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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, November, 1974

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Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, November, 1974
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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News
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Santa Fe Trail
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Denver, CO
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Santa Fe Trail
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English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Railroad Right-of-Way Agreed On
Westside residents can be proud of their victory on October 10th as they stood together to keep Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) from tearing across their neighborhoods.
It all happened at the Regional Transportation District (RTD) meeting. There was a tremendous turn out as approximately 200 people came to Baker Jr. High School to find out about RTD and make their voices heard. The purpose of the meeting was for the Westside Community to recommend to the RTD Board which of thp following routes the RTD
should take. The routes being considered run along Broadway, Lincoln, Bannock, Delaware, and the Railroad. Richard Castro moderated the meeting and J.D. Wilas and Tom Heaton of the Citizens Action Committee (CAC) provided information on RTD and showed slides to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the PRT routes. After the presentations the meeting was opened for discussion. The people raised a strong protest against PRT, as residents felt it would destroy the Westside Community. There were also businessmen from
Broadway who felt it would ruin their businesses.
A motion was made to accept only the railroad as the PRT to take. The motion was seconded and put to a vote. The motion passed unanimously. Westsiders will not be stepped on this time!
A task force is being formed to make sure that our vote counts and that Westside will have a voice in the future of their homes and neighborhoods. The task force will also be studying bus routes and recommending new bus routes and additional buses to the RTD Board.
Santa Fe Trail

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NUMBER 5
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Westside News m
NOVEMBER 1974 II__________^16
Vote NOV-5
Your Vote Affects Your Future
Del Pueblo Community
Now that Del Pueblo Elementary School is a reality; another dream of the planners and residents is coming true. Denver Public Schools will be hiring a community-school coordinator sometime after the first of the year.
Gil Cruter, executive director for community schools with Denver Public Schools, met with a group of 35 people to begin planning for a community school program. This is not to be just an after-school program nor is it to be in competition with other organizations or agencies or programs around the neighborhood.
An advisory council is being formed to guide the community school program. Neighborhood persons wanted to make sure that this council would have some authority and would be responsible for the program not just a “rubber stamp.” Much of the discussion at the meeting was on the power and authority of the council.
Representatives from youth, parents, clergy, business, professionals, teachers, and agencies will be on this council. The principal of Del Pueblo will also be on the council.
One of the first tasks of the
council will be to do a survey of the community to dtermine the needs, interests, and skills of the area persons. Then the council will select priorities for the program and hopefully will be part of the process for selecting the community-school coordinator for Del Pueblo.
Mr. Cruter said that he had not yet written up a job description for the community school coordinators and would be happy to work with the planning group when he had a rough draft. The advisory council or the planning group would also have imput into specific requirements for the position at Del Pueblo.
The selection process for the advisory council has not been determined but will be decided on by the planning group which is meeting. Persons interested in the program or in the advisory council should come to the next meeting at Del Pueblo on October 30th at 7:00 p.m.
Money for the coordinator’s salary has been allocated by Denver Public schools and there will be some additional money for administrative overhead. Monies for program, staff, and supplies for the various activities at the school will have to be raised by the ad-
visory council, coordinator, principal and the neighborhood. There may be some federal or state money which could be received through the school.
There will also be a city-wide coordinating council for the community school programs. Del Pueblo is the first such program in Denver although some of the suburbs have already established a community school. Another program will be established at a Denver school, probably a high school.
Future meetings of the planning group will include a trip to one of the suburban community school programs, a planning meeting lor the community survey, and the organization of the advisory council.
Questions asked on the survey will be: what services are needed? who can teach skills or classes? what are other agencies doing in the area?
Everyone’s imput is needed for this new program in the area. Plan to attend the October 30th meeting and be a part of your future and the future of others in the area. The community school will hopefully serve all persons: pre-school, parents, students, older persons, etc.-
Business Survey Completed
For more than a year now, the â–  . cooperation with DC DC and! Board members of NEW-SED, other development agencies.
Inc., the economic development “The community should urge the . corporation of the Westside Action City and County government to Council, have been busy putting assist in: together many ideas on the . • rerouting traffic possibility of a Cultural Plaza . . creating parking provisions located somewhere on the near . . placing an employment center Westside, maybe along Santa Fe in the community (a mail room or Drive. Many different ideas as to keypunch center, for example, location, size, kinds of stores, etc., would be extremely helpful in have been discussed and developed starting a revitalization of the with the help of the Community community’s economics. There Design Center from the University would follow a natural growth of of Colorado at Denver. Before any business around such a center), future plans could be developed, a “Private investment in the market feasibility study was community must also be en-needed to determine the size and couraged and will be stimulated kinds of stores and retail services by:
Westside residents could actually . . improved appearance support. . . better security
Working with the Denver . . an increasing number of Housing Administration and its contiguous successful enterprises.” Director, Dan Luna, a contract to As to location of an eventual do the study was signed with the Cultural Plaza, it was noted that firm of Bickertt, Browne, & the market lies outside the com-Coddington and Associates, Inc. munity for the most part and, as a NEW-SED recently received the consequence, the area around 6th report which was started in June of and 8th Avenues and Santa Fe 1974. Conclusions of the report Drive would have the greatest were presented first to the Housing access. Other locations to be Administrations, then to the considered are the area around the Mayor’s Assistant, Mr. Wilder, and Westside Action Center and near the City Housing staff and finally to Colfax Avenue. the Westside Action Council at its The Westside area had a great monthly meeting on September number of advantages due to 26th. location, housing, population and
Mr. Jim, author of the study, facilities already in existence in made the following analysis: the community. Declining urban “Though the proposed Cultural areas have traditionally sought Plaza does not stand a great assistance from the government in chance for success at this time, their revitalization which this there are a number of things to be community also may need to do in done in the Westside community the near Mure, which will lead to the conditions NEWSED, Inc. will continue to which could support such a retail develop economic opportunities in and commercial venture in the the community. It plans to request future. Among these are: city help in developing a corn-
continuation of the local prehensive improvement plan for
newspaper
. . creation of a Businessmen’s Association
. . expansion of community services through the Action Center . . continued efforts to stimulate
the Westside. At the same time, it is exploring an expanded multiservice center, a development plan for the Colfax region Neighborhood Development Program (DURA), and an ethnic-oriented retail
city interest in the neighborhood center for future development.


2 • SANTA FE TRAIL
Santa Fe Trail
OUR editorial policy
This newspaper—THE SANTA FE TRAIL — and its editorial staff will not come out in favor of one candidate or another. Because of this, we have called all candidates and have given them an opportunity to advertise at a fair and equal price.
Republicans and Democrats have advertised. The staff hopes that all readers who are registered to vote will study the backgrounds and political stands of each candidate. Then we ask each person to vote on November 5th!!!
On the issues, the editorial staff feels compelled to speak out, especially jvhen the issues affect residents and workers in this neighborhood. In the' past we have spoken out on the school boycott, vandalism, PRT, and. registering to vote.
In this issue we are also speaking out on issues which affect persons from this area and hope that residents will also begin to state their response and feelings to issues as they see them. For that reason we publish letters to the editors, neighborhood notes, and articles from residents and workers as much as space permits.
We are looking forward to a heavy voter turn-out on the Westside and we are looking forward to hearing from many persons about our paper and about the neighborhood concerns.
NOON LUNCH PROGRAM FOR OLDER PERSONS
Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Monday, Wednesday, Friday Lunch at 11:30 a.m.
Dorothy Martin, coordinator 523-7614
St. Joseph’s Parish Hall (PASCO) 6th and Galapago Monday through Friday, daily Lunch at 12:45 noon Fr Leroy Burke, coordinator 534-4408
A good lunch is served and often there is a program of interest to older persons.
If you are over 60 years old and want to have a good time with others and a good meal, come to one of the lunch programs. ^Youcanjjwasyouar^bl^hroughadonattoi^ystem^^^^^^
Our Logo
Because questions were raised about the masthead of SANTA FE TRAIL, a brief description is included. Several images stand out in the symbol and logo.
First is the name — THE SANTA FE TRAIL — which for many will be a reminder of St. Joseph’s High School and some of the publications at that school.
But SANTA FE TRAIL also stands for the main thoroughfare of the neighborhood and the hope that again there will be nice sjiops and'retail stores along that street that will serve this area. The map of the area is highlighted by Santa Fe Drive which will partially be a thermometer of the progress of our neighborhood as all work for the redevelopment of the area and the remodeling of homes.
The two pictures show our people at work and at play. Though there is presently a large amount of work to do, time off for laughter, good fun, and times together is very important.
Bi all the issues and work of THE SANTA FE TRAIL, the editorial board hopes to serve the entire neighborhood: Mexican
Americans, Anglos, Blacks, residents, professionals, agencies, organizations, and businesses. So the pictures show different peoples who are working together without forgetting who they are as individuals.
Perhaps you have other things you see in the masthead or logo. Write us and give us your opinion. Thanks to Jaime Espinoza, the artist and advertising manager, who designed this logo for our newspaper and for our communily.
CAPITAL PUMSHMENT
The state legislature wasn’t strong or brave enough to face the issue of capital punishment, the issues is on the ballot this November 5th.
But, people around the neighborhood and around the state are beginning to speak out against capital punishment and are urging people to vote NO on Amendment No. 2 on the state ballot.
Lawyers are saying capital punishment is in violation of the U.S. Constitution.
Professionals who study statistics are saying that death penalty and the fear of it does not reduce murder and crime.
Religious persons are saying that killing a person for crimes is not the Christian way. The person should be rehabilitated.
District Attorneys are saying that executions cost more tax money and time than life imprisonment. Colorado will pay over $1,300,000 per year if the amendment is passed.
Wardens of prisons say that murderers can be rehabilitated and are being rehabilitated so that they become good citizens.
Prisoners have said that law courts are not infallible and some persons who are innocent have been executed.
Around the world, other countries are saying that capital punishment is inhumane and unjust.
Minorities and poor people are saying that most of the persons who are in prison or who have been executed are poor or minority. Extremely few have been middleclass or rich.
Other newspapers are asking their readers to vote against this amendment for the above and other reasons.
The Westside has many families with sons in the Canon City Prison. Some men from the neighborhood have been executed during the past century and families have had to grieve their loss, for there was no hope that these executed men would return to families and wives and parents.
Because capital punishment is inhuman, discriminatory, ineffective, costly, and so very final, we ask that you vote against Amendment No. 2 on November 5th. This is a vote that will affect families* and persons in this neighborhood.
None of us can be sure that the person convicted of the crime committed it or that the convicted person cannot be rehabilitated.
Several men that Warden Tinsley knew were originally sentenced to death. After having their sentences commuted and then serving 20-40 years, these men were released and none of them that the Warden knew ever committed another homicidal crime (murder). Men and women can be rehabilitated and live useful lives.
VOTE NO — on Amendment No. 2 on November 5th.
WESTSIDE
At Auraria Community Residents and Agency
Inter Agency Meeting 12:00 noon Center
Persons INVITED


