Citation
Front Range Airport administration and fixed base operator facility

Material Information

Title:
Front Range Airport administration and fixed base operator facility
Creator:
Voigt, Alfred M.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture
Committee Chair:
Kindig, Robert
Committee Members:
Abels, L. Gale

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Alfred M. Voigt. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY
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ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY
Front Range Airport Administration and Fixed Based Operations Facility
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture.
by
Alfred M. Voigt
Spring 1984


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The Thesis of Alfred Michael Voigt is approved.
Bob Kindig Committee Chairman
Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver
Date


To me this is the most important project of my graduate studies in architecture. The support and patience of my wife, Betty, helped to make it possible. I dedicate this project to her.
I would also like to thank professors Gary Long, Paul Heath, and Bob Kindig, and especially L. Gale Abels who devoted many hours of guidance and advice to what I believe was a successful thesis design. They were all a pleasure to work with.


Introductory Note To The Reader
This document presents the culmination of my graduate school studies in Architecture. To me its importance lies in clarifying my technique for designing a building, that being a Fixed Based Operator facility at a local airport. This is not to say that my technique is the only correct one nor is it to say that this project has challenged me in all of the important issues in architecture.
I think, however, that there is a way of going about design in an orderly manner, that design is a rational process and that this can be applied to the design of many building types.
This document is composed of 3 parts - a beginning, development and recapitulation. First, I state my design ideas and hypotheses. Second,
I present a program of an airport facility. Finally, I present the design of a building that demonstrates application of my design ideas to the program.
Perhaps someone following my methodology would not come up with the same end product. This is all right, and I believe normal. When two different people to use the same pieces of a puzzle and assemble them produce a different picture, the world becomes new, exciting and more fun.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction 1
The Project 1
The Thesis 3
The Site 6
Location 6
Topography 9
Zoning 9
Utilities 10
Climate 12
Building Codes and Other Constraints 17
Requirements Based on Occupancy 18
Requirements Based on Type of Construction 24
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation 26
Egress and Access 29
The Facility Program 35
Spatial Requirements Brief 36
Programmatic Entry and Exit Requirements 37
Operations Department 38
Maintenance and Repair Department 51
Airport and Terminal Administration Department 76
Public and Pilot Services 84
The Design 98
Conclusions 105
Bibliography
Appendix A, Programming notes and diagrams.
Appendix B, Studies and Observations of Existing FBO Facilities.


Introduction
The Project
Travel by air has consistently increased over the years of this century.
In accompaniment with this has been the increase in facilities that service and store the aircraft and provide a gathering place for people who use the aircraft.
In order for the Denver metro area to keep pace with this growth new airports must be constructed. The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) played a major role in this determination. It sponsored the Denver Regional Airport System Plan (RASP, 1974) that concluded that four to six new general aviation airports* would be required in the Denver Metro Area by the year 2000.
In response to this study and others, and to the encouragement of aviation minded interests within the county, the Board of Commissioners of Adams County, Colorado first contracted in 1975 with the firm of Isbill Associates, Inc. (Denver, Colorado) for an Airport Site Selection and Master Plan study. After many years, an airport has now been partially constructed and is known as Front Range Airport.
An essential element to the Front Range Airport is the Fixed Base Operator (FBO) facility. This is generally a "commercial business which provides maintenance, repair, fueling and other services for general aviation aircraft users." This is the type of facility that will be designed in this project. In addition, a flight training school and an airport administration department will be included in the facility's program.
For the time being the airport administration (as opposed to a commercial business) will operate the facility.
* General Aviation includes all domestic civil flying except that performed by the public air carriers (scheduled, supplemental, contract, and intrastate). Within the General Aviation category are agricultural aviation, industrial aviation, business and corporate aviation, the aviation of federal, state^ and local government, and similar miscellaneous aviation activity.
-1-


The FBO Airport Administration facility will be located on a parcel of land located adjacent to the aircraft parking apron. The boundaries of this parcel have been previously established by the Airport Master Plan study.
This facility must accommodate its specialty of airport service requirements for about the next 20 years or when the volume of airplane traffic justifies the installation of an aircraft control tower (to be located elsewhere on the airport site). When this occurs the administration department will probably require its own facility and the need for more than one FBO might be desirable.
-2-


The Thesis
The following problems and objectives define the issues that will be addressed in the design.
1. Context will evolve over time.
This facility will be the first major public building on the airport
site. Airplane storage hangars are being built at this time and as
such they have set an architectural context in which it should fit.
At present the airport site is surrounded by predominantly rural
agricultural land uses. There is evidence, though, that the next
thrust of urbanization from Denver could settle into the eastern
4
portion of Adams County. In addition the Airport Master Plan
5
study states that based upon other airport projects:
- "The airport will serve as an attraction to business interests who are seeking a site for new plant or expansion into the region.11
- "Combined with the highway network and the railroad, the airport presents an exceptional opportunity for attracting new i ndustry."
- "Land values in the airport environs will appreciate as development of all airport property takes place."
This suggests that the predominantly rural context surrounding or adjacent to the airport will change to an urban one. The facility should attempt to tie together and express both situations.
2. The facility must become economically viable.
In order for the FBO facility to become a self supporting business it must attract users. In order to attract users it must, from the beginning, provide the full and complete services that they expect. This requires that it be designed and built for full projected capacity. The building should help to create and support the facility's success.
-3-


3. The facility must compete with similar facilities.
It is assumed that there will be a certain amount of competitive marketing between this facility and other FBO facilities within the region. Although the users of this facility are "expected to be primarily from Adams County and the northeast sector of the Denver Metropolitan Region" other users might come from the broader region or from across the nation.^ The visual image that the facility presents, especially to the itinerant traveler, will have an impact on their memory. It should make them want to come again. That image should be memorable.
4. The approach is unique.
Airports are special in that they are approached from a position overhead as well as from the ground. The form of the facility should be distinctive in plan as well as elevation. There should be external formal continuity between plan and elevation.
5. Provide for occupant needs and desires.
The facility is a hub for activity and movement. The staff provides a broad range of services for users with various needs. Space and form should combine activity and movement with staff expertise and user need. This will promote efficiency, security, safety and occupant enjoyment.
I believe that under certain circumstances a building should be responsive to the user. Sometimes this could be in the active sense such as that typified by the mechanical and electrical systems. Other times it could be in a more passive sense such that the user can manipulate elements of the building to suit his or her needs at the moment.
I also believe that a building should promote some kind of response from the user. These responses can be emotional, that is that strong feelings are aroused by the building. These responses can also be rational, that is that the user can draw some logical conclusion about how the building is organized and respond in some predictable manner.
-4-


I propose that the following hypotheses form the foundation for my design solution - that they help to resolve the design issues.
Form & Space
* can contribute to power and strength with which a design is percei ved;
* helps the design to respond appropriately to climate and context;
* helps to define hierarchies of use and publicness.
Ci rculation
* circulation can organize the forms and spaces of the design;
* can help promote efficiency, safety and security in the design;
* can help define relationships for the user.
Structure
* can clarify the building form;
* can enhance the aesthetic qualities of the design.
Materials
* can interpret the scale of the design;
* can provide the most immediate contribution to satisfying user comfort;
* can help to unify the design.
Color and Texture
* can enhance the visual qualities of the other elements by providing interest; *
* can help to unify the elements within the context.
-5-


The Site
Location
The Front Range Airport is located in Colorado, about 15 miles east (as the crow flies) of Denver's Stapleton International Airport. It lies in Adams County directly north of Interstate 1-70 and north-east of the small town of Watkins.
Regional Map
7
-6-


Access to the site by ground transportation at present is from the west on County Rd. 48 and then north on the access road. In the future, after the north-south runway has been constructed, the approach will be from the east on County Rd. 48 and then north on the access road.
I I
I I
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Locality Map -7-


\
The facility site is located south of and about midpoint along the existing runway. An apron has been constructed and the facility is to be located adjacent to it. Airplane storage hangars are located south of the site. Fuel storage and hydrants are_.located at the south-east, corner of the site.
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,Site Map


Topography
The site is located on a relatively flat parcel of land. The elevation ranges from about 5420 ft. to about 5425 ft. and slopes down to the south.
Zoning
Development rules for land on the airport site are determined and enforced by the airport administrative authority. The master plan states that the airport "will adopt development standards whch will assure efficient
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utilization of land areas" and "maintain safety in aircraft movement."
The east-west runway is designed to incorporate an Instrument Landing System. To assure that this system functions properly, the FAA reguires a minimum separation of 800 feet between the instrument runway center-line and the building restriction line.
In order for personnel in the future control tower to see aircraft on the apron building height is limited to 30 feet.
-9-


Uti1i ties
All utilities are located underground. Where appropriate the water line occupies its own trench, electric power and telephone share a trench, and sanitary sewer and gas share a trench.
I_____________________________I
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Utility Location Map


Sanitary Sewer
The present system incorporates a septic tank with leach field located at the north-west corner of the airport site. It is expected that in the future an improvement district that includes the airport will be created and that its system will tie in directly to the present system.
Water
The present system transports water pumped from wells located at various points in the central portion of the airport site. It is expected that in the future an improvement district will be created and that its system will tie in directly to the present system.
Gas
Gas is piped in from a main line that parallels County Road 25N to north-west of the airport site. It is expected that this gas will be used to supply the heating requirements of the facility.
Electric Power
The step-down transformer for electric power is located in the central portion of the airport site. The facility will require 480V 3 phase in order to meet the service requirements of aircraft.
At present all switching for runway lighting is located in the same area as the step-down transformer. It is desired that all switching for runway lights and other electronic systems be moved into the facility for easier access.
Telephone
The telephone company's telephone box is located in the same area as the electric step-down transformer.
Fire Protection
The airport site is located in the Watkins Fire District. Three pieces of equipment are located at Bennett and one truck at Watkins. Its manpower is provided by volunteers. Eventually a Crash Fire Rescue unit will be located on the airport site.
-11-


Climate
"Climate of the area is mild, characterized by low precipitation (15
inches annual average) and abundant sunshine. Temperature maximums
reach below 0°F in winter and above 90°F in summer which is the daily
mean maximum temperature (hottest month). The area experiences only
g
rare occurrences of violent winds and weather."
Wi nd
User comfort and building economy can be enhanced when the forces of wind are recognized. For example, the orientation and velocity of prevailing winds may suggest the need for protection. Or proper fenestration orientation and size may enhance the natural cooling effects of a summer breeze. 20 FlourUj Pertentoqe* 10
6dl(U
a
6
Wind Roses show the percentage of time the wind blew from the 16 compass points or was calm.
Wind pressure is an important determinant in structural design.
Design Wind Pressure (per 1979 UBC) For Square Buildings
Height Zone Wind Pressure
(in feet) (in lbs./sq. ft.)
Less than 30 30 to 49
-12-
20
25


Temperature
“An important determinant of annual fuel use is the number of degree-days at the geographic location of the building. For any one 24-hour day, the number of degree-days is the difference between 65°F and the mean outdoor temperature for the day."^
Avg. Winter Degree Days
Station_______________Temperature_________Yearly Total
Denver Airport 37.6 6283
Fuel consumption calculations include:
Calculated hourly heat loss of the building Degree-days annually Average winter temperature Fleating value per unit of fuel Efficiency of heating system
The amount of humidity in the outside air is an important variable in determining the type of cooling system that can be utilized in a building.
Outside Design Conditions for Denver
11
Summer Daily Dry Bulb Range Temperature _________________
Summer Wet Bulb Temperature
95
H
40
Precipitation
The design storm describes the largest quantity of water that may be deposited upon the site during a certain length of time. It is used to calculate the amount of surface runoff on the site and from this the amount of water to be temporarily stored on the site as required by local regulations.
Adams County prescribes 6.1 in./hr. for 5 minutes time duration.
-13-


5 —
The amount of rainfall through the year presents no unusual design constraints.
Snow loads are used in structural design to design main structural members.
Adams county requirements - 30 lbs./sq. ft., horizontal projection 1$ —
Mean Monthly Total Snowfall
The amount of snowfall through the year suggests that areas will have to be provided for the temporary storage of snow from paved outdoor circulation areas.
-14-


Solar
Latitude is used as an aid in calculating the amount of overhang or recess in shading devices.
Latitude = 39°47'10M
Percentage of sunshine vs. cloudy days suggests the applicability of daylighting design for the building. See Appendix "A".
For a temperate climate the following rules of thumb should be observed for position and form of building on site. These suggestions are based on moderately insulated house. However, they may still be applicable to an FBO facility that is not heavily loaded with people and lights.
Building location on site
"Outdoor space to south and north for control of winter access to sun and to facilitate summer passage of breezes. A variety of outdoor space orientations for seasonal outdoor activities. Use of underground space. Locate to provide summer shade east, west, and above."
Plan and volume characteristics
-15-


Roofs (solar gain refers to horizontal surfaces)
"Summer solar gain more than twice that of east or west wall.
Winter solar gain about half that of south wall. Attics helpful in winter, but must be well ventilated in summer to lose heat in high humidity areas. Moderately steep pitch to south for optimum winter solar gain."
Skylights
"Should be insulated at night in winter and shaded against direct summer sun. Avoid snow accumulation. Skylights that can open can aid summer ventilation."
Wall Orientations
"Summer: Shading of east and west walls critical. (South walls gain about two-thirds that of east and west walls.)
Winter: South wall clearly best for solar gain, with east or west wall gain about one-third that of south wall. Potential freeze-thaw and glare problems on south walls, though less severe than in cool regions."
-16-


Building Codes and Other Constraints


1979 UBC Brief
Requirements Based on Occupancy
Table No. 5-A
Wall & Opening Protection of Occupancies Based on Location on Property
Group
B
See Sec. 702
H
See also Secs. 902 903
Description of occupancy_________
2-retail stores, office building, drinking & dining establishments having occupant load of less than 50 persons.
Portions of building having rooms used for educational purposes, beyond 12th grade, with less than 50 occupants in any room. Storage and sales rooms for combustible goods, paint stores without bulk handling
5-Aircraft repair hangars 60 feet.
Fire resistance of Exterior Wal1s
1 hour less than 20 feet
1 hour less than 60 feet.
Openings in Exterior Wal See 504
Not permitted less than 5 f Protected les than 10 feet.
Protected les than 60 feet
Location on Property
- Building shall adjoin or have access to a public space, yard or street on not less than one side of street or alley used as property line.
- Locate eaves over required windows not less than 30 inches from side and rear property lines (see Section 1710).
-18-


