Citation
Mount St. John Winery

Material Information

Title:
Mount St. John Winery
Creator:
Swett, Brainard Story
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture

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Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
r\loutfb c 5b.(Joft ft


Nlouifb (Sb. cJofm Winery'
A THESIS IN PREPARATION for the
MASTER of ARCHITECTURE DEGREE at the
UNIVERSITY of COLORADO
May 1981
Submitted by Brainard Story^ett


AS AN ART, MAKING FINE WINES, LIKE ARCHITECTURE;
A PRODUCT OF MAN'S KNOWLEDGE, SKILL, AND LABOR, IS A MATTER OF DETAILS


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
Pages
IV-XXI
Issues and Intensions
Preface to Site Data 1
Site Map 2
Setbacks 3
Circulation and Right of Way Map 4
Wind Direction Map 5
Vegitation Map 6
Views and Site Nuisances 7
Preface to Program 8
Program of Space Requirements 9-11
Description of Space as Required 12-14
Winery Performance Criteria 15
Special Mechanical and Control Reqmts. 16 Winery Expansion 17
Environmental Impact 18
Sewage Treatment Process 19
Winery Functional Interelationship Diagram 20


ible of Contents Continued
isearch
jpendix
Pages
Introduction to Climatological Data 22
Regional Clinrpate 23-24
Climatological Summary 25-26
Solar Access 27
Solar Path Diagrams 28-29
Monthly Solar Data 30
Soils Information 31
Seismic Notes 32-33
Seismic Map Detail 34
Seismic Criteria 35
Seismic Design Notes 36-39
Building Code Check 40-41
Code Check Summary 42-43
Handicapped Design Data 44-49
Glossary of Terms 51
Project Calendar 56
Credits 57-58
Bibliography 59-60




INTRODUCTION
Mount Saint John Winery is located in America's premier wine region, the Napa Valley, 60 miles north of San Francisco. The 30 mile long valley is ideally situated for a climate that will nurture wine grape production.
There are currently over 80 wineries concentrated within the small area of the valley. Giants like Inglenook and The Christian Brothers, which turn out millions of cases a year coexist amiably with tiny boutique wineries like Grgich Hills, with an annual output of a little over 10,000 cases.
Mount Saint John Winery will produce an estimated 150,000 gallons of wine, marketed as premium varietals, annually. Those red wines to be produced are Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Petit Sirah, and Gamay. Whites are to be Chardonnay, Fume Blanc, and Johannisburg Riesling. The wine will be produced from 980 tons of grapes grown on 1,100 acres of land. The winery will have an ultimate storage capacity of 1,800,000 gallons.
The winery will be designed to provide all the functions necessary for vineyard ODerations, winemaking, business administration marketing, and distribution. Aligned with these functions, the Mount Saint John Winery will feature a banauet room, a conference center, an ampitheater, and a tourist capability. The open ampi-theater will provide facilities for summer evening music concerts as well as, support for the conference center, for technical seminars, and as seating for the tour reception area.


le Mount Saint John Winery is modeled upon the program and siting •om that used to develop the Robert Mondavi Winery at Oakville, ilifornia. Originally designed by Cliff May, Architect of Los Angel-;, California, the winery was built in several phases, begun in 1969. le design of the MSJW will address a variety of issues. As a mctional system, the winery design will seek to enhance the natural •ocess of winemaking through architectural technologies. The potent-il for solar design applications will be explored and alternative en-ronmental systems considered.
le history of winemaking is rich in tradition, symbology, and imagry. irt of this tradition has been an architectural culture that develop-I in Europe, and has been adopted here in America's winemaking reg-rns. The design of this winery should acknowledge such a heritage i its formal response.
winery is also a workplace and an opportunity for education and pro-ition, as well. As such it is critical that the architecture of the >unt Saint John Winery, responds to the users specific sociological id psychological needs.
am sure that these, and other issues, concientiously addressed, will isult in an excellent, intriguing, and rewarding thesis submission, lis introduction would be incomplete without the special acknowleg-int of the kind assistance of Joseph Phelps of the Joseph Phelps Vine-irds and the important contributions of Frederick L. Clark J.D.,P.E. nery Engineer, of the Robert Mondavi Winery.
V


hrl lfl|| l ° A
MENDOCINO
San Francisco!
VI
MOUNT SAINT JOHN WINERY
VICINITY MAP
NO SCALE


1"=2000


VIII
A SHORT HISTORY OF WINEMAKING
The grape vine, vitis vinifera, was being cultivated in the near east by 4000 B.C., and probably earlier. Egyptian records from 2500 B.C. refer to the use of grapes for winemaking. Wines were important, also, to the Minoan, Greek,Phoenecian, and Etruscan regions. The vine and its .juice are always present in evidence of daily life, worship, myth, and ooetry. The Greeks, with numerous colonies, held an active wine trade and planted grapes in colonies from the Black Sea to Spain. The Romans carried grape growing into the Rhine, Moselle, and Danube Valleys. The role of wine in the Christian Mass, helped maintain the industry after the fall of the Roman Empire-and the monastic orders originally developed many of the highly regarded wine producing areas in Germany, France, and Austria.
Following the voyages of Columbus, grape culture and wine making were transported from the old world to Mexico, South America, South Africa, Austrailia, and California.
The rediscovery of the cork, sometime in the 17th Century, and the subsequent redicovery that wine in a tightly corked bottle lasted much longer than wine kept in a barrel, brought about a wine revolution. The rise of the great estates, and the evolution of modern wines, dates, therefore, from the 18th Century,
-the age of enlightenment.


[n the 1860's, Louis Pasteur contributed to the stability of the wine )y demonstrating that heating prevented undesirable microbal activity in wines.
rhe introduction of the Eastern American root louse, phylloxera, seriously threatened the European wine industry between 1870 and 1900, iestroying vineyards almost everywhere that v. vinifera was planted, in both Europe and California. To combat this parasite, v. vinifera scions, (detatched shoots including buds), were grafted to the American species, v. rupestris, v. berlaniberi, and v. riparia, natives )f Eastern U.S., which proved almost completely resistant to phylloxera.
tn 1970, 25,000,000 acres of grape, most of them v. vinifera vari-ities, were grown throughout the world, predominantly in the north md south temperate zones. (See Table which follows) A full 30%
)f the worlds production comes from the U.S.
rhousands of grape varieties have been developed; with 5000 reported rrom v. vinifera alone, differing in such characteristics as color, size and shape of berry, juice composition, ripening time, and Jisease resistance.
Irapes are grown under widely varying climatic conditions and many iifferent processes applied in producing wine from them. All these :ontribute.to the vast variety of wines we enjoy today.
The wine grapes importance to the celebration of the Christian Mass helped to sustain most of the early wineries during the Prohibition Era of the 1930's. Some were operated by the monastic orders for sacremental wine and have continued the tradition of monastic involvement in winemaking that began in the 5th Century.
The connection between the winr industry of Europe and its counterpart in California is well rooted by the past as the industry looks toward the future as a part of this country's huge agricultural output.


X
GROWTH OF THE CALIFORNIA WINE INDUSTRY
Since the Spanish Padres began planting California's mission vineyards, more than two centuries ago, wine growing has been a fairly steady, if low profile, part of Californias agricultural industry.
But the last decade ending with last fall's crush found a once quiet wine making world thrust rather suddenly into the ranks of the wests major industries. Statistics alone can almost tell the story. Acreage planted, gallons produced, and the number of bonded wineries in California have all virtually doubled in recent times.
The nature of the wine produced has changed; table wines have supplanted dessert wines in popularity, rising from 48% to 75% of national consumption. The trend toward premium varietals has been even more striking; by example an eight-fold increase in Cabernet Sauvignon production alone.
Quality has risen right along with quantity, with the introduction of new wine making techniques such as stainless steel temperature controlled fermentation tanks, sterilized bottling, and computerized monitoring systems. Numerous blind tastings against premium European wines testify that now, after centuries of chauvinism European vintners have accepted that west-


ern wine making has come of age in a big way.
’B—ed on raeldent population as of July 1. Includes military aarvtcM paraonnal stationed In tha U.S. but exclude* U.S. civilian* and military aervioa* paraonnal living abroad. 2 Preliminary. 3 Baaed on Colorado * 1078 figure; figure for 1979 la not available.
Sources State beverage and tax agenciea; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearm* and Bureau of the Canaua.
Par Capita Consumption In the U.S., by State*, 1050,1960,1069 and 1070 1
Slat*
AL.
AK
AZ
AR
CA
CO
CT.
DE
DC
FL.
GA
HI .
ID .
IL .
IN .
IA .
KS
KY
LA.
ME
MD
MA
Ml.
MN
MS
MO
MT
NB
NV
NH
NJ.
NM
NY
NC
NO
OH
OK
O'i
PA
Rl .
SC
SD
TN
TX.
UT.
VT.
VA
WA
wv
Wl.
WY
1050 1060 1069 Gallon*
.31 .22 .34
— .77 1.26
1.18 1.12 1.22
.36 .45 49
2.05 2 09 265
.69 .78 1.17
1.36 1.31 1 42
1.24 1.17 .96
2.59 2.84 388
.69 .89 1.26
.27 .25 .62
— .76 .84
.28 .29 39
1.09 .85 1.11
.58 .41 .46
.19 .15 .24
.42 .28 .38
.37 .25 .35
1.42 1.25 1.16
.49 .36 .39
1.03 .98 1 06
1.12 1.10 1.25
.74 .66 .94
.48 .46 .64
— — .32
85 .69 .69
.59 .43 .56
.50 .41 .51
1.88 1.90 2.52
.40 .54 1 06
1.51 1.30 1 58
1.44 1.25 1.39
1.52 1.45 1.74
.22 .33 62
.49 .37 .46
.77 .65 .79
— .37 .59
.44 1.00 1.55
.05 .82 .64
1.07 1.22 1.46
— — —
.38 .45 .58
.17 .25 .30
.51 .54 .47
.78 .44 .47
.66 .00 1.47
.80 .62 .86
.91 .80 1.78
.82 .30 .38
.84 .88 .81
.48 .46 .61
M .01 1.17
1079 J Percent Chang* from19693 Rank
.75 120 6 44
263 106 7 14
2 32 90.2 17
66 34 7 48
4 32 63.0 3
2.753 135.0 9
2 49 75 4 16
1.63 69.8 26
6.24 60.8 1
2.31 83 3 18
1.10 77.4 37
2 65 215.5 12
1.64 320.5 25
1.99 79 3 19
.95 106.5 41
.72 200.0 45
.73 92 1 44
.56 80 0 51
1.52 31.0 2B
1.74 346.2 22
1.95 80 6 20
264 111.2 13
1.65 75.5 24
1 45 126 6 29
.59 84 4 49
1.22 76 8 34
2.55 355 4 15
1.10 115.7 36
5.33 111.5 2
379 257.5 4
2 67 69 0 11
1.78 2B.1 21
2.73 56.9 10
1.37 121.0 31
.98 113.0 40
1.19 50.6 36
.91 54.2 42
2.01 87.7 7
1.38 64 3 30
3.13 114.4 5
1.03 — 30
1.06 81.0 38
.70 79.5 47
1.27 170.2 33
.78 86.0 43
2.84 832 8
1.54 79.1 27
2.04 87.0 8
.57 50.0 50
1.73 113.6 23
1.33 118.0 32
2.81 72.S
US Total


Percent
100-
90-
80-
70-
60-
50-
40-
30-
20-
"'I
o-l
1
MARKET SHARES: 1970-79
CALIFORNIA
i
»
-)
i

L..J
OTHER STATES
_
OTHER STATES^HH-
â– MWM-
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79
GROWTH OF GRAPE AND WINE PRODUCTION
World Wine Production 1970
Viticultural Areas Acres Planted(Th) Gall*
Spain 4078 647
Italy 3683 1717
France 3349 1619
USSR 2687 766
Turkey 2098 14
Yugoslavia 628 159
USA 581 370
Note: The high yield for USA.
World Wine Production Ranking ' 1976
Viticultural Areas
France
Italy
Spain
USSR
Argentina
USA (494 M. gallons)
Note: California produced 73%. California also boasts of the largest production winery in the world, E.J. Gallo Winery, in Modesto.


400
300
200
CALIFORNIA GROSS WINE PRODUCTION MARKETINGS & INVENTORIES 1970-1979
500
450
MILLIONS OF GALLONS
PRODUCTION MARKETINGS INVENTORIES DEC. 31


XIV
REGIONAL HISTORY
The word "napa" was probably from the name given to a Southern Wappo Indian village whose people shared the area with elk, deer, grizzlies, and Danthers for centuries. At the time of the first recorded exploration into the Napa Valley in 1823, the population consisted of hundreds of indians. Padre Jose Altimira, founder of the nearby Sonoma Mission, led the expedition. Spanish and Mexican control lasted until the Bear Flag Revolution and the valley became one of the first in California to be settled by American farmers, arriving in the 1830's.
By 1870 most of the Indians who had inhabited the valley were iped out by smallpox and other diseases brought by the white man. The few that remained finally were taken into Alexander Valley where a few descendents now reside in government reservations.
It was the gold rush of the late 1850's that really built Napa City. After the first severe winter in the gold fields many miners sought refuge in the city, finding work in the local cattle ranches and the lumber industry.
Stage coaches began regular runs between Vallejo and Calistoga during the 1850's and a railine was built from Vallejo to Napa in 1864-65. This rail was later extended to Calistoga, and by 1868 North-South transportation by rail was available for the entire Napa Valley.
In the 1870's and 1880's, Bay Area residents became interested


n the mineral and hot springs, which spawned many resorts.
'he earliest white settlers planted vineyards from mission cuttings, ;upplied by the Padres from Sonoma and San Rafael. Later, in 1861, tiesling cuttings were introduced into the valley. From these small leginnings; Napa Valley has since become noted throughout the world is the center of the American table wine industry.
XV


XVI
REGIONAL ARCHITECTURAL VERNACULAR
The mixed bag of architectural styles evident in the Napa Valley regions winery architecture borders on the historic cartoon-like architecture of Disneyland. Indeed, as a tourist mecca the Valley probably ranks close to that most visited of California's places. Despite the historic eclecticism found there, much of the regions architecture has been produced by architects well skilled in the art. Winery architects like Hamden McIntyre in the late 1800's and more recently, Cliff May have maintained a standard of quality design that merits some study.
The architecture of the wine region is not studied for nostalgic or picturesque reasons, but for it's permanence. The images which qualify the specificity of the place, the relationship between architectural forms, climatic factors, the socio-psycological context, and the local means of production of architecture, are all embodied within the context of the region.
The importance of place to the wine making art cannot be underestimated. There is a definite association between place and the wine that place produces. The appreciation of the diverse varieties of wines results from an understanding of place, manifested in its climate, topography, soil, and architecture.


architectural tradition is often borrowed partially and superficially n'thout investigation into the logic behind its forms and materials /hich risks debasing it to a level of picturesque imagery, he difficulty of working on a local tradition is to decode it with-n an appropriate analytical framework. The strategy used must in-;errelate traditional and contemporary architectural cultures.
XVII


XVIII
WINE COUNTRY TOURISM
California wineries have employed the public interest in the winemaking art to their benefit. They have discovered the promotional value of tourism and the money to be made in the tasting room as well. Most major wineries have scheduled tours and tastings for visitors. Smaller wineries will do so by appointment. The tourists come to learn and to buy. The tourist activity is a year-round fundtion, though it peaks during the summer and fall harvest months. The wineries attract people from the world over though many Bay area residents obtain local recreation on weekends as wel1.
Tour facilities range from simple to elaborate with one winery that features a tramway ride to reach the ridgetop winery.
The Robert Mondavi Winery has become a showplace amoung wineries featuring banquet facilities and summer evening music events during the summer.


XIX
ARCHITECTURE OF THE WORKPLACE
The design of Mount Saint John Winery should consider the requirements of the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Standards,Chapter XVII 1910, for noise, ventilation, sanitation, and machinery and electrical operation, as minimum requirements for employee well-being.
The operation of a winery, producing a product of high quality, requires the talents of some highly skilled workers. In order to attract and retain the personel that it needs the winery should provide them with amenities beyond those set as industry min-imums. Todays industries are now realizing that environmental health goes beyond just providing workers with good eating, parking, and toilei facilities. The winery should provide an atmosphere which includes provisions for good lighting, color, acoustics, and general worker convenience and comfort.
The design of the Mount Saint John Winery should anticipate the expansion of the architects role as creators of workplaces.
The design should respond with quality spaces and amenities that explore the potential value that good design can offer the workplace.