OLDER PERSONS GO TO SCHOOL FREE
Some people’s idea of Utopia would be to be able to walk into a fine college with no entrance examination, no examination papers and no fees of any kind, and be allowed to choose any subject that they want.
Suddenly, we find out that there is such an Utopia, only to get in it, you have to be a little bent, with hair a little gray, for you have to be over sixty years old.
Professor Tom Stein who is in charge of this program for Senior Citizens at the Denver campus of the University of Colorado, said that this program is being received with enthusiasm by both the older students and the younger students.
He said that at the present time there are over twenty-five elderly people attending classes and that they are doing very well in them. Professor Stein said that the area is quite wide. There are two elderly
people study history; one studying business law; several who are studying French and Spanish; one who has entered the Introduction to Psychology class; one has altered a philosophy class; sever are in the Fine Arts Class, one in German, one in the theater; one in the Sociology of Family class; several are in Modem Japan courses and another is in the Formation of American Education class.
Professor Stein said that the only classes that Senior Citizens are not encouraged to enter are lab and science classes and those requiring intensive physical exertion.
He said that new classes will start in the Spring Semester and all interested parties are encouraged to register for them sometime in January. Professor Stein hopes that there will be a wonderful turnout of Senior Citizens from the Westside for these free college
Student Active
in Community
“I like the Westside. The way it’s progressing. Santa Fe Drive is starting to become pretty. Like Adelante Community Supermarket is a name which came from the people.” These are the words and feelings of a beautiful Chicana who is the youngest member of a familia which has lived on the West Side for over 26 years.
Darlene Dominguez is 17 years old and a Senior at West High School. She is the Westside youth representative of the Westside Action Council and works part-time at the Westside Action Center where she is studying to be a Paralegal in the field of Landlord-Tenant Law.
Working along side the Housing Counselor, Betty Koehler, Darlene feels that she is really helping out the people. With the experience of counseling people as to their rights
as a tenant, Darlene wants to continue her education at Metro College in the area of Criminal Law. She says that she would like to teach young people, especially, about the law and rights because she sees a great many of the youth of the West Side being harrassed. Darlene says that maybe even some day she would like to become a lawyer.
Asked if she had any special people in mind whom she admired, Darlene really didn’t admire any special person other than saying that any Chicano who tally becomes a leader is a person to be admired.
As to the future, Darlene simply says, “I want to live on the Westside for the rest of my life not necessarily in the projects but I want to live oh the Westside to help out my people.
N. Lincoln Food Stamps
Mr. Robert Jennings, Denver Director of the Food Stamp Administration, announced recently that residents on the westside would be able to purchase food stamps at a new location on the westside. This location is the Community Center in North Lincoln Park Homes at 1438 Navajo. Present plans would allow for the purchase of stamps on two days each month beginning this November. The dates for this month are November 6 and 8. Persons who find it more convenient to purchase food stamps at the Lincoln Park Community Center should request that their records be transferred to this location. At the present time this request must be done in person at Byers School.
The idea for a Food Stamp location came from Mattie Nixon, President of the Concerned Seniors of Noryh Lincoln Park Homes. With the support of Liz Vigil, President of Noryh Lincoln Resident Council, and Norma Wilson, President of the South Lincoln Resident Council, questionnaires and petitions were circulated throughout the area. Over 200 signatures were collected in a short period of time and sent to Mr. Jennings for his consideration.
Residents from North and South Lincoln Park Homes have planned a Halloween “Victory” Party to be held at Auraria on October 31. The purpose of the party is to thank the hundreds of people who worked together to accomplish something good for all the people. It is also planned to be a reminder to everyone that people working together can make a difference here on the westside — that people working together can win.
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SANTA FE TRAIL - 3
Westside Artist Businessman
In many ways Walt Weinberg seems to be very much at home in his potters shop at 701 Santa Fe Drive, known as the Santa Fe Pottery. Unlike many of the other business people of the Westside who commute daily to their place. of work from the suburbs — one feels that Walt Weinberg is one of us who live and struggle to make the Westside a better place for all of us.
Believing that he is first and foremost an artist and as an artist with a talent, he has an obligation to society—this obligation is to be creative. To be creative, especially in a society as Walt says, “where people are fighting for their identities amid all of the production of plastic things around them. Through the work of my hands people have an opportunity to express themselves, their personalities.”
A potter now, Walt Weinberg wanted to be a dentist, but says that the major turning point in his life came when he was studying Spanish at San Joe, Costa Rica in the University and later on when-he worked in Bogata, Columbia. In Latin America he became interested and very much inspired by what he calls now “my second home.” He said, “I have very close ties there. I’ve been greatly inspired by the culture, especially by the Latin American philosophers who saw the need to fight for independence from the European colonialists.” The potto's says that here in the schools of the United States we are exposed to one side of
the history of Latin America. To see their history from the eyes of Latin Americans definitely
changes one’s outlook on life.
Today after working 3 years from the same storefront
operation, Walt Weinberg believes that things are changing for the better on the Westside, although there are many who still want to take from the Westside and not leave anything behind. “Like many of the landlords,” Walt says, “You see many of the buildings? What are their owners doing? Just letting things get run down, make their investment and leaving. The people, however, are taking more pride in the community and improving things.”
As for the future, Walt believes that, “We are all responsible for building the earth or better, salvaging what we have left. It’s not just one part that’s in danger. We’ve all got to work — or we’ll all go down together.” Walt has observed that when we go to museums, we see the items which have been left over faom
civilizations before us — mostly works of art, like pottery. He believes that this is where he is playing an important role in the world today. When this reporter started the interview with Walt, he was making a casserole. An hour later, 5 casseroles were finished. All molded from dirt and a little water by the hands which have joined with some hands of people on the Westside to help create it into a place for people. Westsiders are grateful to you Walt Weinberg.
Group Helps with Personal Problems
Do you fed you have lost interest in work or family activities? Do you know someone who is tense or worried about handling ordinary demands of daily living, or afraid and unable to cope with them?
People with problems in living like this may need help to resume or learn independence, self-reliance, productivity, and social abilities.
Westside Transitional Living, a unit of the Northwest Denver Mental Health Center (part of the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals) has opened new offices at 999 Clay Way — in the Sun Valley Housing Project, four blocks east of the West Side Health Center. It serves adults and late adolescents who live in west Denver, who need counseling and interaction with others every day, for most of the day, or as often as necessary.
Westside Transitional Living offers a variety of services — individual and group counseling, occupational therapy, community participation activities, crisis intervention, resocialization activities, marital and family counseling — in a day program, available from 9:00 a.m. till 3:00 pjn. Monday through Friday. Clients may spend from a few hours to the entire day in group
activities, and may go to the center from one to five days a week, depending on their goals and the plans they make with their counselors.
By participating in groiip activities and discussions with people who have similar concerns, Transitional Living members learn they are not alone with their problems, and share and learn new ways of dealing with them.
The day program also serves as an alternative to hospitalization for many people, either preventing their admission to a psychiatric hospital by providing structured daily activities in the community, or by helping them return to their homes and 'families more quickly after hospital treatment.
The Transitional Living staff consists of two social workers, a psychologist, nurse, occupational therapist, psychiatrist, and three mental health counselors. The unit is open for referrals or emergencies from 7:00 am. till 6:30 pm. Monday through Friday. Every Westside resident is welcome to call 573-6877 for information about the program. Clients may be referred by other agencies or other teams, of the Northwest Denver Mental Health Center, but self-referrals are welcome.


4 - SANTA FE TRAIL
ssCHURCH NEWS ®dsetaecPonate Celebration for Elderly
ST. ELIZABETH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
1060 11th Street •
Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES:
Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:15, 5:15 CONFESSIONS Daily — before 12:15 Mass Sat. — 4:00 to 5:00 DEVOTIONS
Tues. St. Anthony Novena Fri. St. Jude Novena (During the Mass)
ST. CAJETAN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 9th and Lawrence Denver, Colorado James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor MASSES
Sat. Evening 7:00 Sun. 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00, (Spanish), 7:00 p.m. Weekdays — 8:00 a.m. (Spanish)
FIRSTAVENUE PRESBYTERIAN 120 East 1st Avenue Denver, Colorado Rev. Arnold Bloomquist, Pastor Sunday School 9:45 Mroning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Coffee House Faith Factory 25 Broadway
John Cox, Student Pastor Director
FIRST MENNONTTE CHURCH 430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Kermit Derstine, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister
Morning Worship 9:00 am.
Church School 10:00 am.
Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038
CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL)
126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. P. George Castono, Pastor SERVICES
Sunday 8:00 am. Holy Communion
10:30 am. Morning Prayers and Sermon
Wednesday 10:00 Holy Communion and Bible Study
The Santa Fe Trail would be happy to include information about your church and its services in its listing of Westside churches.
Please send the times of services and any special events to: Santa Fe Trail, 430 West 9th Avenue, Denver 80204.
FIESTA
RESULTS
Although final results from the St. Joseph’s Fiesta are not in, the Fiesta was a success and the goal of $15,00 was met.
The winning raffle award went to a young woman who has been seriously ill in the hospital. This is certainly exciting to see someone who really needed the money receive the benefit.
JOHN P. DALEIDEN CO
1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver, Colorado 80204 Tel: 534-8233
RELIGIOUS ARTICLES FREE PARKING
SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH 1230 Decatur 255-2317
Lou Rossein, Pastor
Ted Koeman, Intern at Sun Valley
Chapel
Sunday School and Worship at 11:00 am.
NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST)
325 West Irvington Place Donald Davis, Pastor
Worship Services: 8:30 am. and 11:00 am.
Sunday School: 9:45 am.
Bible Study: 6:00 pm.
Prayer Service Thurs. 7:30 pm.
Boys Club — Wed. 7:00 pm. to 8:30 pm.
Girls Club — Sat. 9:30 am. to 11:00 am.
ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado
Fr. Patrick Sullivan, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Martin Marquez
MASSES:
Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 in Spanish — Church 10:00 in English — Hall, and 12:00 noon Weekday: 6:00, 7:00, and 8:00 am.
AVONDALE LUTHERAN Rev. Wm. R. Pape West Colfax and Irving 534-4478
Worship Service: 11:00 am. Sunday School: 9:45 am.
Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER
215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorako Rev. Dick Magnus, Pastor John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky, Older Persons Ministry
Workshop Service and Sunday School
10:00 to 11:30 am.
BAPTISMS AT ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH
SEPT. 22, 1974 —
Crystal Josette Marie Chavez dau. of Gilbert & Charlene Chavez — Godparents are Joe & Mary Vigil.
Lawrence Joseph Victor DeNava son of Lawrence & Barbara DeNava — Godparents are Victor & Rita Lucero.
SEPT. 29, 1974 —
Adellita Tomasita Benavides dau. of John & Ruth Benavides — Godparents are Nick & Rhonda Espinosa OCT. 6, 1974 —
Steven Ray Sena son of Victor & Jennie Sena — Godparents are Edward & Mary Ann Duran OCT. 13, 1974 —
Joaquin Clarence William Liebert son of William & Alberta Liebert — Godparents are Joseph & Mary Romero OCT. 20, 1974 —
Marc Christopher Herrera son of Steven & Marian Herrera — Godparents are William & Frances Plisga.
FUNERALS AT ST. JOSEPH’S
CHURCH
OCT. 1, 1974 —
Frederick Marquez of 726 Elati passed away Sept. 28, 1974.
OCT. 15, 1974 —
Bennie Martinez Of 1219 W. Custer PI. passed away on Oct. 8, 1974.
Max Sanchez from St. Joseph’s Parish, Carlos Padilla from St. Elizabeth’s and Phil' Gonzales sfrom St. Cajetan’s were ordained to the ministry of lector on October 19 at St. Thomas Seminary. This means that they can read the Word of God to the congregation in church, but more than that, for these three men it is a step towards their ordination as permanent lay deacons of the Catholic Church.
They have been studying for more than a year now and will be ordained as deacons, in April or May of next year. After that they can preach, witness marriages, preside at funerals, baptize and distribute Communion to the sick, and serve the Christian community in many other ways.
It is not just the priest who is the Church. The continuation of Christ’s work depends even more on the presence of dedicated people like these three men in our world today.
New Bishop
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Denver celebrated the ordination of Richard Hanifen as bishop on September 20, 1974, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. He was ordained by Archbishop James Casey with the help of Bishop George Evans of Denver and Bishop Carles Buswell of Pueblo.
The ordination Mass was a celebration of joy and prayerfulness. The people joined in the singing with the Mariachi de Colores and the Cathedral Choir.
Bishop Hanifen has chosen as his motto ‘‘de Colores”, the theme of the Cursillo movement, with which he has been greatly involved. (He is the only bishop in the United States who has a motto in Spanish instead of Latin.)
Bishop Hanifen was bom June 15,1931; he graduated from Regis High School. He attended St. Thomas Seminary, Denver, and was ordained to the priesthood on June 6, 1959. Later he studied in Washington, DC, and in Rome.
He sees his role as bishop as a postoral one, working among the people as Christ did.
WOMEN’S
OUTING
(Columbus
Day-Oct. 12th)
It was a rainy, cold morning when 17 women of Auraria Community Center headed for Camp Malo and a day in the Mountains. Wet snow four inches deep was on some cars coming off N. Turkey Creek Canyon, but the ladies drove on. And even though the sun never did come out, it was a real discovery for the womeh — a truly happy memorable day for all.
The fireplace in Camp Malo’s central building was the gathering place. Jean Jackson directed lessons in the “Bump.” Loyola Salazar, Ceramics teacher at the Center, showed the ladies how to produce plaques from the bark of pine trees. Everyone had brought a special dish for the 7 course breakfast and scrumptious dinner. Meat had been donated by the Auraria Center, a United Way agency. Its director Adolph Gomez had also donated other supplies.
All of those who went agreed it was a worthwhile and very inexpensive day. We hope that there will be other occasions for the Women of Auraria to get out for a little “fun and games” . . . with more cooperation from the weather.
Four parishes on the Westside, St. Cajetan, St. Elizabeth, St. Joseph and Presentation are sponsoring a Common Annointing of the sick at Presentation Church on Sunday, Nov. 3rd at 3 p.m. This will be during Mass.
Any Catholic can receive the Sacrament of the sick as soon as he BEGINS to be in danger because of illness or advanced years. This includes elderly people if they are clearly weak, even though no dangerous illness has been diagnosed. A general rule would be those who, because they are elderly or infirm, are no longer able to live a completely active life.
The Church NO LONGER regards this Sacrament as “Extreme Unction” or the “Last Rites” because NO LONGER is this Sacrament reserved exclusively for those who are in extreme and immediate danger of dying.
The Church does not want her children to worry as to whether or
BAPTISMS AT ST. CAJETAN’S Guadalupe Kathleen, Joseph Gilbert, and Josephine Lynn Daughters and Son of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Carmen Reyther, 2959 W. 11th Avenue.
not they qualify for this Sacrament. If there is any reasonable doubt, the Church wants to resolve the doubt in favor of receiving the Sacrament.
Any eligible Catholic should receivb this Sacrament because Jesus loves the elderly and the infirm NOW just as He loved them during the time of HIS public life on earth. The Sacrament of the sick is the continuation of His “Caring” for those growing older or more inform.
The elderly or the infirm should receive this Sacrament because they need the deepening and strengthening of the life of Grace that every Sacrament brings. Also they receive the comfort of Christ to sustain them in hours of loneliness and the courage of Christ, received through this Sacrament, to bear bravely, with dignity and serenity the sorrow and suffering wovwn into their life as it was woven into His life.
Anyone needing a ride to Presentation Church Sunday the 3rd, please call 534-4408,
FIRST COMMUNION CLASSES AT ST. JOSEPH’S — Classes for the parents of children wanting to make their First Holy Communion will begin Nov. 12th at 7:30 p.m. in the Middle School building (6th & Fox) These classes are NOT for children, so please don’t bring your child with you.
This nation is looking back on some very dark moments. But we can also look ahead to a new era of hope.
Government is only effective when it places the needs of human beings above all other needs, when public interests never lose out to private interests.
Yes, Pat Schroeder went to Washington with a desire to change things, with a will to fight for a better way to govern.
Yes, she challenged old fashioned ideas that stand in the way of the new solutions we need.
No, she will not forget the needs of children, . of elderly citizens, of consumers, of working people, of minorities, of the small businessman.
No, she will not yield to the pressures of big business interests, to special lobby groups, to discriminatory attitudes, to powerful conglomerates.
The reason we are raising hell is so that we can raise hopes.
Pat Schroeder will continue to fight —for the things that are at the very heart of the idea of a free, strong and compassionate America.
And every single one of us can be very grateful that she will.
Vote for
Pat Schroeder
Democrat for Congress, Nov, 5
Schroeder for Congress Committee, Steve Marsters Chairman Sakura Square, 18th & Lawrence, Denver, Colo. 80202 572-1833