- Measure distance at right angle to Property Line. Provisions do not apply to walls at right angle to Property Line. Projections beyond exterior wall shall not extend beyond:
- Buildings on same property and court walls of buildings over one story height shall assume to have Property Line between them.
For existing buildings assume Property Line to be as set forth in Table 5-A.
Exceptions:
2 or more buildings on same property may be considered as one if aggregate areas do not exceed those of Table 5-C. If different types of occupancy or construction type are considered, use worst restrictive.
Table No. 5-B
Required Separation of Buildings of Mixed Occupancy (in hours)
B-2 H-2 H-5
B-2 X 1 1
H-2 1 X 1
H-5 1 1 X
A one hour separation is not less than one hour resistive construction. Openings are protected by fire assembly having one hour fire protection rating.
A 2 hour separation is not less than 2 hour resistive construction. Openings are protected by fire assembly having a lk hour fire protection rating.
-19-


Exception to Table No. 5-B
Assembly rooms having floor area not over 75 sq. ft. and administrative and clerical offices (and similar rooms) the aggregate floor area not to exceeding 25% of major use not related to Group H-2.
For B-2 occupancy
Room containing boiler or central heating plant shall be separated from rest of building with one hour fire resistive construction (only if each piece of equipment exceeds 400,000 Btu/hr. input).
For H-5 occupancy
Every boiler or central heating plant separated from rest of building by 2 hour fire resistive occupancy separation.
Table No. 5-C
Basic Allowable Floor Area for Buildings One Story in Height
(in square feet)
Occupany _______________________________Type of Construction
I II III IV V
F.R. F.R. One Hour N One Hour N H.T. One Hour N
B-2 uniimited 39,900 18,000 12,000 18,000 12,000 18,000 14,000 8,00C
H-2 15,000 12,400 5,600 3,700 5,600 3,700 5,600 4,400 2,500
F.R. - Fire Resistive
N - No requirements for fire resistance H.T. - Heavy Timber
Buildings greater than one story
Area of all floors not to exceed twice that allowed for one story. Basements not included.
-20-


Separation walls must meet fllowing requirements for each area to be considered a separate building.
- 4 hr. for types I, II F.R., III and IV.
- 2 hr. for types II one-hour, 11-N and V
Length of opening not to exceed 25% wall length/each story, protect opening with fire resistive assembly with:
- for 4 hr. wall use 3 hr. assembly
- for 2 hr. wall use lh hr. assembly
Separation for projects.
Separation for ground to roof.
-21-


Separation for different heights.
Allowable Area Increases (not allowable if height and story increase used)
AM.y = ([1.25% x (X-20 ft.)] x A) + A,
1.25% x (X-20 ft.) not to exceed 50% if:
2.5% per ft. not to exceed 100% if:
Public fydct $uil4irv|
-22-


5% per foot not to exceed 100% except for 1 story aircraft storage hangar, and for aircraft repair hangar if:
Area increase shall not exceed 500%.
B and H-5 can have unlimited area if fire sprinklers are used (see Chp. 38) and if building surounded by public space 60 ft. min. width.
Table No. 5-D
Maximum Height of Buildings Occupancy Type of Construction
r' ............. ii in iv
F. R. F. R. One Hour R One Hour N H.T. One Hour [T
Maximum height in feet
uniimi ted 160 65 55 65 55 65 50 40
Maximum height in stories
B-2 uniimi ted 12 4 2 4 2 4 3 2
H) 2 & 5 uniimi ted 5 2 1 2 1 2 2 1
Increases not allowable if Area increase used.
Allow 1 story increase if sprinkler system used (see Chp. 38) Exceptions
aircraft hangar height unlimited with auto sprinkler system, and surrounded by public space, width = lh x height.
-23-


Requirements Based on Types of Construction
TABLE NO. 17-A—TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION—FIRE-RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
(In Hours)
For Details see Chapters under Occupancy and Types of Construction and (or Exceptions see Section 1705.
BUILDING ELEMENT TYPE 1 TYPE II TYPE III TYPE IV TYPE V
NONCOMBUSTIBLE COMBUSTIBLE
Fire- Resistive Fire- Resistive 1-Hr. N 1-Hr. N H.T. 1-Hr. N
Exterior Bearing Walls 1803%) 4 1903 (a) 1 N 4 2003 (a) 4 2003 (a) 4 2103 (a) 1 N
Interior Bearing Walls 3 2 1 N 1 N 1 1 N
Exterior Nonhearing Walls 1803%) 4 1903 (a) 1 N 4 2003 (a) 4 2003 (a) 4 2103 (a) 1 N
Structural Frame* 3 2 1 N 1 N 1 or H.T. 1 N
Partitions — Permanent l2 1* 1* N 1 N 1 or H.T. 1 N
Shaft Enclosures 2 2 1 1 1 1 i 1 1706 1 1706
Floors 2 2 1 N 1 N H.T. 1 N
Roofs 2 Sec. 1806 1 1906 1 1906 N 1 N H.T. 1 N
Exterior Doors and Windows Cpy\ 1803 (b) 1903 (b) 1903 (b) 1903(b) 2003 (b) 2003 (b) 2103(b) 2203 2203
N—No general requirements for fire resistance. H.T.—Heavy Timber.
'Structural frame elements in the exterior wall shall be protected against external fire exposure as required for exterior bearing walls or the structural frame, whichever is greater.
Tire-retardant treated wood (see Section 407) may be used in the assembly, provided fire-resistance requirements are maintained. See Sections 1801 and 1901, respectively.
Type I
Sructural Framework: structural steel or iron, reinforced concrete
or masonry.
Mezzanine: Not more than 2 floors in any room; shall not cover more than 33-1/3% of room area
-24-


Type II
Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete or masonry.
Mezzanine: Not more than 2 floors in any room; shall not cover more than 33-1/3% of room area.
Type III
Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood.
Partitions: Wood partitions shall not support more than 2 floors and a roof.
Stairs: May be constructed of any material.
Type IV
Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood.
Partitions: Wood partition shall not support more than 2 floors.
Heavy Timber: Columns not less than 8 inches in any dimension when supporting roof or floor loads;
Floor beams and girders not less than 6 inches width and 10 inches depth;
Timber arches supporting floor loads not less than 8 inches in any dimension.
Timber arches supporting roof loads; 6 inch min. width, 8 inch min. depth lower half and 6 inch min. depth upper half.
Type V
Structural framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood.
-25-


Light, Ventilation & Sanitation for Group B-2 and H~5
Areas Used by Human Beings
If mechanical ventilation is not provided then:
- Provide natural light using exterior glazed openings with area equal to 1/10 total floor area
- Provide natural ventilation using exterior openings with area greater than or equal to 1/20 total floor area.
If fenestration is not provided then:
- Mechanical ventilation shall supply minimum 5 cu. ft./minute per occupant of outside air and total of 15 cu. ft./minute per occupant in all portions of building continuously during time building is occupied. If register velocity exceeds 10 ft./sec. then place more than 8 ft. above floor.
Water Closet Rooms
Where mechanical ventilation is not provided then:
- Provide exterior window with 3 sq. ft. or greater area - fully operable. Add 50 sq. ft. for each toilet.
Where fenestration is not provided:
- Provide exhaust system, connected to light switch, supplying complete air change every 15 minutes, vent to outside air at least 5 ft.
from any operable window.
Provide at least one water closet.
Provide separate facilities for each sex if number of employees exceeds
4 and if both sexes are employed.
-26-


Water closets where food is prepared, stored or served shall:
- have non-absorbent interior finish;
- have hand washing facilities;
- be separated from food preparation.
Water Closet Compartments and Showers
General
Floors and WalIs
- Floor material - smooth, hard, non-absorbent surface such as Portland cement, ceramic tile, concrete or similar. Extend upward onto wall at least 5 inches.
- Extend material 4 feet onto wall within water closet compartment and 2 feet in front of and on either side of urinals.
- Wall material not to be adversely affected by moisture.
Toilet Facilities
- Locate stool in clear space min. 30 inches wide and allow 24 inches min. in front of stool.
Handicap Requirements
- Allow one unit per sex on floors accessible by handicapped.
- All doorways leading to unit to have clear, unobstructed width of 30 inches min.
- 44 inch. min. clear space on each side of doorway accessing toilet room. No more than one door may encroach into this space.
- 60 inch diameter min. clear space in toilet room. Door in any position may not encroach space by more than 12 inches.
-27-


- Locate stool in clear space min. 42 inches wide and allow 48 inches min. in front of stool entry at front (end) not less than 30 inches wide. Entry at side not less than 34 inches wide. Door swing side not to encroach in front of water closet (requird space). Allow 44 inches min. width clear unobstructed access to compartment.
Toilet Room Facilities
- Except for bowl provide clear unobstructed space 26 in. width, 27 in. height and 12 inches depth under lavatory.
- Where mirror provided, install one so that bottom of mirror is 40 in. from floor.
- Where towel and disposal fixture provided, shall be accessible to handicapped and at least one shall be 40 inches above floor.
Minimum Plumbing Facilities (from Appendix C 1976 UPC)
Type of
Building
or
Occupancy Water Closets Uri nals Lavatories Bathtub or Shower Drinking Fount
Office or Fixtures Persons Fixtures Persons Fixtures Pers
Buildings 1 1-15 * 1 1-15 - 1 per 100
2 16-35 2 16-35
3 36-55 3 36-60 1 req1d for mo
4 56-80 4 61-90 than 6 persons
5 81-110 5 91-125
Workshops 1 1-9 * Up to 100, 1 shower for each -
2 10-24 1 per 10 15 persons exposed
3 25-49 to excessive heat
or to skin contamination with poisonous, infectious or irritating material
-28-


Egress and Access
Table No. 33-A
Minimum Egress & Access Requi rements
Use Minimum of two exits other than elevators are required where number of occupants is over Square feet per occupant Access by means of a ramp or an elevator must be provided for the physically handicapped as indicated
Assembly Areas, less concentrated use - Conference Rooms - Lounges 50 15 yes
Mechanical Equipment Room 30 300 no
Offices 30 100 yes
Warehouse 30 300 no
All others 50 100 --
Exits
Number
- Every building shall have at least 1 exit.
- Floors above first story with occupant load of more than 10 shall have not less than 2 exits.
- Determine number of exits for each floor by using occupant load of that story plus percentage of occupant load of floors which exist through level of consideration as follows:
1. 50% of occupant load in 1st adjacent story above and below (if exits through level under consideration).
2. 25% of occupant load in the story immediately beyond first adjacent story.
Width
- Not less than total occupant load r 50 (in feet)
- Divide width equally among all exits.
- Determine clear width using formula "Number of Exits."
-29-


Arrangement
- Place 2 exits a distance apart equal to and not less than \ of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exits.
- Arrange 3 or more so that if one becomes blocked others will be available.
Di stance
- without sprinkler system: 150 ft.;
- with sprinkler system: 200 ft.;
- increase by 100 ft. when last 150 ft. is within corridor.
Doors
- Applies to every exit door serving occupant load of 10 or
more, or hazardous rooms.
Swing
- in direction of exit travel when serving hazardous area or when serving occupant load of 50 or more;
- see double acting doors.
Width and Height
- not less than 3 ft. width and 6 ft. 8 in. height;
- open at least 9 degrees;
- clear width not less than 32 inches.
Special
- Revolving (see k. for exception), sliding and overhead doors shall not be used as required exits;
- Power operated doors complying with U.B.C. standard No. 33-1 may be used.
-30-


Change in floor level
- Floor landings on each side of door not more than 1 inch lower than doorway threshhold and length of not less than 5 ft. Exception: When door opens into a stair or smokeproof enclosure, landing need not have a length of 5 feet.
Corridors and Exterior Exit Balconies.
- Applies to every corridor serving occupant load of 10 or more
- Exit corridors shall be continuous until egress is provided from building and shall not be interrupted by intervening rooms.
Exception: Foyers, lobbies or reception rooms constructed as required for corridors.
- When more than one exit is required, arrange so that it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit.
- Dead ends not to exceed 20 feet.
Width
- 44 inch minimum serving occupant load of 10 or more.
Height
- 7 feet measured from lowest projection from ceiling.
Projections
- Required width to be unobstructed Exceptions:
- Handrail and _____ opened doors not to reduce required
width by more than 7 inches.
- Doors in any position by not more than one-half.
- Trim by not more than lh inches each side.
-31-


Openi ngs
- The total area of all openings, other than doors, in any portion of an interior corridor shall not exceed 25% of the area of the corridor wall of the room which it is separating from the corridor.
Stai rways.
Exempt stairs or ladders used only to attend equipment.
Width
- occupant load more than 50 then not less than 44 inches width;
- occupant load 50 or less then 36 inches width;
- occupant load less than 10 then 30 inches width;
- handrails may project 3h inches each side;
- trim may project lh inches each side.
Rise & Run
- Rise not less than 4 inches and not greater than lh inches;
- run not less than 10 inches.
Landi ng
- length equal to width;
- need not exceed 4 ft. when stair has straight run;
- door swing shall not reduce required width to less than one-half; or by 7 inches when fully open.
Distance between landings
- not more than 12 feet
Headroom
- Clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches from tread nosing to soffit or ceiling above.
-32-


Ramps
Width
- Same as stairs.
Slope
- required 1 vertical to 12 horizontal;
- other 1 vertical to 8 horizontal
Landi ngs
- For slope greater than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal provide landing at top and bottom and 1 intermediate for each 5 feet ri se.
- Landing length not less than 5 ft. at top and intermediate.
- Landing length not less than 6 ft. at bottom.
- Doors in any position not to reduce ramp width to less than 42 inches and width by more than inches when fully open.
- Surface to be roughened and nonslip materials.
Exit Enclosures
- Extent of Enclosure. Stairway and ramp enclosures shall include landings and parts of floors connecting stairway flights and shall also include corridor on the ground floor leading from the stairway to the exterior of the building.
- Enclosed corridors or passageways are not reqired from unenclosed stai rways.
Exception: Office buildings in Group B, Div. 2 Occupancy, a maximum of 50% of exits may discharge through a street floor lobby, provided the required exit width is free and unobstructed and the entire street floor is protected with an automatic sprinkler system.
Exits for Group H Occupancies
- If floor area is 200 sq. feet or more provide at least 2 separate exits.
- For Div. 2. No part of room shall be more than 75 feet from an exit.
-33-