XX
VINEYARD AND WINERY OPERATIONS
The Harvest
1. The grapes are ripened on the vine.
2. Grape clusters are cut,(or shaken by mechanical harvesters) from the vines.
3. Harvested grapes are then transported by gondola truck to the winery where they are weighed and dumped into a sump to be conveyed to the crusher. The gondolas are then weighed empty to calculate load weight.
4. A crusher/stemmer operating at 600-1200 R.P.M. macerates the grapes to liberate the juice and seoerate the stems from the resulting must. The crushing operation should be done as soon as possible after harvesting. The crushing operation should be arranged for easy transfer of the must to the fermenting
or pressing area with a minimum of pumping or piping.
For red wines the crushed grapes may be pumped into tanks where the skins give up some of their color by respiration.
For white wine the juice is seperated from the skins by presses.
5. Pressing operations release the juice from the pomace (skins and seeds) in horizontal basket presses of screw-type presses. The white wine must should be allowed to settle and seperate suspended materials with the aid of a centrifuge.


Fermentation process is begun and lasts from 10 to 30 days. Constant temperature and relative humidity should be maintained to promote the growth of desirable yeasts. Generally, the optimum temperature is about 77* f (25*c). Temperature regulation is accomplished by heat exchangers in the tank walls. Red wines require maintaining of skin caps which develop at the top of the tank. This requires cycling pumps to draw the wine off the bottom of the tank for spraying over the cap. Contact with air at this time is undesirable and tanks must all be topped up. The tanks used in this operation, sometimes as large as 100,000 gallons, must be treated with sulfur dioxide to supress the growth of undesirable mico-organ-i sms.
Clarification of the wine follows the fermentation where suspended material is removed by filtration and by centrifuge.
Aging is allowed to remove undesirable qualities from some wines and sometimes to allow a second fermentation to take place. Aging times vary with the reds aging up to 28 months in oaken barrels. Certain whites are aged to enhance their varietal character. Fume Blanc and Chardonnay wines age for 10 months in French oak barrels. Johannisberg Riesling is aged in German oak casks of 330 to 660 gallons. Aging must take place at controlled temperatures ( generally, 55* f (13*c). Temperatures of wine and fermenting must are controlled according to the specifications of the enology staff, aided by a process control computer. The computer provides a means of following the temperature and density history of fermenting must
and generates reports on the status of wines in the cellar.
9. Bottling of the finished wine is handled by a bottling line which can process up to 52 bottles a minute. The new bottles arrive in new cases, are cleaned, filled, Tabled, and repacked in the same case. Cases are then stacked on pallets ready for shipment.
10. Shipping and Recieving services all truck freight for wine distribution and incoming equipment and supplies.
Vineyard Operations
Routine vineyard operations include maintainance of weeds and irrigation, fertilization and insect control.
Winery Operations
Routine winery operations include cleaning and preparation of barrels and casks, bottling and shipping, equipment maintainance, and business operations.


cissues ana c


1
PREFACE TO SITE DATA
The brief site survey shown here is based upon the data available at the time of this writing. An on-site visit and site study will be made for further data and is scheduled for June 28th & 29th.


Winery
EXISTING
IffMFRY
Oakville
^.Winery
| PROPERTY ! LINE
NORTH
SITE MAP

Rutherford
-f
* <* Gravel Pit v, ji. c
5 - *
y ,o;;o
rj7
*0.7,
. -
tP3
Wine
*


SCALE: 1"=?000'


NORTH
SETBACKS SCALE: 1"=2000'
3


-*=-«= MAJOR ROADWAYS = SECONDARY ROADWAYS ====” AGRICULTURAL ACCESS —RAILROAD R.O.W.
CIRCULATION AND RIGHT OF
WAYS____________________
SCALE: r=2000*
4


â–  SUMMER PREVAILING â–¡ WINTER PREVAILING
NORThT
WIND DIRECTION SCALE: I"-20001
5


V • °'.“5
* A
137
\o \
o,y
\<*L
\*v*
'♦ vo o
Grave! Pit*. * • °
>> ^
// *
y \<*
* v c>
»" \ Vf ..*
% *
° .. I... ^ *
V-> *3
â–¡ AGRICULTURAL GROWTH NATURAL GROWTH
VEGITATION SCALE: 1"=20001
6



0 BEST 0 POOR
0 ON-SITE NUISANCES W] OFF-SITE NUISANCES
VIEWS AND SITE NUISANCES SCALE: r=2000'
7


8
PREFACE TO PROGRAM
Due to the limitations of time and the availability of information, this program is very basic and does not address itself to issues of cost, comparative analysis, budgeting, and construction time.
This program rather, addresses the issues of need and projected need, facilities, space allocation, and locations.
Emphasis will be upon such items as:
1. Function; aim to establish an effective plant for winery and vineyard operations.
2. Character; development of an atmosphere condusive to worker well-being and efficiency, as well as, one enjoyable and informative for the visitor.
3. Economy; to enhance the "natural" process of winemaking with the application of architectural technologies in energy conservation and environmental control.


9
PROGRAM OF SPACE REQUIREMENTS EXTERIOR AREAS
PROGRAM FACILITIES PROJECTED SPACE REQMT
Parking: Automobile- 25 cars @ Bus - 3 buses 0
Handicapped- 3 space 0 Staff and Business vis 20 space 0
200 sq. ft. ea. 5000 sq. ft.
400 sq. ft. ea. 1200 sq. ft.
200 sq. ft. ea. 600 sq. ft.
tors
200 sq. ft. ea. 4000 sq. ft.
Loading: Handicapped- 1 drop-off w/ turn out Truck loading dock & apron-
TOTAL:
200 sq. ft. 1600 sq. ft.
12,600 sq. ft.
Ampitheater: 2000 persons @ 6 sq. ft./person
12000 sq. ft.


10
PROGRAM OF SPACE REQUIREMENTS INTERIOR AREAS
PROGRAM FACILITIES
Administration Lobby and Reception Offices
Corporate officers Department Heads Administrative & Clerical
Conference Center Banquet Room Food Preparation Storage
TOTAL
Winery Tour Operation Public Relations Office Wine Tasting Rooms Wine Sales
Ampitheater (Exterior space see Public Restrooms
PROJECTED SPACE REQMT
1600 sq. ft.
3 0 144 sq. ft. 432
3 0 120 sq. ft. 360
2 0 100 sq. ft. 200
500
3600
340
2 G> 300 sq. ft. 600
7632 sq. ft.
1 50 sq. ft. 4 @ 302 sq. ft. 1208
540
exterior space program)
2 0 150 300
TOTAL
2198 sq. ft.


ogram of Space Requirements Continued
OGRAM FACILITIES PROJECTED SPACE REQMT
nery Operations
boratory 1225 sq. ft.
periment and Analysis 350
sting Room 200
ushing and Stemming (Exterior area see exterior space program) st Station and Scales " 11
rmentation (Tank) 11025
rmentation (Barrel) 7345
ntrifuge Area 1120
frigeration 1 @ 200 sq. ft. 1 @ 900 sq. ft. 1100
re Aging Room 168
ttle Storage 1200
ttling 750
rrel Washing 800
lk Storage and Aging Room (By Phases)
Phase I 22500
II 10850
III 63550
rehouse Offices 2 0 200 sq. ft. 2 0 100 sq. ft. 600
rehouse 7000
ipping and Recieving 300
TAL
130083 sq. ft.
Vineyard Operations Tractor Storage Vineyard Equipment Storage 900 sq.ft, 600
Tractor and Equip. Maintainance Diesel and Gasoline Storage (Exterior Space) 600
Fertilizer and Chemical Storage 500
TOTAL 2600 sq.ft
Support Facilities Mechanical and Machine Room Maintainance Shop 572 sq.ft 432
Employee Locker Rooms 2 0 200 sq. ft. 400
Employee Restrooms 2 0 150 sq. ft. 300
Emergency Generator Room 200
Training Room 500
TOTAL 2404 sq.ft
GRAND TOTAL (Interior Spaces) 144,917 sq.ft


12
DESCRIPTION OF SPACES AS REQUIRED
ADMINISTRATION
Lobby and Reception
Use: Entry, waiting, reception of winery business visitors
User: Business visitors
Design requirements: Lobby reception space should allow visual
access to vineyard operation and be raised on a platform to denote arrival. Receptionists location should allow visual supervision of visitors arrival.
Furnishings: Receptionist desk 3X6, chairs, receDtion seating
Note: Lobby and reception should be accessible by handicapped.
Offi ces
Use: Individual work stations for officers, department heads, and administrative personnel
User: Administrative staff, clerical staff,
Design Requirements: Basic requirements are common to all offices
Size and furnishings are subject to needs of each of the above catagories.
Corporate officers; Desk 3X6, chairs, files, neat orderly formal/semi-formal atmosphere of impressive character. Coat storage, conference area.
Department heads; Desk 3X5, chairs, files, coat storage, conference area


'Scription of Spaces Continued
sign Requirements: Secretarial and clerical; Desk, extensive filing,
coffee station, worksurface, shelves, materials storage, supply storage, copy and word processing space, coat storage.
inference Center
e: Professional conferences, technical seminars, community association meetings
er: Professionals, local community members
sign Requirements: Seating capacity for a maximum of 40 persons, 6
sq. ft./person minimum. Seating should be flexible to provide a variety of communication-oriented layouts, with emphasis on eye contact between speaker and attendee as well as attendee to attendee. Lighting should not cause eyestrain or glare. Provision will be made for projection and other audio visual aid equipment, If room contains windows, these should be easily operable for adjustment of ventilation and coverable for reduced projection lighting conditions. Ventilation equipment should operate silently and provide an atmosphere condusive to concentration and participation.
TOUR OPERATIONS Tour Reception Area Use: Recieving pubic tourists User: tour participants
Design Requirements: A wide entrance that begins at a rest area
and that is easily identified from all park ing areas. The rest area should be slightly higher than the path to reinforce significance as a landing and to provida an overviewing deck towards the vineyard operation. Restrooms with hot water should be provided adjacent to the waiting area.
Public Relations Office
Use: Cordination of pulic relation and tours User: Public relations staff
Design Requirements: See previous general office design requirements.
Wine Tasting Rooms
Use: Post-tour wine tasting
User: Public visitor
Design Requirements: Provide with a 15' long serving bar, glassware storage, refrigeration equipment below,
3


scription of Spaces Continued
;sign Requirements: wine storage, limited casual seating, wall-mounted product display cases, Atmospheric lighting should be provided.
ipitheater
e; Tour orientation, performance programming (evening music concerts harvest festivals, etc.) er: Tourists, local community
sign Requirements: Outdoor seating capacity of 2000 persons @,.(6 sq. ft./person). Seating should be arranged and accomodated by terraced levels, spaced comfortably, for ease of entry and exit without disturbance of other seated individuals. All seating shall be arranged to maximize sight lines. Ample space and seating to accomodate the handicapped in wheel chairs and those accompanying them shall be provided. Locate handicapped seating with easy access of entry and exits and prime sight lines employed. An amplification system should be provided. Ac-coustical quality will be designed for the projection of the spoken voice. Provisions should be made for the accomodation of electric equipment such as taping systems and electric music instru-
ments. Provision should also be made for the use of performance lighting, the storage of lights, and related equipment.


15
WINERY PERFORMANCE CRITERIA EXTERIOR AREAS
Tourist Activity
Arrival at Winery: Winery tourists are travelers, and travelers need places to rest, escape the clamor of the road, and to readjust to more natural rythmns. They need time and space to make the change from faceless motorist to distinct and individual human beings.
Arrival Sequence:
Highway approach: a signal to travelers that they are entering
the winery.
Entrance Road: a preview of what lies ahead, signs of concentrated activity, low speed one-way design Parking Area: clearly identifiable circulation routes, softened visual impacts with plantings, main path to reception area clearly visible from all areas of the parking area.
General Planning and Graphics
Emphasis should by on cognitive mapping processes to prevent the misuse and misinformation by the visitor, rather than relying upon graphic aids.


16
SPECIAL MECHANICAL AND CONTROL REQUIREMENTS
The winemaking process demands a multiplicity of mechanical and climate control considerations.
Demands: High Pressure Water Source
Sterilizing Water Source Steam Capability
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
High Output Electrical Circuitry for Pumping (Protect)
Industrial Quality Work Space Illumination


17
WINERY EXPANSION
With the explosive growth experienced in the California wine market, and the parallel increase in vineyard acreage yield within the industry, a winery facility must be planned for expansion of its processing, storage, and support facilities from the earliest design stages.
The Mount Saint John Winery will be programmed to expand its operation in three phases over a 5 year period. (See Facilities Program for square footage requirements).
In addition, the winery plant must be flexible, to accomodate any increase in efficiency that may develop within the industry in plany operations. That flexibility must also extend to accomodating the rapid modernization of the industry that will surely continue.


18
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
The greatest single ecological concern in the operation of a winery is the management of its sewage waste. This has become one of the most critical problems in winery planning in California.
Wastes, in the form of pomace and stems from the crushing and pressing operations must be managed by on-site waste treatment operations.
Primary treatment employs settling tanks that rotate daily in use for a week at a time, yielding 5000 gallons of sludge per each 100,000 gallons of pomace. The winery can also pretreat the stillage through a trickle filter then use settling tanks. Settling ponds are undesirable because of the offensive odors they produce, (the town of Oakville is just 3/8 mile to the S.E.) Combustable methane and hydrogen is produced in the digestion of the wastes and could be collected from covered digestiontanks for use as a fuel to produce steam for generation of electricity or other uses.
A second environmental problem that should be addressed in winery planning, is storm run-off and drainage. This problem is moderated by the regionally mild climate, however storm sewage control and retention ponds must be considered in site planning.


19
SEWAGE TREATMENT PROCESS
1. Open channel begins treatment operation.
2. Screening operation catches larger units of debris.
3. Grit chambers allows settling of sand.
4. Digester employs anerobic process allows production of harmless sludge. Dried, it is used as a fertilizer.
1


Lobby & Reception______________
Cleri cal______________________
Staff Offices
Conference Rooms_______________
Tourist Peception______________
Public Relations Office________
Wine Tastinn ft Sales__________
Amoi theater___________________
Conference Center
Food Preoeration ft Pin inn Room
Laboratory_____________________
Crushinq & Stemming
Fermentation Room______________
Bulk Storage & Aging Room______
Bottle Storane_________________
Bottling Operations____________
Bottle Aging___________________
Rare Aging Room
Equipment Storage
Tractor Storage
Vineyard Equipment Storane
Fertilizer & Chemical Storane
Diesel A Gasoline Rumps________
Tractor Maintenance
Locker Rooms___________________
Public Restrooms Employee Restrooms
Training Room__________________
Mechanical Room Pumn Room
Emergency Generator Pnom ______
Exi twa.vs
Hallways ^ Stairs
WINERY FUNCTIONAL INTEPELHIOMSHIPS
Supnortive Relationship O
Disruptive Relationship




oo
INTRODUCTION TO CLIMATE DATA
Grapes, although primarily a temperate zone plant, can be grown under semitropical conditions. They are not adapted to the cooler parts of the temperature zones where growing seasons may be too short to allow the fruit to reach maturity, or low winter temperatures may kill the vines or their buds.
Climate strongly influences the composit of mature grapes, a major cause of the variation among grapes from different areas.
The differing quantities of heat recieved by the vines, during the growing season, and other factors such as, diurnal temperature swings, hours of insolation, and soils temperature, all have a dramatic effect the flavor subtlties of the resulting wine.
These factors are controlled by site location. The site characteristics that promote quality in grapes produced by the winery are exposure (best when from east), air drainage (preferably from the slopes to the valley), soil temperature, and moisture content.