Commission
Ready to Serve
Twenty-five years ago, then Mayor Quigg Newton of Denver directed an earnest group of leading citizens to “go forth and do good’’ in the field of human relations. The original cadres, headed by the then Dean of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral, Rev. Paul Roberts, was made up of socially sensitive individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and of varying religious faiths, including Catholics, Jews, Buddhists and Protestants.
They were a mixed group: prominent community personalities, businessmen, civic leaders, educators, labor people, race relations specialists, housewives, doctors, lawyers, and common ordinary folk concerned about the future of Denver. That was the common bond — how could we keep Denver growing with its diverse populations and yet avoid disruptive turmoil that was evident elsewhere?
Far-sighted Quigg Newton wanted to deter violent confrontations in his beloved Denver. He knew that injustices in employment, housing, education and all phases of human activities existed in Denver. Therefore, he called upon involved leaders in Denver to give of their best thinking and efforts to devise means of eliminating prejudice and discrimination, which led to conflicts in other cities. Thus the Mayor’s Committee on Human Relations was bom in Denver during 1949.
The city fathers subscribed to the wisdom of these efforts, and in 1951 a statutory Commission on Human Relations was established by enactment of a municipal Ordinance by City Council. An Oglala Sioux Indian, Mrs. Helen Peterson, was hired as the first director, with a secretary to assist. Later a man designated in more polite circles as a Mexican American, Mose Trujillo, (now deputy warden of
Denver County Jail), was added to the staff.
From a modest beginning has grown the present Denver Commission on Community Relations (CCR), now headed by Minoru Yasui, a Japanese American lawyer, with an energetic staff of some 40-50 personnel and a budget of about $300,000 annually.
William L. Funk, vice-president for public affairs of the United Bank, heads the 15-member citizen commission, roughly a third of whom are appointed each year by the Mayor. Individuals with wide-ranging interests and concerns, from various racial, religious and ethnic backgrounds, are members of the Commission. Teachers, businessmen, religious leakers, lawyers, housewives, media representatives, and community leaders presently serve. Anyone interested in appointment to the Commission should contact the Mayor’s office.
Specifically, the Commission is
charged with responsibilities to (1) inform the public about community relations matters, (2) advise and assist dty officials and departments in regard to community relations problems, (3) promote good order, peace and harmony in the community, and (4) assure equality of opportunity and treatment for all persons, regardless of race, color, creed or national origin.
Because the Commission is a city agency directly under the Mayor, and since the staff operates under the direct supervision of the Mayor’s office, activities of the Commission reflect the immediate municipal concerns of the city administration. In conformity with directives from the Mayor, the CCR staff is presently involved in assisting the critical desegregation processes of the Denver Public Schools, attempting to establish a city-wide ^youth services system, developing planning and capabilities for citizen par-
SANTA FE TRAIL - 5 ticipation in all governmental activities, and participating in the community aspects of the Denver Anti-Crime Council (DACC). Specifically, the Commission is sponsoring some dozen DACC community- based projects involving some $1.6 million, which hopefully will reduce crime in the community and will help to protect residents of the city.
It must be emphasized, however, that the Denver Commission on Community Relations has no enforcement powers; its forte and accomplishments must come through persuasion, conciliation, negotiation, compromise, and because the cause supported is “right”. Moreover, it must be kept in mind that the Commission does not attempt and indeed is not authorized to operate any specific programs as its own, but may assist, facilitate and support.
Within these restrictions, the Denver Commission on Community Relations stands ready, willing and able to help make this Denver community a better place for all people.
HEALTH
STATION
Mariposa Health Station offers a unique service to the people of this community.
Through a series of fortunate events, for Mariposa and the community, we are privileged to have on our staff Josia Dodds, Professor at the University of Denver Child Study Center. In addition we have two advanced graduate students in Doctoral training in Child Clinical Psychology who are themselves Mexican American obtaining part of their training in a Chicano community.
The need for this type of a service was originally identified by the Pediatritians at Mariposa, who found that there wfere many behavior problems, child rearing problems, school problems, etc. The physicians felt a need to be able to refer to someone knowledgable in these areas. This service is now available, upon referral from any Mariposa Physician. Anyone in the community wishing to utilize this service must simply call for an appointment with any of the Primary Care givers at Mariposa. A preliminary history and physical will be done and a referral initiated to Dr. Dodds and his staff.
Mary Kay Bael Station Director Mariposa
NEWS ON GALLO
Good news on the Gallo boycott! 270 workers, who had been working as strike-breakers, joined the picket lines last week in protest of the low, terrible working conditions, and general treatment they had been receiving from the company and their Teamster allies. On top of this, the Gallo boycott continues to take a heavy toll on Ernest and Julio’s profits, as they have dropped in sales about 15 per cent, despite a very expensive public relations campaign on their part which attempts to fool people into believing that Gallo workers can make “up to $9 an hour” and are housed in “spacious accommodations! ” In response to the success of the boycott, the Gallo company has begun to come out with many new wines which will not have the name Gallo on the label. An example is Madria Sangria, which is made to look like a Spanish import. Remember — before you buy a bottle of wine, check the label for the city of “Modesto, California.’' If you find it, remember that it has scab grapes in it and is very harmful to 'your health!
Now ife our turn
Hart for Senate.
Now, it's clearly our turn to bring our government back to the people. Gary Hart is the candidate who can give Colorado true representation in the United States Senate. Now, it's our turn. The people's turn.
The following people are for GARY HART:
Greg Archuleta, Lakewood Barbara Argiiello, Denver Mary Armijo, Denver Mary E. Baca, Denver Pete Candelaria, Denver Craig Hart, Denver Tim Flores, Denver Steve Garcia, Lakewood Bob Hernandez, Denver Peggy Hernandez, Denver Larry Lopez, Denver Patty Lopez, Denver
J. Carlos Lucero, Boulder Yvonne Lucero, Boulder Leo Lucero, Pueblo Jesse Luna, Denver Al Montoya, Denver Chris Munoz, Pueblo Al Roybal, Wheatridge Ethyl Sandos, Denver Ralph Sandoval, Denver Roger Sisneros, Denver Ruben Valdez, Denver Charles Vigil, Denver


mm
Mr
Gary Hart, Democrat for the United States Senate
This Ad paid for by:
GARY HART Senate Campaign Committee, Inc. Hal Haddon, Campaign Manager.


6 - SANTA FE TRAIL
THINK ADELANTE!
Think ADELANTE THE SUPERMARKET WITH A DIFFERENCE!
Think ADELANTE WHERE WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE !
Think ADEUNTE WHERE YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME!
Think ADELANTE LOCATED IN YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD TO BE THERE!
Think ADELANTE YOUR COMMUNITY OWNED -COMMUNITY OPERATED SUPERMARKET!
Think ADELANTE FOR A BETTER COMMUNITY !
Think ADELANTE YOUR KIND OF STORE! YOUR KIND OF PEOPLE!
Think ADEUNTE FEATURING HUNDREDS OF MEXICAN FOOD SPECIALTIES!
Think ADEUNTE LET’S WORK TOGETHER! LET’S KEEP OUR COMMUNITY GROWING! EVERYONE BENEFITS!
THM1KS POR SHOPPING 4D€WNTe!!


SANTA FE TRAIL • 7
«kBre-H0lrlMY SAIiErUk START STOCKING UP NOW FOR THE \ THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY AT THESE .^^^^^ Wednesday Oct. 30th thru Monday Nov. 4th
| Campbell’s No122$ Mushroom Soup Sky land 1/2 **»»•> Apple Cider 8£K
Campbell’s No.l Can Chicken 2for, Noodle Soup 49^ Food King Big i pScW011”* 49?
Shurfresh llb-Box Crackers 35^ 1/2 gallon CLOROX 4q<;
Shurfine ’ ' l*‘; Flour 41“ TEXUM unsweetened-**-*-**-.^ •» Orange 46 Can : Juice 33^
Van Camp s ^Can 1 Grated Tuna 45^ Viva Jumbo Roll ? TOWELS 49<=
Welch’s 20 oz-Jar Grape Jelly 73^ Shurfine 31b-Can Coffee * 3,m j
FOR YOUR THANKSGIVING DINNER! WE WILL FEATURE AN ABUNDANT SUPPLY OF TURKEYS -GEESE - DUCKS - CAPONS - CHICKENS -PUMPKIN PIES - MINCE MEAT PIES Priced Right at ADELANTEt -WsSjj^g^fk ADELANTE Community Super Market 727 Santa Fe Dr. Plenty Of FREE Parking In Rear Of Store