Special Hazards.
- Boiler, Furnace and Incinerator Rooms Provide 2 means of egress if:
1. area of room exceeds 500 sq. ft. ;
2. largest piece of fuel-fired equipment exceeds 400,000 Btu/hr. input capacity.
-34-


Spatial Requirements Brief
Space Description Sq.Ft. Persons
Operations Department 1,376 11 (E)*, 18 (V)
Maintenance and Repair Department 21,271 23 (E), 8 (V)
Airport and Terminal Administration Department 1,528 7 (E), 6 (V)
Public and Pilot Services 2,216 2 (E), 41 (V)
26,391
15% for Circulation 3,959
Mechanical 800 43 (E), 73 (V)
Total 31,150
Employee Parking - 43+ spaces Close-In/Visitor Parking - 73+ spaces Outlying/Long-Term Parking - 28+ spaces
* E - employee V - visitor
-36-


Programmatic Entry and Exit Requirements
Main Landside Entrance
Main entry for public into facility from curb and parking. Should lead into waiting area. Should be dominant entry from landside approach and visitor parking. Provide curb area for loading and unloading of passenger vehicles. This curb area should be covered to protect visitors from rain and snow. Provide for handicap accessibility.
Main Airside Entrance
Main entry for public from airplane parking apron. Should lead into waiting area via Operations Service Counter. Should be dominant entry from apron approach. Provide for handicap accessibility.
Employee Entrance
Main entry for employees from employee parking area. Time clock should be located so that employees pass it while arriving and departing.
Loading Dock and Entry
Provides access to Parts warehouse. Loading dock should accommodate one typical 13'-6" semi-trailer rig. An entry door of human proportions should be located to the side of the garage type door.
Ready Room Entry
To provide access from the ready room to the airplane parking apron for the line technicians.
Hangar Door
Provides access to the interior of the maintenance and repair hangar for airplanes from the apron. Provide for at least one door of human proportions where appropriate for use by mechanics.
Additional Exits
Provide as required by code.
Gates
Provide at least one entry and one exit control gate for ground vehicles. This will provide access between apron and the landside.
-37-


OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT
This department provides the basic pit stop services required by the pilot and the aircraft before departure and after landing. Such services include refueling, oiling, and cleaning the aircraft. These services are in many ways analogous to those provided by a full service gas station.
Primary Spaces sq- ,.Ft- Persons
Operations Manager's Office 180 1(E), 2(V)
FIight Operations
Service Counter 78 2(E)
Ready Room 152 3(E)
Ki tchen 56
Charter/Air Taxi
Service Desk 78 2(E)
Flight Training
Manager's office 140 1(E)
Receptionist Counter 30 1(E)
Secretary/Bookkeeper1s office 122 1(E)
Traini ng/Supplemental
Conference Room 255 12(V)
Group Study Area 81 4(V)
Flight Simulator Room 120 -
Secondary Spaces
Line Service Toilet 16 -
Janitor Closet/Sink 12 -
Coat Closet, 4 sq.ft./employee 44 -
Storage Closet for clerical
Supplies and Forms 12 -
TOTAL 1,376 11(E), 18(V)
-38-


SPACE DESCRIPTION Manager's Office
AREA
180 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Service Counter, Ready Room, Waiting Area.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, 3 Chairs, Small Conference Table.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable, should be soft.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Materials
Primary users are manager and visitors. Manager controls operations from this location, meets with employees and public as required.


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Service Counter, Flight Operations AREA
78 sq.ft. (2 person counter)
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8.5 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Waiting Lounge, Flight Line Ready Room, Entry from Apron. Should be readily visible from main landside entry.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Communications Receiver, Cash Register, Filing Cabinet, Storage (ie. beneath counter), CRT Terminal/Deyboard, Printout Unit, Counter.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly visible to customers and visitors, should reflect image of facility, open, cheerful, welcoming.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are attendants, pilots and other visitors. Pilots pay for "pit stop" type service and supplies. Attendant monitors lounge area and provides information as required by visitors. Miscelaneous pilot supplies (maps, glasses, souveniers) are displayed and sold at the counter.
-40-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Ready Room AREA
152 sq.ft. (3 technicians)
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Aircraft Apron, Kitchen, Line Service Counter MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Stools, Counter, Communications Receiver, various wall boards (scheduling, apron map, notices)
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain. Materials in space must resist rugged use by technicians to and from parking apron, particularly during inclement weather.
Floor should be water resistant.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are service technicians who watch for arrival of aircraft onto apron prior to servicing them. Fills out appropriate reports, some of which are delivered directly to service counter.
OTHER
Door from this space must have direct access to parking apron. Counter should be located adjacent to window that provides expansive view of apron. Include 4 sq.ft, of closet space for each technician and 32 sq.ft, of storage space for oil, pilot supllies, an air compressor and a tow bar.
-41-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Ki tchen AREA
56 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Ready Room, Toilet
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Counter Tops, Refrigerator, Commercial Ice Maker, Dishwasher, Microwave Oven, Double Sink with Garbage Disposal, Storage Cabinets for storage of plates cups, beverage mix, utensils, etc., Hot Beverage Machines for coffee, hot chocolate, Trash Can
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, Materials should be water resistant.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are line technicians, attendants and pilots. Kitchen is used primarily to provide food and beverage for aircraft occupants and pilots. Catered food provided by outside vendor is stored here as requi red.
-42-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Service Counter, Charter/Air Taxi AREA
36 sq.ft. (2 each)
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8.5 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Waiting area. Should be readily visible from landside entrance.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, storage (beneath counter)
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly visible to customer. Open, pleasant, welcoming. Should reflect image of air carrier it represents.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are customers of representatives of air carrier. The representative occupies the space intermittently as required - shortly before and after flight departs. Sells tickets for commuter and air taxi flights.
-43-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Manager's Office, Flight Training
AREA
140 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Secretary/Bookkeeper, Receptionist Counter
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, 3 Chairs, Desk
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, pleasant, soft materials.
-44-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Receptionist Counter, Flight Training AREA
30 sq. ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office, Waiting Area.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter/Display Case, Chair
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly visible to customers and visitors. Should reflect image of flight school. Open, pleasant and welcoming.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are receptionist and customers. Receptionist sells training supplies, books, schedules training sessions, greets students, and provides information to prospective students.
-45-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Secretary/Bookkeeper's Office, Flight Training AREA
122 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Bookshelves, Chair, Clerical Desk, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit
QUALITY OF SPACE Private, Plain and Pleasant
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary user is secretary/bookkeeper. Telephone conversation, paperwork.
-46-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Flight Training/Supplemental Conference Room
AREA
255 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Locate within flight training area with direct access to Waiting Area.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 12 Classroom Desk, 1 Table, 1 Chair, Chalkboard
QUALITY OF SPACE Public, Plain and Pleasant
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are students and instructors. Flight ground school classes are conducted here.
-47-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Group Study Area AREA
81 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Flight Training Room
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 4 Chairs, Table
QUALITY OF SPACE Private, Plain and Pleasant
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are students. Here they may study for exams or have bull sessions.
-48-


SPACE DESCRIPTION Flight Simulator Room
AREA
120 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Group Study Area, Flight Training Room
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Simulators
QUALITY OF SPACE Plain.
-49-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Line Service Toilet AREA
16 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 4 ft. X 4 ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Ready Room, Kitchen
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool, Sink
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, Water Resistant Materials OTHER
See Code requirements. Not a public space
no handicap requirements.
-50-


MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR DEPARTMENT
This department is similar to an automobile dealership service and repair department. Here airplanes are repaired and the parts to repair them are supplied and sold.
Primary Spaces Sq. Ft. Persons
Manager's Office 113 1(E)
Customer Service
Sales Manager's Office 140 1(E), 2(V)
Maintenance and Repair
Sales Service Counter 213 2(E)
Waiting Lounge 64 4(V)
Inspector's Office 140 1(E), 2(V)
Parts
Service Counter 213 2(E)
Library 400 -
Manager's Office 113 1(E)
Warehouse 1,600
Hangar
Maintenance and Repair
Supervisor's Office 99 1(E)
Hanger 16,000 8(E)
Metal Shop 480 -
Lead Acid Battery Room 64 -
Ni-Cad Battery Room 64 -
Prop and Magneflux Shop 100 -
Employee Lounge 266 -
Woman's Toilet 109 -
Men's Toilet 202 -
-51-


Avionics
Manager's Office Secretary/Receptionist Office Library Space Workbench Space Parts Storage
Secondary Spaces
Toilet (for parts and customer service)
Janitor's Closet/Sink Coat Closet, 4 sq. ft./employee Storage Closet for clerical supplies and forms
Total
113 1(E)
142 1(E)
180 -
288 4(E)
60 -
16
12
68
12
21,271 23(E), 8(V)
-52-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Maintenance and Repair Manager's Office AREA
113 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Sales Service Counter, Supervisor's Office, Repair Hanger should be within close range.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, moderately spacious and comfortable. Materials should be soft.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are manager and employees. Manager controls repair and maintenance operations. Usually meets with employees outside of office.
-53-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Sales Manager's Office AREA
140 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Maintenance and Repair Sales Service Counter, Waiting Lounge
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, 3 Chairs
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable. Materials should be soft.
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are manager and visitors. Manager sells repair and maintenance services, meets with customers as required.
-54-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Maintenance and Repair Sales Service Counter AREA
213 sq.ft. (2 clerks)
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Sales Manager's Office, Waiting Lounge, Maintenance and Repair Manager's Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Counter, clerical Desk, Chair, File Cabinets, CRT Terminal/Keyboard, Printout Unit
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly visible to customers, should reflect image of facility, open, cheerful, welcoming.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are clerks, pilots and other customers. Customer pays for repair service and parts. Clerk attends to customer service needs and does bookkeeping for department.
OTHER
Clerk should have view of waiting area from counter.
-55-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Waiting Lounge AREA
64 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Service Counter, Sales Manager's Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 4 Chairs, End Table, Magazine Table
QUALITY OF SPACE
Public, soft materials, cheerful, comfortable and relaxing.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Waiting, reading and conversation
OTHER
Avoid placement that would encourage customer contact with repair hangar and employees.
-56-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Inspectors Office AREA
140 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Maintenance and Repair Manager's Office and Parts Library. Should be located close to hangar.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, 3 Chairs, Desk, Bookshelves
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable. Materials should be soft.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are inspector and customers. Telephone conversation, paperwork, meeting with customers.
-57-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Parts Service Counter AREA
213 sq.ft. (2 clerks)
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Parts Manager's Office, Parts Library, Parts Inventory Storage MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Counter, File Cabinets, Chair, Clerical Desks, CRT/Keyboard and Printout Unit.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain. Materials should be durable. Floor should be non-absorptive. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are parts clerks, mechanics and occasionaly the public. Generally, clerk retrieves parts from warehouse and passes them to mechanic over the counter. Clerk performs typical inventory control duties.
OTHER
Clerk should be able to view and have direct acces to parts library from counter.
-58-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Parts Library AREA
400 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Parts Service Counter, hangar.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Shelves to hold catalogues and manuals, counter to support reference manuals.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain. Materials should be durable and non-absorptive.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are mechanics and parts clerks. Researching part descriptions and numbers.
-59-


SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts Manager's Office
AREA
113 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Parts Service Counter, Parts Inventory Storage
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable, should be soft.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Materi als
Primary users are manager and employees. Activities include telepho conversation, paper work and brief employee meetings.


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Parts Warehouse AREA
1600 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 1 bay
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Parts Service Counter, Manager's Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Shelves, Shipping and Receiving Counter, Loading Dock
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, Secure and plain. Materials should be durable, hard and non-absorptive.
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Parts Storage and retrieval, Shipping and Receiving.
OTHER
Requires loading dock/roll-up door and adjacent entrance door. Circulation from this area to the hangar should be on the same level with as few obstructions as possible.
-61-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Maintenance and Repair Supervisor's Office AREA
99 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office, Hanger
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Desk, Chair
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private and plain. Materials should be durable and floor should be non-absorbent.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are supervisor and repair technicians. Supervisor performs mostly clerical duties here.
OTHER
Should have view of hanger.
-62-


\
SPACE DESCRIPTION Hangar
AREA
16,000 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION
Tall to accomodate height of aircraft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Metal Shop, Battery Rooms, Employee Lounge, Toilets, Supervisor's Office, Parts Counter and Library
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Connections for various types of electrical power and compressed air.
Space should be open with no obstructions.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, durable and non-absorptive materials.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are aircraft repair technicians. They repair and
service airplanes, however major overhauling of components (such as engines)
is not performed here.
OTHER
See Code requirements.
-63-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Metal Shop AREA
480 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Perimeter of Hangar.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Storage Lockers, Metal Storage Area, work bench and various types of metal worki equipment including a lathe, sheet metal break, sheet metal shear, drill press and grinder.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, hard, durable and non-absorptive materials.
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Fabricating and repairing sheet metal and other metal parts.
-64-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Lead Acid Battery Room
AREA
64 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hanger
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, Shelves and Sink.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, Acid Resistant and non-absorptive hard materials
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Charging and re-charging lead acid batteries
OTHER
Door swing out. Locate eyewash nearby. Vent to outside.
-65-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Ni-cad Battery Room
AREA
64 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hanger
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, Shelves and Sink.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain, Acid Resistant and non-absorptive hard materials
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES I_N SPACE Charging and re-charging Ni-cad batteries
OTHER
Door swing out. Locate eyewash nearby. Vent to outside.
-66-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Prop and Magneflux Shop
AREA
100 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHING AND EQUIPMENT Dip tank
QUALITY OF SPACE
Plain. Hard, durable and non-absorptive materials MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Airplane parts are dipped in solution and checked for cracks.
-67-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Employee Lounge AREA
266 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Hangar, should be close to offices and toilets MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
8 Chairs, 2 Tables, Microwave Oven, Small Refrigerator, Cold and Hot Drink Vending Machines, small sink, cabinets and counter.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, plain and cheerfull. Materials should be durable and non-absorptive.
PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are facility employees. Dining, meeting and general conversation.
OTHER
Employees generally bring their own food. Desirable view would include hangar and outdoor areas.
-68-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Women's Toilet
AREA
109 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool, Sink, Shower, 2 small Lockers
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private and plain. Materials should be non-absorptive.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are mechanics. Cleaning up after a dirty day on the job.
-69-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Men's Toilet
AREA
202 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
1 Toilet, 2 Urinals, 2 Sinks, 2 Showers, 8 Small Storage Lockers QUALITY OF SPACE
Private and plain. Materials should be non-absorptive.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are mechanics. Cleaning up after a dirty day on the job.
-70-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Manager's Office, Avionics AREA
113 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Secretary/Receptionist's Office, Workbench Area
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, cheerful, comfortable. Materials should be soft.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES I_N SPACE
Primary users are manager and employees. Activities include telephone conversation, paperwork and brief employee meetings.
-71-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Secretary/Bookkeeper's Office AREA
142 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Manager's Office, Workbench Area, Waiting Lounge MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Credenza, 3 Chairs, Secretarial Desk, Display Case, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit.
QUALITY OF SPACE
Semi-public, pleasant and moderately spacious.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary user is secretary/bookkeeper. Occasionally customers will wait in space for service. Telephone conversation, paperwork.
-72-


