Citation
Los ninos, the Battl of Chapultepec Castle

Material Information

Title:
Los ninos, the Battl of Chapultepec Castle
Series Title:
This week in history
Creator:
Castro, Richard T.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Richard T. Castron
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
This Week In History
Los Ninos, The Battle of Chapultepec Castle
by
Richard Castro
At eight o'clock on the morning of September 13, 1847, General Winfield Scott's U.S. troops began the assault on Chapultepec Castle, a military school, outside Mexico City. This battle brought to an end, a two year war that the United States waged against Mexico.
Chapultepec was the last stronghold of Mexico during the Mexican War of 1846-1848. Within the castle walls the military academy cadets, in gray uniforms and blue tasseled caps, fought valiantly by the side of their older commanders. Los Nifios - the boys - they were called, but it was a man's part they played that day.
Some of the most notable names of these young heroes are forever
stamped upon Mexico's soul and their statues honor the Mexican soil. To
this day Mexican hearts are moved at the mention of such names as Vicente
/
Suarez, Francisco Escutia, Juan de la Barrera, Agustin Melgar, Fernando
/
Montes de Oca, Francisco Marquez - all young children who gave their very lives as they rose to their country's defense.
During the last hours of the terrible war only a handful of student cadets at the military school stood between the freedom of Mexico and its capital, and the conquering generals, Zachary Taylor, Scott, Worth, Pillow, and Quitman.


2
The man in charge of Mexico's army and her defense, General Santa Anna, was already beating a fast retreat out of the country. The freedom of Mexico was left in the hands of children who none the less grew overnight to become Mexico's most valiant knights whose heroism was to have no equal.
Vitto Alessio Robles, Mexican historian tells an account involving General Worth: "It is said that when General Worth saw the young Agustin Melgar
fall under the great numbers of American soldiers whom he (Melgar) had tried to drive back single-handedly, Worth approached the terribly wounded boy, kissed his forehead, and ordered that the youth be given medical attention. Moments after, the heroic child died."
The love of a country was heroically given new meaning and dimension
/
by the incredible act of Mexico's youngest patriot - Vincente Suarez. The name is now a fountain of inspiration across the face of the Americas.
/
Nephtali De Leon, in his oook, "Chicanos Our Backgound And Our Price" writes, "On that tragic day that was to be crowned with glory - September 13, 1847, Vicente Suarez knew that defeat was inevitable, but neither he
nor his fellow students ever thought of surrendering. But was Suarez going to allow the conquering Americans to trample all over the banner of his battalion - the beloved banner of Saint Bias? When the Americans had killed nearly all the young students, and the battle was lost for Los Ninos Heroes, Vicente Suarez took hold of his battalion's banner, the beloved banner of Saint Bias, wrapped it around his body, and before the astonished Americans could desecrate banner or boy, Vicente Suarez dived from the high walls of the castle. His body crashed against the rocky crags at the foot of the strong
walls."


3
Thus closed the chapter on the history of Mexico and its war with the United States. Even before the war was over some Americans in Congress were talking about taking "all of Mexico." The New York Herald was to say: "It is a part of our "Manifest Destiny" to civilize that beautiful country...."
After the war the United States took from Mexico an area as large as England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Spain, Portugal and Germany, all placed together. Seven American states were carved out of the land taken from Mexico. The states are California, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Texas, Nevada and Utah.
Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote: "The United States shall conquer Mexico,
but it will be as the man swallows the arsenic, which brings him down in turn. Mexico will poison us."
I say that today, 140 years after the Mexican War, we (Hispanics) will not poison - as long as we ha\ e an opportunity to cure.


A modern Mexican artist has tried to re-create the death of Cadet Vincente Sua-
rez, one of the bravest of Los Ninos, who defended his sentry post at the tower stairway of Chapultepec gallantly to the very last.


Full Text

PAGE 1

This Week In History Los Ninos, The Battle of Chapultepec Castle by Richard Castro At eight o'clock on the morning of SeptePJber 13, 184 7, General Scott's U.S. troops began tl1e assault on Chapultepec Castle, a military school, outside Mexico City. This battle brought to an end, a two year war that the United States waged against Mexico. Chapultepec was the last stronghold of Mexico during the Mexican War of 1846-1848. Within the castle walls the military academy cadets, in gray uniforms and blue tasseled caps, fought valiantly by th. e side of their older commanders. Los Nii'ios -the boys -they were called, but it was a man's part they played that day. Some of the most notable names of these young heroes are forever stamped upon Mexico's soul and their statues honor the Mexican soil. To this day Mexican hearts are moved at the mention of such names as Vicente ; Suarez, Francisco Escutia, Juan de la Barrera, Agustin Melgar, Fernando / Montes de Oca, Francisco Marquez -all young children who gave their very lives as they rose to their country's defense. During the last hours of the terrible war only a handful of student cadets at the military school stood between the freedom of Mexico and its capital, and the conquering generals, Zachary Taylor, Scott, Worth, Pillow, and Quitman.

PAGE 2

2 The man in charge of Mexico's army and her defense, General Santa Anna, was already beating a fast retreat out of the country. The freedom of Mexico was left in the hands of children who none the less grew overnight to become Mexico's most valiant knights whose heroism was to have no equal. Vitto Alessio Robles, Mexican historian tells an account involving General Worth: I "It is said that when General Worth saw the young Agustin Melgar fall under the great numbers of American soldiers whom he (Melgar) had tried to drive back single-handedly, Worth approached the terribly wounded boy, kissed his forehead, and ordered that the youth be given medical attention. Moments after, the heroic child died. 11 The love of a country was heroically given new meaning and dimension / by the incredible act of Mexico's youngest patriot Vincente Suarez. The name is now a fountain of inspiration across the face of the Americas. / Nephtali De Leon, in h1s oook, 11 Ch1canos Our Backgound And Our Price" writes, "On that tragic day that was to be crowned with glory September 13, 184 7, Vicente Suarez knew that defeat was inevitable, but neither he nor his fellow students ever thought of surrendering. But was going to allow the conquering Americans to trample all over the banner of his battalion the beloved banner of Saint Blas? When the Americans had killed nearly all the young students, and the battle was lost for Los Ninos Heroes, Vicente took hold of his battalion's banner, the beloved banner of Saint Blas, wrapped it around his body, and before the astonished Americans could desecrate banner or boy, Vicente dived from the high walls of the castle. His body crashed against the rocky crags at the foot of the strong walls."

PAGE 3

3 Thus closed the chapter on the history of Mexico and its war with the United States. Even before the war was over some Americans in Congress were talking about taking "all of Mexico. 11 The New York Herald was to say: "It is a part of our "Manifest Destiny" to civilize that beautiful country .... 11 After the war the United States took from Mexico an area as large as England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Spain, Portugal and Germany, all placed together. Mexico. Seven American states were carved out of the land taken from The states are California, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Texas, Nevada and Utah. Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote: "The United States shall conquer Mexico, but it will be as the man swallows the arsenic, which brings him down in turn. Mexico will poison us. 11 I say that today, 140 years after the Mexican War, we (Hispanics) will :..1ot poison -a3 long as we ha\ e an opportunity to Gure.

PAGE 4

A modern M exic an artist has tried to r e cre ate._. the d e ath of Cad e t Vincente SuA::'""" rez , on e of th e brav est of Los Nifios, who d e fend e d his sentry post at the towe r stair [::T way of Chapult e p e c gallantly to the very last .