8 â–  SAHTA FE TRAIL
A.sSkA
ncmnsT forced busirg
Inmigracion
El General Leonard F. Chapman, Comisionado de Inmigracion estuvo en Denver el dia 17 de Octubre. El General Chapman tuvo una conferencia en el edificio Federal en el Centro y estubo hablando de la situacion de in-migrantes ilegales en Denver.
El General Chapman dijo que aproximadamente 2,800 trabajos serian realizados inmediatamente si todos los “mojados” fueran percibiodos y mandados a Mexico.
El General Chapman esta en favor de el Rodino Bill que lo hiciera ilegal que patrones em-plearan mojados. Tambien dijo que el Director de Inmigracion en Denver, El Sr. Edwards tiene un programa que se llama Projecto Cooperacion que tiene el apollo de 12 negocios de empleo en Denver. Projecto Cooperacion es para eliminar mojados de empleo con sus companias. El Sr. Edwards dice que no hay discriminacion encontra ninguna raza proque todo los aplicantes reciviran las mismas preguntas.
El General Chapman dijo que mojados no nomas tienen trabajos que pagan poco sueldos pero tambien los encuentran trabajando en contrucion, fabricas, hoteles y restaurantes. Hay veces que ganan de $4 a $5 dolares por hora. Pero luego dijo que muchas veces los mojados estan recibiendo Welfare.
Yo no estoy en acuerdo con esto porque yo se que el Departamento de Welfare en Denver reporta a personas que ellos piensan que estan aqui Uegalmente.
El General Chapman tuvo el descaro de decir que hay personas de otors paises que estan aqui
Uegalmente pero eso es importante porque para el estas personas son educadas. Lo que quiere decir que esta bien si inmigrantes de otros paises esten en los Estados Unidos porque son educados y posiblemente los Estados Unidos podra beneficiar de ellos. Pero que no esta bien que inmigrantes de Mexico esten aqui porque solamente estan desafiando la economia de los Estados Unidos y no tienen nada que ofrecer a este pais. El comisonario esta con-vencido que la base del problema es en el crecimiento de la populacion de Mexico y que no peuden acomodar todas las personas con trabajos.
Es verdad que la mayoria de la gente que viene a los Estados Unidos a trabajar es para ganar mejores sueldos y para poder mantener a sus familias en Mexico.
Una reaUdad que es negada por la inmigracion son los malos tratos que algunos de los investigadores les dan a los “mojados” cuando los agarran. Estos casos han sido observados por varias personas que han estado presente cuando arrestan ya estas personas que estan aqui Uegalmente.
Es una verguenza que estas personas no puedan ser tratadas con dignidad y respeto que otros inmigrantes ilegales de otros paises reciben. Un modo de garantizar que mojados van hacer tratados como seres humanos y no como unos animales seria que quitaran personas del servicio de Inmigracion, como este General Chapman, que tiene una actiud racista.
Cellhouse Seven
Seventy-five people gathered together at the Westside Action Center and were actively concerned about the approximately 200 inmates presently in Cellhouse Seven at Colorado State Penitentiary in Canon City.
Since early September the administration of the Colorado State Penitentiary at Canon City has been operating the institution under a program known as “Operation Return.” “Operation Return” is based upon unsubstantiated aUegations that at one time the inmate population had complete control of the prison, including armed guards, and thus it became necessary to return the institution to the control of the guards. “Operation Return” dramaticaUy went into effect on September 12th of this year with the transofrmation of Cellhouse 7 from a general housing unit to a segregated unit surrounded by a barbed wire fence. Without any investigation or due process, some 200 inmates were either retained in or transferred to Cellhouse 7 following a fire in the prison gymnasium. The fire was allegedly set by inmates and endangered the lives of six guards. Since the incident, facts have been discovered raising doubts about the truth of these allegations. To date these 200 men are still in “deadlock” which consists of the following conditions:
1. confinement in a cell for 22-24 hours each day.
2. no access to showers, hot water or toilet articles
3. two meals a day
4. confiscation of monies, legal materials and personal property
5. restricted visitation without notification to family or visitors (who often made the 200 mile trip to be denied visits)
6. discontinuation of educational, vocational, religious programs, including hobbies used as a source of income.
7. limited access to mail and legal counsel, including jailhouse lawyers.
The administration has indicated that these conditions will continue for an indefinite period of time. In essence, they have locked the doors and thrown away the key. This situation has been allowed to exist for too long. It is only fair to ask how long a man can be caged for 24 hours each day, fed two small meals, and allowed one shower in a period of two and a half weeks without expecting some type of reaction to this adverse environment.
Julius Martinez chaired the meeting to discuss the repressive conditions for these prisoners. Speakers and others at the meeting were lawyers, children, wives and families of the prisoners, former prisoners, the press and concerned community residents. Black, Anglo and Chicano were all represented in the group.
Carl Shames compared the Cellhouse Seven situation to the aftermath of Attica in New York and other situations around the country where prisoners are realizing that they have some rights, such as the right to three meals per day and some exercise each day.
The National Council of Black Lawyers has filed a suit with several other organizations and the process of the law suit was explained to the group. Since the filing of the suit, the prisoners are getting three meals a day and 15-30 minutes of exercise out-of-doors which had not been the case before.
Loretta Martinez spoke of her husband’s situation and her feelings. William Martinez was the manager of the radio station and did not go to the medium security prison because he was learning about radio technology and wanted to keep his job. Now he is in Cellhouse Seven. Though he would have been eligible for parole in ten months, she was not sure how much longer he would have < to serve because other charges had been brought against his previously good record.
Demonstrations are being planned by the group at activities where the governor will be attending or speaking. The group hopes to raise the interest and concern of many citizens and especially those who have family or friendship connections with the prisoners.
If persons desire further information about the Cellhouse Seven situation and activities to get different viewpoints in the newspapers, they may contact Maria Luz Quayle (534-5141) or Joan Zimko (892-0904).
WE URGE ALL CITIZENS to join us in our demands to:
1. End the massive and arbitrary lock-up in Cellhouse 7;
2. Establish disciplinary proceedings commensurate with due process of law, whether these proceedings are applied to inmates or guards;
3. Commence an independent investigation of the general prison lock-up and the deaths of Herman Brickhouse and William Padilla that occurred during the lock-up period;
4. That such independent investigative body be composed of three inmates, the representatives of the Corrections Department and thrqe lay citizens; and
5. expunge all records of these transfers to Cellhouse 7 so that none of the inmates will suffer adverse actions before the parole and/or commutation board.
Tuesday 9:30 a.m. -12:00 noon Sewing Classes at
Inner City Parish Beginning on November 5th
Sponsored by:
Headstart Inner City Parish Auraria Community Center Mennonite Urban Ministry Opportunity School
MARY BARRON CONQUERS ILLNESS
Not too long ago, it looked very much as though Mary Barron was on the losing side when she was struck down with acute pancreatitis. Her life was despaired of, but Mary Barron has never been a quitter and she fought as hard for her life as she has fought for all of the things that she believed in.
Mary fought not only for the sake of her family, but also for her community. After a quarter of a century of living in it, she was fully aware of its needs and frustrations.
Because it didn’t look like Mary Barron would ever be out campaigning again, Gerard Trujillo was designated as the legislative candidate of district 6. Trujillo, however, suddenly moved to Wheatridge, and the Republicans were left without a candidate.
A miracle then happened, aided by her three D’s: Desire, Determination and Destiny. Mary Barron got well. For she had the Desire to live; to leave her bed and get out among people again; the Determination to help the community in which she lived which was floundering about with many problems; and the Destiny that she felt the good Lord had endowed her with by giving her health again so she could set out on their goal of reaching the Hill where she felt the
solution to the problems of District 6 were.
The Republican Party gave her the go-ahead by appointing her as their candidate through the vacancy committee, and Mary was on the road to the Hill again.
Like so many West Denver residents, Mary is a native of Trinidad where she received her education and began her career as
As a member of Cooperative Endeavor, she is fully aware that the police and the community have to learn to better communicate with one another. As a census taker and nurse she often came upon the problem of child abuse and she feels that the legislature should do more to protect the helpless, little children who could be exposed to child abuse.
Mary Barron is on her way now, reaching for the Hill, her goal, the State Legislature. Up there on that Hill are many legislators who know Mary and like and respect her. With their help and co-operation she feels that she truly can do something for her community.
And those of us who watched her battling for her life, never giving up, know what a truly courageous person she is and how sincere she is in her concern for the welfare of the people of district 6.
Sunday School Youth at First Mennonite Church, collected over $500 in canned goods and money for Westside Action Center -
emergency assistance.


SANTA FE TRAIL - 9
Children use new playground at West Side Child Care.
Right to Read
PEANUT’S
Special Projects take Special People and thus is the case of Rita Mattingly, Head Teacher of the Peanuts Head Start Center.
Ms. Mattingly joined the program three years ago and refined the only Special Heal Start for emotionally disturbed children into a very unique program. She has done various workshops for teachers and administrators from throughout the state in the area of “Children with Special Needs”.
Rita received her B.A. in education from the College of Saint Mary,-her M.A. in Guidance and
The children enrolled in Peanuts Head Start this year are participating in an exciting new program in Developmental Dance. The teacher for this innovative project is Mrs. Jo Keel, dance instructor employed through C.S.U.’s Urban Extension Division.
Jo chose Peanuts as a pilot school after meeting and working with the children only once last
TEACHER
Counseling from St. Thomas College, and is currently working on another M.A. in Educationally Handicapped with emphasis on Learning Disabilities and Behavior Disorders. In addition, she has received grants from the National Science Foundation to study at Notre Dame University and from the EDPA Institute to study at Adams State College.
Ms. Mattingly’s experience includes twelve years teaching experience in various states as well as the head of the guidance and counseling department at Saint Joseph’s High School from 1967-1970. Her travels have taken her throughout the United States, Europe, and Mexico.
As a truly involved educator, Rita’s volunteer work has included summer teaching at various churches, tutoring, and she has served on a committee for the Denver Archdiocese in developing a curriculum for sex education in the primary grades. Her membership in various organizations includes the Council for Exceptional Children, the Colorado Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Colorado Association for Children with Learning Disabilities.
spring. She hopes to enhance the self-concept of the children and enrich their emotional experiences through fundamental dance movements. This class is being planned in conjunction with Joyce Edwinson, developmental motor therapist, and replaces her regular gross motor periods on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each week.
We are happy to announce that our Right to Read Program has been refunded for another year, till August, 1975. We hope to have an increasing amount of students and volunteer tutors in the coming year. For those of you who are not familiar with our program, let.me briefly tell you what services we provide. We work with adults only, 16 years and older, and teach the following classes:
(1) English as a Second Language — English is taught to those who speak another language (mainly Spanish).
(2) Reading — Helps improve the basic skills of English, and teaches up to the 6th grade level of reading. These sessions are taught one tutor to one student.
(3) Drivers Education — A 3 day course (3 hours a day) which helps you pass the written drivers exam. It is taught in both Spanish and English. For more information call 477-1043 or 572-1149.
We depend greatly on volunteers to tutor our students and are always in need of good tutors. The only requirement is that you have the desire to help and can work at
least two hours a week with a student.
Anyone interested or wanting more information about our program, please call 572-1149 or come down to our office at 675 Santa Fe Drive.
Tenemos el placer de in-formarles que nuestro programs “El Derecho de Leer" ofrece los siguientes clases:
Ingles — para todos los que no sepan hablarlo.
Lectura — para los que ya saben hablar en ingles y les interesa aprender a leer.
Leyes del transito — clases donde le ensenan todo lo que necesitan saber para el examen escrito.
Todo el que este interesado en ser estudiante o tutor voluntario en neustro programs, por favor comuniquese con cualquiera de nosotros: Jorge Gallegos, Maria Rumaitis, Diana Davalos, Gladys Pensado.
Neustro telefono es el: 572-1149. O venga a nuestra oficina situada en la biblioteca Byers — 675 Santa Fe Drive.
HEADSTART
A bigger and better Head Start Program is planned this year for the West Side. Center operated by the Auraria Community Center are Peanuts, 430 West Avenue, 534-8573; Auraria, 1212 Mariposa, 534-7614; and Raggedy Ann and Andy, 430 West 9th Avenue.
Teachers are Rita Mattingly, Harvey Ben as, Patricia Carlos, Eleanor Lucero, and Nancy Baca. They will be assisted by Pam Burnside, Jennie Bustos, Loyola Arellano, Virginia Darrow, Lenore Nieto, and Fabian Arellano. Instructional staff includes Joyce Edwinson as Motor Therapist and the following as Foster Grandparents: Cedi King, Mary Nelson, Helen Gurule, Carmen Hodges, and Rose Coleman.
The Sodal Serivces will be done by Rosalie Padilla, Social Worker; Marie Martinez and Marlene Sena, Community Aides. Other staff includes Jennie Dewald, Bookkeeper; Juanita Trujillo, Secretary; Psychologists — Barbara Pollack and Grace Ogden; Nutritionists — Mary Anthony and Betsy Palin; Nurses — Laurie Brodie and Carol Root; Speech Therapists—Betty Heboid, Nieves McIntyre, and Carla Yim. The program is administered by Sam Abeyta, Director.
Many of the staff members are presently expanding their expertise in childhood programs. Ms. Bustos and Ms. Mattingly are going to “Clown School”, Pan Burnside is involved in learning to become a ventroliquist, Ms. Edwinson is developing a “Body Movement and Awareness Program”, and Ms. Carlos is finishing her Child Development Associate Degree.
Staff plans include First Aid Training and Play Therapy. Throughout the year, some individuals will be conducting workshops in “Working with the Handicapped”.
Dance Program at Peanuts
VOTE ON NOV. 5 FOI^.
MARY BARRON - LIFTS HER EYES TO THE HILL
TO SEEK Understanding for Problems of Elderly and Needy of the Inner City - TO RENEW Hopes of Meaningful Aid for Youth of the Inner City - TO FIND Solutions for the Frustrations of Tax-Payers of the Inner City - TO TURN Eyes towards Working Programs in Crime Control, Drug Abuse and Child Abuse of the Inner City -TO BEGIN Era of Close Co-operation between all Legislatures and the Representative of the Inner City.
_____ REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR DISTRICT - 6._
State Representative Dist. 6
DEMOCRAT A VOTE FOR CASTRO, IS A VOTE FOR
QUALITY LEGISLATION
EXPERIENCE:
Group - Worker - Curtis Park Community Center 1968-69 Youth Worker - Denver Youth Services Bureau 1970
Mental Health Counselor - Boulder County 1971
Director -Westside Coalition 1972-74
Part-time Instructor - Metro State College 1973
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT:
Chairman, Auraria Community Center 1971-72
Vice Chairman, Student. Association School of Social Work, D.U. 1972
Chairman, Denver University Scholarship Cimm 1973
Menber, Colorado Heart Association - 1973-74
Member,, Mayors Manpower Advisory Committee 1974
Member Westside Youth Development Project 1973-74
Member, Project Common Cause 1973-74
Member, Plan Metro Denver 1973-74
Richard Castro
EDUCATION:
Annunciation High School St. Thomas Seminary Trinidad State Jr. College A.A.Degree - Education Metro State College B.A.Degree - Sociology & Psychology
Denver University M.S.W.Degree - Community Org.
1964
1965 1967
1970
1972
MARY BARRON
VOTE FOR CASTRO Tuesday NovemberSth