SPACE DESCRIPTION Library Space
AREA
180 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION
4.5 ft. for shelf & bending down
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Within workbench space
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Bookshelves, open or cabinet.
-73-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Workbench Space AREA
288 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Library Space, Parts Storage
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Large workbench with chairs. Allow for smaller workbenches as required. OTHER
Provide rear entry. Technicians should enter and exit this space without having to go through secretarial area.
-74-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Parts Storage
AREA
60 sq.ft.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Shelves for Storage Trays
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Workbench Area
OTHER
It should be a secure space.
-75-


AIRPORT AND TERMINAL ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT
The personnel in this department work together to insure the smooth operations of the airport in general and the terminal facility in particular. This department functions as both the manager of the fixed based operations and the airport authority.
Primary Spaces Sq. Ft. Persons
General Manager's Office 200 1(E), 4(V)
Secretary/receptionist Office 116 1(E), 2(V)
Bookkeeper Office 142 1(E)
Conference Room 150 -
Computer Area 168 -
Mail Room 72 -
Future Office Space 600 4(E)
Secondary Spaces
Coat Closet, 4 sq.ft./employee 12 -
Storage Closet for clerical
supplies and forms 52 -
Optional Toilet (provide, if this
area located on separate level) 16
Total 1,528 7(E), 6(V)
-76-


SPACE DESCRIPTION General Manager's Office
AREA
200 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Secretary/receptionist Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
7 Chairs, Desk, Credenza, Table, End Table with Lamp, CRT/keyboard
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private with small group meeting area. Spacious, pleasant, comfortable. Materials should be soft. Should project desirable image.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are General Manager and visitors. Manager controls overall activities of airport and FBO facility. Telephone conversation, paperwork, meeting with public and employees.
OTHER
View of apron area and public spaces would be desirable.
-77-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Secretary/receptionist Office AREA
116 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
General Manager's Office, Bookeeper's Office
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Secretarial Desk, 3 Chairs
QUALITY OF SPACE
Public/private. Pleasant, comfortable and moderately spacious. Materials should be soft. Should project desirable image.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary users are receptionist and visitors. Receptionist provides secretarial support services to general manager and receives visitors. Telephone conversation, typing, filing and other clerical activities. Visitors wait in this area for appointments with general manager.
-78-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Bookkeeper's Office
AREA
142 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Secretary/receptionist Office, Storage Closet MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Credenza, Clerical Desk, Chair, Bookshelves, File Cabinets, CRT/keyboard and Printout Unit
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private, plain, comfortable and pleasant
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Primary user is bookkeeper. Telephone conversation, paperwork.
-79-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Conference Room AREA
150 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
All department manager offices
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 8 Chairs, 1 Conference Table, 1 Credenza
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private/Publ ic. Moderately spacious, pleasantand comfortable, should be soft and space should reflect desirable image.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Materials
Primary users are management personnel. Staff meetings. Substitutes as alternate public conference room.


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Computer Area AREA
168 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES In Administrative Area
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Desk, Chair, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit, Main Computer and Central Processing Unit, Disk Storage Cabinet
QUALITY OF SPACE Private, plain and secure.
-81-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Mail Room AREA
72 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Central to all departments
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Counter, Mail Bag Stands, Scale, Postage Meter, Mail Sorting and Receiving Slots
QUALITY OF SPACE Plain.
OTHER
This space is used by all personnel. As a central area, tack board space should be provided for notices and other general information. A secretary will be put in charge of mail receiving, sorting and shipping.
-82-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Future Office Space
As the use of the airport and this facility increases, there might be a
need for more employees. They might administrate and manage such tasks
as accounting, public relations, property leases, space rental and airport development.
AREA
600 sq.ft. (4 additional offices at 150 sq. ft. each)
This space is not to be finished until such time that it is needed.
-83-


PUBLIC AND PILOT SERVICES
Most spaces in this area are open to the public and should have direct access by the public. The pilot, however, has access to some spaces that serves his or her particular needs.
Primary Spaces Sq. Ft. Persons
Public Areas
Waiting Area 721 28 (V)
Snack Room 345 8 (V)
Television Area 70 5 (V)
Outside Services and Reservation Board 14 -
Newstand Vending Area 54 -
Public Telephones 32 -
Car Rental Counters 102 2(E)
Automatic Bank Teller 12 -
Public Restrooms 378 -
Conference/Training Room 150 -
Pilot Areas
Flight Planning and Weather Briefing Room 66 -
Pilot Rest Area 200 -
Pilot Toilet 60
Secondary Spaces
Janitor Closet/Sink 12
Total 2,216 2(E), 41(V)
-84-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Waiting Area AREA
721 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Line Service Desk, All User Service Spaces, should be easily found from landside entrance and apron entrance.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
28 Seats, 3 Tables, 10 End Tables, Writing Table
QUALITY OF SPACE
Public, spacious and open. Soft materials, cheerful, welcoming and comfortable.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Active and passive activities such as waiting, reading, conversation, resti ng.
OTHER
Users like to see apron from their seats in order to watch for arrival of airplanes and other apron activity.
Provide for temporary storage of baggage in a highly visible location. It should be located close to the entrance from the apron and yet still be conspicuous as one enters the waiting area from the main entrance. Baggage should be stored close to ground level. People don't like to lift baggage onto high shelves.
-85-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Snack Room
AREA
345 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Tables, 8 Chairs, 8± Vending Machines, Trash Can
QUALITY OF SPACE
Public, non-absorptive materials on floors & walls, cheerful, inviting, comfortable.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Eating, Drinking & Conversation.
-86-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Television Area
AREA
70 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION
Allow about 8 ft. space between seats and television.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Waiting Area
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Television, 5 Chairs
QUALITY OF SPACE
Public, Quietness to hear TV, inviting, cheerful, soft material
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Watching Television


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Outside Services and Reservation Board AREA
14 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Waiting Area, Along Main Circulation
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
2 Direct Link Telephones, Information Display with writing counter.
QUALITY OF SPACE Public, Highly Visible
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Making hotel, car rental, restaurant, etc. reservations over the phone.
-88-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Newstand Vending Area
AREA
54 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Waiting Area and along major circulation.
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 6 Vending Machines
QUALITY OF SPACE Public, High Visibility
-89-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Public Telephones
AREA
8 sq.ft, per phone, 32 sq.ft. (4 phones)
CRITICAL DIMENSION
Allow 30 inches width per phone and unobstructed access within 12 inches of phone (per UBC 1979).
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
More than one location, Waiting Area, Public Restrooms
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Booths with seat
QUALITY OF SPACE
Private (booths), soft materials, comfortable.
OTHER
Provide ventilation.
-90-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Car Rental Counter (2 required)
AREA
51 sq.ft. each.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 8.5 ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES
Passenger Waiting Area, Entrance from apron MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Cash Register, Telephone, Credit Card Machine, Filing Cabinet, Counter, Storage (ie. beneath counter)
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly visible to customer
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Customer rents automobile
OTHER
Provide for hand baggage storage beneath counter.
Both counters should be located in the same general area.
-91-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Automatic Bank Teller AREA
12 sq.ft.
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area
QUALITY OF SPACE
Highly Visible, privacy space at money dispenser. OTHER
Should be seen from line service desk.
-92-


SPACE DESCRIPTION
Public Restrooms, male & female AREA
378 sq.ft.
CRITICAL DIMENSION 7 ft. width
CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Waiting Area
MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT
Men's : 3 Toilets, 3 Urinals, 3 Sinks; Womens : 3 Toilets, 3 Sinks, Powder Room Area with couch, mirror, counter and seat. Provide appropriate dispensers and trash collection.
QUALITY OF SPACE Clean and pleasant.
MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE
Women will rest and change babies' diapers in powder room.
OTHER
Handicap accessibility requirements. See code.
-93-


Full Text

PAGE 1

ARCHIVES LD 1190 A72 1985 V64 --1 10/ ENVIRONMENTAL DESIG AURARIA LIBRARY _lr#Uf & (jaLe flkU . V)alL l & $(14iwf r. I . ..

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U18700 4094491 ,. T '

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ENV\RONMENTAL OES\GN AURAR\A UBRAR'i Front Range Airport -Administration and Fixed Based Operations Facility An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture. by Alfred M. Voigt ... Spring 1984

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D E S 1 '11 ::{ LO ll '1 0 1/.t> y

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The Thesis of Alfred Michael Voigt is approved. Bob Kindig Committee Chairman L. Ga 1 e Abe 1 s Principal Advisor University of Colorado at Denver Date

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To me this is the most important project of my graduate studies in architecture. The support and patience of my wife, Betty, helped to make it possible. I dedicate this project to her. I would also like to thank professors Gary Long, Paul Heath, and Bob Kindig, and especially L . Gale Abels who devoted many hours of guidance and advice to what I believe was a successful thesis design. They were all a pleasure to work with.

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Introductory Note To T h e Reader This document presents the culmination of my graduate s chool studies in Architecture. To me its importance lies in clarifying my technique for designing a building, that being a Fixed Based Operator facility at a local airport. This is not to sa y that my technique i s the only correct one nor is it to say that this project has challenged me in all of the important issues in architecture. I think, however, that there is a way of going about design in an orderly manner, that design is a rational process and that this can be applied to the design of many building types . This document is composed of 3 parts -a beginning, development and recapitulation. First, I state my design ideas and hypotheses. Second, I present a program of an airport facility. Finally, I present the design of a building that demonstrates application of my design ideas to the program. Perhaps someone following my methodology would not come up with the same end product. This is all right, and I believe normal. When two different people to use the same pieces of a puzzle and assemble them produce a different picture, the world becomes new, exciting and more fun.

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Introduction The Project The Thesis The Site Location Topography Zoning Utilities Climate TABLE OF CONTENTS Building Codes and Other Constraints Requirements Based on Occupancy Requirements Based on Type of Construction Light, Ventilation and Sanitation Egress and Access The Facility Program Spatial Requirements Brief Programmatic Entry and Exit Requirements Operations Department Maintenance and Repair Department Airport and Terminal Administration Department Public and Pilot Services The Design Conclusions Bibliography Appendix A, Programming notes and diagrams. Appendix B, Studies and Observations of Existing FBO Facilities. 1 1 3 6 6 9 9 10 12 17 18 24 26 29 35 36 37 38 51 76 84 98 105

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Introduction The Project Travel by air has consistently increased over the year s of this century . In accompaniment with this has been the increase in facilities that service and store the aircraft and provide a gathering place for people who use the aircraft. In order for the Denver metro area to keep pace with this growth new airports must be constructed. The Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) played a major role in this determination. It sponsored the Denver Regional Airport System Plan (RASP, 1974) that concluded that four to six new general aviation airports* would be required in the Denver Metro Area by the year 2000.1 In response to this study and others, and to the encouragement of aviation minded interests within the county, the Board of Commissioners of Adams County, Colorado first contracted in 1975 with the firm of Isbill Associates, Inc. (Denver, Colorado) for an Airport Site Selection and Master Plan study. After many years, an airport has now been partially constructed and is known as Front Range Airport. An essential element to the Front Range Airport is the Fixed Base Operator (FBO) facility. This is generally a 11commercial business which provides maintenance, repair, fueling and other services for general aviation aircraft users.112 This is the type of facility that will be designed in this project. In addition, a flight training school and an airport administration department will be included in the facility1s program. For the time being the airport administration (as opposed to a commercial business) will operate the facility. *General Aviation includes all domestic civil flying except that performed by the public air carriers (scheduled, supplemental, contract, and intrastate). Within the General Aviation category are agricultural aviation, industrial aviation, business and corporate aviation, the aviation of federal, state3 and local government, and similar miscel laneous aviation activity. -1-

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The FBO Airport Administration facility will be located on a parcel of land located adjacent to the aircraft parking apron. The boundaries of this parcel have been previously established by the Airport Master Plan study. This facility must accommodate its specialty of airport service requirements for about the next 20 years or when the volume of airplane traffic justifies the installation of an aircraft control tower (to be located elsewhere on the airport site). When this occurs the administration department will probably require its own facility and the need for more than one FBO might be desirable. -2-

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The Thesi s The f ollowin g problems and objectives define the issues that wil l be addressed in the design. l. Context will evolve over time. This facility will be the first maJor public building on the airport site. Airplane storage hangars are being built at this time and as such they have set an architectural context in which it should fit. At present the airport site is surrounded by predominant ly rural agricultural land uses. There is evidence, though, that the next thrust of urbanization from Denver could settle into the eastern portion of Adams County. 4 In addition the Airport Master Plan t d t t th t b d th . t . t 5 s u y s a es a ase upon o er a1rpor proJec s: 11The airport will serve as an attraction to business interests who are seeking a site for new plant or expansion into the region.11 11Combined with the highway network and the railroad, the airport presents an exceptional opportunity for attracting new industry. 11 11Land values 1n the airport environs will appreciate as development of all airport property takes place. 11 This suggests that the predominantly rural context surrounding or adjacent to the airport will change to an urban one. The facility should attempt to tie together and express both situations. 2. The facility must become economically viable. In order for the FBO facility to become a self supporting business it must attract users. In order to attract users it must , from the beginning, provide the full and complete services that they expect. This requires that it be designed and built for full projected capacity . The building should help to create and support the facility's success. -3-

