Citation
Alaska's inside passage : a kayaking marine atlas from Ketchikan to Glacier Bay

Material Information

Title:
Alaska's inside passage : a kayaking marine atlas from Ketchikan to Glacier Bay
Creator:
Steger, Andrew
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Notes

Abstract:
The Inside Passage along the Pacific coast of Southeast Alaska is considered by many to be the premiere kayaking route in North America. It winds its way between islands in sheltered waters, and many alternate routes are available. It is a dream of many kayakers, including myself. To date however, the marine maps along the route have catered solely to motorized craft. This presents an issue to human-powered touring, as the concerns, variables, daily distances, and even route are different. This project aims to create an atlas that caters to the kayaker’s needs, and collects information that was previously obtained from multiple disjointed sources into a single resource. It is my hope that I can use this atlas for my own expedition planned for the summer of 2021.
General Note:
Final project for GEOG 5091: Open Source Software for Geospatial Applications

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University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright Andrew Steger. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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University of Colorado Denver

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Full Text
Alaska’s Inside Passage: A Kayaking Marine Atlas from
Ketchikan to Glacier Bay
Andrew Steger
University of Colorado Denver GEOG5091


2
Abstract
The Inside Passage along the Pacific coast of Southeast Alaska is considered by many to be the premiere kayaking route in North America. It winds its way between islands in sheltered waters, and many alternate routes are available. It is a dream of many kayakers, including myself. To date however, the marine maps along the route have catered solely to motorized craft. This presents an issue to human-powered touring, as the concerns, variables, daily distances, and even route are different. This project aims to create an atlas that caters to the kayaker’s needs, and collects information that was previously obtained from multiple disjointed sources into a single resource. It is my hope that I can use this atlas for my own expedition planned for the summer of 2021.
Goal and Purpose
The overall goal of the project is to create an atlas that includes all the data required to safely paddle from Ketchikan to Glacier Bay, Alaska. It is not to provide a narrative of past expeditions, a natural history of the area, or a how-to guide to paddling. Only information relevant to travel in the area is included.
The primary difficulty in creating a kayaker’s atlas of the Inside Passage was determining what information is needed and displaying it in an efficient manner. The needs of human-powered travel are much different than the needs of motorized craft. Additionally, the atlas needed to be sufficient for the entire length of the route, a 25-30 day paddle for most people. Never having completed the route myself, it was difficult to understand what information the kayaker would need or want to have. Unfortunately, there is no single definitive resource or guidebook on paddling the Inside Passage, so I compiled two books, as well as online information, to understand the required information. The two books were Alone in the Passage: An Explorers Guide to Sea Kayaking the Inside Passage by Denis Dwyer and Kayaking the Inside Passage by Robert H, Miller. With these resources, I determined that I needed a map with the minimum information:
1) A very detailed outline of the coastline
2) A line denoting the route and any alternate routes
3) The names and locations of prominent points and islands along the route
4) The locations of campsites and potential campsites
5) The locations of rivers and other potential sources of freshwater
6) The locations and links to tidal measurements
7) The locations and links to tidal current measurements
8) Topography of the coastline to aid in navigation
9) Land ownership
10) Locations of cities
11) Warnings of any particularly hazardous areas, why they are hazardous, and strategies for mitigating the hazards
12) Other important information that is best represented in narrative form.


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Data Sources and Software
This project used QGIS Desktop 3.4.1. This is free and open source software. Several plugins were added to increase functionality.
The first step in finding data was determining the scale at which the data needed to be displayed. As the terrain is very complicated, most sources recommended using a map at a scale of at least 1:250,000 to kayak the Inside Passage (Miller, 2018). As such, I used that as a baseline, and began the search for data that would show sufficient detail at that scale.
Fortunately, the data that I was able to obtain showed accuracy well beyond that scale, and I was able to make 1:100,000 maps instead. My maps included 13 layers that I imported from the web, and six that I created myself. Below is a summary of the data sources that I imported from the internet. I will describe the cartographic methods performed on and with these layers later in the write-up.
1) Alaska Boundary: http://gina.alaska.edu/catalogs/417-alaska-coastline-l-63-360 I used this to show the detailed coastline. It is a large file created by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources in 1998 used for small-scale mapping at 1:63,360.
2) Cities: http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#7
This is data from the Alaska Department of Natural Resources used to show the locations of cities in Alaska. The locations were entered by latitude-longitude, as well as digitized fromUSGS 1:250,000 quadrangle maps.
3) Place Names: http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#2921
These are point files containing the names of points, islands, capes, mountains, etc. from the Alaska Department of Natural Resources that I used for labeling geographic features. According to the metadata on the website, “The usgsname coverage was generated from the latitude, longitude coordinates provided by USGS. These locations reflect the coordinates and names cited in the Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. The date of the Dictionary is 1967, while it was automated in more recent years. These are points only, with corresponding attributes. Note, the names of these locations have been automated into Arc/Info annotation in a separate coverage,” (Alaska Department of Natural Resources, 1967).
4) Hydrology: http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#121
Again, this is data from the Alaska Department of Natural Resources used for mapping stream and lake locations at 1:63,360 scale. According to the metadata on the website, “DNR, LRIS, GIS Services Unit (SGU) maintains a hydrography coverage consisting of data that was digitized by SGU staff, primarily from 1:63,360 USGS quadrangles photo-revised by BLM from aerial high altitude photography flown between 1978-1985. In addition, data from other sources was digitized or obtained in digital format if BLM data was not available,” (Alaska Department of Natural Resources, 2007).
5) Towns: http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/# 14
Similar to the cities data, this data was from AK Department of Natural Resources. The metadata explains that “locations of statewide towns and villages were entered by latitude-longitude, digitized fromUSGS 1:250,000 quadrangle maps, and heads-up