10 - SANTA FE TRAIL
SCHOOL SEWS
ELECTION
This new school year has started off pretty well considering all the busing issues and rearranging of younger human beings. Though some schools are having problems, West has been blessed with peace, tranquility, and the attitudes of “Oh, well, this isn’t' really my school so why should I bother?” and ‘T didn’t care what went on here last year so I won’t care this, year, either.” A great way for. avoiding racial tensions and other related matters, but these attitudes are causing trouble in some school functions, such as school elections.
More people in a school means more ideas. What a better way to make known these ideas and to get into the action than through Student Council?
Here is a list of the people who cared enough to get involved and the offices they now hold:
SOPHOMORE CLASS President Loretta Cordova
Vice President Kathy Porter
Secretary Pam Colvert
Treasurer Darlene Martinez
Sophomore representatives
___Lupe Herrera, Nickie
Medrano, Terri Dorcas, Tony Montano, Pat Munoz
JUNIOR CLASS
President Kip Velasquez
Vice President Lisa Munoz
Secretary Len Wilson
Treasurer Kathy Desormeaux
Junior Representatives ... .Terry Rios, Janice Hathaway, Debbie Mejia, Annette LeDoux, Denis Gallegos, Dave Zambromo
SENIOR CLASS
President Cindy Mares
Vice President Lee Simpson
Secretary Vicki Van \fleet
Treasurer Phil Montoya
Senior Representatives....Scott
Kitzman, Sara Guererro, Annette Sanchez, Pat Valdez, Jill Hill, Kim Rusch
ALL-SCHOOL
Head Girl ' Marisa Zamora Head Boy Gary Baca
Vice Head Girl Viola Barela
Vice Head Boy TimSandos
School Secretary LaDonn Witt
Assistant Secretary Vicki Cordova
Bl LINGUAL COORDINATOR,
Patricia Ann Carpio is the newest addition to the faculty at Del Pueblo Elementary School, 720 Galapago Street. Mrs. Carpio has been assigned, as the Bilingual-Bicultural teacher, to assist in the further development of Del Pueblo’s bilingual-bicultural educational program.
Mrs. Carpio has taught for seven years, teaching Spanish in both Jefferson County and Denver. Last year, she taught at Smedley Elementary School and has previous experience in curriculum development in bilingual-bicultural education for the Denver Public Schools and the Colorado Migrant Council. Mrs. Carpio received her degree in Spanish from Colorado State College in Greeley and was certified in Elementary Education through Denver’s Metropolitan State College.
During her first two weeks at Del Pueblo, Mrs. Carpio’s time has been devoted to becoming familiar with Del Pueblo’s educational program, meetings with teachers
on the development of future plans, identifying needed educational materials, and conducting cultural activities. The first of these activities was an all-school assembly presented on September 16th. This assembly featured a skit, involving several students at Del Pueblo, on the history of September 16th and a Mexican dance performance by the Guadalupe Mestizo Dancers.
Mrs. Carpio has found the staff at Del Pueblo an exciting group to work with and sees Del Pueblo as leading the way in bilingual-bicultural education. Summarizing her feelings, Mrs. Carpio stated, “I have found Del Pueblo an educationally exciting school with a warm and comfortable atmosphere”. She believes that bilingual-bicultural education is a vital part of any educational plan geared to meet the unique needs of children. Mrs. Carpio also believes that the school community must be part of the plan. She and the staff at Del Pueblo want you to remember that you are always bienvenidos at Del Pueblo.
FAIRMONT-LINCOLN
PAIRED
The pairing of Fairmont and Lincoln Elementary School, under the plan for desergration, has resulted in 100 children being exchanged every day. Lincoln Anglo children come to Fairmont and Fairmont Hispano children go to Lincoln. Children stay in their own school for reading and math.
During the time they exchange, they have art, music, physical education, science, social studies and lunch. Teachers meet frequently between the two schools to exchange ideas and keep the programs together.
Children seem to be adjusting well to the new schedules and bus schedules are beginning to smooth out. We have a community bus aide on each bus to help the driver in case any student needs help or is misbehaving.
After the first 9 weeks grading period we will select a new group of children to be exchanged, parents will be notified at that time. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation and urge parents to continue to work with their school to make this program work.
The two gym teachers at Fair-
mont this year are Mr. Montoso and Miss Casey. They are teaching primarily soccer and football to the boys and girls in fourth, fifth and sixth grades.
In the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades they teach some games, work with various playground balls, and explore moving in all kinds of ways. They welcome visitors who may come at any time during the day and see what Fairmont and Lincoln boys and girls are doing.
Louis Mejia, a student at Baker, is helping during the noon hour and in the afternoon.
Fairmont School’s 4th, 5th, and 6th graders are participating in a new individualized reading program called the High Intensity Reading Center.
This program allows each child to work independently on the particular skills that he needs to develop.
Boxes and boxes of new materials and books have been purchased for the program, which is set up in Room 103. Come to the school and visit this exciting reading center from 9:00-11:30 or 1:00-3:20 daily.
D llinoue - Bicultura
Desde que la Corte Districts de los Estasdos Unidas ordeno' a las escuelas publicas de Denver que tenien que integrar sus escuelas muchas actividades se han iniciado. Uno de las actividades discutidas es el programs de education Bilingue-Bicultural.
Las oficinas centrales del programa Bilingue-Bicultural estah localicadas en la escuela Greenlee elementary. Esas oficinas incluyen la oficina del Senor Alberto Aguayo, supervisor del programa, un cuarto de materias, un cuarto de conferencia y un cuarto para el desarrollo de la facultad. ,
Aspectas especificos de este programa basico Bilingue-Bicultural se . iniciara en las escuelas designadas por la corte. Esas escuelas incluyen West High, Baker Junior High, Boulevard, Cheltenham, Del Pueblo, Garden Place and Swansea-Elyria. Cada de las escuelas designadas tiene una maestra Bilingue-Bicultural y ayudantes Bilingues-Biculturales quienes estaran desarrollando la filosofia y la dirreccio'n que se ha propuesto al Board of Education de las escuelas publicas de Denver.
El programa Bilingue-Bicultural tendra un vahedad de propositos. Uno de esos propositos sera comunicacion con el ambiente de cada escuela para comunicar el progreso del programa. Esta comunicacion se hara por la radio, periodicos y con comunicacion con los habitantes de la comunidad.
Since the U.S. District Court ordered the Denver Public Schools to desergregate their schools many activities have been initiated and implemented. One such activity is the Bilingual-Bicultural Education Program.
The central offices for the Denver Public Schools Bilingual-Bicultural Program are located at Greenlee Elementary School. Those offices include the office of Mr. Al Aguayo, Program Supervisor, a resource materials center, a staff development room and a room that is used for regular meetings of the Bilingual-Bicultural Advisory Committees.
Specific aspects of the Pilot Bilingual-Bicidtural Education Program are being implemented in the court designated schools which include West High, Baker Junior High, Boulevard, Cheltenham, Del Pueblo, Garden Place and Swansea-Elyria. Each of the court designated schools has Bilingual-Biculturab Resource Teachers and Bilingual-Bicultural Paraprofessionals who are involved in the implementation of the Bilingual-Bicultural philosophy and objectives that have been proposed to the Board of Education, Denver Public Schools.
The Bihngual-Bicultural Education Program is committed to a variety of goals. One of those goals is to communicate with the respective school communities as to the progress of the program. This communication will be through the news media,
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SANTA FE TRAIL - 11
Boy of the Year
On October 8, 1974 The Boys’ Clubs of Denver held their Annual Awards Banquet at the Brown Palace. At this banquet some thirty six boys from the Lincoln Park Boys’ Club had a dinner and received a trophy.
But these fine young boys worked hard to achieve this award. They earned this by being picked boy of the month this past year, and to be picked boy of the month the boys had to meet the following criteria: Good attendance at the club, good attitude, show some leadership, good participation, loyalty to the club, and above all citizenship.
Out of these boys the club picks one boy to represent the club as boy of the year. And this year Charlie Bargas received the award. Charlie lives at 715 Elati St., with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Joe Bargas who are retired. He has one older sister at home and one older brother in the Navy.
Charlie has been a member of the club since 1963. His participation at the club is as follows: He’s played football at the club. He was active in the boxing program. He’s a member of the Keystone Club, worked in the library, played soccer and baseball for the club. Charlie also made several projects in the arts and crafts shop as well. He has worked as a counter boy at the club and in the community worked at Adelante Super Market and as a sweeper boy at Baker.
Charlie, fifteen years of age, is a sophomore at West High School. He carries an A and B average in his school work. He plays trumpet for the advanced band. He is also a member of the R.O.T.C. and holds a rank of Corporal. He’s won medals for the following: Boulder competition, Color Guard, Voluntary Service, Cadet of Month, and Pro-Marksman.
Charlie’s ambitions are to finish high school, earn a scholarship to a military school, and hopefully make a military career for himself.
Congratulations Charlie and congratulations to the following boys who done a fine job this past year and received awards at the Banquet: David Becerra, Alex Becerra, Anthony Becerra, Manual Hernandez, Harold Rutherford, Robert Rutherford, Marty Archibeque, Albert Vigil, Danny Quintanilla, Ronald Gregory, Manuel Mossman, Vincent Torres, Paul Torres, Manuel Basquez, Johnny Montoya, Leonard Montoya, Billy Decker, Pat Castellano, Anthony Pacheco, Ray Gomez, Johnny Rivera, Marvin Trujillo, Danny Varela, Victor Barros, Ricky Milten-berger, Larry Munoz, Joe Munoz, Carl Camacho, Tommy Solano, Steven Hernandez, Harvey Gray, Dale Oswald, Teddy Romero, Robert Trujillo, Frank Hernandez and Gerald Gonzales.
SUPPORT YOUR - TEAM
AZTECS
DESERVE
SUPPORT
Football is once again upon us, and it is most rewarding to see so many children sign up for football this year. We hope that our youths not only learn football tactics, sportmanship and develop a sense of unity, but enjoy themselves as well. It is the opinion of this writer that the enthusiasm expressed is the best way to solidify cooperation between agencies, coaches, and youth of this Westside Community.
Home game schedules are being posted at the Auraria Community Center bulletin board. Staunch football fans scoff at summer time trial and tribulations, to point out that there are weekends when Aztecs football teams will attract more than 1,500 spectators collectively for the Senior “A’s”, Senior “B’s”, Intermediate, Jr. “A’s” and Jr. “B’s”.
Auraria Community Center as well as all other recreation agencies congratulates eich football player and coach and hopes each division has a successful football season.
LA ALMA TEAM
La Alma Recreation Center, which is located at 1200 Mariposa has had football teams for the past 3 years, in which they have taken 2nd place for the past 2 years. The records for the past two years were 5 wins and 1 loss. This year La Alma’s football team is undefeated and according to the coaches and team, they plan to finish the season undefeated and win the championship this year.
This year’s team consists of coaches, Vic and Phil DeLeon. Players are as follows: Mike Vigil, Nick Martinez, Gab Ortegon, Mike Rogers, Don Mondragon, Anthony Vigil, John Duran, Art Chavez, Joe Martinez, Mario Rameriz, Rich DeLeon, Joe Herrera, Porfirio Carabajal, Earl Anaya, John Valero, Mnual Montoya, Leonard Barela.
LAALMANO.I!!!!'.!
BAKER FOOTBALL
The Red Shield team from the Baker area have had a good year so far with a winning streak and a great deal of backing from Baker boosters. The team, which has defeated Cent a- (Cole) 9 to 3 and the team from Grant 32 to 0. The football placers from Baker are: Mike Padilla, Mike Quintana, Luis Mejia, Albert Romero, Lupe Carlos, Joe Franco, Norman Garcia, Joe Rico, Greg Lopez, Roland Wilcox, Carlos Gutierrez, Earl Achilles, Levi Hobbs, Rod Gerdes, Greg Hogan, Allen Hogan, Rick Tafoya, Ken Nesbitt, Bart
Shedron, Larry An tuna.
Backing the team are a lot of students and an attractive set of cheerleaders sponsored by Margaret Schmidt. The cheerleaders are: Julie Reeves, Peggy Valdez, Laurie Hillman, Lori Gonzales, Sandy Martinez, Kelly Walters, Yvonne Perales, Cathy Atencio.
A Pep Club is also being formed by Mary Arellano, Evelyn Sanchez, and Stephanie Perea under the leadership of Mrs. Mary Espinosa and Josie Quintana.
AZTEC FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
First
Game
I don’t know about you but I can’t remember watching a muddier game than the one the Sr “A” Aztecs and Hawks staged Saturday afternoon (12 Oct 74).
This contest, phsycially played with a heavy measure of brutality, contained a little bit of everything.
A great team effort produced a lone Aztec touchdown on a fake punt by Alonzo Mota, this was easily the Aztecs game’s big play.
Coach Koehler was pleased with the overall play of the team, but feels that a lot more hard work must be accomplished before a championship team can be developed. Asked how the team was responding to the hard workouts: Koehler’s reply was “sweat, exhaustion, and improvement”.
In addition to the Sr. “A’s” the other four Aztec teams, all got off to a slow start, but improvement by the offensive and defensive lines is noticeable and their respective coaches are optimistic that the end results will be a winning season. So patience is the word — to all Aztec fans, our coaches are working very hard to bring the West Side some Championship Football.
Youth
Project
The Westside Youth Development Project received a continuation grant on Tuesday night, September 17, 1974, from the Denver Anti-Crime Council for the amount of $119,000.00. The previous amount requested was $468,000.
Sonny Soriano, Project Director, attended several meetings with DACC staff regarding the above stated monies. However, because we are not a law enforcement agency, we were denied the total amount. The DACC staff then recommended that the Westside Youth Development Project revise its budget to continue functioning at the present level of operation.
Consequently, the Project at this point is unable to develop the vocational program, Camp Malo or an increase in staff. We will, however, continue with Project 20 and Project Freedom.
The Westside Youth Development Project will continue to work with youth in the near west Denver community and will continue to draw up new and innovative • 'programs for tMe*Mttifd..* *’
TEAM DATE
SR “A” VS FALCONS
SR “B” VS FALCONS BLUE 2Nov74
INTER VS FALCONS 2 Nov 74
JR “A” VS BUCKING BRONCOS 2 Nov 74
JR “B” VS ROUGH RIDERS 6 Nov 74
JR “A” VS ROUGH RIDERS 8 Nov 74
INTER VS BOMBERS 9 Nov 74
SR “B” VS INDIANS 9Nov74
SR “A” VS REDSKINS RED 9 Nov 74
JR “B” VS REDBIRDS 13 Nov 74
JR “A” VS REDBIRDS 15 Nov 74
INTER SEASON ENDED SR “B” VS COWBOYS 16 Nov 74
SR “A” VS COWBOYS 16 Nov 74
LOCATION TIME
LINCOLN PARK 10:30 A.M.
LINCOLN PARK 9:00 A.M.
E. 19th & Syracuse 9:00 A.M.
W. 46th & Irving 4:30 P.M.
LINCOLN PARK 4:30 P.M.
LINCOLN PARK 4:30 P.M.
LINCOLN PARK - 9:00 A.M.
CITY PARK 9:00 A.M.
W. OHIO & So CLAY 10:30 A.M.
W. LOUISIANA & So NEWTON 4:30P.M.
W. LOUISIANA & So NEWTON 4:30 P.M.
LINCOLN PARK 9:00 A.M.
LINCOLN PARK 10:30 A.M.
EN EL CORAZON DEL BARRIO
A1TLAIM
••Nuestro Vino es Agrio, pero es nuestro Vino" Jose'Marti
CONSERVEMOS NUESTRO IDIOMA Y CULTURA, ASISTIENDO A LAS MEJORES PELICULAS EN ESPANOL.
ATTENTION! ATTENTION! PRESENTING THE PORTION OF THIS PROGRAM, YOU ARE ENTITLED TO RECEIVE A DISCOUNT OF 35c FOR YOU AND YOUR GUESTS. THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATRONAGE.
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AUUTO VAZQUEZ ? LOftUU VELAZQUEZ
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NOVIEMBRE 8, 9, y 10
ANTONIO AGUILAR _
MARICRUZ OLIVIER If.
CiDl^ademas vea el estreno^X
^"NOSOTROS LOS FEOS"MM* ' ' \
con RUBEN OLIVARES Y ELSA CARDENAS > * i NOVIEMBRE 15, 16 y 17
35c Discount
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VKXNTI FEAltANKZ * IUUKA SANCHEZ
Braulio Castillo
Mario Almada *Machuchal\
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NOVIEMBRE 29, 30 y DICIEMBRE 1j iDos comedias colosales
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TELEFONO - 573-011


