:(?11?-. L Y !!.:D rr' j r !J le J.J0-r 16 zs5t; ::J S &&irs n / & Min . width ___ 44J.......1... ___ occ . load of :52 ee_ h:JI re. _______ .... 2<-:::...=.o __ occ . load of -41 er less -----------occ . load of ------------------__ occ.load of------tl Maximum riser allowed ----L.-----------n/a II MiJlimum tread allowed __ ........_ ___________ n/a WiJlding. circular. spiral stairs n/a 0 '7CJ)'.re.. -t;;;: ,.r-t')\.1 rv. 1o ,, :n!"411 r-.. .. :Aur-l...Ji tf)!_ ts11 n / a Minimum width rqd . \J I D'f1.f STA,!e;N.A.Y Mati.mum width rqd . #'' rt: ; t'TJI\ . I ....I .,-' ':o: Vertical distance betwee.c la..cdi.cgs Handicap refuge space -------------21'e:2 Stair to roof rqd.? ""'---------------n/a II Stair to basement restrictions Bf.e.e :Y. 1D fQ?.veJY n/a C.0/0/. IF ,S'T?'tC: Stair enclosure rqd . ? . ...... . I II J Stair headroom (p -(e t'f'JY\ • n/a 6"o1-B&aclrails -----------------n/a v9:= Rqd. a.t each side? _....;r...,;: tl..---;;;.....:.L::;__ ___________ _ Cu cs 9/ . ) Intermediate rails rqd. ? Max . width between int.eriot r-ails ----------Rqd. height r '?a 111 1 24--'' V-G Max. openings i.e rails ---'-.L....----------He i gh t above nosing _______ _ s

PAGE 118

,( I J LJ:tenSiOn 0( railiJlg ?: ,!_ k ()I.A) /i n f\e/A)P 4 or k. l I I Projection from va.ll 'Exceptions ----------------?'06 BorizoJUal exit requireaents CA1L cF n 1 3?t11(e) ?2< WY'At6r&-I I \VJ.':Oj z._. or rr of't::".: Kro D . Raaps -----------------n1 Width Y):X.. -t:\ 2 v z l Maximum slope ___________ _ Landings ? for > , .. 1'5 Handrails / 1 : 17' j % 2?o-i(J) f s h , t w.a:' 12 I Exit signs rqd . ___________ _ Toilet noa nquireaents (code utilized?) Filwre requirements (basis?) ----------n/ Women 3 . G . {t tmt;!D •ctp) . 2-L.AV. Men 2-lJ. >' i W 2-LAv. Drinking fountains 1 lt?e-r-nJ Haadicap ped Re q uirem.e .D.ts _'TI.u.B..::==:::...._ ______ _ Site------------------?eJ (h..A?..Y a ' Tl2bt::x:::g: Accessible Routes t.._/ l A 'BLDG I I . 10 or) A cr_y_s; 1 I 6

PAGE 119

Accessible housing ---------------@ -------------------------------Special rqmts . not listed ----------------8 7

PAGE 120

' ( C4de Check By M SecUoo . lu.c. llca -2f1 Firezooe ____________________________________ OccupaAcy classification Principle e-2 Others (specify), _________________________ n, C4ostru ctioa. type __ Occupucy separations to to to to to . ---hours hours hours hours hours Cha.n&es in occupancy llaximua aJ..loYable floor area iurM...!..,;;,! ..... If adjacent to open area on two or more sides ----------n / If over one story ----------------------------n J If sprin.klered ----------------------------n / Increases for fire separations ---------------------n / 1

PAGE 121

tfD 4:k Jlaxi•ua &lloY&ble hei&llt -----------nla t:{k types) IV? 4:--6 I '2Feet __ ____;06;.....;... _______________ 11l a Stories __ ......:;.. ________________ 111 a Towers . spires. steeples @ Fi.re resisl&Ace or exterior Y&lls (see occupancy & constructio11 / :H-e-ik 31 North ------r--------------West _____________________________ _ Setbacks requiri.a.g protection of ope11i.a.gs i.a. exterior walls North South ---"'---------------------------3 ' 3 1 11l a Location city I location o.o. property -------8 Use of Public Property ------------8 Door'S prohibited from swi.o.gillg i.nto city property? ____ _ Restrictio.ns o.n marquees. canopies. etc . --------______________________ , g l.EP I UC.. V'h-S Wi..o.doYs .required i..o. rooas Qff:E, Af:i r= \1-.m..LOct\J .nla I I , . I ..J. 1/ 1-A I . Window a.rea D.Mr..vati ltf o/l ao r. . w , ,.: .,A-•. I of io rp 1 J I I /f 'lliJliaua ce ili.o.& he i &h ts i.o. .roo as n I a 2 w/ 0}"1.7 1 BA-111 1 !+1d.L \ !u"::>

