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Dia de LaRaza : Hispanic influence in the New World

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Title:
Dia de LaRaza : Hispanic influence in the New World
Series Title:
This week in history
Creator:
Castro, Richard T.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Richard T. Castron
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
This Week In History
"Dia De LaRaza: Hispanic Influence In The New World"
by
Richard Castro
On the first week of August in 1492, Christopher Columbus struck sail from Palos, Spain in search of a Western passage to the Indies.
His flagship was the Santa Maria and she was accompanied by two sister ships the Nina and the Pinta. The Nina was commanded by Vicente Yanez Pinzon and the Pinta was commanded by his brother, Martin Alonzo Pinzon.
The expedition was funded by Queen Isabella of Spain, and in fact, all
aspects were Spanish in origin including the crew.
Two months later after a difficult journey, he touched land after crossing the Atlantic Ocean at an island he named "San Salvador" (The
Savior). Columbus, through his expedition introduced Hispania to the ,
New World.
i
It is for this reason that Spain, Mexico, Central and Latin *v
i
America observe October 12th as "Dia de LaRaza" (Day of the Race) in j
their countries. This is the same day we observe as Columbus Day in the United States.
I
By "race" Hispanics do not mean any pseudoscientific nonsense involving "pure" blood nor do they intend to express any feelings of innate superiority over other peoples. On the contrary, Dia de LaRaza is a
•celebration of the extension of Spanish culture to the New World and the mixture of the many people which have enriched our culture. For Hispanics trace their roots to many different sources.
At the dawn of history, Spain was inhabited by wild Iberian
tribes that were most probably of Celtic origin and related to the people


2
of prehistoric France. There is evidence of earlier races inhabiting the peninsula, going back to Stone Age times. But the Celts conquered or destroyed them. As the crossroads between Europe, the Mediterranean, and North Africa, Spain was the natural focal point for a mixture of peoples - and it is from this mixture that today's Spaniard descends.
The first non-Iberians to arrive in Spain were the Phoenicians. These hardy sea merchants whose homeland was the coast of what is now Israel opened several trading stations on the Spanish coast near the sites of such present-day cities as Cadiz and Valencia. They traded Egyptian, Greek and North African goods for Iberian fruits, grain, and olive oil. But, the Phoenicians were not conquerors. They did not attempt to penetrate very far into the interior of Spain. They fought the Iberians when they had to, taught them something about the ancient civilization for the Near East, and, presumably, intermarried with them.
After the Phoenicians came their inheritors, the Carthaginians of North Africa. The Carthaginians were colonists and conquerors. They fought their way into the interior of Spain, wiping out the Iberian tribes that resisted, founding such cities as Barcelona, and settling down to mix with the native population. When Carthage went to war against Rome, her armies included regiments of Iberian infantry and Belearic stone slingers. The great Hannibal himself is said to have been born in Spain. But Carthage lost her struggle with Rome and lost her Spanish colonies in the process.
The conquering Romans came to stay. They succeeded in subduing almost the entire Iberian Peninsula and successfully colonized the interior as well as the coastal regions. They brought with them


3
aqueducts, Roman law, arenas, roads, and the Latin language, which was to develop into modern Spanish. Roman rule lasted for six hundred years in Spain and so thoroughly Romanized did the country become that, in
the latter years of the Roman Empire, several of its emperors were Spanish-
born.
The fall of Rome brought Vandals and then Visigoth "barbarians" to Spain. The conquering Visigoths, like others who had come to plunder, stayed to become civilized. They settled down and established petty kingdoms throughout the peninsula adopting Christianity in the process and intermarrying freely with the native population. Blue-eyed, fair-haired Spaniards are not such a rarity (especially in the north) as is often
supposed. They testify to the centuries-long rule of the Visigothic
(Germanic) tribes.
One of the deepest impacts upon the Spanish ethnic heritage, and the one that sets off today's Spaniard from other Europeans, was made by the Moors. Crossing the Straits of Gibraltar in A.D. 711, the Moors, a tribe of North African warriors, carried the holy war of Mohammedanism into Spain. They conquered all but the northern sections of the peninsula. The reconquest of Spain by the Christian Kingdoms of the north took seven hundred years. And all during that time, especially in the relatively
secure southern sections of the country, the Moors were mixing, with the local population and establishing Europe's greatest medieval civilization. The olive-skinned, dark-haired people of southern Spain renowned for their grace and beauty, are the ethnic descendents of the long Moorish rule.
To this mixture must be added the contribution of those Spaniards who sought their fortune in the New World, and married into various Indian tribes forming the mestizo of today.


4
Governor Roy Romer will soon be appointing a Quincentennial Commission to plan for the 500th Anniversary of the Christopher Columbus voyage to the New World. This celebration offers a very real opportunity to witness a rebirth of the rich Hispanic culture that was brought to the New World through Columbus' voyages. Hispanics should be appointed to this commission to ensure that the Quincentennial has the broadest representation in its festivities.