23
REGIONAL CLIMATE
Climatological and weather data is based upon reoorts from substations located in the city of San Rafael, located approximately 30 miles to the south of Napa Valley, and from San Francisco,
45 miles to the south.
The San Francisco Bay Region is typified by cool pleasant summers and mild winters, resulting from its unique location at the orthern end of a penninsula that seperates San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean.
There are wide contrasts in climate within short distances of the Bay. The nearby communities of Marin, Napa, and Sonoma County, lying just to the north, across the Golden Gate and sheltered from the prevailing ocean winds by the fairly high peaks and ridges of the Coast Range, enjoy generally warmer and sunnier weather than San Francisco. Their climate is further modified by proximity to San Francisco and San Pablo Bays to the east.
In general, temperatures increase from south to north, with correspondingly greater daily ranges, and also increase slightly with distance from the bays. Daily maximum temperatures for July average 16° warmer in San Rafael than at San Francisco.
As in San Francisco, there are well-defined wet and dry seasons, but rainfall amounts are strongly influenced by the topography of the Coast Range. Annual average rainfall varies from 26 inches at Hamilton Field to about 40 inches in San Rafael.


jring the summer, stratus season, low overcast frequently covers the itire area during early morning hours, but clearing begins early in le afternoon, especially in the more northern parts of the region.


or
CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY
San Rafael, Calif. 31 miles (Oakville) Northeast
CLIMATE:
Annual Heating Degree Days (65° base): 2083 Annual Cooling Degree Days: 475
PROJECT LOCATION:
Nearest Major City (Weather Data Source) Distance from Major City Direction from Major City
January Minimum Temperature: 44.3 (Degrees farenheit) January Maximum Temperature: 59.0 January Average Temperature: 51.7
July Minimum Temperature: July Maximum Temperature: July Average Temperature:
WIND:
Prevailing direction Average Velocity (MPH)
54.6
83.5
69.1
Summer SE Winter E
Summer 5.75
Winter 5.30


CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY Continued:
HUMIDITY:
Average (% Relative) Summer 74-
Winter 76.5
26


27
SOLAR ACCESS
The site of Mount Saint John Winery is at latitude 38.17*North. True North lies 18° West of compass North and conversely, True South is 18° East of compass South.
The site is sheltered by the moderate slopes of the Mayacamas Range to the west and from most fogs and strong winds. This condition results in few poor energy conservation features, such as exposed ridges and frost prone vales.
Occasional morning fogginess is likely, however, in this region and surfaces intended for use as solar collectors can be directed slightly west of due south, allowing the morning sun to burn off the fog and leaving the collectors to gain solar radiation during the afternoon hours.
Solar access from the west is hampered by the proximity of the mountains to the west. Particularly, Mount Saint John itself, which cases a false sunset at 3:32 P.M. in the winter and at 6:45 P.M. in the summer.
Solar Landscaping Notes: The general climate affords cool summer temperatures which may preclude the normal summer shading requirements.


SOLAR PATH DIAGRAM


Winter and Summer Sun Paths
WINTER
SUNRISE
SUMMER
SUNSET
SUMMER
SUNRISE
+ 121'
+ 59“
WINTER
SUNSET
SOLAR PATH DIAGRAM
OQ


ilifomia Solar Zones
om: California Solar Data Manual
Monthly Solar Data, San Rafael
Ladtoda: 37 .97* Lu.pl ru da: 122.53* Etarabo.: 25*
J- Fafc 44ar Apr May la. Jai *»l Sap Oct Dac Aoral
SOLAR RADIATION (kWh/*2 par anaafc)
horirntd avfaca 45 1* L40 194 225 237 243 220 170 115 68 54 1820
dnalaaimdaatani 105 129 L78 238 259 275 287 268 221 158 99 84 2302
SOLAR RADIATION (Ota/ft2par noadM
fcwfcwai mriacm 21 24 44 41 71 75 77 70 54 36 22 17 576
33 41 54 74 82 87 91 85 70 50 31 27 729
PERCENT OF POSS9LE SUNSHINE* •
MEAN CLOUD COVER (is la.that* 4 is 5 5 4 3 2 3 2 4 5 6 4
FRACTION OF EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIATION (fcf) .44 .53 .58 .47 .44 .49 .70 .70 .66 .56 .45 .42 .59
tMcortinx lauml: If70-1*74
Sourca of aolar tau: 84APCD, Ipplay ll«hcbulb pyrmanmmtor■
30


31
SOILS INFORMATION
The local soils are classed by the Soils Conservation Service as Class Two. Soil composition is an excellent mixture of equal parts of sand, clay, and silt, called bale loam.
Soils bearinq value (q) will be assumed to be 5 KSF.


32
SEISMIC NOTES
The site of the Mount Saint John Winery lies just 1% miles west of the West Napa Fault. The geology of the entire North Coast region is of volcanic and is laced with many fault lines and geothermically active zones. Application of seismic design principles is mandated both locally and by state codes.
Earthquakes can subject buildings to horizontal loads induced by the inertia of the building and its contents. In addition, the positioning of a structure near a fault line can result in vertical loads due to liquifaction induced ground failure in the form of settlement and slides.
Design Principles:
How an earthquake effects a building is the result of its structural system, 3-D form or shape, building materials, and the distribution and bulk of its contents.
1. Earthquake action may best be resisted by rigid frame action, shear walls, rigid frame in combination with shear walls, or special ductile design systems.
2. A building which is formed in a regular complete shape in plan is best suited to resist unwanted torsion.
3. The structures building materials should be similar with respect to their ductility characteristics, when used to-


gether, they can react as a unit to seismic forces rather than causing connections to fail.
4. A buildings subcomponents, parapets, railings, sunshades, statues, signage, planters, etc, should be considered as potential problems in an earthquake.
5. Attention should be given to a buildings contents. This is especially important to winery design, with thousands of tons of valuable wine product being stored in vats and barrels.
6. In reinforced concrete design use of an fy of no greater than 60 KSI and an f'c of no less than 3 KSI should be standard.
(ACI Code)
Uniform Building Code Notes Chapter 23 1979 U.B.C.
Occupancy importance factor: 1.0 Type of occupancy is not essential or for primary occupancy of more than 300 persons.
Site is located in zone 4 of Seismic Risk Map (Fig. No.l)
Zone 4 indicates areas of major damage and corresponds to intensity
VIII and higher of the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale of 1931.
o o


MOUNT SAINT JOHN WINERY

so#*©*#

$OtAN0
MAHth
CONTIlA
COST#
AMM(0#
SUMHAOS
fH**asco
34
CALIFORNIA SEISMIC ZONE MAP DETAIL NO SCALE
RED INDICATES EXTREME SEISMIC ACTIVITY ZONE


Vulnerable to Struct. Damage Continue t Function Rank
<£ »—t Cr ; UJ j h- *—4 a o 2. CO »—H UJ to Structural Damage Electrical Disruption HVAC Diruntion Snecial Risk to Occupants Protect Contents Critical He!nful No Need / vj u 13 ADMINISTRATION
Lobby X Receotion O O P O O
Clerical Area O o o O P o
Staff Offices o o o o o
Conference Rooms o o o o o
TOUR OPERATIONS
Tourist Reception o o o o o
Public Relations Offices o o o o o
Wine Tasting o o o o o
Sales 0 o o o
Conference Center o o o o o
Food Preneration & Dining Room o o o o o
WINERY OPERATIONS
Laboratory o o o O o
Crushing & Stem'q o o o o o
Fermentation o o O o 0
Bulk Storage & Aging Room o o o o o o •
Bottle Storage o 0 o o o
Bottling Operation o o o o o
Bottle Aging o o o o o
Rare Aning Poom o o o o o
Equipment Storage o o o o o
Tractor Storage o o o
Vineyard Equipmt Storage o o o Ov
Ferti1i zer & Chem. o o o o
Storage o o o o
Diesel & Gasoline Storage o o o 0 p 0
Tractor Maint. o o o o o
Locker Rooms o o o o o o
SUPPORT FACILITIES
Public Restrooms o o o o o
Employee Restrooms o o o o
Traininq Room o o o o
Mechanical l1oom o o o o o
Pump Room o o o o
Emergency Generator Room o o P o O O
Exitways o o o O 0
la 11 ways & Stairs o o o o o



SEISMIC DESIGN NOTES
DAMAGE AT TWO WINERIES DUE TO THE MT. DIABLO, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKE OF JANUARY 2k, 1980
by
Onder Kustu
URS/John A. Blume £ Associates, Engineers San Francisco, California
A reconnaissance by an engineer from URS/John A. Blume £ Associates, Engineers, on January 26, 1980, indicated that damage to storage tanks at the Wente Bros. Winery near Livermore, California, from the Mt. Diablo earthquake of January 2k, 1980, was of engineering significance. A survey team* was assembled, and this team visited the Concannon and Wente Bros, wineries on January 28, 1980. The team spent the next two days documenting the damage at the Wente Bros. Winery.
The two wineries surveyed are located about three kilometers southeast of Livermore, and are one kilometer apart from each other. Each winery contains, in addition to buildings, one elevated water tank and a variety of cylindrical wine tanks. No damage to any structure was observed at the Con-cannon Winery. Extensive damage was sustained by the elevated water tank and the wine tanks at the Wente Bros. Winery, even though no damage to the buildings was observed.
The elevated water tank at the Wente Bros. Winery has a capacity of 20,000 gallons. Total height to the top of the tank is about 85 feet. The tank is supported on four L6x6xi legs, which are connected with 3“inch-angle horizontal members and braced with 1-inch-diameter diagonal turnbuckle rods (Figure 1). The earthquake caused the two northern legs to buckle at the lowest two spans (Figure 2). There was evidence of uplift at the two southern legs: the base plate at the southeastern leg had shifted inward about
0.5 inch. An approximate analysis indicated that a base shear coefficient of 35% would be necessary to cause the observed damage, neglecting the effect of vertical accelerations.
36


:er tank was drained immediately following the first shock and was luring the aftershocks. At the time of this report, no estimate of iair costs was available.
of 208 cylindrical steel tanks were surveyed at the Wente Bros.
Thirty-one of these were small, fiberglass-lined steel tanks sup-on individual legs constructed of pipes. The remaining 177 tanks :ainless steel tanks with capacities ranging from 6,000 to 50,000
i. Some of these stainless steel tanks had cooling jackets consist-a belt of a second layer of steel wrapped around the shell with a between through which the coolant is circulated. In addition, a of wood casks and barrels were surveyed, none of which was found to iged by the earthquake.
ume survey team members: T. Allan Moore, Gerald W. Kralik, Charles D. jr, Peter I. Yanev, and Roger E. Scholl
lical damage to the small, fiberglass-lined steel tanks was toppling tanks due to broken legs at the cast iron joints. However, no rup-r the tanks or loss of their contents was observed. Damage to these lid not appear to be significant, and they could be easily repaired lified to withstand similar ground motion without damage.
it extensive damage occurred to the stainless steel tanks (Figure 3). :anks are vertical cylinders made of 12- to H-gage stainless steel The diameters vary from 6 to 22 feet with a height-to-diameter !H/D) between 0.8 and 3.0. The tanks are seated on elevated concrete to k feet above the ground. The tops of the pads are sloped slightly litate drainage of the tanks. Most tanks are anchored to the con->ads at two points at the high side of the pads, although a few are :d at six to eight points.
the earthquake, k7 stainless steel tanks were empty or partially Forty of these suffered no damage or only minor damage from the earth-Out of the 130 tanks that were completely full at the time of the ihock, 10 suffered no damage and 2k suffered minor damage consisting >r spalling of concrete, failed anchorage welds, or minor local buck-
ling. Seventy tanks suffered a medium level of damage consisting of concrete spalling at the pads, failed anchorage welds and bolts, and some shell buckling with peak-to-peak buckle amplitudes of less than 2 inches. Twenty-six of the tanks sustained damage considered to be severe. Most of the anchors for these tanks had failed, and the shells were buckled extensively with buckle amplitudes exceeding 2 inches peak to peak. Most of the severely damaged tanks had permanent overall deformations such as uplift at the base by as much as 3 inches and visible tilting from the vertical. Only one tank was reported to have ruptured at the base.
A cursory study of the damage data indicates that the mode of failure or the pattern of damage was a function of the following factors:
1. Fullness or emptiness of tanks: Empty tanks suffered little or no damage.
2. Height-to-diameter ratio (H/D): The tanks with low values of H/D (H/D < 1.5) had-predominantly large-amplitude "elephant foot" buckles all around (Figure k). The tanks with intermediate values of H/D (1.5
< H/D < 2.0) exhibited varying patterns and combinations of diamond-shaped buckles (Figure 5) and elephant foot buckles. Tanks with high values of H/D (H/D > 2.0)" suffered minor or no damage to the shell but had some failed anchorage welds or bolts.
3. Location of the cooling jackets: Where this extra sheet of steel was close to the bottom of the tank, there was no damage to the shell. Where the jacket was located 3 to k feet above the base, the major buckling occurred between the cooling jacket and the base.
The other damage at the Wente Bros. Winery consisted of a few buckled, broken or dislocated pipes; some damage to the catwalks around and above the tanks also occurred.
The total dollar value of repairs to the wine tanks is estimated to be between $1 million and $1.5 million, which is considered to be a small loss.
A greater loss would have been sustained if tank ruptures and complete loss of contents had occurred.


FIGURE 3 A GENERAL VIEW OF TANK DAMAGE AT WENTE BROS. WINERY
on
FIGURE 5 TYPICAL DIAMOND-SHAPED BUCKLING PATTERN


PROJECT Mount Saint John Winery LOCATION Oakville, California
APPLICABLE ZONING ORDINANCE _ c* <=**=> â–  C^-
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE -t^ u. yfa.p,___________
ZONING CLASSIFICATION A.P>. £
ounjn
'ce»jOQ

FLOOR AREA RATIO/BUILDING SQ. FT. LIMITS
BUILDING HEIGHT LIMITS: STORIES/FT______
BUILDING SET-BACK/YARD REQUIREMENTS MINIMUM LOT SIZE REQUIREMENTS >0 â–  A . OFF-STREET PARKING REQUIREMENTS
W. A , 4o^ Sn-e. CoVgRA ^ ■» fee- Adgs&gg-i1
HV^P ( PoiXjQV-tS)
fAttiilAGs ftaO-AtLoi^S
SCREENING/WALL HEIGHT REQUIREMENTS M/A DRIVEWAY AND CURB CUT REQUIREMENTS. M/A
FIRE ZONE DESIGNATION OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION _
OCCUPANCY SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS s/Mx
CONSTRUCTION TYPE Va/uc.& ‘
EXTERIOR WALL FIRE RATINGS VA EXTERIOR WALL OPENINGS LIMITATIONS ____________
FLOORS FIRE RATING _ J/vuej>-____________________________
ROOFS FIRE RATING v/Am^S''_______________________________
PARTITIONS FIRE RATING JaoiCS.-__________________________
STRUCTURAL FRAME FIRE RATING. '________________
MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED v/aa-aC^’ MAXIMUM HEIGHT: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED "
REFERENCE
fTp^V. ^M/ MAjCK QoO»»rr?
Aftr c=>. croja .