PAGE 122

i tzo-r 1"1'-A 1"10( 7+ }%4 Fire resistive requireaea-----------n / a '11-loo Exterior bea.riJlg walls ___ ..__ _________ hrs Interior bea.riJlg valls ---.....L...---------hrs Exterior no.n-bea.riJlg valls __ ..__ _________ bl"S Structural frame _____ ......_ _________ hrs Permanent partitions ____ _________ hrs Exit corridor walls --------------hrs Vertical openiJlgs --------------hrs Floors ________ ___.:.1 _________ hrs Roofs ----------'---------hrs Exterior doors __ . ....;______ hrs \I Exit frames --------------hrs Inner court walls Y\..M h I I Mez:zanille floors (area allowed) _,_..h -r/fl.->--------h Roof coverings E 1 eE-oA&-fT h Boiler room enclosure 14-t.uJess 'vfi.Dr-e t\, C?g;:/l )T7J h Structural requirements Ml1 Corn.lol.6-h bte t'K2!k r a k n l 4:--1 bft_, Framework -----------------h Stairs ___ . ...:.:;.b..:.=le::;;..._ _____ h ( I h Floors -------------------h II Roofs -------------------h Partitions if r wJ; C!J!," b:: .fie:.: I"P. huck t hrs Exits t&i M f1Wdl'l o} t rvv L 11 I Oc cu pa.n cy _ ...... !..._! Ce;:;,o;;;;_ ___ Basis tJo L CJI Actual Load I I 3

PAGE 123

32o2 ll h II Number of exits required Z.. t:/t. 1?WJS one;; -e;;xrev t=::x 1 Exit separation arrangement TI !2i?\JidCC... Ito+-Yz._ ddzvao t . n/a n/a n/a .,...-C": 7 J :;::::; ,-.... .....;..?.....;..::r_ ..;... Maximum allowable travel distance to exit n/a With sprinklers ________ ____;ZO;.......;....o..;;....._ ___ _ 5"75, Exit sequence (through adjoining or accessory areas) ___ n/a M-tJ trtoe T-kAJJ oiJ:=-. ecvt0. W VWe:f...UUe-If' CLJi::A.f:_ , e-fc.. . -UJ' Erit doors /< L 6?C 1 ij 1 tr<-6"!7" / "-"" \ '?o Mi!limum width & height '::? X ?-8 C 2:280 .J. n/a A .t::L.. u Maximum leaf width Width required for number of occupa11ts __...;.. _____ _ Swing \>1 d lr'uJi<7f.-b.r;=ui f i ?x:> Change in floor level at door ' ' JPr : l 'o1%uwc:s.e_ l/ Exit Corridors D.Q Y1 6 t-ea fr, S n/a. Required widlh .o;avi N( !!
PAGE 124

I ' II II I I I • II ( a ) (t) ??4 / li) /)fA-Cp) 2 0 5 Openi.Qgs 2o f'r<..i.ft, ontE1Z-:5 1XJr =td 25Z .;/!ie.el:t c:De :xe. UY. n/ Min . width __ ___ occ . load of 1q or ( e:;5 ______ J..k..;... . ...._ ___ occ . loadof 20 e>l"" ----------occ .load of------------=---;__ ____ occ.load of------1 / Muimum riser allowed ----'----------n/ II Minimum tread a.llowed ___ ..:..11.:.....-_________ n / Will ding. circular. spiral stairs n/ 7ee (J) LandiJlgs 'l'2 Minimum width rqd. 47 deer:< . a;z co rr\doc L.<.c.id e Maximum width rqd. # '' i t ?fm b yj (Uf\..--1' Vertical distance between Iandin gs --t, I.:::;.Z.. _______ _ . . f rfA I .rf!. I f I Hand1cap refuge space 1:2 YrJ Y t 'it-o ((1l. r4u I I I I Stair to roof rqd . ? l1o I LE:S5 "ffwJ 4: n/ n Stair to basement restrictions 11 Stair enclosure rqd.? .....;.l,l-=-------------n If Sta.ir headroom _ n Ba.adrails n Rqd. a.tea.ch side? Ye:? { i f f.e-55 4=1-'' ct..f. \ r I . Intermediate rails rqd.? ,--\"" J2 /...J Ma1 . width between interior rails -------Rqd. " Max. openings in rails 1 1 Height above nosing tvvt t1 2o It 2f 5