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digitizing from USGS 1:250,000 maps based on relative positioning of hydrography and township lines,” (Alaska Department of Natural Resources, 1998).
6) Marine Highway Route: http ://www.asgdc. state. ak.us/#74
The AK Marine Highway is a system of ferries for transportation to and from towns and cities. This is vector data from 1995 produced by the AK Department of Natural Resources to be used for creating a standard map rendition.
7) Mv Adec Contingency Plan: http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#54
This is a file by the AK Department of Natural Resources that divides the state into 10 separate regions. It is used for small scale mapping, but I used it primarily to clip features to just southeast Alaska.
8) 60mDTMHillshade: https://elevation.alaska.gOv/#56.39566:-134.39575:6
This data was provided by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys.
The 60m resolution helped with adding contrast to the cartography of physical features.
9) DEM’s for Canada and Alaska: http://www.diva-gis.org/gdata
This data is used for small scale overview maps of the region. It is created by Robert Hijmans of DIVA-GIS.
10) Forest Service Boundaries:
https://data.fs. usda.gov/geodata/edw/datasets. php?xmlKeyword=surface This data was created by the USDA Forest Service. According to its metadata it was made “to allow national forest system boundary managers to query and report on the status of these boundaries for planning boundary management and maintenance work, and to provide this information to anyone else needing this information for analysis, querying, reporting, mapping. The lines should indicate the current status of the physical marked and posted lines in the field, and their maintenance status,” (USDA Forest Service, 2019).
11) USFS Contour Lines:
https://data.fs. usda.gov/geodata/edw/datasets. php?xmlKeyword=contour
These are contour lines created for mapping at the 1:63,360 scale by the National Forest
Service. The data were published on March 20, 2019.
12) USGS Contour Lines : https://viewer.nationalmap.gOv/basic/#productSearch Like the USFS Contours, these were created for large scale mapping. They were particularly useful for the Glacier Bay Region.
One of the challenges of the project, but also what made it unique, was integrating data from the two kayaking books into the map. This proved difficult, as converting the written information into data that could be used in a GIS was time consuming. Below are the data sources that I created myself.
1) Campsites from the Dwyer book: Thankfully Denis Dwyer had taken the locations of his campsites on his GPS. These coordinates were given in the back of his book. I manually entered the coordinates into an Excel file, converting from degrees/minutes into decimal degrees along the way. I then saved the file as a CSV, and added the layer into QGIS as a “Delimited Text Layer.”


5
2)
3)
4)
5)
Campsites from the Miller Book: Miller did not give the exact coordinates in his book, so I created them in QGIS as a point layer. I had to use context clues via the narrative to find the correct locations, which are likely not as accurate as the Dwyer ones.
Warning Areas: I used the narrative in both the Dwyer and Miller books to create a point layer in QGIS denoting areas of particular concern. This also required using context clues to find the correct locations. For the attributes, I included writing on why they were concerning areas and how to mitigate the hazards.
Tide and Tidal Current Locations: After reading the Miller and Dwyer guides several times, it became apparent where a paddler had to be particularly concerned about tides and rips. Using this information, I went to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website to find stations corresponding to these locations. The tidal predictions may be found here:
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html?gid=1391, and the tidal current predictions may be found here:
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Stations?g=693. Both websites give the latitude and longitude of each station. Once I found the appropriate stations, I again manually entered the coordinates into Excel, saved them as a CSV, and imported them as Delimited Text Layers. The following shows a screenshot of the process:
Q Data Source Manager | Delimited Text
Delimited Text
Fite name E:\OpenSourcedS\Aleska\PhysKalFeatures\Tidal CurrentsCSV.es*
Layer name Tidal CurrentsCSV ▼ r «e runui
♦ CSV (comma separated values) Regular expression delimiter Custom delimiters
Encoding UTF-8
â–º Record and Fields Options â–¼ Geometry Definition
® Point coordinates X field LONG
G Well known text (WKT) Y field LAT
No geometry (attribute only table) QMS coordinates
Geometry CRS EPSG:4326 - WGS 84
â–º Layer Settings Sample Data
Name 10 LAT LONG -
1 E of Ketchikan Airport (150 1 55.3541 -131.6997 httpsy/tidesandcu
2 Ship Island 2 55.6 -132.25 httpsy/tidesarvdcu -
« ►
dose
Add
Help
Kayak Path: I made a line layer denoting the kayaking route, and alternate routes, using the descriptions in both books. I read the descriptions and used them to trace a correct path using QGIS.


6
Methods Employed
The first step in the process was manipulating the files to select only the relevant information. A large portion of the cartography relied upon making the map look svelte at large scales (small areas). Thankfully, the alaska boundary layer was very detailed and made this a possibility. In order to reduce the sizes of the files however, it became necessary to clip the data to just the southeastern part of the state. I used the mv_adec_contingency_plan_py layer as a clip layer for most of my other layers. To do this, I selected just the southeastern region from this layer, exported it into its own layer, and used it as a clip layer on the others. If the cartography required a layer to be even more detailed, I used the clipped version (aka. Southeast Alaska only) of the alaska boundary layer as a clip layer. Unfortunately, with all of the small islands, this process would take the computer upwards of 15 hours to process for each layer that needed to be clipped. I would let the function run overnight.
Many layers also required that I only represented a portion of the layer. For the hydrologic features for example, I removed any ones with the “watertype” equal to “s” to get rid of the unnecessary lines in the ocean. The contours proved difficult in this regard as well. For the Glacier Bay region. I needed several files from the USGS database. I merged these files into a single one, and selected only every other contour in order to keep the symbology clean. Similarly, for the other areas along the route, the USFS contour data was used. In order to select only a portion of these contours, I used the code: "ELEVATION" LIKE '%000' OR "ELEVATION" LIKE '%200' OR “ELEVATION" LIKE '%400' OR “ELEVATION" LIKE '%600' OR “ELEVATION" LIKE '%800'.
The second step in the process was to manipulate the symbology. One of the more tedious parts in the process was the symbology for the capes, bays, and canals. The USGS place names layer was a file that had point layers for every named geographic feature in Alaska. Since it wasn’t divided up by prominence or land feature, I had to create separate layers based on what feature it was naming; and then hand select what I believed to be the most important features. Once I did this, I selected even more prominent features from these layers to make 3 additional files. I then symbolized these 6 layers, adjusting the size and type of the font. The more prominent features had a larger font; and the land layers were colored black (with a white outline) and a Javanese Text font, while hydrologic features were colored blue with a Monotype Corsiva font. I moved and rotated these labels as needed to help fit all of the information onto the map.
For the land, the DTM hillshade layer provided a good initial visual of surface features. I added contrast by using a shapeburst fill from green to white on the Alaska boundary layer, and then duplicated this layer (with a transparent fill and dark black outline). I adjusted the opacity of the Alaska boundary layers so that the hillshade showed through. For the ocean, I used an inverted polygons technique on the Alaska boundary layer, and had it fade from white to blue. This provided helpful for several reasons. The first is that there is a white halo around very small islands that helps make them visible. The second is that it makes the shoreline stand out, as there is more contrast between the black outline and white in the ocean, as opposed to black against blue.