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3. The facility must compete with similar fa cilities. It is assumed that there will be a certain amount of competitive marketing between this facility and other FBO facilities within the region . Although the users of this facility are 11expected to be primarily from Adams County and the northeast sector of the Denver Metropolitan Region11 other users might come from the broader region or from across the nation. 6 The visua l image that the facility presents, especially to the itinerant traveler, will have an impact on their memory. It should make them want to come again. That image should be memorable. 4 . The approach is unique. Airports are special in that they are approached from a position overhead as well as from the ground. The form of the facility should be distinctive in plan as well as elevation. There should be ext ernal formal continuity between plan and elevation. 5. Provide for occupant needs and desires. The facility is a hub for activity and movement. The staff provides a broad range of services for users with various needs. Space and form should combine activity and movement with staff expertise and user need. This will promote efficiency, security, safety and occupant enjoyment. I believe that under certain circumstances a building should be responsive to the user . Sometimes this could be in the active sense such as that typified by the mechanical and electrical systems. Other times it could be in a more passive sense such that the user can manipulate elements of the building to suit his or her needs at the moment. I also believe that a building should promote some kind of response from the user. These responses can be emotional, that is that strong feelings are aroused by the building. These responses can also be rational, that is that the user can draw some logical conclusion about how the building is organized and respond in some predictable manner. -4-

PAGE 13

I propose that t h e fol lowing hypotheses form the foundation for my design solution -that they help to resolve the design issues. Form & Space * can contribute to power and strength with which a design is perceived; * helps the design to respond appropriately to climate and conte xt; * helps to define hierarchies of use and publicness. Circulation * circulation can organize the forms and spaces of the design; * can help promote efficiency, safety and security in the design; * can help define relationships for the user. Structure * can clarify the building form; *can enhance the aesthetic qualities of the design. Materials * can interpret the scale of the design; * can provide the most immediate contribution to satisfying user comfort; * can help to unify the design. Color and Texture *can enhance the visual qualities of the other elements by providing interest; * can help to unify the elements within the context. -5-

PAGE 14

The Site Location The Front Range Airport is located in Colorado, about 15 miles east (as the crow flies) of Denver1s Stapleton International Airport. It lies in Adams County directly north of Interstate I-70 and north-east of the small town of Watkins. ; I . . . /,' OOUGLA.S Regional Map 7 -6-

PAGE 15

Access to the site by ground transportation at present is from the west on County Rd. 48 and then north on the access road. In the future, after the north-south runway has been constructed, the approach will be from the east on County Rd. 48 and then north on the access road . I I I L ___ _j Loca 1 i ty Map -7-

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' : ' ' . . . .. ... ' The facility site is located south of and about m idpoi n t along the existing runway. An apron has been constructed and the facility i s to be located adjacent to it. Airplane storage hangars are located s outh of the site. Fuel storage and hydrants are Located at t h e sollt.h-Prlst. ... .. ... . corner of the site. . ' . ' .. . . / ' . . ., ..... .... . . . . ... . -8.• ... . .. . . &__,. --:a . .... . . ' • ... . . . . . . ....... . , .. , . s-. . . . .

PAGE 17

Topography The site is located on a relatively flat parcel of land . The e levation ranges from about 5420 ft. to about 5425 ft. and slopes down to the south . Zoning Development rules for land on the airport site are determined and enforced by the airport administrative authority. The master plan states that the airport 11Wi 11 adopt deve 1 opment standards whch w i 11 assure efficient utilization of land areas11 and 11maintain safety in aircraft movement.118 The east-west runway is designed to incorporate an Instrument Landing System. To assure that this system functions properly, the FAA requires a minimum separation of 800 feet between the instrument runway centerline and the building restriction line. In order for personnel in the future control tower to see aircraft on the apron building height is limited to 30 feet. -9-

PAGE 18

Utilities All utilities are located underground. Where appropriate the water line occupies its own trench, electric power and telephone share a trench, and sanitary sewer and gas share a trench. I• '' II Ill 1•:: II 11. l ., "'1 ' :rri rr. .1-11 1roo 11 , 1111 II • 1111 II II I till II M I 1111 I: --1111 .. II M I o(=j• 11 II -II I Jl " I I I I L ___ _j fpJ 0 ,..... Utility Location Map

PAGE 19

Sanitary Sewer The present system incorporates a septic tank with leach field located at the north-west corner of the airport site. It is expecte d that in the future an improv ement district that includes the airport will be created and that its system will tie in directly to the present system. Water Gas The present system transports water pumped from wells located at various points in the central portion of the airport site. It is expected that in the future an improvement district will be created and that its system will tie in directly to the present sy stem. Gas is piped in from a main line that parallels County Road 25N to north-west of the airport site. It is expected that this gas will be used to supply the heating requirements of the facility. Electric Power The step-down transformer for electric power is located in the central portion of the airport site. The facility will require 480V 3 phase in order to meet the service requirements of aircraft. At present all switching for runway lighting is located in the same area as the step-down transformer. It is desired that all switching for runway lights and other electronic systems be moved into the facility for easier access. Telephone The telephone company1s telephone box is located in the same area as the electric step-down transformer. Fire Protection The airport site is located in the Watkins Fire District. Three pieces of equipment are located at Bennett and one truck at Watkins. Its manpower is provided by volunteers. Eventually a Crash Fire Rescue unit will be located on the airport site. -11-

PAGE 20

C l imate 11Climate of the area is mild, cha racterized by low precipitation (15 inches annual average) and abundant sunshine. Temperature maximums reach below 0F in winter and above 90F in summer which is the daily mean maximum temperature (hottest month). The area experience s only rare occurrences of violent winds and weather.119 Wind User comfort and building economy can be enhanced when the forces of wind are recognized . For example , the orientation and velocity of prevailing winds may suggest the need for protection. Or proper fenestration orientation and size may enhance the natural cooling effects of a summer breeze. ZO Hourl'{ Z.O E. Wind Roses show the percentage of time the wind blew from the 16 compass points or was calm. Wind pressure is an important determinant in structural design. Design Wind Pressure (per 1979 UBC) For Square Buildings Height Zone (in feet) Less than 30 30 to 49 -12-Wind Pressure (in lbs./sg. ft.) 20 25

PAGE 21

Temperature 11An important determinant of annual fuel use is the number of degreedays at the geogr aphic location of the building. For any one 24-hour day, the number of degree-day s is the difference between 65F and the mean outdoor temperature for the day. ,,lO Station Denver Airport Avg. Winter Temperature 37.6 Fuel consumption calculations include: Degree Days Yearly Total 6283 Calculated hourly heat lo ss of the building Degree-days annually Average winter temperature Heating value per unit of fuel Efficiency of heating system The amount of humidity in the outside air is an important variable in determining the type of cooling system that can be utilized in a building. Outside Summer Dry Bulb Temperature 95 Precipitation Design Conditions for Denver11 Daily Range H Summer Wet Bulb Temperature 40 The design storm describes the largest quantity of water that may be deposited upon the site during a certain length of time . It is used to calculate the amount of surface runoff on the site and from this the amount of water to be temporarily stored on the site as required by local regulations. Adams County prescribes 6.1 in./hr. for 5 minutes time duration. -13-

PAGE 22

S-Z.-, I =II II II F M J J o N Normal Monthly Total Precipitation The amount of rainfall through the year presents no unusual design constraints. Snow loads are used in structural design to design main structural members. Adams county requirements 30 lbs./sq. ft., horizontal projection IS-10-•• J J J A 0 Mean Monthly Total Snowfall The amount of snowfall through the year suggests that areas will have to be provided for the temporary storage of snow from paved outdoor circulation areas. -14-

PAGE 23

Solar Latitude is used as an aid in calculating the amount of overhang or recess in shading devices. Latitude= 3911011 Percentage of sunshine vs. cloudy days suggests the applicability of daylighting design for the building. See Appendix 11A11• For a temperate climate the following rules of thumb should be observed for position and form of building on site. 12 These suggestions are based on moderately insulated house. However, they may still be applicable to an FBO facility that is not heavily loaded with people and lights. Building location on site 110utdoor space to south and north for control of winter access to sun and to facilitate summer passage of breezes . A variety of outdoor space orientations for seasonal outdoor activities. Use of underground space. Locate to provide summer shade east, west, and above.11 Plan and volume characteristics -15-

PAGE 24

Roofs (solar gain refers to horizontal surfaces) 11Summer solar gain more than twice that of east or west wall. Winter solar gain about half that of south wall . Attics helpful in winter, but must be well ventilated in summer to lose heat in high humidity areas. Moderately steep pitch to south for optimum winter solar gain.11 Skylights 11Should be insulated at night in winter and shaded against direct summer sun. Avoid snow accumulation. Skylights that can open can aid summer ventilation.11 Wall Orientations 11Summer: Shading of east and west walls critical. (South walls gain about two-thirds that of east and west walls.) Winter: South wall clearly best for solar gain, with east or west wall gain about one-third that of . south wall. Potential freezethaw and glare problems on south walls, though less severe than in cool regions. 11 -16-

PAGE 25

Building Codes and Other Constraints -17-

PAGE 26

1979 UBC Brief Requirements Based on Occupancy Table No. 5-A Wall & Opening Protection of Occupancies Based on Location on Property Group B See Sec. 702 H See also Sees. 902 & 903 Description of occupancy 2-retail stores, office building, drinking & dining establishments having occupant load of less than 50 persons. Portions of building having rooms used for educational purposes, beyond 12th grade, with less than 50 occupants in any room. Storage and sales rooms for combustible goods, paint stores without bulk handling 5-Aircraft repair hangars 60 feet. Location on Property Fire resistance of Exterior Walls 1 hour less than 20 feet 1 hour less than 60 feet. Openings in Exterior Wa 1 See 504 Not permitted less than 5 f Protected les than 10 feet. Protected les than 60 feet Building shall adjoin or have access to a public space, yard or street on not less than one side of street or alley used as property line. Locate eaves over required windows not less than 30 inches from side and rear property lines (see Section 1710). -18-

PAGE 27

-Measure distance at right angle to Property Line. Provisions do not apply to walls at right angle to Property L ine . Projections beyond exterior wall shall not extend beyond: Building s on same property and court walls of buildings over one story height shall assume to have Property Line between them. For existing buildings assume Property Line to be as set forth in Table 5-A. Exceptions: 2 or more buildings on same property may be considered as one if aggregate areas do not exceed those of Table 5-C. If different types of occupancy or construction type are considered, u se worst restrictive. Table No. 5-B Required Separation of Buildings of Mixed Occupancy (in hours) B-2 H-2 H-5 B-2 X 1 1 H-2 1 X 1 H-5 1 1 X A one hour separation is not less than one hour resistive construction. Openings are protected by fire assembly having one hour fire protection rating. A 2 hour separation is not less than 2 hour resistive construction . Open lngs are protected by fire assembly having a hour fire protection rating. -19-

PAGE 28

E xception to Table No. 5-B Assembly rooms having floor a r ea not over 7 5 sq. ft. and administrative and clerical offi ces (and similar rooms) the aggregate fl oor area not to exceeding 25% of major use not related to Group H-2. F o r B-2 occupancy Room containing boiler or central heating plant shal l be sepa rated from rest of building with one hour fire resistive construction (only if each piece of equipment exceeds 400,000 Btu/ hr . input). For H-5 occupancy Every boiler or central heating plant separated from rest of building by 2 hour fire resistive occupancy separation. Table No. 5-C Basic Allowable Floor Area for Buildings One Story in Height (in square feet) Occupany of Construction I II III IV v F.R. F. R. One Hour N One Hour N H.T. One Hour B-2 unlimited 39,900 18,000 12,000 18,000 12,000 18,000 14,000 H-2 15,000 12,400 5,600 3,700 5 ,600 3,700 5,600 4,400 F.R. -Fire Resistive N -No requirements for fire resistance H.T. -Heavy Timber Buildings greater than one story Area of all floors not to exceed twice that allowed for one story. Basements not included. -20N 8,00C 2,500

PAGE 29

Separation walls must meet fllowing requirements for each area to be considered a separate building. -4 hr. for types I, II F.R., III and IV. 2 hr. for types II one-hour, II-N and V Length of opening not to exceed 25% wall length/each story, protect opening with fire resistive assembly with: -for 4 hr. wall use 3 hr. assembly -for 2 hr. wall use hr. assembly Separation for projects. (J' Separation for ground to roof. %"'" kt.-?&Vfrft{.c1 W•ll -21-

PAGE 30

Separation for different heights. lO' Allowable Area Increases (not allowable if height and story increase used) AMAX = ([1.25% x (X-20 ft.)] x A) +A, 1.25% x (X-20 ft.) not to exceed 50% if: 2.5% per ft. not to exceed 100% if: ?p6" -22fublk.