PAGE 125

82ol ?2?1(e) 977 -rJte;i..E: ?3 A I f or [Itension of ra.iling (q f ot-0 j 'n Qr' 1 11 I Projection from wall --l-1 ..:...I'Z;;;;.z..__________ _ Exceptions -====------------Borizo.atal exjt requirements . CAN 12fC . oF ?GP'!VLT n/a VJ rta.l '2.--ol?-J;rte_C::: 12t=;o'o D fX...if!!ee-Af2e:A Rua9s _-.....,_ ... _ . --------------n/a Width __ ______ _ I Maximum slope __.i_:__._"------------Luldings /1:17 ?3oz(d) I 1 Handrails ? fap-c > 1 : 1? A? Uit signs rqd . ___________ _ l:::)e:s l <:..tJ Toilet toea requireaents (code utilized?) . @ Filwre requirements (basis?) oU / i v i ft\t1 om ... :J I I Women <%= 'N C-. k-LA:rJS Men '2-YJ, C. 1 { LJ t z ... uJA L Drinking l r"!.A ..flcor-n/a Showers Z-?e:L-st:P)/e.eouP n/a Handicapped Requirements --------Site OAJ-t::" ACC.e=??l ?:a' :C ?aUJ'E" Accessible Routes 0 '-JE: W t11AE.Y /::::72 fCep--AJc;_!;:::' tAl@ A-12 !J)c? . 1Wtr /? oAJ EL.$1 Am e L.eJ.sL. t-r m.u_s-r-1:::. 6

PAGE 126

/2/ 3 f 1 Accessible housi4g -------------o./ ; Number of units 1 + W .:::?I..J.L2:;.+-vtX.Y..-< Minimum requirements c../-L_ 71 /e_ L .. .q)t?_,.;cJ.-2 r: I I Ua-r oAJE-U u r1 T'rlu?l k Ace ess VC02-W I D TtT M IA.Jl rvtUft\-• Special rqmts. not listed o./ 7

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CONCLUSION The issues I mentioned in the introduction were things that came to mind as I was brainstorming during pre-thesis. A major part of the reason the 'third functional desire' became important is because of the intriguing question 'who are these people who pay money for the privilege of being laborers and guinea pigs?'. Even after all the questions and attempts to answer that question, all I feel comfortable with saying is that these participants are a breed of searcher looking for answers, particularly answers to questions that fall under that broad heading 'who am 1?'. And as part of that endeavor , the question 'who are you?' arises as they try to discover a common experience. What I could not pinpoint as I started out was a phrase as simple as 'common experience'. I was groping, too. With architecture being a strong experience and a cause and effect phenomenon, it becomes an obvious vehicle for the the common experience. How many times do we say where we have been and what we have seen as a conversational ice breaker and as a tool to bridge the social gap? Architecture becomes the strong tie between the contemporary Crow Canyon residents and visitors and our Anasazi predecessors who built the first true masonry architecture in North America. I found that it is not all that difficult and probably not all that unusual to layer one -117-

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time and place's style over another's organization. I believe that I created a strong work of architecture that would serve all the mundane programmatic requirements of a research and teaching campus for archaeology . In addition to that, it would be a memorable place to live in and to visit. The only way to determine the success of the architecture as an heuristic device would be to develop a set of criteria for educational goals directly related to the architectural environment and consistently evaluate people's response to the architecture over time. Among the questions asked at different times would be: what do you feel you better understand due to the Center's architecture, what do you remember as a result of your experiences there, and do you feel that this experience has influeneced other aspects of your life? For the future I intend to have a better knowledge and understanding of known organz i ations and styles , so that I may use them with better purpose and greater facility. Also, I intend to improve my skills of communication because when I have used my talents and energies in an effort to develop an idea and information, it is foolish not to be able to share what I have done because my ability to communicate them is weak.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Anel l a , Anthony A. " Betwe en Sacred Mou n tains". Architectural Thes is. University of Colorado at Denver, 1986 . Berger , Jo. "Plann ing and Preservation of Cultural Resources". Planning Thesis. University of Colorado at Denver , 1982. Bloomer , Kent C. and Moore, Charles W. Body , Memory , and Architecture . New Haven: Yale Univers i ty Press , 1977. de Chiara , Joseph and Callendar , John A., ed. Time Saver Standards. New York: McGraw H ill, 1980 . Dale, Wayne M., P :E. "Soils Exploration , Crow Canyon Campus, Cortez , Colorado". Unpublished report from Tech , Inc. Farmington , NM to The Mulhern Group , Denver, CO , 1985. Hall, Edward T. The Hidden Dimension . New York: Doubleday , 1966. Klein , Frederick C. American Digs : Archaeology Attracts Volunteers And Rounds Up Broader Support For Projects In U.S." Wall Street Journal Midwest Edition, Vol. LX No, 225 , September 2 , 1980 . Lightfoot , Ricky . "Crow Canyon Archaeology" The Mines. Go l den Colo r ado , March 1985 . Olsen, Don. "New School Gives Its Visitors Chance To Learn Archaeology : Crow Canyon Facility Offers Unique Opportun i ty" , The Sunday Denver Post , May 29 , 1983.