7
For the towns, I made the size rule based so that towns with larger populations would show up as a larger font than the smaller ones. For this, I made the big labels have the rule of “POP” > 905, medium labels “POP” > 700 AND “POP” < 906”, and small labels “POP” <701. To the rules, I added a clause that would make only the largest cities appear at small scales. I also used this “size strategy” for other point features, including campsites. Since the Dwyer campsites were verified via a GPS locator, I made them larger than the Miller campsites to draw attention to them. I also applied draw effects (a drop shadow and glow) to make them stand out even more. The contours required rule based labeling as well for the symbology. I made the 1000’ contours darker and slightly thicker to make them stand out. This screenshot shows the SQL used to create this effect.
Representing the non-USFS land proved difficult. There were already multiple layers over the land at this point, and adding another shaded layer would’ve made the map look cluttered. Therefore, I chose to use a dotted pattern to represent this private land. It had the effect that you could see it if you were specifically looking for it, but it wouldn’t make the map look overly chaotic.
Certain features required more advanced symbology. When I created the route line, I clicked on many points and QGIS created a line connecting them. In order to keep the line from looking choppy, I needed to use the generalize function. This smoothed out the line into curves rather than sharp turns.


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I also used more advanced symbology when creating markers for the warnings, tides, and tidal currents layers. The tides symbol consisted of layering 3 concentric circles on top of each other. Their blue pattern gives the impression of water receding, similar to dirt rings when emptying a bathtub. The warning symbol (an exclamation point) required importing an SVG image; and the tidal currents symbol went one step further in layering an SVG image of a wave (with an outer glow) on top of another marker.
The final step in the map design was to create the layout for the maps. This was best done creating each individual map by hand, rather than using the atlas feature in QGIS. This was to cut back on the number of pages in the atlas, as each page will need to be laminated and then carried for the duration of the kayaking journey. As space in the kayak itself is limited, it is a goal to get as much information into a small amount of page space as possible. It also enabled placing the scale bar, key, and north arrow in varied locations depending on where the most important content in the map was located on the page. It was also easier to do each map individually, as I needed to include attribute tables for important information (such as campsite coordinates, warning locations and information, and tide and tidal current resources). These tables were large, and I needed to include only features that were included in any given map. Below demonstrates how this was done for the GPS-located campsites.
Layout Item Properties Guides Atlas
Item Properties & X
Attribute table â–¼ Main Properties
Source Layer features v
Layer Campsites DwyerCSV v
Refresh Table Data Attributes...
â–¼ Feature Filtering
Maximum rows 130
O Remove duplicate rows from table
0 Show only features visible within a map
Linked map Map 1
[ Show only features intersecting atlas feature
â–¡ Filter with
â–¼ Appearance
1 1 Show empty rows
Cell margins 11.00 mm *


9
When creating the layout, I made sure that the maps were at a 1:100,000 scale; and I used EPSG 32068 as UTM is what the USGS uses for their 1:100,000 navigational maps. I used a portrait layout, as it would fit better on the bow of the kayak underneath the mesh strings. I included a key that used a white, opaque background that made its contents stand out, but also allowed a user to see the map below if needed. I also included a grid showing the coordinates for these maps. A line was drawn every 0.02 degrees latitude and 0.03 degrees longitude. This is a smaller interval than normal, but suits modern kayak navigation well. It is common for kayakers to carry a handheld GPS, and having a grid with squares approximately 1 square mile in area will make the map easy to correlate with in-the-field GPS information. I made the lines white and adjusted the opacity so that the grid did not obstruct the rest of the map. Below shows how the grid was created.
Layout Item Properties Guides Atlas
Item Properties & X
4*1 Map Grid Properties
â–¼ Appearance A
Grid type Sold V
CRS EPSG:4326
Interval units Map unit 3
[x 0.030000000000 €3
Interval
|y 0.020000000000 aJ
[x 0.000000000000 : |
Offset
[y 0.000000000000 Id
Line style -
Blend mode Normal 3
â–¼ Frame
Frame style No frame 3
Frame sze 2.00 mm :
The overview maps required a different strategy. The goal was to show the route, both in its complete form and in smaller sections, to aid in choosing one of the smaller maps on route. This required a smaller scale map, and I used 1:700,000 for the majority of them. In order to make the map look less cluttered, I omitted the contour layer, as well as warning, tides, tidal currents, water labels, land ownership, hydrology, and grid lines. In their place, I added another layer using the USGS place names for larger features (like large islands), as well as the marine highway route (which is important in expedition planning for the beginning and conclusion of the journey). Keeping the hillshade layer and inverted polygons ocean layer added needed contrast, and the routes layer looked nice at this scale too with an added drop shadow. Since these maps are to be used for more general purposes, the route specific information was also left out, and the maps could be made much larger on the page.
Results, Summary, and Conclusions
The goal of this atlas was to cater to the modern kayaker’s needs. These maps do this well by choosing which information to include and leave out. Most marine charts have contours denoting water depth. While this is important for large vessels that may scrape the ocean floor in shallow water, they are of no use to the kayaker that sits only feet below the water’s surface.