PAGE 31

5 % per foot not to exceed 100% except f o r 1 sto r y aircraft storage h angar, and f or aircraft repair hangar if: Area increase shall not exceed 500% . f'yblic. 8 and H-5 can have unlimited area i f fire sprinklers are used (see Chp. 38) and if building s urounded by public space 60 ft. min. width. Table No. 5-D Maximum Height of Bui ldings Occupancy I II III IV V F. R. F. R . One Hour N One H our N H. T . One Hour Maximum height in feet unlimited 160 65 55 65 55 65 50 Maximum height 1 n stories B-2 unlimited 4 2 4 2 H) 2 & 5 unlimite d 12 5 2 1 2 1 4 2 3 2 Increases not allowable if A rea increase used. Allow 1 story increa s e if sprinkler system used (see Chp. 38) Exceptions aircraft hangar height unlimited with auto sprinkler system, and surrounded by public space, width = x height. -2340 2 1 N

PAGE 32

Requirements Based on Types of Construction TABLE NO. 11A-TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION-FIRERESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (In Hours) For Details see Chapters under Occupancy and Types of Construction and for Exceptions see Section 1705 . TYPE I TYPE II TYPE Ill TYPE IV TYPEV NONCOMBUSTIBLE COMBUSTII!LE BUILDING ElEMENT Fire Fire 1 Hr. N H .T. 1Hr . N R .. latlve R .. latlve 1Hr . N . 4 4 4 4 4 Exterior Bearing Wnlls Sec. 1903 (a) 1 N 2003 (a) 2003 (a) 2103 (a) 1 N 1803 (a) Interior Bearing Walls 3 2 1 N 1 N 1 1 N Exterior Nonhearing 4 4 4 4 4 Sec. 1 N 1 N Walls 1803 (a) 1903 (a) 2003 (a) 2003 (a) 2103 (a) Structural Frame' 3 2 1 N 1 N 1 or 1 N H . T . Partitions -Permanent I2 12 I2 N 1 N 1 or H . T . 1 N I 1 Shaft Enclosures 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1706 1706 Floors 2 2 1 N 1 N H.T. 1 N Roofs 2 1 1 N 1 N H.T. 1 N Sec. 1806 1906 1906 Exterior Doors and Sec. 1903 (b) 1903 (b) 1903(b 2003 (b) 2003 (b) 2103 (b) 2203 2203 Windows 1803 (b) N-No general requirements for fire resistance. H . T .-HeavyTimber. 'Structural frame elements in the exterior wall shall be protected against external fire exposure as required for exterior bearing walls or the structural frame, whichever is greater. 'Fire-retardant treated wood (see Section 407) may be used in the assembly, provided fire-resistance requirements are maintained. Sec Sections 1801 and 1901, respectively . Type I Sructural Framework: structural steel or iron, reinforced concrete or masonry . Mezzanine: Not more than 2 floors in any room; shall not cover more than 33-1/3% of room area -24-

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Type II Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete or masonr y. Mezz anine: Not more than 2 floors in any room; shal l not cover more than 33-l/3% of room area. Type III Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood . Partitions: Wood partitions shall not support more tha n 2 floors and a roof . Stairs: May be constructed of any material. Type IV Structural Framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood. Partitions: Wood partition shall not support more than 2 floors. Heavy Timber: Columns not less than 8 inches in any dimension when supporting roof or floor loads; Type V Floor beams and girders not less than 6 inches width and 10 inches depth; Timber arches supporting floor loads not less than 8 inches in any dimension . Timber arches supporting roof loads; 6 inch min. width, 8 inch min. depth lower half and 6 inch min. depth upper half. Structural framework: steel, iron, concrete, masonry or wood. -25-

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Light, Ventilation & Sanitation for Group B-2 and H-5 Areas Used by Human Beings If mechanical ventilation is not provided then: Provide natural light using exterior glazed openings with area equal to 1/10 total floor area Provide natural ventilation using exterior openings with area greater than or equal to 1/20 total floor area. If fenestration is not provided then: Mechanical ventilation shall supply minimum 5 cu. ft./minute per occupant of outside air and total of 15 cu. ft./minute per occupant in all portions of building continuously during time building is occupied. If register velocity exceed s 10 ft./sec. then place more than 8 ft. above floor. Water Closet Rooms Where mechanical ventilation is not provided then : Provide exterior window with 3 sq. ft. or greater area -fully operable. Add 50 sq. ft. for each toilet. Where fenestration is not provided: Provide exhaust system, connected to light switch, supplying complete air change every 15 minutes, vent to outside air at least 5 ft. from any operable window. Provide at least one water closet. Provide separate facilities for each sex if number of employees exceeds 4 and if both sexes are employed . -26-

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Water closets where food is prepared, stored or served shall: have non-absorbent interior finish; have hand washing facilities; be separated from food preparation. Water Closet Compartments and Showers General Floors and Walls Floor material smooth, hard, non-absorbent surface such as portland cement, ceramic tile, concrete or similar. Extend upward onto wall at least 5 inches. Extend material 4 feet onto wall within water closet compartment and 2 feet in front of and on either side of urinals. -Wal l material not to be adversely affected by moisture. Toilet Facilities -Locate stool in clear space min. 30 inches wide and allow 24 inches min. in front of stool. Handicap Requirements Allow one unit per sex on floors accessible by handicapped. -All doorways leading to unit to have clear, unobstructed width of 30 inches min. 44 inch. min. clear space on each side of doorway accessing toilet room. No more than one door may encroach into this space. 60 inch diameter min. clear space in toilet room. Door 1n any position may not encroach space by more than 12 inches . -27-

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Type of Building or Occupancy Office or Buildings Workshops Locate stool in clear space min. 42 inch es wide and allow 4 8 i nches min. in front of stool entry at front (end) not less than 30 inches wide. Entry at side not l e ss than 34 inches wide. Door swing side not to encroach i n f ront of water closet ( r equird space). Allow 44 inche s min. width clear unobstructed access to compartment. Toilet Room Facil ities Except for bowl provide clear unobstructed space 26 in . width, 27 in. height and 12 inches depth under lavatory. Where mirror provided, install one so that bottom of mirror is 40 in. from floor. -Where towel and disposal fixture provided, shall be accessible to handicapped and at least one shall be 40 inches above floor. Water Closets Fixtures 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 Persons 1-15 16-35 36-55 56-80 81-110 1-9 10-24 25-49 Minimum Plumbing Facilities (from Appendix C 1976 UPC) Urinals Lavatories Bathtub or Shower Drinking Fount * * Fixtures 1 2 3 4 5 Persons 1-15 16-35 36-60 61-90 91-125 Up to 100, 1 per 10 -28-1 shower for each 15 persons exposed to excessive heat or to skin con tamination with poisonous, infectious or irritating material Fixtures Pers 1 per 100 1 req1d for mo than 6 persons

PAGE 37

Egress and Access Use Table No. 33-A Minimum Egress & Access Requirements Minimum of two exits other than elevators are required where number of occupants is over Square feet per occupant Access by means of a ramp or an elevator must be provided for the physically handi capped as indicated Assembly Areas, less concentrated use 50 15 yes Conference Rooms -Lounges Mechanical Equipment Room 30 300 no Offices Warehouse All others Exits 30 100 yes 30 300 no 50 100 Number Every building shall have at least 1 exit. -Floors above first story with occupant load of more than 10 shal l have not less than 2 exits. Determine number of exits for each floo r by using occupant load of that story plus percentage of occupant load of floors which exist through level of consideration as follows: Width 1. 50% of occupant load in 1st adjacent story above and below (if exits through level under consideration). 2. 25% of occupant load in the story immediately beyond first adjacent story. -Not less than total occupant load 7 50 (in feet) -Divide width equally among all exits. -Determine clear width using formula 11Number of Exits.11 -29-

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Doors Arra ngement Place 2 exits a distance apart equal to and not l e s s of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between e xits. -Arrange 3 or more so that if one becomes blocked others will be avai labl e . Distance without sprinkler system: 150 ft. ; with sprinkler system: 200 ft.; increase by 100 ft. when last 150 ft. is within corridor. Applies to every exit door serving occupant load of 10 or more, or hazardous rooms. Swing in direction of exit travel when serving hazardous area or when serving occupant load of 50 or more; see double acting doors. Width and Height not less than 3 ft. width and 6 ft. 8 in. height; -open at least 9 degrees; -clear width not less than 32 inches. Special Revolving (see k. for exception), sliding and overhead doors shall not be used as required exits; Power operated doors complying with U.B.C. standard No. 33-1 may be used. -30-

PAGE 39

Change in floor level Floor la ndings on each side of door not more than l inch lower than doorway threshhold and len gth of not less than 5 ft. Exception: When door opens into a stair or smokeproo f enclosure, landing need not have a length of 5 feet. Corridors and Exterio r Exit Balc onies . Applies to every corridor serving occ upant load of 10 or more Exit corridors sha l l be continuous until egress is provided from building and shall not be interrupted by intervening rooms. Exception: Foyers, lobbies or reception rooms constructed as required for corridors. When more than one exit is required, arrange so that it is possible to go in either di rection from any point in a corridor to a separate exit. -Dead ends not to exceed 20 feet. Width -44 inch minimum servin g occupant load of 10 or more. Height 7 feet measured from lowest projection from ceiling. Projections Required width to be unobstructed Exceptions: Handrail and opened doors not to reduce required width by more than 7 in ches . -Doors in any position by not more than one-half. -Trim by not more than inches each side. -31-

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Openings The total area of all openings, other than doors, in any portion of an interior corridor shall not exceed 25% of the area of the corridor wall of the room which it is separating from the corridor. Stairways. Exempt stairs or ladders used only to attend equipment. Width occupant load more than 50 then not less than 44 inches width; occupant load 50 or less then 36 inches width; occupant load less than 10 then 30 inches width; -handrails may project inches each side; -trim may project inches each side. Rise & Run Rise not less than 4 inches and not greater than inches; run not less than 10 inches . Landing -length equal to width; need not exceed 4 ft. stair has straight run; door swing shall not reduce required width to less than one-half; or by 7 inches when fully open. Distance between landings not more than 12 feet Headroom Clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches from tread nosing to soffit or ceiling above. -32-

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Ramps Width -Same as stairs. Slope -required 1 vertical to 12 horizontal; -other 1 vertical to 8 horizontal Landings For slope greater than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal provide landing at top and bottom and 1 intermediate for each 5 feet rise. Landing length not less than 5 ft. at top and intermediate. Landing length not less than 6 ft. at bottom. -Doors in any position not to reduce ramp width to less than 42 inches and width by more than inches when fully open. Surface to be roughened and nonslip materials. Exit Enclosures Extent of Enclosure. Stairway and ramp enclosures shall include landings and parts of floors connecting stairway flights and shall also include corridor on the ground floor leading from the stairway to the exterior of the building. Enclosed corridors or passageways are not reqired from unenclosed stairways. Exception: Office buildings in Group B, Div. 2 Occupancy, a maximum of 50% of exits may discharge through a street floor lobby , provided the required exit width is free and unobstructed and the entire street floor is protected with an automatic sprinkler system. Exits for Group H Occupancies -If floor area is 200 sq. feet or more provide at least 2 separate exits. For Oiv. 2. No part of room shall be more than 75 feet from an exit. -33-

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Special Hazards . -Boiler, Furnace and Incinerator Rooms Provide 2 means of egress if: 1. area of room exceeds 500 sq. ft. ; 2. largest piece of fuel-fired equipment exceeds 400,000 Btu/hr. input capacity. -34-

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Spatial Requirements Brie f Space Description Operations Department Maintenance and Repair Department Airport and Terminal Administration Department Public and Pilot Services 15% for Circulation Mechanical Total Sq. Ft. 1,376 21,271 1,528 2,216 26,391 3,959 800 31,150 Employee Parking -43+ spaces Close-In/Visitor Parking -73+ spaces Outlying/Long-Term Parking -28+ spaces * E employee V -visitor -36Persons 11 (E)*, 18 (V)* 23 (E), 8 (V) 7 (E), 6 (V) 2 (E), 41 (V) 43 (E), 73 (V)

PAGE 44

Programmatic Entry and Exit Requirements Main Landside Entrance Main entry for public into facility from curb and parking. Should lead into waiting area. Should be dominant entry from landside approach and visitor parking . Provide curb area for loading and unloading of passenger vehicles. This curb area should be covered to protect visitors from rain and snow. Provide for handicap accessibility. Main Airside Entrance Main entry for public from airplane parking apron. Should lead into waiting area via Operations Service Counter. Should be dominant entry from apron approach. Provide for handicap accessibility. Employee Entrance Main entry for employees from employee parking area. Time clock should be located so that employees pass it while arriving and departing. Loading Dock and Entry Provides access to Parts warehouse. Loading dock should accommodate one typical 131-611 semi-trailer rig. An entry door of human proportions should be located to the side of the garage type door. Ready Room Entry To provide access from the ready room to the airplane parking apron for the line technicians. Hangar Door Provides access to the interior of the maintenance and repair hangar for airplanes from the apron. Provide for at least one door of human proportions where appropriate for use by mechanics. Additional Exits Provide as required by code. Gates Provide at least one entry and one exit control gate for ground vehicles. This will provide access between apron and the landside. -37-

PAGE 45

OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT This department provi d es the basic pit stop services required by the pilot and the aircraft before departure and after landing. Such services include refueling, oiling, and cleaning the aircraft. These services are in many ways analogous to those provided by a full service gas station. Primary Spaces Operations Manager ' s Office Flight Operations Service Counter Ready Room Kitchen Charter/Air Taxi Service Desk Flight Training Manager's office Receptionist Counter Secretary/Bookkeeper's office Training/Supplemental Conference Room Group Study Area Flight Simulator Room Secondary Spaces Sq. Ft . 180 78 152 56 78 140 30 122 255 81 120 Line Service Toilet 16 Janitor Closet/Sink 12 Coat Closet, 4 sq.ft./employee 44 Storage Closet for clerical Supplies and Forms TOTAL 12 1,376 -38Persons 1(E), 2(V) 2(E) 3(E) 2(E) 1(E) 1(E) 1(E) 12(V) 4(V) ll(E), 18(V)

PAGE 46

SPACE DESCRIPTION Manager's Office AREA 180 sq.ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Service Counter, Ready Room, Waiting Area. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, 3 Chairs, Small Conference Table. QUALITY OF SPACE Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable . Materials should be soft. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are manager and visitors. Manager cont rol s operations from this location, meets with employees and public as required. -39-

PAGE 47

SPACE DESCRIPTION Service Counter, Flight Operati o n s AREA 78 sq.ft. (2 person counter) CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 . 5 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Lounge, Flight Line Ready Room, Entry from Apron. Should be readily visible from main landside entry. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Communications Receiver, Cash Register, Filing Cabinet, Storage (ie. beneath counter), CRT Terminal/Deyboard, Printout Unit, Counter. QUALITY OF SPACE Highly visible to customers and visitors, should reflect image of facility, open, cheerful, welcoming . MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are attendants, pilots and other visitors. Pilots pay for 11pit stop11 type service and supplies. Attendant monitors lounge area and provides information as required by visitors. Miscelaneous pilot supplies (maps, glasses, souveniers) are displayed and sold at the counter. -40-