QDQmW P,t>.
Q-P>X^ .____
40


REFERENCE
NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIRED ^uu^siS
NUMBER OF STAIRS REQUIREDJ^SAiSa________ “
DOOR WIDTH REQUIREMENTS »<* ul**,
STAIR WIDTH REQUIRMENTS ^gr t%U^ 4-4 *A STAIRWAY LANDING RFQI1TRMFNTS gl^C
CORRIDOR WIDTH REQUIRMENTS
TRAVEL DISTANCE LIMITS ")
DEAD END C00RID0R LIMITS t^eyac A»u.oujcp DOOR SWING REQUIRMENTS x»ec.cnt» of ex""
STAIR BALCONY RAIL REQUIREMENTS Az.*
RISER/TREAD LIMITS arir
RAMP RFQUIRFMFNTS ».C. v4Q-PLS>
VERTICAL OPENING LIMITS AND FIRE RATINGS
EXIT LIGHTING RFQIITRFMFNTS teoo (? ta/fc^V exrr PcQg-i^
EMERGENCY LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS GPtota .__________________________
CEILING HEIGHT MINIMUMS _______( CjnT^^ ~7 **
MEZZANINE RESTRICTIONS ^ ^>t*> >r > zcop ^ > fro' ■*» *►*<
LIGHT AND VENTILATION RFQUIRFMFNTS ^/A tSrEfbT)
ROOF ACCESS RFQUIRFMFNTS ^ ftegD t*3-CO 4- *^***£3 PENTHOUSE LIMITATIONS A^osfei
SKYLIGHT REQUIREMENTS CgvWK^^A.fc>OL o»a
FURNACE AND BOILER ROOM RESTRICTIONS <-Va.________________________
CHIMNEY HEIGHT AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS _±!/k________________
TOILET ROOM FIXTURE REQUIREMENTS ifc-. osc*.
SPRINKLER REQUIRMENTS _____________________
DRY STANDPIPE orQiiTorMruTg o^>.r^ _____________
WET STAND PIPE REQUIREMENTS w/ __________

33o3 ^
•3>^gCgN>____
â–  _____________
6./=>.C- .
33o4__________
flg)
-3-^0^ CO :=>3ou ftp_____
.C.
22Ag ^_______

s«>e\ CcQ 2*ov
-LZ1A___
3&o2>
*>g*os>


ADMINISTRA- riON AMPITHEATER FOOD PREP & DINING CONFERENCE CTR WINERY OPERATIONS BOTTLING OPERATIONS CHEMICAL * FUEL STORAGE MECHANICAL ROOM WORKSHOP
' B-2 /_ vA-4 B-2 A-3 /B-4 B-4 H-1\ B-4 M-l OCCUPANCY
II-N ■II-l HR 1,1-N ,I{rN ■II-N II-N II-N 1I -N II-N, £ CONSTRUCTION TYPE
,1 -HR 1 -HP. l-HR l-HR l-HR l-HR 2-rHR l-HR l-HR APEA SEP
n 2,000 .13,500 12,000 9,100 ' 18,000 18,000 3,700 18,000 18,000 ALLOWABLE AREA (SO. FT
JNDER 20' -HR UNDER 10' 1 -HR UNDER 20' l-HR UNDER 5' 2-HR UNDER 5’ l-HR UNDER 5' l-HR UNDER *5' l-HR UNDER 3' l-HR EXT WALLS
JNDER 5' JOT PERMITD JNDER 10' ’ROTECT UNDER 5' NOT PERMITE UNDER 5' NOT PERMITD UNpER 5' NOT -PERMITD UNDER 10' PROTECT UNDER 5' NOT PERMITD UNDER 5* NOT PERMITD UNDER 5' NOT PERMITD UNDER 3' NOT PERMITD OPENINGS
2 STORY 1 STORY 1 STORY 1 STORY 2 STORY 2 STORY 1 STORY l 2 STORY MAX HEIGHT
USE NONABSOR-BENT FLGOPS NOTES
42
CODE CHECK SUMMARY


DMINISTRA- ION AMPITHEATER FOOD PREP. & DINING CONFERENCE CENTER WINERY OPERATIONS BOTTLING OPERATIONS CHEMICAL ft FUEL STORAGE MECHANICAL ROOM WORKSHOP
N 1 -HR N N N N 2-HR N N STRUCTURAL FRAME
N 1 -HR N N N N 1-HR N N PARTITIONS
1 -HR 1,-HP 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 2-HR 1 -HR 1 -HP SHAFT ENCLOSURES
N 1-HR N N N N N N FLOORS
N 1 -HR N N N N N N POOF
DE CHECK NOTES: Chap. 33)
Mezzanine requires two exits if larger than 2000 Sq. Ft.
requires three exits if O.A. length more than 500 Ft.
required width= O.A. length
50 (inches)
CODE CHECK SUMMARY
43


BARRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS


45
BARRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS
Parking and droD-offs Adequate area
Special stalls with pedestrian access Access to building by level or ramped path
Walks
Continuous uninterrupted surface 48u minimum width
5% maximum gradient on principle walks Curb cuts at streets, driveways, parking lots
Ramps (exterior and interior)
8.33% (1:2) maximum gradient
Level approaches and landings at 30' intervals
Doors
32" minimum width (clear opening)
Vestibules with 6'-6" separation between doors
Corridors, Public Spaces, Work Areas Corridors 60" Minimum width


^RRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS CONT.
irridors, Public Spaces, Work Areas Cont.
;cessed doors when opening into corridors
:airs
!" minimum width ' maximum riser
mdrails 32" high, 18" beyond top and bottom steps evators
:essible to each floor
ib size minimum 60"x60" or 63"x56"
>or clear oprning 32" minimum
)i 1 et Facilities
nimum one (1) per sex per floor
impartment 36"x56" with clear opening 32"
ill hung W.C., 20" high
ivatory with 29" clear space underneath
'inal (where used) wall-mounted @ 19" or 0 floor level
irrors, shelves, dispensers useable from lav. at 40" maximum height
'inking Fountain
inimum one per floor for handicapped
A
Drinking Fountain Cont.
Wall-mounted, projecting basin at 30" to 36" height Alcove 60" wide if used
Public Telephones
Minimum one (1) per bank accessible
Dial, handset and coin slot maximum 48" high
Controls
Alarms, switches, etc. maximum 48" high


RUBLIC TOILETS
â– de one toilet full lor handicapped in all public toilet rooms. Stall to be one I an hen from toilet room entrance
Ur mall may be door or wall mounted with protection o< V - 6" from wan and lip at V — 5" above floor. Urinal Hum valve at mu. of 4' - 0” above floor.
ELEVATION
LAVATORIES
MOTE t
If recened unit in alcove, control and Ipout mould protect minimum of 2" beyond adtacem wane Control! and ipout at front of unit, and water mould ipout parallel to front face.
Provide hand only or hai.d foot control.


NOTE:
Avoid ramos if possible
hemp surface should be non-slip.
Ramp should be minimum 36" wide dear.
48
ACCCM
Access from main entrance sidewalk through the entrance to the elevator, and from the elevator to all of building planned for occupancy should be free of steps
Exterior and interior thresholds should be flush, if not possible — maximum height 1 **.
Revolving doors not usable.
If double doors used — one leaf must have 2**6" dear opening
Door closers must be ad | us table for both speed and effort.
*
A a
3-B 2 -IO" Cl£aR
OVER 3 - a 2‘-B" CUE A*


DOORS a HARDWARE
NOTC;
Provide 32 " dear width when door « at 90°. Plan door swings to ooen into larger spaces Auxilary door handle 7" from hinge edge as shown is recommended.
or knob height and auxilary door handle jht maximum 36”.
Floor should be level on eacn side of door for distance of 5 -0” from door in direction it swings and 3 ‘ - 0 ” from ooor in ooposite direction it swings
Hardware identification for blind - integral or applied textured surfaces as shown above.
ACCtPTkiLC
STAIR 6 MOTE:
Individuals with restrictions in the knee, ankle, or hip, with artificial legs or leg braces cannot use steps noted as unacceptable, without great difficulty and hazard.
Steps noted as acceptable can be used with minimum difficulty by the above mentioned »nd iv **•«»*$.
a n
PUSUC TELEPHONES
NOTE;
Folding seat must be easily operable Add to depth of booth, as required, for doors if they are necessary. Door must not project into 3' — 6" clearance.




51
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Chai: Wine shed.
Cuve: Fermenting Vat.
Finished Wine: Wine after its last fermentation.
Heat Summation: The total number of degrees of average daily temperature over 50 f (10 c) for each day of the growing season. A heat summation of 1800 is necessary for successful growth.
Lees: sediment
Maitre de Chai: Cellarmaster
Must: Unfermented grape juice or crushed grapes.
Racking: Seperation of the supernatant wine from the lees.
Remontage: Maintainace of the floating cap of skins on fermenting red juice by spraying with juice pumped from the bottom of the vat.


PROJECT CALENDAR
PROJECT
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CREDITS
ADVISORY CONSULTANTS PRETHESIS
Instructor
Eugene Benda, Professor University of Colorado
Edward Jereb, Architect A.I.A. 1228 15th Street Suite 205 Denver, Colorado 80202
Gail Gunter, Landscape Architect University of Colorado
Remote Advisors
Joseph Phelps
Joseph Phelps Vineyards
200 Taplin Road
St. Helena, California 94574
Frederick L. Clark, J.D,, P.E. Winery Engineer Robert Mondavi Winery Oakville, California 94562
John Picchi, Architect 2975 West Steele Lane Santa Rosa, California 95401


Credits Continued:
Edward Church
Consulting Geological Engineer E.O. Church, Inc.
925 East 17th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80202
58


59
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Amerine, M.A.,Ph.D, M.V. Cruess, The Technology of Winemaking
The AVI Publishing Co. 1980
Balzer, Robert C., Wines of California
Abrams NY 1978
Editors, Lane Publishers, California Wine Country
Palo Alto, CA 1979
Botsai, Elmer E. FAIA, et al, Architects and Earthquakes
AIA Research Corp. Wash. D.C.
1975
Goers, Ralph W., P.E., Cost Impact Analysis, A Methodology for
Seismic Design and Construction of Single Family Dwellings
U.S. Dept, of Housing and Urban Development Wash. D.C. 1978
Kennett, Earle W., Seismic Design for Police and Fire Stations
AIA Research Corp. Wash. D.C.
References
The New Encyclopaedia Britanica Vol. 19 William Benton Publishers 1974


References Continued:
Uniform Building Code 1979 Edition
International Conference of Building Officials Whittier,
California
Winter, George, Arthur Nil son Design of Concrete Structures
McGraw-Hill NY,NY 1979
Magazines
Wines and Vines Magazine May 1980 Statistical Issue
Wines and Vines Magazine April 1974
Dr. Richard G. Peterson, "An Expert Plans the Premium Winery" AIA Journal July 1980
Stanley Abercrombie, AIA "Workplaces: Assemblyline Architecture"
Architectural Record April 1979 Building Types Study William Marlin "Heavy Duty Delights"
Vancouver Calendar Magazine August 1980 Ted Streshinsky, "Vintage California"
Sunset Magazine December 1980 "Wine Growing Accelerates"
Mainliner Magazine January 1981
Grover Sales, "Keeping it in the Family, The Mirassous"
Napa County Ordinance Number 511 Zoning Ordinance, Chapt.l&2 Section 1
U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Standard 29 CFR 196 Revised Nov. 7, 1978
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Site Planning for Solar Development, American Planning Association Contract
HUD-PDR-481 1979


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Mount Saint John Winery
Statement of Client Philosophy
The client for Mount Saint John Winery, a member of a family long associated with wine making, and the Napa Valley region, desires to develop a winery on a 1,1QO acre site in the valley,
The client desires the architecture of MSOW to be reflective of both the tradition of the age-old process of the wine makers art, and the latest developments in todays scientific approach to wine making, The clients winery will incorporate teciw niques which have been developed bv wine makers which enable the wine industry to increase production capabilities while continuing to maintain and improve the quality of their wine,
A quantity and quality demanded by a growing and increasingly sophisticated consumer market.
The client required that his winery be flexible, handling a variety of grapes and process them into different kinds of wine. Such a winery can then adapt to the changing tastes of consumers as well as new developments in the wine processing technology. The winery is to be planned around a given amount of vineyard with no allowance for expansion beyond that limit. This condition is preferable for a premium winery, such as MSJW, because of grape quality and control considerations,
The client desires that his winery operate efficiently. To be efficient it must have the longest possible wine making season, using it's presses and fermenting vats continually from the arrival of the first grapes in the early autumn to the late arrivals, just after the first frost. This distribution of ripening times can be accomplished by selecting those varieties of grapes that exhibit differing ripening characteristics and meet maketina considerations as well,
The winery general plan will be designed to provide all the functions necessary for vineyard operations, wine making, and distribution, Alaigned with these functions, the client desires that the winery feature a banquet/meeting room, an ampitheater, and a tourist capability as marketing and product promotional functions of the program.
The tourism operation, a guided walking tour of the operation functioning year-round, is considered fundamental, by the client as a marketing strategy. The tourist experience should be informative and relaxed, reflective of.tbe;rlch tradition of wine making symbology and imagry and an exposure to modern wine making techniques, Importance is placed upon promoting hospitality toward the visitor while establishing a hierarchy of public and private spaces,
The client desires that the architects formal response address the the influence of the Californian architectural heritage and context as a place where the old and new merge,
The client desires a winery that will seek to enhance the natural process of wine making through architectural technologies. He wishes to promote his winery as a showplace for energy conservation and environmental concern,
The winery is also a workplace and the client desires that the design respond well to the specific sociological, psychological, and environmental needs of it's workers. Natural daylighting should be incorporated into the building design,


A Wine Making Primer
1. The Harvest
Grapes are ripened on the vine. Grape clusters are cut, or shaken by mechanical harvesters, from the vines.
Special support systems necessary: None
2. Crushing
Harvested grapes are transported to the winery by gondola truck where they are weighed and dumped into a sump, to be conveyed to the crusher-destemmer.
From the crusher, the broken grapes and juice, called must, are pumped through pipes to the winery. Red wine must goes directly to fermentation vats, where the skins give up some of their color to the wine. White grapes may be pressed to separate the skins from the juice before fermentation.
Special support systems necessary: Pumps and high pressure hot water for sanitation.
3. Fermentation
The stainless steel fermentation vats allow the fermentation from sugar to alcohol. This process takes from 10 to 30 days. Constant temperature and relative humidity are maintained to promote the growth of desirable yeasts. Generally, the optimum temperature is about 77 degrees F. Heat buildup due to the process is controlled by jacketed vats cooled by refrigeration. The fermentation process is artificially stopped by rapid reduction of the vat temperature when desired balance of alcohol to sugar is attained in the wine.
Some red wines require a secondary fermentation process, which is artificially induced in the wine by raising its temperature from a chilled 55 degrees F to 70 degrees F. During fermentation, red wines also require maintenance of skin caps which develop at the top of the vat. This requires cycling pumps that drain wine from the bottom of the tank for spraying over the cap. Contact with the air during fermentation is undesirable and all vats must be kept full.
4. Aging
Aging is employed to remove undesirable qualities from some wines. Aging times vary, with reds aging for up to 28 months in oaken barrels. Certain whites are aged to enhance their
varietal characteristics. Fume Blanc and Chardonnay wines age for 10 months in Franch oaken barrels. Johannisburg Riesling is aged in German oak casks. Aging must take place under controlled temperatures, generally 55 degrees F.
Special support systems necessary: Refrigerated or cooled space, pumping.
5. Bottling
Bottling of the finished wine is handled by a bottling line, which can process up to 52 bottles a minute. The new bottles arrive in new cases, are cleaned, filled, labled, and repacked into the same cases. Cases are then stacked on pallets, ready for shipping.
Special support systems necessary: Cooled space, hot water for sani tation.
6. Shipping
The shipping and receiving department accomodates trucks for wine distribution and incoming equipment and supplies.
Special support systems necessary: None.
7. Laboratory
Wine making, today, combines traditional methods with modern technology. An enology staff, aided by a process control computer, monitors and conditions the wine during processing.
The computer provides a means of following the temperature and density history of the wine, generates status reports, controls winery environmental conditions, and handles business related processing.
Special support systems necessary: Temperature control.
8. Offices
Offices, reception and tasting rooms comprise business and visitor operations.
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Full Text

PAGE 2

A THESIS IN PREPARATION for the MASTER of ARCHITECTURE DEGREE at the UNIVERSITY of COLORADO May 1981 Submitted by Brainard Story S ett

PAGE 3

AS AN ART, MAKING FINE WINES, LIKE ARCHITECTURE; A PRODUCT OF MAN'S KNOWLEDGE, SKILL, AND LABOR, IS A MATTER OF DETAILS

PAGE 4

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Issues and Intensions Preface to Site Data Pages IV-XXI Site Map 2 Setbacks 3 Circulation and Right of Way Map 4 Wind Direction Map 5 Vegitation Map 6 Views and Nuisances 7 Preface to Program 8 Program of Space Requirements 9-11 Description of Space as Required 12-14 Winery Performance Criteria 15 Special Mechanical and Control Reqmts. 16 Winery Expansion 17 Environmental Impact Sewage Treatment Process Winery Functional Interelationship Diagram 18 19 20

PAGE 5

t ble of Contents Continued ! Search >pendi x Introduction to Climatological Data Regional Climatological Summary Solar Access Solar Path Diagrams Monthly Solar Data Soils Information Seismic Notes Seismic Map Detail Seismic Criteria Seismic Design Notes Building Code Check Code Check Summary Handicapped Design Data Glossary of Terms Project Calendar Credits Bibliography Pages 22 23-24 25-26 27 28-29 30 31 32 -33 34 35 36-39 40-41 42-43 44-49 51 56 57-58 59-60

PAGE 7

IV INTRODUCTION Mount Saint John Winery is located in America's premier wine region, the Napa Valley, 60 miles north of San Francisco. The 30 mile long valley is ideally situated for a climate that will nurture wine grape production. There are currently over 80 wineries concentrated within the small area of the valley. Giants like Inglenook and The Christ ian Brothers, which turn out millions of cases a year coexist amiably with tiny boutique wineries like r,rgich Hills, with an annual output of a little over 10,000 cases. Mount Saint John Winery will produce an estimated 150,000 gal lons of wine, marketed as premium varietals, annually. Those red wines to be produced are Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Petit Sirah, and Gamay. Whites are to be Chardonnay, Fume Blanc, and Johannisburg Riesling. The wine will be produced from 980 tons of grapes grown on 1,100 acres of land. The winery will have an ultimate storaqe capacity of 1,800,000 gallons. The winery will be designed to provide all the functions neces sary for vineyard ooerations, winemaking, business administration, marketing, and distribution. Aligned with these functions, the Mount Saint John Winery will feature a banauet room, a conference center, an ampitheater, and a tourist capability. The open ampitheater will provide facilities for summer evening music concerts, as well as, support for the conference center, for technical seminars, and as seating for the tour recention area.