10
Instead, it is much more important for a kayaker to have detailed information of the shoreline, which is needed for navigation, finding campsites and water, and dealing with locals. The decision to omit bathometric data and include detailed topographic information (contours, hillshades, hydrology, and land ownership) helps to attain this goal. Their symbologic decisions further aid in this process. By having a detailed black outline of the shoreline, the map reader is able to make out small deviations in the shoreline. Paired with an inverted polygons gradient for the ocean (with a white color near the shore), this shoreline becomes even easier to discern.
Using a white dotted symbology for non-USFS land helps the kayaker to make decisions as to where it is appropriate to land, or even camp in an emergency; and does so without disrupting the color scheme of the shoreline. Many marine charts also have a compass rose that denotes magnetic declination. While declination is large in southeast Alaska, 18 degrees (“Magnetic Declination,” 2018), most kayakers choose to forgo accounting for it using a compass in the field. It is difficult; and it is much easier nowadays to use a GPS for navigation. Therefore, in place of the declination symbol, I chose to add detailed gridlines showing latitude and longitude and intervals of 0.02 and 0.03 degrees respectively. This will make it easy for a kayaker to place themselves within a quarter of a mile knowing simply their GPS location.
This map also contains tidal and tidal current information that is not normally included in a marine atlas used for mechanized craft. Engine-powered vessels do not normally have to worry about slow moving currents; but to a kayaker, these currents can be the difference between moving forward vs. moving backward. The tidal information is also more important to a kayaker as kayakers are more likely to land on difficult beaches in between campsites. While a motorized craft would simply take a break on the water, the kayaker needs to know the tide as it relates to the ease or difficulty of landing at unconventional take-outs.
When including information important to kayak navigation, I also made the informed decision to include a substantial amount of space (about a quarter of the map space) to include information that would not display well in the map itself. These include websites, warnings, and, most importantly, narrative of the day’s paddle. This information is arguably what sets the atlas apart the most. For example, knowing that Dry Strait is buggy and requires passage on the upper half of a rising tide will prepare a kayaker to leave Wrangell three hours before high tide with head nets accessible.
It is of my opinion that, for these reasons, this atlas meets its goal of serving a kayaker’s needs on the Inside Passage. I feel confident using them for my own expedition, which is the ultimate test of their usefulness. They provide the information needed to safely and successfully navigate this stretch of water. Cartographically, the maps are legible, have great visual contrast, and suitable figure-ground organization. The maps are well balanced overall, although this had to take a backseat on some of the maps where the route was erratic. It also has appropriate hierarchical organization, with the route and campsites taking priority, and land ownership in the background.
Further Research


11
These maps will need to be updated periodically, and at shorter intervals than in the contiguous United States. Alaska is a very geologically active area, thus stream locations, campsites, and shorelines can potentially change very quickly and drastically. In Glacier Bay for instance, the glaciers have retreated 65 miles since 1750 (National Parks Service Department of the Interior, 2017). With the weight of the main glacier gone, the land is rebounding upwards at rates up to 32 mm/yr. (Motyka, Larsen, Freymueller, & Echelmeyer, 2007). This will require a updating the coastline polygon, as channels will disappear and islands converge. When this happens, the hydrology will change, and therefore the campsites and other data will also need to be updated. The Beardslee Islands should be updated first, as this is where these changes are occurring most rapidly.
References
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (2007). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse: Hydrography 63,360. Retrieved from http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#121
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1998). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse: Cities. Retrieved from http ://www.asgdc. state. ak.us/#7
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1998). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse: Populated Places. Retrieved from http ://www.asgdc. state, ak.us/# 14
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1996). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse:
ADEC Contingency Planning Regions. Retrieved from http ://www.asgdc. state. ak.us/#54
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1995). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse: Alaska Marine Highway Routes. Retrieved from http ://www.asgdc. state. ak.us/#74
Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1967). AK State Geo-Spatial Data Clearinghouse: USGS Place Names. Retrieved from http://www.asgdc.state.ak.us/#7
Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, (n.d.). DGGS Elevation Portal. Retrieved May 6, 2019, from https://elevation.alaska.gOv/#56.39566:-134.39575:6
Diva-GIS. (n.d.). Download Data by Country. Retrieved May 6, 2019, from http://www.diva-gis.org/gdata
Dwyer, D. (2013). Alone in the Passage: An Explorers Guide to Sea Kayaking the Inside Passage. Denis Dwyer.
GINA: Alaska Department of Natural Resources. (1998). Alaska Coastline 1:63,360. Retrieved from http://gina.alaska.edu/catalogs/417-alaska-coastline-1-63-360
Magnetic Declination in Juneau, USA. (2018). Retrieved May 7, 2019, from http://www.magnetic-declination.com/USA/Juneau/2723723.html
Miller, R. H. (2018). KAYAKING THE INSIDE PASSAGE: A paddlers guide from olympia, Washington, to muir glacier, alaska. Place of publication not identified: W W NORTON.


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Motyka, R., Larsen, C., Freymueller, J., & Echelmeyer, K. (2007). Post Little Ice Age Rebound in the Glacier Bay Region. Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 57-59. Retrieved May 7, 2019, from
https://www.nps.gov/glba/learn/nature/upload/Motyka_etal2007_PostLittleIceAgeRebou
nd.pdf.
National Parks Service Department of the Interior. (2017). Glacier Bay's Glacial History. Retrieved May 7, 2019, from https://www.nps.gov/glba/learn/nature/glacier-bay-s-glacial-history.htm
USDA Forest Service. (2019). Survey Boundaries maintained by the US Forest Service.
Retrieved from https://data.fs.usda.gov/geodata/edw/datasets.php?xmlKeyword=surface
USDA Forest Service. (2019). FSTopo ContourFSAK Line. Retrieved from
https://data.fs. usda.gov/geodata/edw/datasets. php?xmlKeyword=contour
USGS. (n.d.). TNM Download. Retrieved May 6, 2019, from https://viewer.nationalmap.gOv/basic/#productSearch


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-131.85 -131.82 -131.79 -131.76 -131.73 -131.70 -131.67 -131.64 -131.61 -131.58
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
E of Ketchikan Airport (151) 55.3541 -131.6997 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0711_12
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Ketchikan 55.3318 -131.6262 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9450460
The Eagle View Hostel in Ketchikan has laundry. The Ketchikan post office is near the marina. You can fill water at the Bar Harbor Office. The paddle from Ketchikan to Pt. Higgins is 10 miles. The current in the Tongass Narrows flows north on a rising tide, so launch after the tide has reached a minimum. Just past Ward Cove is Totem Bight State Historic Park, a good stop with totems. For camping, a black gravel beach goes to sites in the forest at Point Higgins and is accessible at all tide levels.
Camp Lat Long
Ketchikan-Bar Harbor 55.35157 -131.6838
Ketchikan 55.34352 -131.6477
Point Higgins 55.45832 -131.8307