12 - SANTA FE TRAIL
Your Neighbors
Mrs. Margot Serumgard of 1247 Lipan Street recently honored an old friend and neighbor, Mrs. Mary Galli, who turned 102 years old. Mrs. Galli who now resides in an nursing home in Westminister, formerly lived at 1242 Lipan Street. There were fifteen guests present including the Swiss Consul, Robert Gasser and his wife, for Mrs. Galli is of Italian and Swiss descent. Mrs. Serumgard provided a beautiful birthday cake, and the guests brought lovely gifts for Mrs. Galli. The Mayor of Denver, William McNichols, Jr. sent a lovely basket of roses to Mrs. Galli.
Mrs. Mary Kay Bloch of Phoenix, Arizona, recently visited her mother, Mrs. Annie Williams of 365 Delaware Street with her new little four month daughter, Rachel Annie. Mrs. Bloch’s three other children, Kenny, Melanie and Jennie Sue Brott are well remembered on the Westside for they lived at the 365 Delaware address for many years while they attended Fairmont School. Jennie Sue is now enrolled in Brigham Young University in Utah; Melanie is studying nursing in a San Francisco hospital and Kenny plans to become a psychiatrist.
Jewell Howard has moved from 1427 Mariposa to a trailer home, in Aurora. However, she will continue as president of the North Lincoln Senior Clubs so we know we’ll see her in the area at least twice a month. Many people will miss Jewell, both for her friendship and for the many times she has helped people by giving rides to various places as well as assisting in many other ways.
Mrs. Melody 'Moseley, and children arrived in Tokyo, Japan September 4, 1974. Her husband Sp4 — Stephen Moseley is stationed at Yama Hospital. They will be in Tokyo for 3 years. Melody is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Frank Dabrowski who live at 1115 Inca. Stephen is the son of Mrs. Ida Moseley, she lives at 1140 Mariposa.
Emma Lucero of 1211 Kalamath passed away on September 3,1974. She lived at this address for 12 years. She is the mother of Mrs. Mary Ann Trujillo and Toby Espinosa, formerly of the West-side.
Sylvia Perrin visited her two older sisters in Iowa for about ten days this last month, returning to Denver on October 15.
Nellie Morales was proud to meet her first great-great-grandson, Brian, in Sacramento, California this past month. Brian was bom in Alaska where his father was then stationed with the Coast Guard.
Mag Maydral of 1212 Lipan is in St. Luke’s Hospital. He suffered a heart attack on September 20,1974. He is the son of Mrs. Euladea Maynoe of 1110 Inca St.
Laura Henderson, who works in the office of the Lincoln Homes, was hospitalized in Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center for several days this month and is now at home recuperating. Laura is missed by many of the residents because her quick smile and helpfulness make the office a warmer place. We wish you a speedy recovery, Laura!
Westsiders are reminded not to forget to send a birthday card to Mrs. Bertha Lynch who will celebrate her 85th birthday next month. Her address is now the Valley Hi Nursing Home, 4686 Asbury Circle, Denver, Colo. She formerly resided at 326 Galapago Street.
Mr. Orwin Coffman, formerly of 1319 W. 13th Avenue, died on October 9, 1974. He had moved to the Lakewood Nursing Home a short time before his death.
Mrs. Irene Patty of 316 Galapago Street just returned from visiting her mother and her old home in' New York.
Ruby Barros, 1432 Osage, died at Denver General on October 12, 1974. Her funeral was at Sacred Heart Church on October 15. She was taking care of Virginia Duran, a granddaughter, until the time she died. Mrs. Barros had many relatives on the West Side.
Father Aquinas from St. Elizabeth’s Church and Lincoln Park Senior Citizen’s Group went on an aspen drive Sept. 27. There were 23 people in all. We went to Georgetown, Colorado then on toward St. Mary’s Glacier and then back to Idaho Springs. The aspens were in full splendor! We had lunch in Idaho Springs and while eating, it started to rain and snow. We enjoyed the snow and ride so very much, thanks to Sister Rene and to Sister Jean.
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens had another trip on October 5 to Buckingham Square for lunch. Lunch was at the club’s expense and a good time was had by all.
Luncheon is still being served at 1212 Mariposa at the Auraria Community Center. Afterwards there is Spanish music by Charles Armya and David Furieta. Seniors may also play bingo, transportation to go shopping is provided.
Action on Stores
Within the last two years the Stamp Investigator^ off erred only Westside Action Center has little help, received numerous complaints on A meeting was held at the some of the neighborhood stores on District Attorney’s Office on the Westside. The majority of the Consumer Affairs. All store owners complaints have been on the with the exception of Jack’s following stores: Baker Corner Grocery attended. Others in at-Grocery, American Way Market, tendance were Mr. Barella with Third Avenue Market, K & B, Public Health, Dr. Larson with Jacks Comer Grocery and K & N Meat Inspection, Mr. Lucas with Supermarket. The complaints the D.A.’s Office and Rita Lucero have ranged from spoiled food, and Pat Gibson with the Westside bugs in food, dirty stores, short Action Center. The F.D.A. was changing, not giving food stamp asked to attend since they do have change, and disrespectful attitudes a Consumer Division. They did not towards customers. send a representative, as they had
Surveys have been taken of these an overload of work, to my stores and it is felt that the estimation the F.D.A. does not majority of the complaints are represent the poor, justified. Many different ways A list of demands was presented have been tried to straighten out to the store employers. They will these stores. A boycott was called be given one week.to clean up their on Baker Corner Grocery stores stores and .make other im-last year but was unsuccessful provements. They did agree to do Meetings have been held with this.
Health and Meat Inspectors and
also the Federal Drug Ad- Things are looking better, ministration. These meetings Rita Lucero and Pat Gibson resulted in little or no action. Food Westside Action Center
STOP INFLATION
Let us unite together now to kill nation wide demonstration on the monster — INFLATION! November 16th. This demon-People from all over the country stration will take place in Denver are forming together in the fight at the Capitol building. (The against inflation. These people are location is subject to change, known as Citizens Against In- watch your newspapers and TV for flation. A chapter has been formed further information), in Denver and is now actively Let’s stop the rich from getting taking part in the battle. Roseanne richer and the poor from getting Washington has been elected poorer. It is not getting any better chairwoman. and it never will end unless we the
On October 18th, Citizens people stand up and join the fight. Against Inflations picketed the Come to the demonstration and Safeway store on 26th and Federal, show your support! If you are Approximately thirty people came interested in joing up with the and gave their support from dif- Citizens Against Inflation please ferent agencies and groups across call Rita Lucero or Pat Gibson at Denver. The Westside was also the Westside Action Center. (534-there and will continue in the fight 5141) LET’S KILL THAT MON-against inflation. There will be a STER BEFORE IT KILLS US!
n/7,
WMSMT
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Full Text