PAGE 8

1e Mount Saint John Winery is modeled upon the program and siting om that used to develop the Robert Mandavi Winery at Oakville, 1lifornia. Originally designed by Cliff May, Architect of Los Angel , , California, the winery was built in several phases, begun in 1969. 1e design of the MSJW will address a variety of issues. As a rnctional system, the winery design will seek to enhance the natural ocess of winemaking through architectural technologies. The potent 1 1 for solar design applications will be explored and alternative en ronmental systems considered. 1e history of winemaking is rich in tradition, symbology, and imagry. 1rt of this tradition has been an architectural culture that develop ! in Europe, and has been adopted here in America' s winemaking reg InS. The design of this winery acknowledge such a heritage 1 its formal response. winery is also a workplace and an opportunity for education and pro ltion, as well. As such it is critical that the architecture of the 1unt Saint John Winery, responds to the users specific sociological td psychological needs. am sure that these, and other issues, concientiously addressed, will !Sult in an excellent, intriguing, and rewarding thesis submission. tis introduction would be incomplete without the special acknowleg !nt of the kind assistance of Joseph Phelps of the Joseph Phelps Vine trds and the important contributions of Frederick L. Clark J.D.,P.E. mery Engineer, of the Robert Mandavi Winery. v

PAGE 9

.. l E • • San Franctsco VI ..... . . _.,... ... SAINT JOHN WINERY M OUNT VICINITY MAP NO SCALE

PAGE 10

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH 111=2000'

PAGE 11

VIII A SHORT HISTORY OF WINEMAKING The grape vine, vitis vinifera, was being cultivated in the near east by 4000 B.C., and probably earlier. Egyptian records from 2500 B.C. refer to the use of grapes for winemaking. Wines were important, also, to the Minoan, Greek,Phoenecian, and Etruscan regions. The vine and its juice are always present in evidence of daily life, worship, myth, and poetry. The r,reeks, with numerous colonies, held an active wine trade and planted grapes in colonies from the Black Sea to Spain. The Romans carried grape growing into the Rhine, Moselle, and Danube Valleys. The role of wine in the Christian Mass, helped maintain the industry after the fall of the Roman Empire and the monastic orders originally developed many of the highly reqarded wine producing areas in Germany, France, and Austria. Following the voyages of Columbus, grape culture and wine making were transported from the old world to Mexico, South America, South Africa, Austrailia, and California. The rediscovery of the cork, sometime in the 17th Century, and the subsequent redicovery that wine in a tightly corked bottle lasted much longer than wine kept in a barrel, brought about a wine revolution. The rise of the great estates, and the evolu tion of modern wines, dates, therefore, from the 18th Century, the age of enlightenment.

PAGE 12

[n the 1860's, Louis Pasteur contributed to the stability of the wine >Y demonstrating that heating prevented undesirable microbal activity in wines. rhe introduction of the Eastern American root louse, phylloxera, ;eriously threatened the European wine industry between 1870 and 1900, jestroying vineyards almost everywhere that v. vinifera was planted, in both Europe and California. To combat this parasite, v. vinifera ;cions, (detatched shoots including buds), were grafted to the American species, v. rupestris, v. berlaniberi, and v. riparia, natives >f Eastern U.S., which proved almost completely resistant to phyl loxera. [n 1970, 25,000,000 acres of grape, most of them v . vinifera vari were grown throughout the world, predominantly in the north 1nd south temperate zones. (See Table which follows) A full 30% >f the worlds production comes fro m th e U.S. rhousands of grape varieties have been developed; with 5000 reported From v. vinifera alone, differing in such characteristics as color, ;ize and shape of berry, juice composition, ripening time, and jisease resistance. ]rapes are grown under widely varying climatic conditions and many jifferent processes applied in producing wine from them. All these the vast variety of wines we enjoy today. IX The wine grapes importance to the celebration of the Christ ian Mass helped to sustain most of the early wineries during the Prohibition Era of the 1930's. Some were operated by the monastic orders for sacremental wine and have continued the tradition of monastic involvement in winemaking that began in the 5th Century. The connection between the winr industry of Europe and its counterpart in California is well rooted by the past as the industry looks toward the future as a part of this country's huge agricultural output.

PAGE 13

X GROWTH OF THE CALIFORNIA WINE INDUSTRY Since the Spanish Padres began plantinq California's mission vineyards, more than two centuries ago, wine growing has been a fairly steady, if low profile, part of Californias agricultural industry. But the last decade ending with last fall's crush found a once quiet wine making world thrust rather suddenly into the ranks of the wests major industries. Statistics alone can almost tell the story. Acreage planted, ganons , produced, and the number of bonded wineries in California have all virtually doubled in recent times. The nature of the wine produced has changed; table wines have supplanted dessert wines in popularity, rising from 48% to 75% of national consumption. The trend toward premium varietals has been even more striking; by example an eight-fold increase in Cabernet Sauvignon production alone : Quality has risen right along with quantity, with the introduction of new wine making techniques such as stainless steel temperature controlled fermentation tanks, sterilized bottling, and computerized monitoring systems. Numerous blind tastings against premium European wines testify that now,-after cent uries of chauvinism European vintners have accepted that west-

PAGE 14

ern wine mak ing has come of age i n a big way. la..d on ,..ldent population • of July 1 . lnchldet mlltt.y ..-vices per.onnef atatloned In the U . S . but excludee U.S . ctvlllant end mlltwy wviOM per.onnef living et:wo.d . lPY..ttmlrwy . ,a...d on Oolcndo'a1878 figure ; figure few 1871 Ia not eallllble. Bouroea: State ...._..end tax aur.u of Atoohol, Tot.cc:o end Ftrema end 1knau of the o.n.u.. XI &ute AL ..... . AK ... . . A:z. .. ... . AR .... . CA .... . co .... . CT ..... . DE .... . DC .... . F L. .... . GA .... . HI ..... . 10 IL .... . . IN ..... . lA ..... . KS ... . . KY .... . LA ..... . ME .... . MO .... . MA ..•. • MI .....• MN . . . . . MS ... . . MO ... . . MT ... . . NB .... . NV .... . NH . . . . . NJ ..... . NM .... . NY .... . NC .... . NO .... . OH ... .. OK .... . 00 .... . PA ... .. Rl ..... . sc .. .. . so . ... . TN ....• TX ...... UT ...••. vr ...... VA .•... WA ..... Wtl .••. . WI . ..•.. W'f •.••. UIT .... ,._ c.plta Consumption In the U . S., by Stat", 1150 , 1110, 111H end 11711 1150 . 3 1 1.18 .38 2 . 05 .89 1 .36 1 .2. 2 . 59 .69 . 27 .28 us . 58 .19 .42 . 37 1 .• 2 .49 1 .03 1.12 .7. .48 . 85 .59 . 50 1 . 88 .40 1 .51 1 . 44 1 . 52 .22 .49 . n .44 . 85 1 .07 .38 .17 .51 .78 .15 •• .11 .12 .14 •• .. 1110 1.1 ca.llona .22 .3C . n 1 . 26 1 . 12 1 . 22 . 45 . 49 2 .09 2 .65 . 78 1 . 17 1 .31 1 . 42 1 . 17 . 96 2 .a. 3 .88 .89 1 . 26 . 25 . 62 . 76 .a. .29 .39 . 85 1 .11 .41 . 15 .2• .28 .38 . 25 .35 1 . 25 1 . 16 .36 .39 .iS 1 .!m 1 .10 1 . 25 Jl6 . 94 . 64 .32 . 69 . 89 . 56 .41 .51 1.10 2 .52 . 1 . 06 1 .39 1 . 58 1 . 25 1 .39 1 . 45 1 . 74 .33 .62 .37 .85 .7V .37 . 59 1 . 00 1.55 .62 .84 1.22 1 . • .45 . 58 .25 .3& .54 .<64 . 47 •• 1 . 47 .62 . 18 .. 1.71 .38 .31 •• .11 .e .11 .... 1.17 . 75 2 . 63 2 . 32 .66 4 .32 2 . 753 2 . • 9 1 . 63 6 .24 2 .31 1 . 10 2 . 65 1 . 6-' 1 . 99 . 95 .72 . 73 . 56 1 .52 1 .74 1 . 95 2 . 6-' 1 . 65 . 1 . -'5 .59 1 .22 2 . 55 1 . 1 0 5 .33 3 . 79 2 . 67 1 . 78 2 .73 1 .37 . 18 1 . 19 .11 2 .11 1 .38 3 . 13 1 .03 1 .05 .70 1.27 .78 2.14 1 .54 2.94 .57 1.73 1.33 Ul 120 . 6 1!m . 7 90. 2 3C. 7 63 . 0 135 . 0 75 . 4 89 . 8 >. 8 83. 3 n . • 215 . 5 320 . 5 79 . 3 106 . 5 200 . 0 92 . 1 l. O 3 1 . 0 346 . 2 80 . 6 111 . 2 75 . 5 126 . 6 a.. 4 76. 8 355. 4 115. 7 111. 5 257. 5 89 . 0 28 . 1 56 . 9 121. 0 113 . 0 50. 6 87 . 7 84. 3 114 . 4 11. 0 7V. 5 170 . 2 18 . 0 13. 2 7V. 1 87.0 50 . 0 113 . 1 111.0 71.1 <64 ,.. 17 48 3 9 16 26 1 18 37 12 25 1 9 4 1 45 <64 5 1 28 22 2D 13 24 29 49 3C 15 36 2 • 11 21 10 31 40 35 42 7 3) 5 38 38 33 .t3 • 27 I 50 23 S2

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Percent MARKET SHARES : 1970-79 100-9 0 8 0 -70-6050-, ,. , •• • ;ror t . .{ -40. . . . 30.. ... 2 0 -OTHER STATES I 70 7 1 7 2 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 --------------------. U.S . WINE MARKET: 1970-79 500-Million G allon s Tota l a ll sources !':;) r. . liiPOIII8 . . ' 400-300-200-100-0--70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 XII GROWTH OF GRAPE AND WINE PRODUCTION World Wine Production Viticultural Areas Spain Italy France USSR Turkey Yugoslavia USA Note: The high yield for USA. World Wine Production Ranking Viticultural Areas France Italy Spain USSR Argentina USA (494 M. gallons) 1970 Acres Planted(Th) 4078 3683 3349 2687 2098 628 581 . 1976 Gallons(M) 647 1717 1619 766 14 159 370 Note: California produced 73% . California also boasts of the largest production winery in the world, E.J. Gallo Winery, in Modesto.

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CALIFORNIA GROSS WINE PRODUCTION MARKETINGS & INVENTORIES 1970-1979 MILLIONS OF GALLONS PRODUCTION MARKETINGS INVENTORIES DEC . 31 ••• 450 ---------400-----300250 200 1 ' .. I

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XIV REGIONAL HISTORY The word "napa" was probably from the name given to a Southern Wappo Indian village whose people shared the area with elk, deer, grizzlies, and oanthers for centuries. At the time of the first recorded exploration into the Napa Valley in 1823, the populat ion consisted of hundreds of indians. Padre Jose Altimira, founder of the nearby Sonoma Mission, led the expedition. Spanish and Mexican control lasted until the Bear Flag Revolution and the valley became one of the first in California to be settled by American farmers, arriving in the 1830's. By 1870 most of the Indians who had inhabited the valley were iped out by smallpox and other diseases brought by the white man. The few that remained finally were taken into Alexander Valley where a few descendents now reside in government reservations. It was the gold rush of the late 1850's that really built Napa City. After the first severe winter in the gold fields many miners sought refuge in the city, finding work in the local cattle ranches and the lumber industry. Stage coaches began regular runs between Vallejo and Calistoga during the 1850's and a railine was built from Vallejo to Napa in 1864-65. This rail was later extended to Calistoga, and by 1868 North-South transportation by rail was available for the entire Napa Valley. In the 1870's and 1880's, Bay Area residents became interested

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i n the mineral and hot springs, which spawned many resorts. "he earliest white settlers planted vineyards from mission cuttings, ;upplied by the Padres from Sonoma and San Rafael. Later, in 1861, tiesling cuttings were introduced into the valley. From these small leginnings; Napa Valley has since become noted throughout the world ts the center of the American table wine industry. XV

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XVI REGIONAL ARCHITECTURAL VERNACULAR The mixed bag of architectural styles evident in the Napa Valley regions winery architecture borders on the historic cartoon-like architecture of Disneyland. Indeed, as a tourist mecca the Valley probably ranks close to that most visited of California's places. Despite the historic eclecticism found there, much of the regions architecture has been produced by architects well skilled in the art. Winery architects like Hamden Mcintyre in the late 1800's and more recently, Cliff May have maintained a standard of quality design that merits some study. The architecture of the wine region is not studied for nost algic or picturesque reasons, but . for it's permanence. The images which qualify the specificity of the place, the relationship between architectural forms, climatic factors, the soci6-psycological context, and the local means of production of architecture, are all embodied within the context of the region. The importance of place to the wine making art cannot be under estimated. There is a definite association between place and the wine that place produces. The appreciation of the diverse varieties of wines results from an understanding of place, manifested in its climate, topography, soil, and architecture.

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1rchitectural tradition is often borrowed partially and superficially 1ithout investigation into the logic behind its forms and materials 1hich risks debasing it to a level of picturesque imagery. he difficulty of working on a local tradition is to decode it with n an appropriate analytical framework. The strategy used must in traditional and contemporary architectural cultures. XVII

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XVIII WINE COUNTRY TOURISM California wineries have employed the public interest in the winemaking art to their benefit. They have discovered the promotional value of tourism and the money to be made in the tasting room as well. Most major wineries have scheduled tours and tastings for visitors. Smaller wineries will do so by appointment. The tourists come to learn and to buy. The tourist activity is a year-round fundtion, though it peaks during the summer and fall harvest months. The wineries attract people from the world over though many Bay area residents obtain local recreation on weekends as well. Tour facilities range from simple to elaborate with one winery that features a tramway ride to reach the ridgetop winery. The Robert Mondavi Winery has become a showplace amoung wineries featuring banquet facilities and summer evening music events during the summer.

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r XIX ARCHITECTURE OF THE WORKPLACE The design of Mount Saint John Winery should consider the re quirements of the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Standards,Chapter XVII 1910, for noise, ventilation, sanitation, and machinery and electrical operation, as minimum requirements for employee well-being. The operation of a winery, producing a product of high quality, requires the talents of some highly skilled workers. In order to attract and retain the personel that it needs the winery should provide them with amenities beyond those set as industry minimums. Todays industries are now that environmental health goes beyond just providing workers with good eating, park ing, and toileL facilities. The winery should provide an atmosphere which includes provisions for lighting, color, acoustics, and general worker convenien .ce and comfort. The design of the Mount Saint John Winery should anticipate the expansion of the architects role as creators of workplaces. The design should respond with quality spaces and amenities that explore the potential value that good design can offer the workplace.

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XX VINEYARD AND WINERY OPERATIONS The Harvest 1. The grapes are ripened on t h e vine. 2. Grape clusters are cut,(or shaken by mechanical harvesters) from the vines. 3. Harvested grapes are then transported by gondola truck to the winery where they are weighed and dumped into a sump to be conveyed to the crusher. The gondolas are then weighed empty to calculate load weight. 4. A crusher/stemmer operating at 600-1200 R.P.M. macerates the grapes to liberate the juice seoerate the stems from the resulting must. The crushing operation should be done as soon as possible after harvesting. The crushing operation should be arranged for easy transfer of the must to the fermenting or pressing area with a minimum of pumping or piping. For red wines the crushed grapes may be pumped into tanks where the skins give up some of their color by respiration. For white wine the juice is seperated from the skins by presses. 5. Pressing operations release the juice from the pomace (skins and seeds) in horizontal basket presses of screw-type presses. The white wine must should be allowed to settle and seperate suspended materials with the aid of a centrifuge.