O Tide Measurement Locations
H
Campsites
I) GPS Located Campsites , ^2 Ti&dPCurrent Measurement Locations
Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Tal;oosh Poi
iTatoc’sh ^Islands
kGaamanq5 Point
-132.09 -132.06 -132.03 -132.00 -131.97 -131.94 -131.91 -131.88 -131.85 -131.82
Camp Lat Long
Island off Caamano Point 55.50457 -131.9579
Point Higgins 55.45832 -131.8307
Niblack Point 55.54778 -132.0974
In the middle of Clarence Strait (SW of Caamano Pt), spring tides can attain 4 knots, but summertime seas are usually calm. It is 6 miles from Point Higgins to Caamano Point across the Behm Canal. The island NE of Caamano Point has a gravel beach that is great for landing at any tides. No signs of water on the island. The shoreline NW of Caamano Point has many gravel beaches and possible camping.
55.46 55.48 55.50 55.52 55.54 55.56 55.58 55.60 55.62


O Tide Measurement Locations # Campsites A GPS Located Campsites
JTI ££ Tidal Current Me^swre^Tet^o^Wdm.
« ^ Warnings
Non-USFS Land
Three Islands]
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Niblack Point
-132.36 -132.33 -132.30 -132.27 -132.24 -132.21 -132.18 -132.15 -132.12 -132.09
Camp Lat Long
Niblack Point 55.54778 -132.0974
Name ID LAT LONG WEBSITE
Ship Island 2 55.6 -132.25 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3021_l
It is about 25 miles from Caamano Point to Meyers Chuck.


lasterly Island
â– Petersen
Eagle Island
Mlxen ^ Pointy^\
^Onslow Point
Sunshine Island
JJnion Point
'Magnetic Point
Vnion Hay
o Tide Measurement Locations • Campsites 4 j GPS Located Campsites
■Misery Island’
____________________________\
Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/K Warnings Non-USFS Land Route
— Main Route • • Alternate Routes
Three Islands
LD
go
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-132.33 -132.30 -132.27 -132.24 -132.21 -132.18 -132.15 -132.12 -132.09 -132.06
Camp Lat Long
Alaska Mainland-Meyers Chuck 55.73977 -132.2555
What Notes
Camping Restrictions Ask a local where to camp.
At Meyers Chuck, dock at the pier and ask a local where you can quietly put your tent. Cell service is likely here, and you may be able to fill water from a municipal water source. There is also a community bulletin board at the dock. There might be camping in Union Bay. If crossing directly, Union Bay is 4.5 miles long and Vixen Inlet is 5 miles long.


E'dd Island
Island
Nililack Islands
Sound
‘Ernest
Point Pet1
Brownson Peak
O Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
j^| GPS Located Campsites
4(2 Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/i\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route Alternate Routes
Easterly Island
â–  It J
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Niblack Islands 56.0333 -132.0833 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3056_l
Camp Lat Long
Change Island 55.97443 -132.0086
Change Island 55.97442 -132.0086
What Notes
Camping Restrictions Kwakiutl land; Permission required to camp.
Wildlife Warning High bear population. Anan Creek Bear Observatory is about 15 miles north.
At Watkins Point, an alternate route diverges up Wrangell Island's east side towards to Anan Creek bear observatory. Deer Island is Kwakiutl land, so you need permission to camp. A phone number is posted on a sign. Change Island is 24 miles from Myers Chuck. Camping is on the W side of the island and there is a small notch and a great place to land. Cell
phone reception is likely here.
55.90 55.92 55.94 55.95 55.98 56.00 56.02 56.04 56.06



O Tide Measurement Locations
A Campsites
% GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Q? 'Zimovia’lslel.s
- Point ‘Warde
\Wf '

Thoms Point
h/-
Founddsland
( Kuakan Point
Ec^Ld^sland
rsj
fN
LD
Ln
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fN
LD
Ln
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1—1
CD
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LD
Ln
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Ln
-132.24 -132.21 -132.18 -132.15 -132.12 -132.09 -132.06 -132.03 -132.00 -131.97
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Thoms Point 56.1183 -132.078 https://tidesandcurrents. noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions. html?id=9450970
There are many possible campsites in Zimovia Strait. Tidal current run around 1.5 knots here. A creek flows into the drying flats at Thoms Place.


o Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
ft GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land Route
— Main Route • • Alternate Routes

emo
Anita Poinij
'^Islands

rZimovia'IsletsIl
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-132.48 -132.45 -132.42 -132.39 -132.36 -132.33 -132.30 -132.27 -132.24 -132.21 -132.18
Camp Lat Long
Turn Island 56.23817 -132.3381
The Narrows is the last dependable camping before Wrangell. Turn Island is 27 miles from Change Island and 19 miles from Wrangell. On Turn Island, there is a small gravel beach next to a grassy area for camping. There is no water source or cell phone signal.


O Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
Babbler/Point
Point Highfield
Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warptpgs Non-USFS Land
iWranqell
Point Shekesti
Route
Cemetery Point
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Woronkofski Point
T^l---1
lOlCtllU

-132.54 -132.51 -132.48 -132.45 -132.42 -132.39 -132.36 -132.33 -132.30 -132.27
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Wrangell Harbor, 1.6 mi W 56.4667 -132.45 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3131_l
Camp Lat Long
Wrangell Harbor 56.4665 -132.3828
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Wrangell 56.47 -132.387 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9451204
There is an RV and tent campground at Shoemaker Bay, about 5 miles from Wrangell. At Wrangell, the city dock has kayak parking, but there is no parking at the ferry dock (a little farther). To stretch the legs, hike up Mt. Dewey in Wrangell. The library can be used to connect to the internet.
56.34 56.36 56.38 56.40 56.42 56.44 56.46 56.48 56.5C


O Tide Measurement Locations 4 Campsites U GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/K Warnings Non-USFS Land
Summit Island
Route
Main Route
I mere
Alternate Routes
11V 'V\\v.
Kadin'Island1
Sokolof Island
Point Highfield
.Yank Island
Wrangell
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Wrangell 56.47 -132.387 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9451204
Dry Straight 56.615 -132.575 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9451301
Camp Lat Long
Wrangell Harbor 56.4665 -132.3828
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Blaquiere Point, 1 mi SSW 56.55 -132.5667 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3681_l
Wrangell Harbor, 1.6 mi W 56.4667 -132.45 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3131_l
What Notes
Tidal Currents Ebbs can attain 5 knots around Blaquiere Point
Tides Dry straight mostly dries at low water. Be at the middle of Dry Straight at high tide, and then use the ebbing tide of Fredrick Sound to travel north.
Attempt passage through Dry Strait on the upper half of a rising tide (3-4 hours before high tide from Wrangell). Make sure you are past all the shallow spots before high tide. Dry Strait is notoriously buggy.


O Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land Route
— Main Route
Alternate Routes
Pocket Island'
Hidden-Island-
.Cosmos Point
-132.81 -132.78 -132.75 -132.72 -132.69 -132.66 -132.63 -132.60 -132.57 -132.54
Camp Lat Long
Mitkof Island-Crab Pot 56.68037 -132.6654
Mitkof Island 56.71957 -132.7424
Past Dry Strait into Frederick Sound, currents can reach 2 knots. Many campink opportunities exist on Mitkof Island's east coast. A few miles N of Pocket Island is Le Conte Bay; and 10 miles into the bay is where North America's southernmost tidewater glacier is located. Crab Pot is a great, scenic campsite with an easy beach for landing and a creek for water.
Wrangell to Crab Pot is 22 miles.
56.64 56.66 56.68 56.70 56.72 56.74 56.76 56.78 56.80


o Tide Measurement Locations
m Campsites
ft GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/l\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
•Point Agassiz
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Sukoi Islets
McDonald Islands]
Sasby. Island
• JrLo riilCd lif f's“

•Frederi ck Point
Camp Lat Long
Petersburg Harbor 56.81315 -132.9593
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Wrangell Narrows (off Petersburg) 56.815 -132.9628 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0103_8
Petersburg is small but busy. Make lodging arrangements ahead of time. The Waterfront Bed and Breakfast has a kayak launch adjacent to it at the dry dock (ask permission). The harbor is busy, so call the harbormaster on Channel 16 with a VHF 30+ minutes before you arrive, then switch to Channel 9 for a mooring assignment. The harbor phone number is 907-772-4688. Currents only reach 2 knots N of Petersburg and diminish the further NW you go. A rising tide creates
opposing currents here.


O Tide Measurement Locations
# Campsites
^GPS Located Campsites
^2 Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/i\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route Alternate R<
Vandeput, Point
•Ruth Island
^WoodPSit
Camp Lat Long
Alaska Mainland-Wood Point 56.99258 -132.9496
NW of Thomas Bay 57.05723 -133.0181
What Notes
Tidal Currents Rips form off Point Vandeput. Skirt it widely.
Weather Pacific storms can create large waves here. Paddle defensively.
Camping is possible at a number of spots along Thomas Bay. It is 12 miles from Petersburg to Wood Point. It is 7 miles further to the camp north of Point Vandeput. The Wood Point camp requires a long carry during low tide. There is no cell cervice at Wood Point. There is a small creek on the Thomas Bay side of the camp. A falling tide produces a NW flowing current in Frederick Sound that helps push paddlers toward Read Island.
56.94 56.96 56.98 57.00 57.02 57.04 57.06 57.08 57.10 57.12


rf^m.
South Jinn
Re£.d Island
Grand Point
O Tide Measurement Locations
# Campsites
#1 GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
Boulder Point
Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes

00
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-133.41 -133.38 -133.35 -133.32 -133.29 -133.26 -133.23 -133.20 -133.17 -133.14 -133.11
id What Notes
Weather Pacific storms can create large waves here. Paddle defensively.
Camp Lat Long
Read Island 57.1038 -133.194
The distance from Wood Point to Read Island is about 16 miles. The next known campsite further along is 19 miles past Read Island down the coast at Cape Fanshaw. The gravel beach on Read Island offers good camping and easy landing, though there is no known water source or cell service. Again, a falling tide will push paddlers NW.


O Tide Measurement Locations m Campsites
Robert Island?
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS
Route
Main Route
^McNairy Point
Alternate Routes
1 {Whitney Island
.'Fanshaw
o
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LO
CD
fN
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LO
o
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-133.65 -133.62 -133.59 -133.56 -133.53 -133.50 -133.47 -133.44 -133.41 -133.38 -133.35
Camp Lat Long
Cape Fanshaw 57.186 -133.5724
Whitney Island 57.22558 -133.5322
What Notes
Tidal Currents Turbulent water extends 600+ yards off of Cape Fanshaw. Give it a wide berth.
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
The Five Fingers 57.2663 -133.6035 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0503_17
Both Frederick Sound and Stephens Passage (the large passage N of Cape Fanshaw) tend to have morning fog. Stephens Passage tends to have currents between 0.5 and 2 knots. The route up the mainland coast is less dangerous (but not without risk). It is 19 miles from Read Island to Cape Fanshaw. The campsite at Cape Fanshaw is very nice and easy to land at, though be very wary of turbulent water. There is a small creek in the woods on the N side of the beach for drinking water, but there is no cell phone service. Many people kayak on the E side of Whitney Island through the
Cleveland Passage.


o Tide Measurement Locations
# Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
Main Route
Alternate Routes
The Twins'
Entrance Island
Point Hobart
Walter Island
Rob. 3rt Islands'
-133.56 -133.53 -133.50 -133.47 -133.44 -133.41 -133.38 -133.35 -133.32 -133.29 -133.26
Camp Lat Long
Island in Hobart Bay 57.42768 -133.467
Hobart Bay 57.42717 -133.452
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Hobart Bay 57.4067 -133.42 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9451851
If doing an open water crossing across Port Houghton, it is 3.8 miles. It is 22 miles from Cape Fanshaw to the island in Hobart Bay. The Island has a small flowing creek, and there is a beach on the W side of the island that is often good for
spotting humpback whales.
57.30 57.32 57.34 57.36 57.38 57.40 57.42 57.44 57.46 57.48


Point'iJookout;
Dry (Bax
Windham, Point
O Tide Measurement Locations • Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
42 Tidal Current Measurement
Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Route
/"^Sunset Isla id
Main Route
Alternate Routes
There are many possible campsites along the mainland coast east of Sunset Island. Windham Bay is steep except for the islets at the mouth. The crossing of Windhap Bay is only 2 miles. The coast north of Windham Point is steep with few campsites before Dry Bay. The camp in Dry Bay is difficult to reach at low tide.