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Pena, William. Problem Seeking. Boston: Cahers Books International, 1977. "The Plan For Crow Canyon: A Prospectus". Center for American Archaeology Evanston,lllinois. November 1, 1983. Preiser, Wolfgang ed. Facility Programming. Stroudsberg, PA.: Dowden, Hutchinson & Ross, Inc., 1978. Rappaport, Amos. House Form and Culture. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1969. Rohn, Arthur H. Mug House, Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Interior, 1971. Ruffner, James A. Climates of the States, Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale Research Co., 1980. Schiller, Ronald. "The Mysteries of America's 'Ancient Ones"' Readers' Digest, April 1985.

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• I \ \,. ( l ( I . I > II L ( I ' ' ' ( 0 0 0 0 0 0 TERRACE COURT ' c c c c a c a a a a a a a 0 0 a I 0 a a a a a a 0 o -D o r--o-L o-o-a J 0 0 0 I EE rn Etl ffl a----. I I I I 0 c 0 a c 0 c 0 0 a 0 0 c a c a 0 0 I ! o ! a a a a a a a I .. --rD D o I ---! rn ffi. rn I I E.l I I I I I ----r-I -----. -.... . --. -::: . ), --------SOUTHWEST 1.16

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A I I ' :I II II II I I Jl :I II II I I II II LOWER LEVEL 1.16

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Mechanical Summary Hot water boiler (propane fired) Circulated hot water heat (two pipe system) 1) Museum: Water to rooftop handling unit(s) 2) Lab: Rooftop unit100% Evaporative Cooling 25% Ventilation & pre-heat Economizer Positive pressure to exhaust, spring load louvres Local baseboard zoning Fresh air supply plus evaporative coo lin g & pre-heat (from mechanical room) Specific ducting from some lab locations & exhib i t prep shop 3) Housing: Local baseboard zoning (group & Fresh air supply plus evaporative cooling & pre-heat common) (from mechanical room) Exhaust kitchens & bathrooms Working windows Shad in g from pergolas, verandas 4) Housing: Local baseboard zoning (apt's) Exhaust bathrooms (through-wall units) Working windows ' '

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Lighting Summary (see following lighting diagram for approximate location, arrangement and notes on lighting) Museum: Track lighting i n all exhibit areas (min. 30 fc general, plus more in contrast and other situations) Track lighting in sales (min. 30 fc general) Recessed cans in lobby & auditorium (min 20 fc general) Cove lighting & foot lighting in kiva-like area of audi torium ( ambience & contrast) Lab: 2' x 2' drop-in fluorescent fixtures (general light i ng; 70 fc) Task lights at work stations (min 130 fc) Housing: Incandescent lighting in corridors (20 fc) Recessed can lighting dining (min 10 fc) Suspended fluorescent lighting litchen (min 70 fc) Wall & ceiling incandescent in rooms, halls , off i ce bathrooms (rang i ng from 20 -70 fc) Lamps to supplement lighting in common areas Lamps as primary source most rroms in apartments Cove light inter ior dining room (ambience) Grounds: Foot level & ballard incandescent on terraces, museum vest i bule, forecourt and paths between parking & building (5-15fc)

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Building Material Summary Bearing wall and open web steel joists with some smaii'W' sections Exterior finish-stucco on lath over rigid insulation fixed to masonry Interior constructiondry wall on metal framing or furring on masonry drop-in acoustical tile, 2' x 2' ceramic tile floors museum lobby, dining and other common areas carpet offices, rooms and s l oping gallery