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Fermentation process is begun and lasts from 10 to 30 days. Con stant temperature and relative humidity should be maintained to promote the growth of desirable yeasts. Generally, the optimum temperature is about 77• f (25.c). Temperature regulation is ac complished by heat exchangers in the tank walls. Red wines require maintaining of skin caps which develop at the top of the tank. This requires cycling pumps to draw the wine off the bottom of the tank for spraying over the cap. Contact with air at this time is undesirable and tanks must all be topped up. The tanks used in this operation, sometimes as large as 100,000 gallons, must be treated with sulfur dioxide to supress the growth of undesirable mica-organ isms. Clarification of the wine follows the fermentation where suspended material is removed by filtration and by centrifuge. Aging is allowed to remove undesirable qualities from some wines and sometimes to allow a second fermentation to take place. Aging times vary with the reds aging up to 28 months in oaken barrels. Certain whites are aged to enhance their varietal character. Fume Blanc and Chardonnay wines age for 10 months in French oak barrels. Johannisberg Riesling is aged in German oak casks of 330 to 660 gallons. Aging must take place at controlled temperatures ( generally, ss f (13.c). Temperatures of wine and fermenting must are controlled according to the specifications of the enology staff, aided by a process control computer. The computer provides a means of following the temperature and density history of fermenting must XXI and generates reports on the status of wines in the cellar. 9. Bottling of the finished wine is handled by a bottling line which can process up to 52 bottles a minute. The new bottles arrive in new cases, are cleaned, filled, labled, and repacked in the same case. Cases are then stacked on pallets ready for shipment. 10. Shipping and Recieving services all truck freight for wine distribution and incoming equipment and Vineyard Operations Routine vineyard operations include maintainance of weeds and irrigation, fertilization and insect control. Winery Operations Routine winery operations include cleaning and preparation of barrels and casks, bottling and shipping, equipment maintainance, and business operations.

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• • • assuts an antenstons

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1 PREFACE TO SITE DATA The brief site survey shown here is based upon the data available at the time of this writing. An on-site visit and site study will be made for further data and is scheduled for June 28th & 29th.

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\ . , , \ \ ' , : ( , \ . \ 0 " .. // . h . ,, , . SITE M,AP SCALE: 1"=2000'

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.A 48' ALONG BELLA OAKS .7 L'/ <" ? / "" "' \ \ \ ,, 90 I ALONG HI GHIJAY 29 ,. v\ '\ \ ,> ) //' I \ 50' ALONG OAKVILLE y3 SETBA.CKS SC.l\LE: 1 "=2000 I

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'..,. \f. \ ' \ I (' \ , 'I . . • ( 4 /40 ' .. . .,. , _ ' ... MAJOR ROADWAYS SECONDARY ROADWAYS ==-===:-AGRICULTURAL ACCESS +-+---+-RAILROAD R.O.W. CIRCULATION AND RIGHT OF WAYS SCALE: 1"=2000'

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"ti , \{\"' 'l .. . • • ,, , , \ ' , ... , .. . . .. . . 5 .. -:4-0 -' / \ \ . ' . . ' .. _ : .... . -II SUMMER PREVAILING c=) WINTER WIND DIRECTION SCALE: 1"=2000'

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-., I ., I ) ' V \ ' .,. -' ) ( , , \ , I ' \ , , • . , . ' 14.1 .. , • . < < . . ( 6 [] AGRICULTURAL GROWTH NATURAL GROWTH VEGITATION SCALE: 1"=2000'

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-. \ .
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PREFACE TO PROGRAM Due to the limitations of time and the availability of information, this program is very basic and does not address itself to issues of cost, comparative analysis, budgeting, and construction time . This program rather, addresses the issues of need and projected need, facilities, space allocation, and locations. Emphasis will be upon such items as: 1. Function; aim to establish an effective plant for winery and vineyard operations. 2 . Character; development of an atmosphere condusive to worker we 11-bei ng and efficiency, as we 11 as, one enjoyab 1 e and in formative for the visitor. 3. Economy; to enhance the "natural" process of winemaking with the application of architectural technologies in energy con servation and environmental control.

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PROGRAM OF SPACE REQUIREMENTS EXTERIOR AREAS PROGRAM FACILITIES t;? PROJECTED SPACE REQMT Parking: Automobile-25 cars @ 200 sq. ft. ea. 5000 sq. ft. Bus -3 buses @ 400 sq. ft. ea. 1200 sq. ft. Handicapped-3 space @ 200 sq. ft. ea. 600 sq. ft. Staff and Business visitors20 space @ 200 sq. ft. ea. 4000 sq. ft. Loading: Handicapped-1 drop-off w/ turn out 200 sq. ft. Truck loading dock & apron1600 sq. ft. TOTAL: 12,600 sq. ft. Ampitheater: 2000 persons @ 6 sq. ft./person I2000 sq. ft. 9

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PROGRAM OF SPACE REQUIREMENTS INTERIOR AREAS PROGRAM FACILITIES PROJECTED SPACE REQMT Administration Lobby and Reception 1600 sq. ft. Offices Corporate officers 3 @ 144 sq. ft. 432 Department Heads 3@ 120 sq. ft. 360 Administrative & Clerical 2 @ 100 sq. ft. 200 Conference Center 500 Banquet Room 3600 Food Preparation 340 Storage 2 @ 300 sq. ft. 600 TOTAL 7632 sq. ft. Winery Tour Operation Public Relations Office 150 sq. ft. Wine Tasting Rooms 4 @ 302 sq. ft. 1208 Wine Sales 540 Ampitheater (Exterior space see exterior space program) Public Restrooms 2 @ 150 300 TOTAL 2198 sq. ft. 10

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ogram of Space Requirements Continued OGRAM FACILITIES nery Operations bora tory periment and Analysis sting Room PROJECTED SPACE REQMT 1225 sq. ft. 350 200 ushing and Stemming (Exterior area st Station and Scales 11 see exterior space program) rmentation (Tank) rmentation (Barrel) ntrifuge Area frigeration 1 @ 200 sq. ft. 1 @ 900 sq. ft. re Aging Room ttle Storage ttling rrel Washing lk Storage and Aging Room (By Phases) Phase I II III rehouse Offices 2 @ 200 sq. ft. 2 @ 100 sq. ft. rehouse ipping and Recieving TAL 11025 7345 1120 1100 168 1200 750 800 22500 10850 63550 600 7000 300 II 130083 sq. ft. 1 1 Vineyard Operations Tractor Storage Vineyard Equipment Storage Tractor and Equip. Maintainance Diesel and Gasoline Storage (Exterior Soace) Fertilizer and Chemical Storage TOTAL Support Facilities Mechanical and Machine Room Maintainance Shop Employee Locker Rooms Employee Restrooms Emergency Generator Room Training Room TOTAL 2 @ 200 sq. ft. 2 @ 150 sq. ft. GRAND TOTAL (Interior Spaces) 900 sq.ft. 600 600 500 2600 sq.ft. 572 sq.ft. 432 400 300 200 500 2404 sq.ft. 144,917 sq.ft.

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12 DESCRIPTION OF SPACES AS REOUIRED ADMINISTRATION Lobby and Reception Use: Entry, waiting, reception of winery business visitors User: Business visitors Design requirements: Lobby reception space should allow visual access to vineyard operation and be raised on a platform to denote arrival. Receptionists location should allow visual supervis ion of visitors arrival. Furnishings: Receptionist desk 3X6, chairs, reception seating Note: Lobby and reception should be accessible by handicapped. Offices Use: Individual work stations for officers, department heads, and administrative personnel User: Administrative staff, clerical staff, Design Requirements: Basic requirements are common to all offices Size and furnishinqs are subject to needs of each of the above catagories. Corporate officers; Desk 3X6, chairs, files, neat orderly formal/semi-formal atmosphere of impressive character. Coat storage, con ference area. Department heads; Desk 3X5, chairs, files, coat storage, conference area

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:scription of Spaces Continued : sign Requirements: Secretarial and clerical ; Desk, extensive filing, coffee station, worksurface, shelves, materials storage, supply storage, copy and word processin g space, coat storage. 1 nference Center e: Professional conferences, technical seminars, community associa tion meetings er: Professionals, local community members : sign Requirements: Seating capacity for a maximum of 40 persons, 6 sq. ft./person minimum. Seating should be flexible to provide a variety of communication-oriented layouts, with emphasis on eye contact between speaker and attendee as well as attendee to attendee. Lighting should not cause eyestrain or glare. Provision will be made for projection and other audio visual aid equipment, If room contains windows, these should be easily operable for adjustment of ventilation and coverable for reduced projection lighting conditions. Ventil ation equipment should operate silently and pro vide an atmosphere condusive to concentration and participation. 13 TOUR OPERATIONS Tour Reception Area Use: Recieving pubic tourists User: tour participants Design Requirements: A wide entrance that begins at a rest area and that is easily identified from all park ing areas. The rest area should be s1ight t y higher than the path to reinforce ificance as a landing and to provida an overviewing deck towards the vineyard operation. Restrooms with hot water should be provided adjacent to the waiting area. Public Relations Office Use: Cordination of pulic relation and tours User: Public relations staff Design Requirements: See previous general office design require ments. Wine Tasting Rooms Use: Post-tour wine tasting User: Public visitor Design Requirements: Provide with a 15• long serving bar, glassware storage, refrigeration equioment below,

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of Spaces Continued Requirements: wine storage, limited casual seating, wall-mount ed product display cases, Atmospheric lighting should be provided. 1pitheater e; Tour orientation, performance programming (evening music concerts harvest festivals, etc.) er: Tourists, local community Requirements: Outdoor seating capacity of 2000 persons @,_(6 sq. ft./person). Seating should be arranged and accomodated by terraced levels, spaced comfortably, for ease of entry and exit without disturbance of other seated individuals. All seating shall be arranged to maximize sight lines. Ample space and seating to accomodate the handicapped in wheel chairs and those accompanying them shall be provided. Locate handicapped seating with easy access of entry and exits and prime sight lines employed. An amplification system should be provided. Accoustical quality will be designed for the projection of the spoken voice. Provisions should be made for the accomodation of electric equipment such as taping systems and electric music instru-14 ments. Provision should also be made for the use of performance lighting, the storage of lights, and related equipment.

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15 WINERY PERFORMANCE CRITERIA EXTERIOR AREAS Tourist Activity Arrival at Winery: Winery tourists are travelers, and travelers need places to rest, escape the clamor of the road, and to readjust to more natural rythmns. They need time and space to make the change from faceless motorist to distinct and individual human beings. Arrival Sequence: Highway approach: a signal to travelers that they are entering the winery. Entrance Road: a preview of what lies ahead, signs of concentrated activity, low design Parking Area: clearly identifiable circulation routes, softened visual impacts with plantings, main path to recep tion area clearly visible from all areas of the parking area. General Planning and Graphics Emphasis should by on cognitive mapping processes to prevent the misuse and misinformation by the visitor, rather than relying upon graphic aids.

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16 SPECIAL MECHANICAL AND CONTROL REQUIREMENTS The winemaking process demands a multiplicity of mechanical and climate control considerations. Demands: High Pressure Water Source Sterilizing Water Source Steam Capability Air Conditioning and Refrigeration High Output Electrical Circuitry for Pumping (Protect) Industrial Quality Work Space Illumination

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17 WINERY EXPANSION With the explosive growth experienced in the California wine mar ket, and the parallel increase in vineyard acreage yield within the industry, a winery facility must be planned for expansion of its processing, storage, and support facilit ies from the earliest design stages. The Mount Saint John Winery will be programmed to expand its operation in three phases over a 5 year period. (See Facilities Program for square footage requirements). In addition, the winery plant must be flexible, to accomodate any increase in efficiency that may develop within the industry in plany operations. That flexibility must also extend to accomodating the rapid modernization of the industry that will surely continue.

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18 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT The greatest single concern in the operation of a winery is the management of its sewage waste. This has become one of the most critical problems in winery planning in Californ ia. Wastes, in the form of pomace and stems from the crushing and pressing operations must be managed by on-site waste treatment operations. Primary treatment employs settling tanks that rotate daily in use for a week at a time, yielding 5000 gallons of sludge per each 100,000 gallons of pomace. The winery can also pretreat the stillage through a trickle filter then use tanks. Settling ponds are undesirable because of the offensive odors they produce, (the town of Oakville is just 3/8 mile to the S.E.) Combustable methane and hydrogen is produced in the digestion of the wastes and could be collected from covered digestiontanks for use as a fuel to produce steam for generation of electricity or other uses. A second environmental problem that should be addressed in winery planning, is storm run-off and drainage. This problem is moderated by the regionally mild climate, however storm sewage control and retention ponds must be considered in site planning.

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19 SEWAGE TREATMENT PROCESS 1. Open channel begins treatment operation. 2. Screening operation catches larger units of debris. 3. r,rit chambers allows settling of sand. 4. Digester employs anerobic process allows production of harmless sludge. Dried,it is used as a fertilizer.

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Lobby & Recertion Clerical Staff Offices Conference Rooms Tourist P.ecertion Public Relations Office Wine Tastin0 & Sales Ampitheater Conference Center Food Preoeration & P ininn Room Labor a tory Crushinq & Fermentation Room Bulk Storaqe & Bottle Storane Ooerations Bottle nq Rare A g ing Room Tractor Storage Vineyard Enuioment Stora0e Fertilizer & Chemical Stora<1e Diesel r u mos Tractor Maintenance Locker Rooms Public Restroor.1s Emnloyee Restrooms Trainina Room Ooom FIINCTIONAL HITEPELIITIONSHIPS Pumn Room Emerqency Exitwa_vs )urnnrtive Qelationshin 0 Hallwa s Qisruntive 0elationshio •

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INTRODUCTION TO CLIMATE DATA Grapes, although primarily a temperate zone plant, can be grown under semitropical conditions. They are not adapted to the cooler parts of the temperature zones where growing seasons may be too short to allow the fruit to reach maturity, or low winter temperatures may kill the vines or their buds. Climate strongly influences the composit of mature grapes, a major cause of the variation among grapes from different areas. The differing quantities of heat recieved by the vines, during the growing season, and other factors such as, diurnal tempera ture swings, hours of insolation, and soils temperature, all have a dramatic effect the flavor subtlties of the resultin9 wine. These factors are controlled by location. The site characteristics that promote quality in grapes produced by the winery are exposure ' (best when from east), air drainage (preferably from the slopes to the valley), soil temperature, and moisture content.

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23 REr,IQNAL CLIMATE C1imatological and weather data is based upon reoorts from substations located in the city of San Rafael, located approximately 30 miles to the south of Napa Valle y , and fro m San Francisco, 45 miles to the south. The San Francisco Bay Region is typified by cool pleasant summers and mild winters, resulting from its unique location at the orthern end of a penninsula that seperates San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. There are wide contrasts in climate within short distances of the Bay. The nearby communities of Marin, Napa, and Sonoma County, lYing just to the north, across the Golden Gate and sheltered from the prevailing ocean winds by the fairly high peaks and ridges of the Coast Range, enjoy and sunnier weather than San Francisco. Their climate is further modified by pro ximity to San Francisco and San Pablo Bays to the east. In general, temperatures increase from south to north, with cor respondingly greater daily ranges, and also increase slightly with distance from the bays. Daily maximum temperatures for July average 16 warmer in San Rafael than at San Francisco. As in San Francisco, . there are well-defined wet and dry seasons, but rainfall amounts are strongly influenced by the topography of the Coast Range. Annual average rainfall varies from 26 es at Hamilton field to about 40 inches in San Rafael.