Midway HJ- J
Islands
Wm£
Harbor Island/
Round Islet
O Tide Measurement Locations # Campsites
\Wood Spit
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
^r
00
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-133.80 -133.77 -133.74 -133.71 -133.68 -133.65 -133.62 -133.59 -133.56 -133.53
Camp Lat Long
Alaska Mainland-Sand Bay 57.67808 -133.6618
What
Notes
Tidal Currents
Strong tidal currents north of Wood Spit. Cross at dead slack only.
Tidal Currents
Strong tidal currents NE of Harbor Island. Cross at dead slack only.
Tidal Currents.
Tidal currents exist south of Harbor Island, but are weaker than further east. Cross at slack.
Tidal Currents
Strong tidal currents S of Coke Pit. Timing during slack is crucial.
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Point Astley, NE of (33') 57.73 -133.6312 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0811_14
Tracy Arm Bar (32') 57.7797 -133.6322 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0307_18
Point Coke, SE of (33') 57.776 -133.6497 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0810_14
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Holkham Bay, Tracy Arm Entrance 57.76 -133.603 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452067
The landing at Sand Bay is easiest at high tide and there is no water or cell service. Tidal currents often reach 4 knots in Holkam Bay and icebergs are present. Cruise ships may travel through here. For the 1st Crossing (Endicott Arm) crossing from Point Astley to Harbor Island is longer but more forgiving with currents. The 2nd Crossing north (Tracy Arm) is more critical, so cross right at slack. Don't cross in fog. In case of an emergency, there is a ranger station on an island at 57.75825 N x 133.6117 W.


Sentinel Point
ieman’
O Tide Measurement Locations # Campsites
A| GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current ^
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
JVl id way Islands
What Notes
Tidal Currents Rips possible at the entrance of Port Snettisham.
Camp Lat Long
Alaska Mainland-Point Anmer 57.93223 -133.8452
Shettisham Peninsula's west coast has haul-out spots and water in places, even though it is long and steep. It is 23 miles from Sand Bay to Point Anmer. There is water at the campsite at Point Anmer and no cell service. There are possible tide rips at the entrance to Port Snettisham, but they are often not observed.


Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
Ai GPS Located Campsites
PoinFSalisbury
Tidal Current Measurement Locations
Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
•False Arden
unit -rtj'uen
.Grand Island
Stocks *de; Point
Camp Lat Long
Alaska Mainland-Taku Inlet 58.17672 -134.066
What Notes
Tidal Currents Tidal currents at the head of the Taku Inlet reach a maximum of 4 knots during spring tides.
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Point Arden 58.15 -134.1333 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=PCT3876_l
Point Salisbury, W of (21') 58.2092 -134.2497 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0805_16
It can be difficult to find a spot to camp at Taku Harbor. At Taku Inlet, a good campsite is located where the powerline descends to cross the inlet. There is water here. Currents are of no particular concern in the Gastineau Channel until you are close to Juneau. The geolocated campsite is on a beach 24 miles from Point Amner on a gravel beach. Landing is easy and there is no cell service. No water at the camp, but grab some at a stream just south before landing.


O Tide Measurement Locations
€ Campsites
ft GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
Warnings
Route
Juneau
Main Route
Alternate Routes
’Point Salisbury
Ion Point
-False Arclen'
r uml Arden
-134.46 -134.43 -134.40 -134.37
-134.34 -134.31 -134.28 -134.25 -134.22 -134.19 -134.16
Camp Lat Long
Juneau-Aurora Harbor 58.30475 -134.4327
NAME ID LAT LONG WEBSITE
Juneau 13 58.2983 -134.412 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa. gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452210
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Point Salisbury, W of (21’) 58.2092 -134.2497 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0805_16
Juneau Harbor, N of (10') 58.2964 -134.4247 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0801_8
Cruise Ships use Gastineau Channel. It is very busy with traffic, so approach up the west side of the Channel and cross over to Juneau under the bridge. Dock at the Harris/Aurora Basin Harbor.
What Notes
Tidal Currents Tidal currents can become strong close to Juneau.
58.16 58.18 58.20 58.22 58.24 58.26 58.28 58.30 58.32 58.34


\\<\\ll
O Tide Measurement Locations • Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Jlutie Bay
[an Island
Spiihn Island
'Juneau
-134.70 -134.67 -134.64 -134.61 -134.58 -134.55 -134.52 -134.49 -134.46 -134.43 -134.40
What Notes
Tidal Currents Tidal currents can become strong close to Juneau.
Tides The Mendenhall Bar dries at low tides. Leave Juneau on a flooding tide, an hour or two after low tide. Actual tide levels are often lower than predicted, but any tide above 10' will work.
NAME
Juneau
Auke Bay
LAT
58.2983
58.3817
LONG
-134.412
-134.645
WEBSITE
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452210
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452263
Camp Lat Long
Juneau-Aurora Harbor 58.30475 -134.4327
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Juneau Harbor, N of (10') 58.2964 -134.4247 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0801_8
The Mendenhall Bar deepwater channel marked well and maps can be found at the harbormaster's office. Wait up to 3 hours after low tide to launch.
58.28 58.30 58.32 58.34 58.36 58.38 58.40 58.42 58.44 58.4


Island
O Tide Measurement Locations # Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
& Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings Non-USFS Land Route
Hump Island
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Aaron Island
Shelter Island
Retreat
Point Lena
>ariow Islands
"Xuke Cape
Barlow Point
Point Louisa
FalseuAunt Retreat
Coghlan Island
Portland Is land
-134.97 -134.94 -134.91 -134.88 -134.85 -134.82 -134.79 -134.76 -134.73 -134.70 -134.67
Camp Lat Long NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Auke Bay Campground 58.37767 -134.7245 Lincoln Island 58.4983 -134.965 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452336
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Saginaw Channel, 2 mi E of Pt. Retreat 58.405 -134.885 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0818_8
What Notes
Wildlife Warning Humpback whales common. Watch out for bubble-net feeding.
Tidal Currents Currents off Barlow Point can attain 2 knots and may be tricky.
Camping Restrictions 10-20' cliffs. Shelf camping only until Funter Bay.
The geolocated campsite is Auke Village, a USFS campground. Launching and landing is easy, and there is cell service, but there is a use fee. There is a lighthouse at the northern tip of Admiralty Island at Point Retreat. If you can't find shelf camping, you can camp at Funter Bay (5 miles off route) which is further south.
58.32 58.34 58.36 58.38 58.40 58.42 58.44 58.46 58.48 58.50