PAGE 1

111111111111111111111111111111 Railroad Rightof-Way A_greed On Westside residents can be proud of their victory on October lOth as they stood together to keep Per sonal Rapid Transit ( PRT) from tearing across their neigh borhoods. It all happened at the Regional Transportation District ( RTD) meeting. There was a tremendous turn out as approximately 200 people came to Baker Jr. High School to find out about RTD and make their voices heard. The purpose of the meeting was for the Westside Community to recom mend to the RTD Board which of thP fnllnwinlt routes tQe RTD We s hould take . The routes being considered run along Broadway, Lincoln, Bannock, Delaware, and the Railroad. Richard Castro moderated the meeting and J.D. Wilas and Tom Heaton of the Citizens Action Committee ( CAC) provided information on RTD and showed slides to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the PRT routes. After the presentations the meeting was opened for discussion. The people raised a strong protest against PRT, as residents felt it would destroy the Westside Community . There were also businessmen from Broadway who felt it would ruin their businesses . A motion was made to accept only the railroad as the PRT to take. The motion was seconded and put to a vote . The motion passed unanimously. Westsiders will not be stepped on this time! A task force is being formed to make sure that our vote counts and that Westside will have a voice in the future of their homes and neighborhoods . The task force will also be studying bus routes and recommending new bus routes and additional buses to the RTD Board. Santa Fe TrailJ =------<>'f/.111 • ; , " = " -ests lidl e NUMBER 5 NOVEMBER 1974 . . \ ':..;-t. Del Pueblo Community Now that Del Pueblo Elementary School is a reality; another dream of the planners and residents is coming true . Denver Public Schools will be hiring a com munity-school coordinator sometime after the first of the year. Gil Cruter, executive director for community schools with Denver Public Schools, met with a group of 35 people to begin plan ning for a comrnunity schqol program. This is not to be just an after-school program nor is it to be in competition with other organizations or agencies or programs around the neigh borhood. An advisory council is being formed to guide the comrnunity school program. Neighborhood persons wanted to make sure that this council would have some authority and would be responsible for the program not just a "rubber stamp." Much of the discussion at the meeting was on the power and authority of the council. Representatives from youth, parents, clergy, business, professionals, teachers, and agencies will be on this council. The principal of Del Pueblo will also be on the council. One .6f the first tasks of the council will be to do a stirvey of the community to dtermine the needs, interests, and skills of the area persons. Then the council will select priorities for the program and hopefully will be part of the process for selecting the com munity-school coordinator for Del Pueblo . Mr . Cruter said that he had not yet written up a job description for the community school coordinators and would be happy to work with the planning group when he had a rough draft. The advisory council or the planning group would also have imput into specific requirements for the position at Del Pueblo . The selection process for the advisory council has not been determined but will be decided on by the planning group which is meeting . Persons interested in the program or in the advisory council should come to the next meeting at Del Pueblo on October 30th at 7:00 p.m. Money for the coordinator's salary has been allocated b y Denver Public schools and there will be some additional money for administrative overhead. Monies for program, staff, and supplies for the various activities at the school will have to be raised by the advisory council, coordinator , principal and the neighborhood . There may be some federal or state money which could be received through the school. There will also be a city-wide coordinating council for the community school programs. Del Pueblo is the first such Jrogram in Denver although some of the suburbs have already established a community school. Another program will be established at a Denver school, probably a high school. Future meetings of the planning group will include a trip to one of the suburban comrnunity school programs, a planning meeting lor the community survey, and the organization of the advisory council. Questions asked on the survey will be : what services are needed? who can teach skills or classes? what are other agenCies doing in the area? Everyon e' s imput is needed for this new program in the area. Plan to atte nd t he October 30th meeting and b e a part of y our future and the future of others in the area. The com munity school will hopefully ser v e all persons : pre-school, pare nts, s tudents, older persons, etc . Vote NOVS Your Vote Affects Your Future Business Survey Completed For more than a year now, the .. coo peration with DCDC and l Board members of NEW-SED, other development agencies . Inc., the economic development " The community should ur ge the corporation of the W es tside Action City a nd County g overnment to Council, have been busy putting assist in: together many ideas on the .. rerouting traffic possibilit y of a Cultural Plaza . . creating parking provisions located somewhere on the near . . placing an employment center Westside, maybe along Santa Fe in the community ( a mail room or Drive. Many different ideas as to keypunch center, for example, location, size, kinds of stores, etc., would be extremely helpful in have been discussed and developed starting a revita lization of the with the help of the Community community' s economics. There Design Center from the University would follow a natural growth of of Colorado at Denver . Before any business around such a center) . future plans could be developed, a "Private investment in the market feasibility study was community must also be en needed to determine . the size and couraged and will be stimulated kinds of stores and retail services by: Westside residents could actually . . improved appearance support. . . better security Working with the Denver . . an increasing number of Housin g Administration and its contiguous successful Director , Dan Luna, a contract to As to location of an eventual do the study was signed with the Cultural Plaza, it was noted that firm of Bickertt, Browne, & the market lies outside the com Coddington and Associates, Inc . munity for the most part and, as a NEW-SED recently received the consequence, the area around 6th report which was started in June of and 8th Avenues and Santa Fe 1974. Conclusions of the report Drive would have the greatest were presented first to the Housing access. Other locations to be Ad,ninistrations, then to the considered are the area around the Mayor's Assistant, Mr. Wilder, and Westside Action Center and near the City Housing staff and finally to Colfax Avenue . the Westside Action Council at its The Westside area had a great monthly meeting on September number of advantages due to 26th. . location, housing, population and Mr. Jim, author of the study, facilities already in existence in made the following analysis: the comrnunity. Declining urban "Though the proposed Cultural areas have traditionally sought Plaza does not stand a great assistance from the government in chance for success at this time, their revitalization which this there are a number of things to be community also may need to do in done in the Westside comrnunity the near future. which will lead to the conditions NEWSED, Inc. will continue to which could support such a retail develop economic opportunities in and comrnercial venture in the the community . It plans to request future. Among these are: city help in developing a com . . continuation of the local . prehensive improvement plan for newspaper the Westside . At the same time, it . . creatio n of a Businessmen's is exploring an expandeq multi Association service center, a development plan . . expansion of comrnunity ser-for the Colfax region Neighborhood vices through tl\e Action Center Development Program (DURA), .. continued efforts to stimulate and an ethnic -oriented retail c ity interest in the neighoor.hood ' . 'Center, ' fQr future : development.

PAGE 2

2 SANTA FE TRAIL Santa Fe Trail OUR-EDITORIAL POLICY This newspaper -THE SANTA FE TRAIL-and its editorial staff will not come out in favor of one candidate or another. Because of this, we have called all candidates and have given them an opportunity to ad vertise at a fair and equal price. Republicans and Democrats have advertised. The staff hopes that all readers who are registered to vote will study the backgrounds and political stands of each candidate. Then we ask each person to vote on November 5th!!! On the issues, the editorial staff feels compelled to speak out, especially Nhen the issues affect residents and workers in this neighborhood. In the ! )ast we have spoken out on the school boycott, vandalism, PRT, and _ to vote . . In this issue we are also speaking out on issues which affect persons from this area and hope that residents will also begin to state their response and feelings to issues as they see them. For that reason we publish letters to the editors, neighborhood notes, and articles from residents and workers as much as space permits. We are looking forward to a heavy voter turn-out on the Westside and we are looking forward to hearing from many persons about our paper and about the neighborhood concerns. NOON LUNCH PROGRAM FOR OLDER PERSONS Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Monday, Wednesday, Friday Lunch at 11:30 a.m. Dorothy Martin, coordinator 523-7614 St. Joseph's Parish Hall (PASCO) 6th and Galapago Monday through Friday, daily CAPITAL PUNISHMENT 10ur Logo The state legislature wasn't strong or brave enough t<>'face the issue of capital punishment, the issues is on the ballot this November 5th. But, people around the neighbOrhood and around the are begin ning to speak out against capital punishment and are urging people to vote NO on Amendment No. 2 on the state ballot. . Lawyers are saying capital punishment is in violation of the U.S. Constitution. Professionals who study statistics are saying that death penalty and the Because questions were raised fear of it does not reduce murder and crime. about the masthead of SANTA FE Religious persons are saying that killing a person for crimes is not the TRAIL, a brief description is inChristian way. The person should be rehabilitated . eluded. Several images stand out District Attorneys are saying that executions cost more tax money and in the symbol and logo. time than life imprisonment. Colorado will pay over $1,300,000 per year if First is the name-THE SANTA the amendment is passed. . FE TRAIL-which for many will Wardens of prisons say that murderers can be rehabilitated and are be a reminder of St. Joseph ' s High being rehabilitated so that they become good citizens. School and some of the Prisoners have said that law courts are not infallible and some persons publications at that school. who are innocent have been executed. But SANTA FE TRAIL also Around the world, other countries are saying that capital punishment is stands for the main thoroughfare inhumane and unjust. of the neighborhood and the hope Minorities and poor people are saying that most of the persons who are that again there will be nice sbops in prison or who have been executed are poor or minority. Extremely few and retail stores along that street have been middleclass or rich. that will serve this area. The map Other newspapers are asking their readers to vote against this of the area is highlighted by Santa amendment for the above and other reasons. Fe Drive which will partially be a The Westside has many families with sons in the Canon City Prison. thermometer of the progress of our Some men from the neighborhood have been executed during the past neighborhood as all work for the century and families have had to grieve their loss, for there was no hope redevelopment of the area and the that these executed men would return to families and wives and parents . remodeling of homes. Because capital punishment is inhuman, discriminatory , ineffective, The two pictures show our people costly, and so very final, we ask that you vote against Amendment No. 2 at work and at play . Though there on November 5th. This is a vote that will affect families-and persons in is presently a large amount of work this neighborhood. to do, time off for laughter , good None of us can be sure that the person convicted of the crime com-fun, and times together is very mitted it or that the convicted person cannot be rehabilitated . important. Several men that Warden Tinsley knew were originally sentenced to In all the issues and work of THE death. After having their sentences commuted and then serving 20-40 SANTA FE TRAIL, the editorial years , these men were released and none of them that the Warden knew board hopes to serve the entire ever committed another homicidal crime (murder). Men and women can neighborhood: Mexican be rehabilitated and live useful lives. Americans, Anglos, Blacks, VOTE NOon No. 2 on November 5th. residents , professionals, agencies, organizations, and businesses. So the pictures show different peoples who a re working together without forgetting who they are as inWESTSIDE Inter Agency Meeting Lunch at 12:45 noon Fr Leroy Burke, coordinator 534-4408 , dividuals. 12:01) noon A good lunchjs served and often is a program of interest to Perhaps you have other things you see in the masthead or logo. Write us and give us your opinion. Thanks to Jaime Espinoza, the artist and advertising manager, who designed this logo for our newspaper and for our community. older persons. If you are over 60 years old and want to have a good time with others a g()og come to one o' the lunch programs . . I ,You can pay as you are through a system. e ENJOY A DELIGHTFUL ESCAPE INTO TOTAL TRADITIONAL ATMOSPHERE, AS YOU DINE AT ONE OF DENVER'S TRULY ORIGINAL e SERVING THE FINEST IN AN UNRIVALED SPANISH ATMOSPHERE, YOUR FAVORITE COCKTAILS AND THE FINEST IN MEXICAN FOOD. e LISTEN TO OUR ROMANTIC ENTERTAINMENT EVERY NIGHT FROM TUESDAY TO SATURDAY, AND LET YOUR IMAGINATION GO TO DIFFERENT PLACES FROM THE LATIN WORLD. FEATURING JAIME GOMEZ GUITAR SOLOIST At Auraria Community Residents and Agency I LARIMER SQUARE DENVER, COLORADO Phone 573-9797 Center Persons INVITED