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Jring the summer, stratus season, low overcast frequently covers the 1tire area during early morning hours, but clearing begins early in 1e afternoon, especially in the more northern parts of the region. 24

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CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY PROJECT LOCATION: Nearest Major City (Weather Data Source) Distance from Major City Direction from Major City CLIMATE: Annual Heating Degree Days (65 base): 2083 Annual Cooling Degree Days: 475 San Rafael, Calif. 31 miles (Oakville) Northeast January Minimum Temperature: January Maximum Temperature: 44.3 (Degrees farenheit) 59.0 January Average Temperature: Sl. 7 July Minimum Temperature: 54.6 July Temperature: 83.5 July Average Temperature: 69.1 WIND: Prevailing direction Average Velocity (MPH) Summer SE Summer 5.75 Winter E Winter 5.30

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CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY Continued: HUMIDITY: Average ( % Relative) Summer 74 Winter 76.5 26

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27 SOLAR ACCESS v The site of Mount Saint John Winery is at latitude 38.17 North. True North lies 18 West of compass North and conversely, True South is 18• East of compass South. The site is sheltered by the moderate slopes of the Mayacamas Range to the west and from most fogs and strong winds. This condition results in few poor energy conservation features, such as exposed ridges and frost prone vales. Occasional morning fogginess is likely, however, in this region and surfaces intended for use as solar collectors can be directed slightly west of due south, allowing the morning sun to burn off the fog and leaving the to gain solar radiation during the afternoon hours. Solar access from the west is hampered by the proximity of the mountains to the west. Particularly, Mount Saint John itself, which cases a false sunset at 3 :32 P.M. in the winter and at 6 :45 P.M. in the summer. Solar Landscaping Notes: The general climate affords cool summer temperatures which may preclude the normal summer shading requirements.

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SOLAR PATH DIAGRAM 28

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SUMMER SUNRISE Winter and Summer Sun Paths ,/ / , , /' OLLECTOR w WINTER SUNSET SOLAR PATH DIAGRAM ?0

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ilifornia Solar Zones -Mount Saint John Winery om: California Solar Data Manual 9 Monthly Solar Data, San Rafael 37.97. .... : Ul.5J• m...a.. : , .. ...., • . , J• .... Alii !IOU& (kW\/,.lJIIIr ....... ............ u " 11-40 us %37 243 ....... (--.11 It I 105 u' u' 275 217 .. IOlAit UDIA1101'C _.... .............. 21 21 44 61 71 75 77 70 33 41 " 76 12 17 91 15 Pl!ltCENT or POSSZaL SUNSHINE• MEAN CLOUD COYD (Ia ' 5. ' ' 4 3 2 3 AACTtON or "' • 53 • .sa .67 ... " .70 .70 RADIA110fl l"fl t.cU.. 1atai"''N.l.: 197o-U74 lnrce of eolu .. tal i&AI'CD, ... ley liPdN.l.ll P"tTir -ltel' • 3 0 25' s... Oct N.9 .,_ .u.-1 170 w .. S4 11120 221 Ul " .. 2302 S4 36 22 17 576 70 50 31 27 729 2 4 5 ' 4 ... • .56 .45 .42 " . .

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31 SOILS INFORMATION The local soils are classed by the Soils Conservation Service as Class Two. Soil composition is an excellent mixture of equal parts of sand, clay, and silt, called bale loam. Soils value (q) will be assumed to be 5 KSF.

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32 SEISMIC NOTES The site of the Mount Saint John Winery lies just miles west of the West Napa Fault. The geology of the entire North Coast region is of volcanic and is laced with many fault lines and geothermically active zones. Application of seismic design principles is mandated both locally and by state codes. Earthquakes can subject buildings to horizontal loads induced by the inertia of the building and its contents . In addition, the positioning of a structure near a fault line can result in vertical loads due to liquifaction induced ground failure in the form of settlement and slides. Design Principles: How an earthquake effects a building is the result of its structural system, 3-D form or shape, building materials, and the distribution and. bulk of its contents. 1. Earthquake action may best be resisted by rigid frame action, shear walls, rigid frame in combination with shear walls, or special ductile design systems. 2. A building which is formed in a regular complete shape in plan is best suited to resist unwanted torsion . 3. The structures building materials should be similar with respect to their ductility characteristics, when used to-

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gether, they can react as a unit to seismic forces rather than causing connections to fail. 4. A buildings subcomponents, parapets, railings, sunshades, statues, signage, planters, etc, should be considered as potential problems in an earthquake. 5. Attention should be given to a buildings contents. This is es pecially important to winery design, with thousands of tons of valuable wine product being stored in vats and barrels. 6. In reinforced concrete design use of an fy of no greater than 60 KSI and an f'c of no less than 3 KSI should be standard. (ACI Code) Uniform Building Code Notes Chapter 23 1979 U.B.C. Occupancy importance factor: 1.0 Type of occupancy is not essen-tial or for primary occupancy of more than 300 persons. Site is located in zone 4 of Seismic Risk Map (Fig. No.1) Zone 4 indicates areas of major damage and corresponds to intensity VIII and higher of the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale of 1931.

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MOUNT SAINT JOHN WINERY L.-CALIFORNIA SEISMIC ZONE MAP DETAIL NO SCALE RED INDICATES EXTREME SEISMIC ACTIVITY ZONE 34

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V u lnerable to Damag e til +-' t: II:' t: 0 .u C( +-' u ...... Q) c c o: 0 :::::1 w n:: s... 0 ...... E til +.> ....... n:: ...... 0.. c . c: .::.t. u til rr-;-...... w n:: n:: s:: cr ...... s... u :::::1 ...... .,.. rVl +-' s... c: n:: ...... u +-' ...... w :::::1 u u Vl s... Q) Q) +.> r-c (/') w Vl ADMIN I STRA.T I O N Lobby & Receot1on 0 0 0 Clerical Area 0 0 0 0 Staff Office s 0 0 0 Conference Rooms 0 0 0 T OUR OPERATIONS Tourist Reception 0 0 0 Public Relations 0 0 O ffices 0 !-line Tast i n g 0 0 0 Sales 0 0 0 Conference Center 0 0 0 Food Preneration & D i n ing Room 0 0 0 WINERY OPERATIONS Laborat ory 0 0 0 Crushing & Stern' g 0 0 0 Fermenta t io n 0 0 Bulk S t o r aqe & 0 0 0 Agin g Roor.1 Bottl e S t orage 0 0 0 Bottlin9 Operot l o n 0 0 0 Bottle Aqing 0 0 R a r e A ai n g Poorn 0 0 Equipmen t Stor age 0 0 0 Tract or St0 rag e 0 0 Viney ard Equi omt 0 0 Stora g e Fertilizer h Chern. 0 0 Stora g e 0 0 D i e s el & Gasoline s to rage 0 0 0 Tractor i nt. 0 0 Locker Rooms 0 0 0 0 S UPPORT FACILITIES Public R estrooms 0 o o E m ployee R estrooms 0 0 Training_ Room 0 0 M echanic a l no o m 0 0 0 Pump Room 0 0 E mergen c y Genera -tor Room 0 Exitways 0 0 0 & Stairs 0 0 0 Struct. Continue Function . 11 til +-' t: Q) +-' t: 0 u r-+.> n:: r-"C u u :::::1 Q) Q) . ..... 4-Q) +-' +.> c. z c ...... r-s... s... Q) 0 0. u ::c z 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 P.ank "" s... Q) :::::1 ru .0 Q) n:: +.> Vl s... u Q) Q) 0 . t: +-' Q) r-0 Q) :::::1 s... :::..:: > 0... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0\ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 r-n:: u . ..... +.> . ..... s... u 0 0 0 Q) s... :::::1 u Q) Vl 0 . i.n M

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SEISMIC DESIGN NOTES "DAMAGE AT TWO WINERIES DUE TO THE HT. DIABLO, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKE OF JANUARY 24, 1980 by Onder Kustu . URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers San Francisco, California A reconnaissance by an engineer from URS/John A. Blume & Associates, Engineers, on January 26, 1980, indicated that damage to storage tanks at the Wente Bros. Winery near Livermore, California, from the Ht. Diablo earthquake of . January 24, 1980, was of engineering significance. A survey team* was assembled, and this team visited the Concannon and Wente Bros. wineries on January 28, 1980. The team spent the next two days documenting the damage at the Wente Bros. Winery. ihe two wineries surveyed are located about three kilometers southeast of Livermore, and are one kilometer apart from each other. Each winery contains, in addition to buildings, one elevated water tank and a variety of cylindrical wine tanks. No damage to any structure was observed at the Con c annon Winery. Extensive damage was sustainedby the elevated water tank and the wine tanks at the Wente Bros. Winery, even though no damage to the buildings was observed. The elevated water tank at the Wente Bros. Winery has a capacity of 20,000 gallons. Total height to the top of the tank is about 85 feet. The tank is supported on four L6x6xi legs, whlch are connected with 3-inch-angle horizontal members and braced with l-inch-diameter diagonal :turnbuckle rods (Figure 1). The earthquake caused the two northern legs to buckle at the lowest two spans (Figure 2). There was evidence of upl ift .a.t . tlie two southern 1 egs : ' the base p 1 ate at the sou t he a s tern 1 eg had . shifted . .inward about 0.5 inch. An approximate analysis Indicated that a base shear coefficient of 35% would be necessary to cause the damage, neglecting the effect of vertical accelerations. 36

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:er tank was drained immediately following the first shock and was luring the aftershocks. At the time of this report, no estimate of 1a i r costs was ava i 1 ab 1 e. of 208 cylindrical steel tanks were surveyed at the Wente Bros. Thirty-one of these were small, fiberglass-lined steel tanks supon individual legs constructed of pipes. The remaining 177 tanks :ainless steel tanks with capacities ranging from 6,000 to 50,000 .• Some of these stainless steel tanks had cooling jackets consista belt of a second layer of steel wrapped around the shell with a between through which the coolant is cf rculated. . In addition, a of wood casks and barrels were surveyed, none of which was found to 1ged by the earthquake. lume survey team members: T. Allan Moore, Gerald W. Kralik, Charles D. !r, Peter I. Yanev, and Roger E. Scholl 1ical damage to the small, fiberglass-lined steel tanks was toppling tanks due to broken legs at the cast iron joints. However, no rup : the tanks or loss of their contents was observed. Damage to these lid not appear to be significant, and they could be easily repaired lified to withstand similar ground motion without damage. ;t extensive damage occurred to the stainless steel tanks (Figure 3). : anks are vertical cylinders made of 12-to 14-gage stainless steel The diameters vary from 6 to 22 feet with a height-to-diameter :HID) between 0.8 and 3.0. The tanks are seated on elevated concrete to 4 feet above the ground. The tops of the pads are sloped slightly litate drainage of the Most tanks are anchored to the con lads at two points at the high side of the pads, although a few are !d at six to eight points. the earthquake, 47 stainless steel tanks were empty or partially Forty of these suffered no damage or only minor damage from the earth Out of the 130 tanks that were completely full at the time of the ;hock, 10 suffered no damage and 24 suffered minor damage consisting ,r spalling of concrete, failed anchorage welds, or minor local buck-ling. Seventy tanks suffered a medium level of damage consisting of concrete spalling at the pads, failed anchorage welds and bolts, and some shell buckling with peak-to-peak buckle amplitudes of less than 2 inches. Twentysix of the tanks sustained damage considered to be severe. Most of the anchors for these tanks had failed, and the shells were buckled extensively with buckle amplitudes exceeding 2 inches peak to peak. Most of the severely damaged tanks had permanent overall deformations such as uplift at the base by as much as 3 inches and visible tilting from the vertical. Only one tank was reported to have ruptured at the base • A cursory study of the damage data indicates that the mode of failure or the pattern of damage was a function of the following factors: 1. Fullness or emptiness of tanks: Empty tanks suffered little or no damage. 2. Height-to-diameter ratio (H/0): The tanks with low values of H/0 (H/0 < 1.5) had predominantly amplitude "elephant foot11 buckles all around (Figure 4). The tanks with intermediate values of H/0 (1.5 H/0 2.0) exhibited varying patterns and combinations of diamond-shaped buckles (Figure 5) and elephant foot buckles. Tanks with high values of H/0 (H/0 > 2.or or no damage to the shell but had some failed anchorage welds or bolts. 3. Location of the cooling jackets: Where this extra sheet of steel was close to the bottom of the tank, there was no damage to the shell. Where the jacket was located 3 to 4 feet above the base, the major buckling occurred between the cooling jacket and the base. The other damage at the Wente Bros. Winery consisted of a few buckled, broken, or dislocated pipes; some damage to the catwalks around and above the tanks also occurred. The total dollar value of repairs to the wine tanks is estimated to be between $1 million and $1.5 mill ion, which is considered to be a small loss. A greater Joss would have been sustained if tank ruptures and complete loss of contents had occurred. 37

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FIGURE 5 TYPICAL DIAMOND-SHAPED BUCKLIHG PATIERN FIGURE 3 A GENERAL VIEW OF TANK DAMAGE AT WENTE BROS. WINERY

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PROJECT Mount Saint John Winery LOCATION Oakville, California APPLICABLE ZONING ORDINANCE G<>=....n-1 tJA.PA. Z!atoll.'-lGr • (":z.. . c:a:') APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE _ __.;.lc:f...:.....,_.;....CI\.:.,____,:!U.::.:. <=-=-::.....---ZONING CLASSIFICATION A. P ( FLOOR AREA RATIO/BUILDING SQ. FT. LIMITS 4oC?o s,.-n::, rr BUILDING HEIGHT LIMITS: BUILDING SET -BACK/YARD MINIMUM LOT SIZE REQUIREMENTS OFF-STREET PARKING REQUIREMENTS SCREENING/WALL HEIGHT REQUIREMENTS _ __;N_.V.=&;:a._ ____________ _ DRIVEWAY AND CURB CUT REQUIREMENTS __ FIRE ZONE DESIGNATION _..:3:::::;_ __ OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATI-ON OCCUPANCY SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS __ ..J __ :.A.Ih--..CC.=5,;;;;;..._ __ ._. -----------' CONSTRUCTION TYPE • EXTERIOR WALL FIRE RATINGS --------------_ EXTERIOR WALL OPENINGS LIMITATIONS .. ____________ • '---FLOORS FIRE ROOFS FIRE RATING __ -----------------STRUCTURAL FRAME FIRE RATING ---------------MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED MAXIMUM HEIGHT: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED __ ---------'"'--40 REFERENCE _, a.aAJ>A. <::::...ow..". w I PU.H'u.. M-T' . \C\1.. . .. .. . . .. .. .. ... .. ..