•iziyy/^m
O Tide Measurement Locations • Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/l\ Warnings Non-USFS Land
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
Howard, Point
Couverden Re ck
Ansley Island'
Couverden Island
Entrance Island
"''Point Couverden
Rockwlslarid
-135.27 -135.24 -135.21 -135.18 -135.15 -135.12 -135.09 -135.06 -135.03 -135.00 -134.97
What Notes
Tides NW of Ansley Island dries at low tides. Portage required.
The crossing of the Lynn Canal is only 3 miles and currents are rarely over 1 knot. Nevertheless a camp along the ledge is ideal for an early morning crossing to point Howard. Many of the Couverden Islands are campable. If you don't want
to portage, go east of Ansley Island.
58.18 58.20 58.22 58.24 58.26 58.28 58.30 58.32 58.34 58.36


Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
4j GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
ioise Islands1
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Excursion Inlet Entrance 58.4167 -135.447 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html7icN9452437
Noon Point is a great campsite, and most of Pleasant Island's north shore also holds camping.



Pleasant Island
O Tide Measurement Locations
# Campsites
0J GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement /j\ Warnings
Locations
Strait
Point Adolphus
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
-135.81 -135.78 -135.75 -135.72 -135.69 -135.66 -135.63 -135.60 -135.57 -135.54 -135.51
The north shore of Icy Passage has drying sandy flats that are up to a mile long. The town of Gustavus is on flat, deltaic terrain with hard access to the shoreline. It is easiest to visit by taking the road from Bartlett
Cove.


Link Island
/G)‘Kutc dins Bay
Kidney'Island
Lars Island
Strawberry Island>
Young Island
'^Rush Point
Lester. Island
soariuf
O Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
GPS Located Campsites £ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings
Route
— Main Route
Alternate Routes
Point Gustavus
\r
co
lD
â– 'ti-
ed
Ttr
rsj
^r
co
Ttr
co
oo
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co
-136.11 -136.08 -136.05 -136.02 -135.99 -135.96 -135.93 -135.90 -135.87 -135.84 -135.81
What
Tidal Currents
Notes
Currents up to 6 knots from Point Gustavus up to Willoughby Island.
Other
Before a paddling trip in Glacier Bay, registration and a video orientation at Bartlett Cove are required.
Tidal Currents
Rips and currents to 7.5 knots in Sitakaday Narrows. Avoid by travelling through Beardslee Islands.
Tides
East end of Lested Island dries and is only passable near high tide. Leave Bartlett Cove 1-2 hours before high tide.
Channel between Young and Lester Islands dries at low tide, but are deeper than east of Lester.
Tidal Currents Strong currents in the Beardslee Entrance.
NAME LAT LONG WEBSITE
Bartlett Cove 58.4567 -135.883 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaatidepredictions.html?id=9452534
Name
LAT
LONG
WEBSITE
Glacier Bay Entrance off Pt. Gustavus (23’)
58.3824
-135.9462
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA1002_24
Beardslee Island, W of (20')
58.4671
-136.0345
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacu rrents/Predictions?id=SEA0847_22
At Bartlett Cove, land at the boat launch located between the breakwater and the big NPS public-use dock. The visitor information kiosk is at the foot of the pier. There are accommodations ranging from free camping (register at the kiosk) to luxury suites. White gas and bear canisters are available. Laundry and showers are available at the campground. There is no fresh water in the Beardslees.


Tide Measurement Locations
'Puffin Island
• Campsites ^ GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/l\ Warnings
Island'
Route
Main Route Alternate R<
'North
Marble Island
South Marb le Island
(Beartracl^C
hWillougliby' Island
Link Island
-136.17 -136.14 -136.11 -136.08 -136.05 -136.02 -135.99 -135.96 -135.93 -135.90 -135.87
What Notes
Wildlife Warning Bear activity common north of Beartrack Cove and may be closed.
North of Beartrack Cove, the mainland coast is steep. Camp on the offshore islands. The southern part of South Marble Island is closed for sea lions. Passage between the mainland and the large island south of Puffin Island is only possible at
high tide.


o Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/N Warnings
Route
— Main Route • •..Alternate Routes
t Point
Lone Island
’ss Island'
tt
oo
CO
What Notes
Other Beware of drying shoals between Sebree Island's west shore and the mainland.
Currents in the Muir Inlet never surpass 1 knot.


Composite Island
O Tide Measurement Locations
• Campsites
ft GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/l\ Warnings
Route
Main Route Alternate Routes
O
CO
CO
LO
-136.65 -136.62 -136.59 -136.56 -136.53 -136.50 -136.47 -136.44 -136.41 -136.38 -136.35
Name LAT LONG WEBSITE
Hugh Miller Inlet (25') 58.7494 -136.3733 https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/noaacurrents/Predictions?id=SEA0850_15


i
O Tide Measurement Locations C Campsites % j GPS Located Campsites
£ Tidal Current Measurement Locations
/j\ Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
ite Island
lOmposil
'oint
-136.80 -136.77 -136.74 -136.71 -136.68 -136.65 -136.62 -136.59 -136.56 -136.53
What Notes
Wildlife Warning From the point that forms the pediment of Mt. Abdallah to the head of the Tarr Inlet, the shore is thick with brown bears.
Because of bears, it is best to camp on the tiny islands near Russell Island. The 4 islands (one in a group of 3, and one by itself) closer to the middle of the water are permanently closed however.


Russell Island
O Tide Measurement Locations • Campsites ^ j GPS Located Campsites
^2 Tidal Current Measurement Locations A Warnings
Route
Main Route
Alternate Routes
-137.13 -137.10 -137.07 -137.04 -137.01 -136.98 -136.95 -136.92 -136.89 -136.86 -136.83
CM
O
or
LD
o
0
01
LO
CTi
CO
Tt"
co
CO
lo
What Notes
Camping Restrictions Few campsites exist in the Johns Hopkins Inlet. Don't pass up a good place to camp.
The Grand Pacific Clacier lies at the head of the Tarr Inlet. Johns Hopkins Inlet is home to 11 glaciers, with 2 advancing tidewater glaciers. If returning down the West Arm of Glacier Bay to the pickup, there are many possible campsites.


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2 Abstract Goal and Purpose

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3 Data Sources and Software

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6 Methods Employed alaska boundary

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9 Results, Summary, and Conclusions

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10 Further Research

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11 References

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