PAGE 48

SPACE DESCRIPTIO N R eady Room AREA 152 sq . ft. (3 tec hnici a ns) CRITI C A L DIMENSION 8 f t . width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Aircraft Apron, Kitchen, Line Service Counter MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool s , Counter , Communications Receiver, various wall boards ( s cheduling , apron map, notices) QUALITY OF SPACE --Plain. Materials in space must resist rugged use by technicians to and from parking apron, particularly during inc l ement weather . Floor should be water resistant. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Pr imary users are service technicians who watch for arrival of aircraft onto apron prior to servicing them. Fills out appropriate reports, some of which are delivered directly to service counter. OTHER Door from this space must have direct acces s to parking apron. Counter should be located adjacent to window that p r ovides expansive view of apron. Include 4 sq.ft. of closet space for each technician and 32 sq.ft. of storage space for oil, pilot supllies, an air compressor and a tow bar. -41-

PAGE 49

SPACE DESCRIPTION Kitchen AREA 56 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Ready Room, Toilet MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter Tops, Refrigerator, Commercial Ice Maker, Dishwasher, Microwave Oven, Double Sink with Garbage Disposal , Storage Cabinets for storage of plates cups, beverage mix, utensils, etc., Hot Beverage Machines for coffee, hot chocolate, Trash Can QUALITY OF SPACE ---Plain, Materials should be water resistant. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are line technicians, attendants and pilots. Kitchen is used primarily to provide food and beverage for aircraft occupants and pilots. Catered food provided by outside vendor is stored here as required. -42-

PAGE 50

SPACE DESCRIPTION Service Counter, Charter/Air Taxi AREA 36 sq. ft. (2 each) CRITICAL DIMENSION 8.5 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting area. Should be readily visible from landside entrance. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, storage (beneath counter) QUALITY OF SPACE Highly visible to customer . Open, pleasant, welcoming. Should reflect image of air carrier it represents. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are customers of representatives of air carrier. The representative occupies the space intermittently as required -shortly before and after flight departs. Sells tickets for commuter and air taxi flights. -43-

PAGE 51

SPACE DESCRIPTION Manager's Office, Flight Training AREA 140 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Secretary / Bookkeeper, Receptionist Counter MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, 3 Chairs, Desk QUALITY OF SPACE Private, pleasant, soft materials. -44-

PAGE 52

SPACE DESCRIPTION Receptionist Counter, Flight Training AREA 30 sq . ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office, Waiting Area. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter/Display Case, Chair QUALITY OF SPACE ----Highly visible to customers and visitors. Should reflect image of flight school. Open, pleasant and welcoming. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are receptionist and customers. Receptionist sells training supplies, books, schedules training sessions, greets students, and provides information to prospective students. -45-

PAGE 53

SPACE DESCRIPTION Secretary/Bookkeeper ' s Office , Flight Training AREA 122 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Bookshelves, Chair, Clerical Desk, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit QUALITY OF SPACE Private, Plain and Pleasant MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary user is secretary/bookkeeper. Telephone conversation, paperwork. -46-

PAGE 54

SPACE DESCRIPTION Flight Training/Supplemental Conference Room AREA 255 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Locate within flight training area with direct access to Waiting Area. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 12 Classroom Desk, 1 Table, 1 Chair, Chalkboard QUALITY OF SPACE Public, Plain and Pleasant MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are students and instructors. Flight ground school classes are conducted here. -47-

PAGE 55

SPACE DESCRIPTION Group Study Area AREA 81 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Flight Training Room MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 4 Chairs, Table QUALITY OF SPACE Private, Plain and Pleasant MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are students . Here they may study for exams or have bull sessions. -48-

PAGE 56

SPACE DESCRIPTION Flight Simulator Room AREA 120 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Group Study Area, Flight Training Room MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Simulators QUALITY OF SPACE Plain. -49-

PAGE 57

SPACE DESCRIPTION Line Service Toilet AREA 16 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 4 ft. X 4 ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Ready Room, Kitchen MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool, Sink QUALITY OF SPACE Plain, Water Resistant Materials OTHER See Code requirements. Not a public space-no handicap requirements. -so-

PAGE 58

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR DEPARTMENT This department is similar to an automobile dealership service and repa1r department. Here airplanes are repaired and the parts to repair them are supplied and sold . Primary Spaces Manager's Office Customer Service Sales Manager's Office Maintenance and Repair Sales Service Counter Waiting Lounge Inspector's Office Parts Service Counter Library Manager's Office Warehouse Hangar Maintenance and Repair Supervisor's Office Hanger Metal Shop Lead Acid Battery Room Ni-Cad Battery Room Prop and Magneflux Shop Employee Lounge Woman's Toilet Men's Toilet Sq. Ft. 113 140 213 64 140 213 400 113 1,600 99 16,000 480 64 64 100 266 109 202 -51Persons 1(E) 1( E), 2(V) 2(E) 4(V) 1(E), 2(V) 2(E) 1(E) 1(E) 8(E)

PAGE 59

Avionics Manager's Office 113 1( E ) Secretary/Receptionist Office 142 1(E) Library Space 180 Workbench Space 288 4(E) Parts Storage 60 Secon dar y Spaces Toilet (for parts and customer serv i c e) 16 Janitor's Closet/Sink 12 Coat C l oset, 4 s q . ft./employee 68 Storage Closet f o r cleric al supplies and forms 12 Total 21 '271 23(E), 8( V ) -52-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Maintenance and Repair Manager's Office AREA 113 sq.ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Sales Service Counter, Supervisor's Office, Repair Hanger should be within close range . MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair QUALITY OF SPACE Private, moderately spacious and comfortable. Materials should be soft. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are manager and employees. Manager controls repair and maintenance operations. Usually meets with employees outside of office. -53-

PAGE 61

SPACE DESCRIPTION Sales Manager's Office AREA 140 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Maintenance and Repair Sales Service Counter, Waiting Lounge MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, 3 Chairs QUALITY OF SPACE Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable. Materials should be soft. PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are manager and visitors. Manager sells repair and maintenance services, meets with customers as required. -54-

PAGE 62

SPACE DESCRIPTION Maintenance and Repair Sales Service Counter AREA 213 sq. ft. (2 clerks) CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Sales Manager1s Office, Waiting Lounge, Maintenance and Repair Manager1s Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, clerical Desk, Chair, File Cabinets, CRT Terminal/Keyboard, Printout Unit QUALITY OF SPACE Highly visible to customers, should reflect image of facility, open, cheerful, welcoming. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are clerks, pilots and other customers. Customer pays for repair service and parts. Clerk attends to customer service needs and does bookkeeping for department. OTHER Clerk should have view of waiting area from counter . -55-

PAGE 63

SPACE DESCRIPTION Waiting Lounge AREA 64 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Service Counter, Sales Manager1s Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 4 Chairs, End Table, Magazine Table QUALITY OF SPACE Public, soft materials, cheerful, comfortable and relaxing. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Waiting, reading and conversation OTHER Avoid placement that would encourage customer contact with repair hangar and employees. -56-

PAGE 64

SPACE DESCRIPTION Inspectors Office AREA 140 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Maintenance and Repair Manager's Office and Parts Library. Should be located close to hangar. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, 3 Chairs, Desk, Bookshelves QUALITY OF SPACE Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable. Materials should be soft. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are inspector and customers. Telephone conversation, paperwork, meeting with customers. -57-

PAGE 65

SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts Service Counter AREA 213 sq. ft. (2 clerks) CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Parts Manager's Office, Parts Library , Parts Inventory Storage MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, File Cabinets, Chair, Clerical Desks, CRT/Keyboard and Printout Unit. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain. Materials should be durable. Floor should be non-absorptive. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are parts clerks, mechanics and occasionaly the public. Generally, clerk retrieves parts from warehouse and passes them to mechanic over the counter. Clerk performs typical inventory control duties. OTHER Clerk should be able to view and have direct acces to parts library from counter. -58-

PAGE 66

SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts Library AREA 400 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Parts Service Counter, hangar. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Shelves to hold catalogues and manuals, counter to support reference manuals. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain. Materials should be durable and non-absorptive. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are mechanics and parts clerks. Researching part descriptions and numbers. -59-

PAGE 67

SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts Manager's Office AREA 11 3 s q . ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Parts Ser v ice Counter, Parts Inventory Storage MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair QUALITY OF SPACE Private, moderately spacious, cheerful and comfortable. Materials should be soft. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are manager and employees. Activities include telephone conversation, paper work and brief employee meetings. -60-

PAGE 68

SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts War ehouse AREA 1600 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 1 bay CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Parts Service Counter, Manager's Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Shelves, Shipping and Receiving Counter, Loading Dock QUALITY OF SPACE Private, Secure and plain. Material s should be durable, hard and non-a b sorptive. PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Parts S torage and retrieval, Shipping and Receiving . OTHER Requires loading dock/roll-up door and adjacent entrance door . Circulation from this area to the hangar should be on the same level with as few obstructions as possible. -61-

PAGE 69

SPACE DESCRIPTION Maintenance and Repair Superviso r ' s Office AREA 9 9 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office, Hanger MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Desk, Chair QUALITY OF SPACE Private and plain. Materials should be durable and floor should be non -absorbent. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are supervisor and repair technicians. Supervisor performs mostly clerical duties here . OTHER Should have view of hanger. -62-

PAGE 70

SPACE DESCRIPTION Hangar AREA 16,000 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION Tall to accomodate height of aircraft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Metal Shop, Battery Rooms, Employee Lounge, Toilets, Supervisor1S Office, Parts Counter and Library MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Connections for various types of electrical power and compressed air. Space should be open with no obstructions. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain, durable and non-absorptive materials. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are aircraft repair technicians. They repair and service airplanes, however major overhauling of components (such as engines) is not performed here . OTHER See Code requirements. -63-

PAGE 71

SPACE DESCRIPTION Metal Shop AREA 480 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Perimeter of Hangar. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Storage Lockers, Metal Storage Area, work bench and various types of metal worki equipment including a lathe, sheet metal break, sheet metal shear, drill press and grinder. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain, hard, durable and non-absorptive materials. PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Fabricating and repairing sheet metal and other metal parts. -64-

PAGE 72

SPACE DESCRIPTION Lead Acid Battery Room AREA 64 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hanger MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, Shelves and Sink. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain, Acid Resistant and non-absorptive hard materials PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Charging and re-charging lead acid batteries OTHER Door swing out. Locate eyewash nearby . Vent to outside. -65-

PAGE 73

SPACE DESCRIPTION Ni-cad Battery Room AREA 64 sq . ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hanger MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, Shelves and Sink. QUALITY OF SPACE Plain, Acid Resistant and non-absorptive hard materials PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Charging and re-charging Ni-cad batteries OTHER Door swing out. Locate eyewash nearby. Vent to outside. -66-

PAGE 74

SPACE DESCRIPTION Prop and Magneflux Shop AREA 100 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar MAJOR SPACE FURNISHING AND EQUIPMENT Dip tank QUALITY OF SPACE Plain. Hard, durable and non-absorptive materials MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Airplane parts are dipped in solution and checked for cracks . -67-

PAGE 75

SPACE DESCRIPTION Employee Lounge AREA 266 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar, should be close to offices and toilets MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 8 Chairs, 2 Tables, Microwave Oven, Small Refrigerator, Cold and Hot Drink Vending Machines, small sink, cabinets and counter. QUALITY OF SPACE Private, plain and cheerfull. Materials should be durable and non-absorptive. PREDOMINENT ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are facility employees. Dining, meeting and general conversation. OTHER Employees generally bring their own food. Desirable view would include hangar and outdoor areas. -68-

PAGE 76

SPACE DESCRIPTION W omen's Toilet AREA 109 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool, Sink, Shower, 2 small Lockers QUALITY OF SPACE Private and plain. Materials should be non-absorptive. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are mechanics. Cleaning up after a dirty day on the job . -69-

PAGE 77

SPACE DESCRIPTION Men's Toilet AREA 202 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Hangar MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 1 Toilet, 2 Urinals, 2 Sinks, 2 Showers, 8 Small Storage Lockers QUALITY OF SPACE Private and plain. Materials should be non-absorptive. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are mechanics. Cleaning up after a dirty day on the job. -70-

PAGE 78

SPACE DESCRIPTION Manager's Office, Avionics AREA 113 sq. ft. ADJACENCIES Secretary/Receptionist's Office, Workbench Area MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Desk, Chair QUALITY OF SPACE Private, cheerful, comfortable. Materials should be soft. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are manager and employees. Activities include telephone conversation, paperwork and brief employee meetings. -71-

PAGE 79

SPACE DES C RIPTION Secretary/ B ookkeeper's Off ic e AREA 142 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Manager's Office, Workbench Area, Waiting lounge MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, 3 Chairs, Secretarial Desk, Display Case, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit . QUALITY OF SPACE Semi-public, pleasant and moderately spacious. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary user is secretary/bookkeeper. Occasionally customers will wait in space for service. Telephone conversation, paperwork. -72-

PAGE 80

SPACE DESCRIPTION Library Space AREA 180 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 4. 5 ft. for she 1 f & bending down CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Within workbench space MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Bookshelves, open or cabinet. -73-

PAGE 81

SPACE DESCRIPTION Workbench Space AREA 288 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Library Space, Parts Storage MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Large workbench with chairs. Allow for smaller workbenches as required. OTHER Provide rear entry. Technicians should enter and exit this space without having to go through secretarial area . -74-

PAGE 82

SPACE DESCRIPTION Parts Storage AREA 60 sq. ft. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Shelves for Storage Trays CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Workbench Area OTHER It should be a secure space. -75-

PAGE 83

AIRPORT AND TERMINAL ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT The personnel in this department work together to insure the smooth operations of the airport in general and the terminal facility in particular. This department functions as both the manager of the fixed based operations and the airport authority. Primary Spaces General Manager1s Office Secretary/receptionist Office Bookkeeper Office Conference Room Computer Area Mail Room Future Office Space Secondary Spaces Coat Closet, 4 sq.ft./employee Storage Closet for clerical supplies and forms Optional Toilet (provide, if this area located on separate level) Total -76-Sq. Ft. 200 116 142 150 168 72 600 12 52 16 1,528 Persons 1(E), 4(V) 1( E), 2(V) 1(E) 4(E) 7(E), 6(V)