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NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIRED VAAl.!=? ) NUMBER OF STAIRS REQUIRED VA<\.l!6"'=> • • DOOR WIDTH REQUIREMENTS STAIR WIDTH REQUIRMENTS u:<; -n.\4t-l STAIRWAY LANDING REQUIRMENTS CORRIDOR WIDTH REQUIRMENTS t-aer 44'f\ TRAVEL DISTANCE LIMITS YA4 4r '-" tpA.. 4 RAMP REQUIREMENTS \l.c..... VERTICAL OPENtNG LIMITS AND FIRE RATINGS ( EX IT LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS MPo e o lT EMERGENCY LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS _ .. Ji?e!Q.....,...._p'---. --------CEILING HEIGHT MINIMUMS a.VA ( qrn..J6N'r '7 ..-r C-\...-.. fi'"''J MEZZANINE RESTRICTIONS "'l. !f: > '2..072 f:T'L 7 (eO' IN 1:Nl. t LIGHT AND VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS N/A ( J ROOF ACCESS REQUIREMENTS Ncrr a.a2o 4-PENTHOUSE LIMITATIONS M.r ""2.8. w SKYLIGHT REQUIREMENTS o...a FURNACE AND BOILER Roo-1 RESTRICTIONS CHIMNEY HEIGHT AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS ____ _ TOILET ROCt FIXTURE REQUIREMENTS \)p. SPRINKLER REQUIRMENTS DRY STANDPIPE REQU ___ _ WET STANO PIPE REQUIREMENTS Ill REFERENCE (q..,., u. b. c. . l71\ ,

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\DMINISTRAAMP ITHEATE FOOD PREP CONFERENCE 80TTLINr, CHEMlCAL MECHANICAL WORKSHOP riON & CTR OPERATIONS OPERATIONS FUff:LJ ROOM ' DINING I B-2 / _ -A-4 B. 2 A-3 .'8-4 8-4. \\H-:1, 8,-4 M-1 OCCUPANCY I I I-N I I -1 HR I ,I 7N !. I [;-N , I I-N .I I-N p-N IJ-"'l I[-N1 CONSTRUCTION TYPE I ' 1-HR l-HR 1-HR 1 •-HR 1-HR 1-HR AP[l\ SEP \ 12,000 , 13. 500 12,000 9,1 Od I 1"8,000 18,000 3,700 18,000 18,000 !1. ll"lWJI8LE AREA (Sn. FT .. , I UNDER.201 JNDER 20 I UNDER ; 0 I UNDER 5 1 UNDER 5 1 UNDER 5 1 UNOEP. _5 I UNDER 31 EXT 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 2.:.HR 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR JNOER 5 I UNDER 5 1 UNDER 5 1 UNQER" 5 I UNDER. 5 1 .: -OPENINt.S WT PERrUTD NOT PERMIH NOT PERMITD NOT NOT PERmTD UNDER 5 1 UN_f)ER UNOER 3 1 H'LDER 101 UNDER 10' NOT PERMIT[' NOT NOT 'ROTECT PROTECT. 2 STORY 1 STORY 1 STORY 1 STORY 2: STORY 2 STORY 1 STORY 2 STORY MAX Htif.HT I USE NON..li.B SOR-NOTES BENT Fl()OPS CODE CHECK SUMMARY 42

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.OMINISTRA-AMPITHEATEF PREP. UJ: BOHLIN\, C1;1EJ1I CAL P ! ION N 1-HR. N PHR 1-HR 1.-HP N 1.-HR N 1-HR DE CHECK NOTES: Chap. 33) & DININr, CENTER OPERATIONS OPERATIONS FUEL N N N N 2-HR N N N N 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 1-HR 2-HR N N N N N N N N Mezzanine requires two exits if larger than 2000 Sq. Ft. requires three exits if O.A. length more than 500 Ft. required width= O.A. lentth 50 inches) 43 I CAL vJORKSH()P RW1M N N STRUCTURAl. "4 N PARTITIONS 1-HD 1-HP SHAFT ENCLOSURES N N FLOORS N N POOF C ODE CHECK SUMMARY

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I 0 I I ill • I .. it I "" . ..... j I it 1 :: l s -e•._ , BARRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS 44

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4 5 BARRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS Parking and droo-offs Adequate area Special stalls with pedestrian access Access to building by level or ramped path Walks Continuous uninterrupted surface 48u minimum width 5 % maximum gradient on principle walks Curb cuts at streets, driveways, parking lots Ramps (exterior and interior) 8.33 % (1 :2) maximum gradient Level approaches and landings at 301 intervals Doors 3211 minimum width (clear opening) Vestibules with 61-611 separation between doors Corridors, Public Spaces, Work Areas Corridors 6011 Minimum width

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IRRIER-FREE DESIGN STANDARDS CONT. >rridors, Public Spaces, Work Areas Cont. !cessed doors when opening into corridors :airs width 1 maximum riser tndrai 1 s 3211 high, 1811 beyond top and bottom steps l evators :essible to each floor tb size minimum 6011x6011 or 6311x5611 >or clear oprni ng 3211 minimum >i 1 et Facilities inimum one (1) per sex per floor >mpartment 3611 x5611 with clear opening 3211 tll hung W.C., 2011 high 1 vatory with 2911 clear space underneath inal (where used) wall-mounted@ 1911 or@ floor level irrors, shelves, dispensers useable from lav. at 4011 maximum height inking Fountain inimum one per floor for handicapped IIC Drinking Fountain Cont. Wall-mounted, projecting basin at 3011 to 3611 height Alcove 6011 wide if used Public Telephones Minimum one (1) per bank accessible Dial, handset and coin slot maximum 4811 high Controls Alarms, switches, etc. maximum 4811 high

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2 '-0" -11"" HOI..OEI'I WIT 8TO1 Iii._ )( 8AT\ 1 '-0" ' • .... I " ELEVATION I "X"A8 OlltEAT A8 1"0881e1..1:1 ... .. UBL..IC TOIL..ETa T'l:. \.. ... l ! li ' w 0 0 .' i "" odt to;lft Dll for ito all public toolft r-..s. SUII to bt flrthen from toilet room ..nr-. Urir\alt 1fteV be floor Otwell mountld will\ projKtoon ol 1 ' e from _,, eriC! lip It 1 ' I " Mlooe floor . UriNI flull'l •live ........ of 4 ' 0" ..... floor • . +--.------, i l ' ID ' " ' .I ;, 0 .... I " ELEVATION L.AVATO .. IEa b ' D .. INKINO NOTE• (TOWEl.. OO&I"ENaE:IIt D I . I " ' ;, If r-=-d unit in alcove . control eriC! JlpOUI lftould projct m inimum o f 2 " beyond ldj.c:en t MilL Controlt end tpOUI It front of unit, end ... ter lftoul d IPOUI per1llel to front f-. l'row ode hand onl y or N!. cHoot control.

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,. ......... NOTE: Avoicl r8fn01 of IIOIIible . f
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LATCH a HANCl..E DOOI't8 a MAROWAA NOTE, "'ANIC aAI't Prowodt 32 " wodtn w+.n door is It toO. ,.,.., aoor sw• "91 to oen into larger IOICft. Auai lll'y door hlndlt 7 •• from edp IS lhown •s r .c:omrntneled . ?< k"'b P\ttght lnd IUxilery door hlf"ldle ,jht ,.... •mum J6 . Floor should be lewet on ucn side of door for d •II....U of 5 0 from coer i n oifecttOn 11 IW • "91 3 ' 0 " from door t n •t ,_,,.. HlrCiw..,e odtnUIICitfor bhnd -intepll or _.,.eo tutur.O turf-u shown ...... AUXIL.IA .,_V 000"' II'UI..L I. I' • 8" NON-a>le , without grut d i'lculty ll'od Steps nottd .s ICctptlblt Qll be uSIId wtth minimum d i fficulty by the M>ovt mentJOn.o iftdjyil
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51 GLOSSARY OF TERMS Chai: Wine shed. Cuve: Fermenting Vat. Finished Wine: Wine after its last fermentation. Heat Summation: The total number of degrees of average daily temperature over 50 f (10 c) for each day of the growing season. A heat summation of 1800 is necessary for successful growth. Lees: sediment Maitre de Chai: Cellarmaster Must: Unfermented grape juice or crushed grapes. Racking: Seperation of the supernatant wine from the lees. Remontage: Maintainace of the floating cap of skins on fermenting red juice by spraying with juice pumped from the bottom of the vat .

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PROJECT CALENDAR PROJECT Mount Saint John Winery, Oakville, California M 0 NT H ,4, K• !'ii'r YEAR ljb\ SUN . MON . TUES. .WED. THURS . FRI. SAT. "F\g,sr T::A."-1 c:r:

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PROJECT CALENDAR Mount Sai n t John Winery, Oak v ille, California YEAR IC\bt SUN . MON . TUES. .WED. THURS . FRI. SAT. ' 2 -4-s k.CPt....\ L..AI-ll:> \...Af.lt:> \ "01111 t-7 1!:> 9 IC) I l 1'2,_ &..At"::c>A.. OAC.\l\AM R:%>srt4iJ . lXXJJMaJT: ,..,_ 15 \(.. 1/ \4 MA'n:::)'U.6l..S o-r 2.o '2.1 2Z... "24 2".5 Zl-}.. . '5\c,NAC/L-27 '2b 30

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PROJECT CALENDAR PROJECT Mount Saint John Winery, Oakville, California YEAR SUN . MON. TUES . .WED. THURS . FRI. SAT. I '2. '3 4 115 t_ I b 9 'C) c.oNc.s.::ns l\ 1"2.. ':!oo 1'5 lc.-,, roce-10c.A'.,;:... I F'oQ...J\1\ le, l<\ 2.0 '2-7.. :u.. "2,7 -2.& -z::t AA..:nc.UI.Ar . I

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PROJECT CALENDAR Mount Saint John Winery, Oakville, California YEAR SUN . MON . .TUES . .WED. THURS . FRI. SAT. I "t... -+ a::::. G.::t 7 a:. ., 10 I\ ''-\4 AL ea..!>\1 t...-\'5 ''-l"7 20 "'2..1 f'uJA.U'"L'-,::,alA.L,.\ bJ' Ltlot t..S <.r Dt:9
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PROJECT CALENDAR PROJECT Mount Saint John Winery, Oakville, California MONTH Dsx :M!"-*-& Y EAR ---SUN . MON. TUES. WED. THURS. FRI. SAT. \ "'1.. '3 4.\:-s t. "7 & q lO l\ 1"2. 14\-IS I(. ' .

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.. .., CREDITS ADVISORY CONSULTANTS PRETHESIS Instructor Eugene Benda, Professor University of Colorado Edward Jereb, Architect A.I.A. 1228 15th Street Suite 205 Denver, Colorado 80202 Gail Gunter, Landscape Architect University of Colorado Remote Advisors Joseph Phelps Joseph Phelps Vineyards 200 Taplin Road St. Helena, California 94574 Frederick L. Clark, J.D,, P.E. Hinery Engineer Robert Mandavi Winery Oakville, California 94562 John Picchi, Architect 2975 West Steele Lane Santa Rosa, California 95401

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Credits Continued: Edward Church Consulting Geological Engineer E.O. Church, Inc. 925 East 17th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80202 58

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59 BIBLIOGRAPHY Amerine, M.A. ,Ph.D, M.V. Cruess, The Technology of Winemaking The AVI Publishing Co. 1980 Balzer, Robert C., Wines of California Abrams NY 1978 Editors, Lane Publishers, California Wine Country Palo Alto, CA 1979 Botsai, Elmer E. FAIA, et al, Architects and Earthquakes AlA Research Corp. Wash. D.C. 1975 Goers, Ralph W., P.E., Cost Impact Analysis, A Methodology for Seismic Design and Construction of Single Fami 1 y Owe 11 i ngs U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Wash. D.C. 1978 Kennett, Earle W., Seismic Design for Police and Fire Stations AlA Research Corp. Wash. D.C. References The New Encyclopaedia Britanica Vol. 19 William Benton Publishers 1974

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References Continued: Uniform Building Code 1979 Edition International Conference of Building Officials Whittier, Ca 1 iforni a Winter, George, Arthur Nilson Design of Concrete Structures McG raw-Hill NY,NY 1979 Magazines Wines and Vines Magazine May 1980 Statistical Issue Wines and Vines Magazine April 1974 Dr. Richard G. Peterson, 11An Expert Plans the Premium Winery11 AlA Journal July 1980 Stanley Abercrombie, AlA 11Workplaces: Assemblyline Arch itecture11 Architectural Record April 1979 Building Types Study William Marlin 11Heavy Duty Delights11 Vancouver Calendar Magazine August 1980 Ted Stres h insky, 11Vintage California11 Sunset Magazine December 1980 11Wine Growing Accelerates11 Mainliner Magazine January 1981 Grover Sales, 11Keeping it in the Family, The Mirassous11 60 Napa County Ordinance Number 511 Zoning Ordinance, Chapt.l&2 Section 1 U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Standard 29 CFR 196 Revised Nov. 7, 1978 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Site Planning for Solar Development, American Planning Association Contract HUD-PDR-481 1979

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4. _,. j j ......... ,._

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u!j"C t7S' j ... -. f[jli . . t r:l -r1 .__l_r:

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••• ,'I' --Fl---:1 ----""':::::: ' ,...,..,... q •• ' "'J ..;;::'I

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.. .. .. .. "-::: .. ... ---.. .. .. ... • • _ .. _ .. .... _ .. -........ .. __ ... .. •

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Mount Saint John Wtnery Statement of Client Philosophy The client for Mount Saint John Winery? a member of a famtly long associated with wine and the Napa Valley regton1 desires to develop a winery on a 1 JlOO acre site tn the valley, The client desires the archttecture of MSJW to be reflecttve of both the tradition of the age-old process of the wine makers art, and the latest developments in todays scientific approach to wine making, The clients winery will incorporate niques which have Been develooed bv wine makers which enable the wine industry to ; ncrease production capabil Hi'es whtl e continuing to mai ntain and improve the quality of their wi ne, A quantity and quality demanded by a growing and increasingly sophisticated consumer market, The client required that his winery be flexible, handling a variety of grapes and process them into different kinds of wine. Such a winery can then adapt to the changing tastes of consumers as well as new developments in the wine processing technology. The winery is to be planned around a given amount of vineyard with no allowance for expansion beyond that limit, This condition is preferable for a premium winery, such as MSJW, because of grape quality and control considerations. The client desires that his winery operate efficiently. To be efficient it must have the longest possible wine making season, using it's presses and fermenting vats continually from the arrival of the first grapes in the early autumn to the late arrivals, just after the first frost. This distribution of ripening times can be accomplished by selecting those varieties of grapes that exhibit differing ripening characteristics and meet maketina considerations as well. The winery general plan will be designed to provide all the functions necessary for vineyard operations, wine making, and distribution. Alaigned with these functions, the client desires that the winery feature a banquet/meeting room, an ampitheater, and a tourist capability as marketing and product promotional functions of the program. The tourism operation, a guided walking tour of the operation functioning year-round, is considered fundamental, by' the client as a marketing strategy. The tourist experience should be informative and relaxed, reflective:oLtbe:rtch_tradition of wine maRtng symbology and imagry and an exposure to modern wine making promoting h?spitalitt toward the Vlsttor wh1le estab1lshtng a h1erarchy of publ1c and pr1vate space$', Tbe client desires that the archttects formal response address the the tnfluence of the Caltfornian architectural heritage and context as a place where the old and new merge, Tne c1 ient desires a winery that wi'll to enhance the natura 1 process of w tne making through architectural technologies, He wishes to promote his winery as a showplace for energy conservation and environmental concern , The wtnery is also a workplace and the client desires that the de sign respond well to the spectfic sociologtcal? psychological, and environmental needs of workers. Natural daylighting should be tncorporated t nto the building design,

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A Wine Making Primer 1 . The HarvesJ.:: Grapes are ripened on the vine. Grape clusters are cut, or shaken by mechanical harvesters, from the vines. Special support systems necessary: None 2. Crushing Harvested grapes are transported to the winery by gondola truck where they are weighed and dumped into a sump, to be conveyed to the crusher-destemmer. From the crusher, the broken grapes and juice, called must, are pumped pipes to the winery. Red wine must goes directly to fermentation vats, where the skins give up some of their color to the wine. White grapes may be pressed to separate the skins from the juice before fermentation. Special support systems necessary: Pumps and high pressure hot water foi sanitation. 3. Fermentation The stainless steel fermentation vats allow the fermentation from sugar to alcohol. This process takes from 10 to 30 days. Constant temperature and relative humidity are maintained to promote the growth of desirable yeasts. Generally, the optimum temperature is about 77 degrees F. Heat buildup due to the process is controlled by jacketed vats cooled by refrigeration. The fermentation process is artificially stopped by rapid reduction of the vat temperature when desired balance of alcohol to sugar is attained in the wine. Some red wines require a secondary fermentation process, which is artificially induced in the wine by raising its temperature from a chilled 55 degrees F to 70 degrees F. During fermentation, red wines also require maintenance of skin caps which develop at the top of the vat. This requires cycling pumps that drain wine from the bottom of the tank for spray ing over the cap. Contact with the air during fermentation is and all must be kept full. 4. Aging Aging is employed to remove undesirable qualities f r o m wines. Aging tim es vary, with reds aging for up to 28 m onths in oaken barrels. Certain whites are aged to enhance their varietal characteristics. Fume Blanc and Chardonnay wines a g e for 10 months in Franch oaken barrels. Johannisburg Riesling is aged in German oak casks. Aging must take place under controlled temperatures, generally 55 degrees F. Special support systems necessary: Refrigerated or cooled space, pumping. 5. Bottling Bottling of the finished wine is by a bottling line, which can process up to 52 bottles a minute. The new bottles arrive in new cases, are cleaned, filled, labled, and repacked into the same cases. Cases are then stacked on pallets, ready for shipping. Special support systems necessary: Cooled space, hot water for sanitation. 6. Shipping The shipping and rece1v1ng department truck s for wine distribution and incoming equipment and supplies . Special support systems necessary: None. 7. Laboratory Wine making, today, combines traditional methods with m odern technology. An enology staff, aided by a process control com puter, monitors and conditions the wine during process ing. The computer provides a means of following the tem pera t ure and density history of the wine, generates status re ports, controls winery environmental conditions, and handles busi ness related processing. Special support systems necessary: Temperature control. 8. Offices Offices, reception and tasting roo m s comprise business and visitor operations . • __ L ___ -------T

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