This 1493 Woodcut Shows Columbus Reaching The New World


Full Text

PAGE 1

This Week In History "Dia De LaRaza: Hispanic Influence In The New World" by Richard Castro On the first week of August in 1492, Christopher Columbus struck sail from Palos, Spain in search of a Western passage to the Indies. His flagship was the Santa Maria and she was accompanied by two sister ships the Nina and the Pinta. The Nina was commanded by Vicente Yanez Pinzon and the Pinta was commanded by his brother, Martin Alonzo Pinzon. The expedition was funded by Queen Isabella of Spain, and in fact, all aspects were Spanish in origin including the crew. Two months. later after a difficult journey, he touched land after crossing the Atlantic Ocean at an island he named "San Salvador" (The Savior). Columbus, through his expedition introduced Hispania to the New World. . ' It is for this reason that Spain, Mexico, Central and Latin " Arnerica observe October l.lth as 11Dia de LaRaza" (Day of the Race) in J their countries. This is the same day we observe as Columbus Day in the United States. I By 11 race" Hispanics do not mean any pseudoscientific nonsense involving "pure" blood nor do they intend to express any feelings .of innate superiority over other peoples. On the contrary, Dia de LaRaza is a celebration of the extension of Spanish culture to the New World and the mixture of the many people which have enriched our culture. For Hispanics trace their roots to many different sources. At the dawn of history, Spain was inhabited by wild Iberian tribes that were most probably of Celtic origin and related to the people

PAGE 2

2 of prehistoric France. There is evidence of earlier races inhabiting the peninsula, going back to Stone Age times. But the Celts conquered or destroyed them. As the crossroads between Europe, the Mediterranean, and North Africa, Spain was the natural focal point for a mixture of peoples and it is from this mixture that today's Spaniard descends. The first non-1 berians to arrive in Spain were the Phoenicians. These hardy sea merchants whose homeland was the coast of what is now Israel opened several trading stations on the Spanish coast near sites of such present-day cities as Cadiz and Valencia. They traded Egyptian, Greek and North African goods for Iberian fruits, grain, and olive oil. But, th. e Phoenicians were not conquerors. They did not attempt to penetrate very far irito the interior of Spain. They fought the Iberians when they had to, taught them something about the ancient civilization for the Near East, and, presumably, intermarried with them. After the Phoenicians came their inheritors, the Carthaginians of North Africa. The Carthaginians were colonists and conquerors. They fought their way into the interior of Spain, wiping out the Iberian tribes that resisted, founding such cities as Barcelona, and settling qown to mix with the native population. When Carthage went to war against Rome, her armies included regiments of Iberian infantry and Belearic stone slingers. The great Hannibal himself is said to have been born in Spain. But Carthage lost her struggle with Rome and lost her Spanish colonies in the process. The conquering Romans came to stay. They succeeded in subduing almost the the interior as well entire Iberian Peninsula and successfully colonized as the coastal regions. They brought with them

PAGE 3

3 aqueducts, Roman law, arenas, roads, and the Latin language, which was to develop into modern Spanish. Roman rule lasted for six hundred years in Spain and so thoroughly Romanized did the country become that, in the latter years of the Roman Empire, several of its emperors were Spanishborn. The fall of Rome Vandals and then Visigoth "barbarians" to Spain. The conquering Visigoths, like others who had come to plunder, stayed to become civilized. They settled down and established petty kingdoms throughout the peninsula adopting Christianity in the process and intermarrying freely with the native population. Blue-eyed, fair-haired Spanrards are not such a rarity (especially in the north) as is often supposed. They testify to the centuries-long rule of the Visigothic (Germanic) tribes. One of the deepest impacts upon the Spanish ethnic heritage, and the one that sets off today•s Spaniard from other Europeans, was made by the Moors. Crossing the Straits of Gibraltar in A.D. 711, the Moors, a tribe of North African wa;riors, carried the holy war of Mohammedanism into Spain. They conquered all but the northern sections of the_ peninsula. The reconquest of Spain by the Christian Kingdoms of the north took seven hundred years. And all during that time, especially in the relatively secure southern sections of the country, the Moors were mixing. with the local population and establishing Europe's greatest medieval civilization. The olive-skinned, dark-haired people of southern Spain renowned for their grace and beauty, are the ethnic descendents of the long Moorish rule. To this mixture must be added the contribution of those Spaniards. who sought. their fortune. in the New World, and married into various Indian tribes forming the mestizo of today.

PAGE 4

4 Governor Roy Romer will soon be appointing a Quincentennial Commission to plan for the SOOth Anniversary of the Christopher Columbus voyage to the New World. This celebration offers a very real opportunity to witness a rebirth of the rich Hispanic culture that was brought to the New World through Columbus• voyages. Hispanics should be appointed to this commission to ensure that the Quincentennial has the broadest representation in its festivities.

PAGE 5

This 1493 Woodcut Shows Columbus Reaching The New Wnrlrl