PAGE 84

SPACE DESCRIPTION General Manager's Office AREA 200 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 9 ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Secretary/receptionist Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 7 Chairs, Desk, Credenza, Table, End Table with Lamp, CRT/keyboard QUALITY OF SPACE Private with small group meeting area. Spacious, pleasant, comfortable. Materials should be soft. Should project desirable image. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are General Manager and visitors. Manager controls overall activities of airport and FBO facility. Telephone conversation, paperwork, meeting with public and employees. OTHER View of apron area and public spaces would be desirable. -77-

PAGE 85

SPACE DESCRIPTION Secretary/receptionist Office AREA 116 sq.ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 8 ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES General Manager1s Office, Bookeeper1s Office MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Secretarial Desk, 3 Chairs QUALITY OF SPACE Public/private. Pleasant, comfortable and moderately spacious. Materials should be soft. Should project desirable image. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are receptionist and visitors. Receptionist provides secretarial support services to general manager and receives visitors. Telephone conversation, typing, filing and other clerical activities. Visitors wait in this area for appointments with general manager. -78-

PAGE 86

SPACE DESCRIPTION Bookkeeper1s Office AREA 142 sq . ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Secretary/receptionist Office, Storage Closet MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Credenza, Clerical Desk, Chair, Bookshelves, File Cabinets, CRT/keyboard and Printout Unit QUALITY OF SPACE Private, plain, comfortable and pleasant MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary user is bookkeeper. Telephone conversation, paperwork. -79-

PAGE 87

SPACE DESCRIPTION C o nf erence Room AREA 150 s q .ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES All department manager offices MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 8 Chairs, 1 Conference Table, 1 Credenza QUALITY OF SPACE Private/Public. Moderately spacious , pleasantand comfortab l e. Materials should be soft and space should reflect desirable ima g e . MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are management personnel . Staff meeti n gs. Substitutes as alternate public conference room. -80-

PAGE 88

SPACE DESCRIPTION Computer Area AREA 168 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES In Administrative Area MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Desk, Chair, CRT/keyboard, Printout Unit, Main Computer and Central Processing Unit, Disk Storage Cabinet QUALITY OF SPACE Private, plain and secure. -81-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Mail Room AREA 72 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Central to all departments MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Counter, Mail Bag Stands, Scale, Postage Meter, Mail Sorting and Receiving Slots QUALITY OF SPACE Plain. OTHER This space is used by all personnel . As a central area, tack board space should be provided for notices and other general information. A secretary will be put in charge of mail receiving, sorting and shipping . -82-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Future Office Space As the use of the airport and this facility increases, there might be a need for more employees. They might administrate and manage such tasks as accounting, public relations, property leases, space rental and airport development. AREA 600 sq. ft. (4 additional offices at 150 sq. ft. each) This space is not to be finished until such time that it is needed. -83-

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PUBLIC AND PILOT SERVICES Most spaces in this area are open to the public and should have direct access by the public. The pilot, however, has access to some spaces that serves his or her particular needs. Primary Spaces Public Areas Waiting Area Snack Room Television Area Outside Services and Reservation Board Newstand Vending Area Public Telephones Car Rental Counters Automatic Bank Teller Public Restrooms Conference/Training Room Pilot Areas Sq. Ft. 721 345 70 14 54 32 102 12 378 150 Flight Planning and Weather Briefing Room 66 Pilot Rest Area 200 Pilot Toilet 60 Secondary Spaces Janitor Closet/Sink Total -84-12 2,216 Persons 28(V) 8(V) 5(V) 2(E) 2(E), 41(V)

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Waiting Area AREA 721 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Line Ser vice Desk, All User Service Spaces, should be easily found fro m landside entrance and apron entrance. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 28 Seats , 3 Tables, 10 End Tables, Writing Table QUALITY OF SPACE --Public, spacious and open. Soft materials, cheerful, welcoming and comfortable. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Active and passive activities such as waiting, reading, conversation, resting . OTHER Users like to see apron from their seats in order to watch for arrival of airplanes and other apron activity. Provide for temporary storage of baggage in a highly visible location. It should be located close to the entrance from the apron and yet still be conspicuous as one enters the waiting area from the main entrance. Baggage should be stored close to ground level. People don't like to lift baggage onto high shelves. -85-

PAGE 93

SPACE DESCRIPTION Snack Room AREA 345 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Tables, 8 Chairs, 8 Vending Machines, Trash Can QUALITY OF SPACE Public, non-absorptive materials on floors & walls, cheerful, inviting, comfortable. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Eating, Drinking & Conversation . -86-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Television Area AREA 70 sq. ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION Allow about 8 ft. space between seats and television. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Waiting Area MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Television, 5 Chairs QUALITY OF SPACE Public, Quietness to hear TV, inviting, cheerful, soft materials. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Watching Television -87-

PAGE 95

SPACE DESCRIPTION Outside Services and Reservation Board AREA 14 sq . ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area, Along Main Circulation MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Direct Link Telephones, Information Display with writing counter. QUALITY OF SPACE Public, Highly Visible MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Making hotel, car rental, restaurant, etc. reservations over the phone. -88-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Newstand Vending Area AREA 54 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area and along maJor circulation. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 6 Vending Machines QUALITY OF SPACE Public, High Visibility -89-

PAGE 97

SPACE DESCRIPTION Public Telephones AREA 8 sq.ft. per phone, 32 sq.ft. (4 phones) CRITICAL DIMENSION Allow 30 inches width per phone and unobstructed access within 12 inches of phone (per UBC 1979). CRITICAL ADJACENCIES More than one location, Waiting Area, Public Restrooms MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Booths with seat QUALITY OF SPACE Private (booths), soft materials, comfortable. OTHER Provide ventilation. -90-

PAGE 98

SPACE DESCRIPTION Car Rental Counter (2 required) AREA 51 sq. ft. each . CRITICAL DIMENSION 8. 5 ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Waiting Area, Entrance from apron MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Cash Register, Telephone, Credit Card Machine, Filing Cabinet, Counter, Storage (ie. beneath counter) QUALITY OF SPACE Highly visible to customer MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Customer rents automobile OTHER Provide for hand baggage storage beneath counter. Both counters should be located in the same general area. -91-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Automatic Bank Teller AREA 12 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Waiting Area QUALITY OF SPACE Highly Visible, privacy space at money dispenser. OTHER Should be seen from line service desk . -92-

PAGE 100

SPACE DESCRIPTION Public Restrooms, male & female AREA 378 sq.ft. CRITICAL DIMENSION 7 ft. width CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Wait ing Area MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Men1s : 3 Toilets, 3 Urinals, 3 Sinks; Womens: 3 Toilets, 3 Sin ks, Powder Room Area with couch, mirror , counter and seat. Provide appro priate dispensers and trash collection. QUALITY OF SPACE Clean and pleasant. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Women will rest and change babies1 diapers in powder room. OTHER Handicap accessibility r equirements . See code . -93-

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SPACE DESCRIPTION Conference/training roo m . AREA 150 sq .ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Major circulation space, flight training area. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 8 Chairs, l Conference Table, l Credenza , l Coat Rack QUALITY OF SPACE Public/Private, comfortable, soft materials, business image. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primarily business meetings and training meetings flight school. OTHER Prefer view of apron area . -94-

PAGE 102

SPACE DESCRIPTION Flight Planning and Weather Briefing Room AREA 66 sq.ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Passenger Waiting Area, Main Circulation, close to apron entrance. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 Pilot Stations with counter space for writing and map storage, 1 Teletype Counter, Trash Can. QUALITY OF SPACE Public/private, well lighted, soft materials, quiet. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Flight planning and weather briefing, filling out flight plan, telephone conversation. OTHER Wall space for clocks and maps. -95-

PAGE 103

SPACE DESCRIPTION Pilot Rest Area AREA 200 square feet. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Pilot toilet, away from public spaces, close to flight line kitchen. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT 2 long sofas, TV, 2 writing tables with chairs, and reclining sofas. QUALITY OF SPACE Private, soft materials, comfortable. MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN SPACE Primary users are pilots. Sleeping, watching TV, writing, resting, reading. OTHER Provide lockers for temporary storage of clothes and baggage. -96-

PAGE 104

SPACE DESCRIPTION Pilot Toilet AREA 6 0 sq. ft. CRITICAL ADJACENCIES Pilot rest area. MAJOR SPACE FURNISHINGS AND EQUIPMENT Stool, Sink, Tub/shower, Clothes Rack, mirror. QUALITY OF SPACE Private, clean and pleasant. OTHER See code. -97-

PAGE 105

The Desi.gn -98-

PAGE 106

Conclusions In the beginning of this document I proposed 5 hypotheses that would help me to solve this design problem. The first two that dealt with form and space, and circulation, I feel, had the greatest impact on my design solution. For form, I eventually had to look for something outside of myself. I feel I found it when I came upon some pictures that were taken of some older airplane hangars and small airport terminal facilities designed and built by the Work Projects Administration during the late 19301s. Not only were they memorable but the ideas of setting pier structures at the four corners of the large box and of capping the box with arched roof seemed to make sense visually and structurally. Visually, because the piers set up a defined starting and ending point on the facade, a frame if you will; the arched roof combined both the side elevation and roof structure into one-i.e., external continuity between plan and elevation-and as a unit all of these provided for sound structural integrity. The pier structures added rigidity to the structures and they provided space for hangar doors, loading dock, storage etc. The arched roof has unique caabilities for spanning long distances. By echoing the large hangar facility with a smaller public component of the same form, I feel I was able to define hierarchies of publicness and privateness. The public being of more human scale and the private at the scale of the airplane. What is essentially a linear public circulation path from landside to airside entry, the public concourse is neatly stated by the high arch of the roof. The more private areas are located along the perimeter where the arch roof falls to meet the perimeter walls. -105-

PAGE 107

The third, fourth and final hypotheses dealt with structure, materials, color and texture. I wanted to experiment by contrasting the building with the airplane. Whereas the structure of the airplane is hidden from v1ew by a skin, the structure of the building is exposed. Whereas the skin of the airplane is smooth, the skin of the building is ribbed. Whereas the airplane is made light and sleek, the building is set into the ground by raising the grade beam above ground level to express its massiveness. Because this building is the first major public facility at the airport, I felt that the color green-a so-called neutral color-would allow for flexibility in the choice of color schemes for future development. I suppose my conclusions can be summed up as follows : I am happy and satisfied with my design proposal . I feel that the scheme-is flexible and could be applied to more than one situation. By the same token, I feel that it can be further refined to help solve the well defined problems of a more specific situation. -106-

PAGE 108

' FOOTNOTES 1Isbill Associates, Inc. Airport Master Plan Study; Front Range Airport; Adams County, Colorado (Denver, Colorado, 1982), p. I-1. 2 I b i d . , p . 3 g 1 o s sa ry . 3 I b i d. , p . 3 g 1 ossa ry 4Ibid., p. II-8. 5 Ibid., p . III-12 6 Ibid., p. II-21. 7copy of location map from Airport Layout Plan; Front Range Airport; Adams County, Colorado; by Isbill Associates, Inc. 8Airport Master Plan Study, p. IV-24. 9Ibid., p. III-1. 10McGuiness and Stein, p. 179-180. 11Ibl. d. , 1299 p. . 12Ibid., p. 30-32 .

PAGE 109

BIBLIOGRAPHY A shf ord, Norman and Paul H. Wright . Airport Engineering . N e w York: John Wiley and Sons, 1979 Campbell, George E. Airport Management and Operations . Baton Rouge, La.: Claitor's Publishing Division, 1974 De Chiara, Joseph. Time-Saver Standards for Building Types. Chp. 8, 2nd edition, New York: McGraw Hill Book Company, 1980 Dorey, Frederick C. Aviation Security. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1983 Federal Aviation Agency, Bureau of Facilities and Material, Airports Division. Airport Terminal Buildings . Washington 25 D.C.: S uper intendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1960 Horonjeff, Robert. Planning and Design of Airports . 2nd edition, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1975 Isbill Associates, Inc. Airport Master Plan Study; Front Range Airport; Adams County, Colorado . Denver, Colorado, 1982 Isbill Associates, Inc. Environmental Assessment; Front Range Airport; Adams County, Colorado. Denver, Colorado, 1982 McGuiness and Stein. Mechanical and Electrical Systems for Buildings . 7th ed. Plumbing and echanical Officials, International Association of. Uniform Plumbing Code, 1976 ed. Uniform Building Code, 1979 ed.

PAGE 110

Persons L. Gale Abels, Principal of firm L. Gale Abels Associates Architects, 1226 Pennsylvania Ave.; Boulder, Colorado 80302. Don Crandall, Director of Planning and Development, Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority. Dave Hobza, General Manager, Beckett Aviation, Arapahoe County Airport. Neil H. Keddington, Airport Manager, Front Range Airport. Mack Larson, Adams County Building Inspector. Neal Rood, Isbill Associates, Inc . Walt Schriber, Isbill Associates,Inc.

PAGE 111

APPENDIX A Programming Notes and Diagrams

PAGE 112

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PAGE 113

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PAGE 114

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PAGE 115

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PAGE 116

lht be, led -a? pha?t':. . f. 1 o f 8>11 (@,a * "G be 4 kt{l1J l?1 tk wi.\-L 6':> &.M. (\..t. z \S6 ;-:, f t "Mw) kllJj oe tz, .k-l>M V\OW _,_ A "":ar: o • of 61\ cap"'c;, .,.:cvt!> 6 e \ ; lt.e. -1-4.. fotbJ\Mt-I..JJ c;W I f f

PAGE 117

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PAGE 118

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PAGE 119

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PAGE 120

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PAGE 121

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PAGE 122

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PAGE 123

APPENDIX B Studies and Observations of Existing FBO Facilities

PAGE 124

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PAGE 125

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PAGE 126

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PAGE 127

)

PAGE 128

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PAGE 129

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PAGE 130

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PAGE 131

.. td_ veJ:'1 .... l o ' ... 1&,1 ?JxJto" • 1&0 (', ( , i. ) ) )

PAGE 132

c ( -t -r$_ , -lo1 m fUf] c t1l u , , , i I I b ' I I I I f -------i--@ j (, t&ek \:k_ IW CD . 0 c=J & . rlap ,aJ.. .. .k. u t::::ILJ -=t== -t--t ... t .. -I S

PAGE 133

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PAGE 134

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PAGE 135

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