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OLDER PERSONS GO TO SCHOOL FREE N . Lincoln Food Stamps Some peo ple' s Idea of Utop ia would be to be able t.o w a lk into a fine college with no e n t ran ce ex amination , no examination papers and no fees of any kin d , an d be allowed to c hoose any sub jec t tha t t h ey w ant. Suddenly , we find out that t h ere is suc h an Utopi a , only to get in it , you have to be a little ben t , with hair a little gray , for you h ave to be ove r sixty ye a r s old . Professor Tom Stein who i s in c harge of this p r o g ram f or Senior C itizens at the Den v e r c ampu s o f t h e Unive r sity of Colorad o , said that thi s pro gram is b eing re ce i ved with e nthu s iasm b y both t he o ld e r stud e nts and the yoWJger stud e nt s . H e said that at the present tim e t h e re are ov e r t wenty -five eld e rly peo ple attending class es and t hat t h ey are doin g v ery w ell in them . Professor Stein s a i d that the area is quite wide . There are t w o elderl y people study history ; one studying business l aw; several who are studying French and Spanish ; one who has entered the Introduction to Ps y chology class ; o ne has entered Mr. Robert Jennings , Denver a philosoph y class; seve r are in the D irector of the Food Stamp Ad Fine . Arts Class , one in ministr a tio n , annoWJced recently o n e m the theater one in the that residents on the we stside Sociology o f Family se v era l would be able to purchase food are m Modern Japan co urses and >tamps at a ne w location o n the anoth e r is in the Formation of westside . This location is the Ameri ca n Educa tion class . CommWJity Cent er in orth Professor Stein said that the only Lincoln Park H omes at 1438 classes that Senior Citize n s are not a v ajo . Present plans w oul d allow e ncoura ge d to enter are la b and for the purchase of stamps on two sc ien ce cl a s ses and thos e requirin g da ys each mo n th b eginn in g this Intensive p hysical e xertion . N ovem ber. The dates for th i s He sai d t hat new classes will m onth are N o v ember 6 and 8. start in the Spring Semester and all Pe r sons who find it more con i n t erested parties are encouraged v enient to purchase food stamps at to register for them sometime in the Lincoln Park Community January. Professor Stein hopes Center should request that their t hat t here will be a w onderful r e c o t ds be transferred to this turnout of Sen i or Citizens from the location . At the present time this Westside for these free college request must be done in person at Student Active Byers School. The i dea for a Food Stamp location came from Mattie N i xon, President of the Concerned Seniors of Noryh Lincoln Park Homes . With the support of Liz V igil , President of Noryh Lin c oln Resident CoWlcil, and Norma Wilson , President of tl1e South Lincoln Resident CoWJcil, questionnaires and petitions were c irculated throughout the area. Ove r 200 signatures were collected in a short period of time and sent to Mr . Jennings for his consideration. 1n Community as a tenant , Darlene wants to continue her education at Metro College in the area of Criminal Law . She says that she would like to teach young people , especially, about the law and right.s because she sees a great many of the youth of the West Side being harrassed. Darlene says that maybe e v en some day she would like to become " I like the W e stside . The way it ' s progressin g . Santa Fe Drive is starti n g to become pretty . Like :'-delante CommWJity Supermarket IS a name which came from the peo ple." These are the w ords and feelin g s of a beautiful Chicana who is the y oungest member of a famil i a which has lived on the West S i de for over 26 years . Darlene Dominguez is 17 years old and a Senior at West High School. She is the Westside youth representative of the Westside Council and works part tune at the Westside Action Center where she is studying to be a Para leg al in the field of Landlord Tenant Law . Working along side the Housing Counselor , Betty Koehler, Darlene feels tha t she is really helpmg out the people . With the experience of counseling people as to the ii' rights a lawyer . . Ask'ed if she had an y special people in mind whom she admired , Darlene really admire any special person other than saying that any Chicano who truly becomes a leader is a person to be admired. As to the future, Darlene simply says, " I want to live on the Westside for the rest of my life not in the but I want to live oil the Westside to help out my people. Residents from North and South Lincoln Park Homes have planned a Halloween " Victory " Party to be held at Auraria on October 31. The purpose of the party is to thank the . hundreds of people who worked together to accomplish something good for all the people. It is also planned to be a reminder to everyone that people working together can make a difference !)ere on the westside -that people working together can win. Trust your Banking to your Friends ... Coronado National Banlf "DENVER'S ONLY MEXICAN-AMERICAN OWNED BANK: SERVING THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY OF METRO-DENVER" 1400 Irving Street Near Colfax and Federal Avondale Shopping Center Denver, Colorado 80204 PH: (303) 572 3811 Enjoy WORRYFREE SHOPPIN . G ... Join Coronado's CHRISTMAS CLUB NOW!! l!i'"""'' ""'"'' = I!::JI!::J'l!:J Good for FREE replica of original AZTEC CALENDAR when you open a NEW SAVINGS or CHECKING ACCOUNT at CORONADO NATIONAL BANK A FULL SERVICE BANK Member FDIC Hours: 1 Oa.m. -6 p.m. Monday thru Friday Saturday Hours: 9 a.m. -to 12 p.m. S AI\ITA FE TRAIL -3 Westside Artist Businessman In many w ays Walt Weinbe r g seems to be v e ry muc h a t h o m e in his potten; sh o p at 7 0 1 Santa Fe Drive, known as th e Santa F e P o tter y . U nlik e man y o f the oth e r bu s iness peop l e o f th e Wests ide who c ommu t e dail y to t heir place . of w ork from the suburbs one feels that Walt Weinberg is one of us who live and struggle to make the Westside a better place for all of us. Believing that he is first and foremost an artist and as an artist with a talent , he has an obligation to society -this obligation is to be creative . To be creative , especially in a society as Walt says, " where people are fighting for their identities amid all of the produc tion of plastic things around them. Through the work of my hands people have an opportunity to express themselves , their per sonalities . " A potter now , Walt Weinberg wanted to be a dentist , but says that the major turning point in his life came when he was studying Spanish at San Joe, Costa Rica in the University and later on whe n he worked in Bogata, Colwnbia. In Latin America he became in terested and very much inspired by what he calls now " my second home." He said, " I have very close ties there. I've been greatly in spired by the culture, especially by' the Latin American philosophers who saw the need to fight for in dependence from the European colonialists. ' ' The potters says that here in the schools of the United States we are exposed to one side of the history of Latin Ame r ica . To see their his tory from t h e ey es of Latin Ame r icans d efi nitel y ch an g es one ' s o u tloo k o n life . Toda y after w ork ing 3 years from the same s t orefront operation , Walt Weinberg believes that things are changing for the better on the Westside, although there are many who still want to take from the Wests i de and not leave anything behind . " Like many of the landlords," Walt says, " You see many o the buildings ? What are their owners doing ? Just letting things get run down , make their investment and leaving . The people , how ever , are takin g more pride in the community and i m proving things." As for the future , Walt believes that , "We are all responsible for building the earth or better , salvaging what we have left. It' s not just one part that ' s in danger . We' ve all got to work-or we' ll all go down together." Walt has ob served that when we go to museums, we see the items which have been left over kotn civilizations before us mostly works of art, like pottery . He believes that this i s where he is playing an important role in the world today. When this reporter started the interview with Walt, he was making a casserole . An hour later, 5 casseroles were finished. All molded from dirt and a little water by the hands which have joined with some hands of people on the Westside to help create it into a place for people . Westsiders are grateful to you Walt Weinberg . Group Helps with Personal Problems Do you feel you have lost interest activities, and may go to the center in work or family activities? Do from one to five days a week, you know someone who is tense or depending on their goals and the worried about handling ordinary plans they make with their demands of daily living, or afraid counselors. and unable to cope with them? By participating in groUp acwith problems in living tivities and discussions with people like this may need help to reswne who have similar concerns, or learn independence, selfTransitional Living members reliance , productivity • and social learn they are not alone with their abilities . problems, and share and learn new Westside Transitional Living, a ways of dealing with them. unit of the Northwest Denver The day program also serves as Mental Health Center (part of the an alternative to hospitalization for Den ver Department of Health and many J:?Ople, either preventing Hospitals ) has opened new offices their admission to a psychiatric at 999 Clay v_yay the Sun hospital by providing structured Valley Housmg four daily activities in the community , blocks east of the West S1de Health or by helping them return te their Center . It serves late homes and 'families more quickly adolescents who hve 1':1 west after hospital treatment. penver,. who .need counseling and The Transitional Living staff mteractwn Wlth others every day, consists of two social workers a for most of the day, or as often as psychologist , nurse, . . . . therapist, psychiatrist , and three Wes.ts1de . mental health counselors . The unit a var1ety of 1 serv1ces -. mis open for -referrals or div1dual . and group emergencies from 7 :00 a .m. till 6:30p.m. Monday through Friday. cnSls Every Westside resident is . welcome to call for in tivltles,_ mru:tal and fariilly formation about the program. COUJ_lselmg -m a day pr?gram, Clients may be referred by other available 9:00 a.m. till 3:00 agencies or other teams of the Monday . through Friday Northwest Denver Mentai Health Clients may _ a tew but _ self-referrals are hours to the entll'e day m group welcome.

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4 SANTA FE TRAIL ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 1060 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES: Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:15, 5:15 CONFESSIONS Daily before 12:15 Mass Sat. 4:00 to 5:00 DEVOTIONS Tues. St. Anthony Novena Fri. St. Jude Novena (During the Mass) ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHuRCH 9th and Lawrence . Denver, Colorado James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor MASSES Sat. Evening 7:00 Sun. 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00, (Spanish), 7:00 p.m. Weekdays-8:00a.m. (Spani$h) FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN 120 East 1st A venue Denver, Colorado Rev. Arnold Bloomquist, Pastor Sunday School 9:45 Mroning Worship 11:00 a.m. Coffee House Faith Factory 25 Broadway John Cox, Student Pastor Director FIRST MENNONITE CiruRCH 430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Kermit Derstine, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister Morning Worship 9:00am. Church School10:00 a.m. Various adult groups meet weekly\ For more information call892-1038 SUN VALLEY CHURCH COMMUNITY 1230 Decatur . 255-2317 Lou Rossein, Pastor Ted Koeman, Intern at Sun Valley Chapel Sunday School and Worship at 11:00 a.m. NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH THE MASTER (BAPTIST) 325 West Irvington Place Donald Davis, Pastor OF Worship Services: 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Bible Study: 6:00p.m. Prayer Service Thurs. 7:30 p.m. Boys Club-Wed. 7:00p.m.to8:30 pm. . Girls Club-Sat. 9:30a.m. to 11:00 am. ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado .CATHOLIC Fr. Patrick Sullivan, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Martin Marquez MASSES: Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, . 10:00 . in SpanishChurch 10:00 m Enghsh Hall, and 12:00 noon Weekday: 6:00, 7:00, and 8:00 am. AVONDALE LUTHERAN Rev. Wm. R. Pape West Colfax and Irving 534-4478 Worship Service: 11:00 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. PETER Bible Study: 7:00p.m. CHURCH OF ST . . (EPISCOPAL) 126 West 2nd Avenue Colorado 80223 Rev. P. George Castono, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 8:00 Holy Com munion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon . LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER 215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorako Rev. Dick Magnus, Pastor John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky, Older Persons Ministry . Wednesday 10:00 Holy munion and Bible Study Com-Workshop Service and Sunday School The Santa Fe Trail would be happy to include information about your church and its services in its listing of Westside churches. Please send the times of services and any special events to: Santa Fe Trail, 430 West 9th Avenue, Denver 80204. FIESTA RESULTS Although final results fro.m the St. Joseph's Fiesta are not m, the Fiesta was a success and the goal of $15,00 was met. The winning raffle award went to a young woman who_ has seriously ill in the hospital. This 1s certainly exciting to see someone who really needed the money receive the benefit. 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. BAPTISMS AT ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH SEPT. 22, 1974 --Crystal Josette Marie Chavez dau. of Gilbert & Charlene Chavez Godparents are Joe & Mary Vigil. ......_ Lawrence Joseph Victor DeNava son of Lawrence & Barbara DeNava-Godparents are Victor & Rita Lucero. SEPT . 29, 1974 Adellita Tomasita dau. of John & Ruth Benavides _;;_ Godparents are Nick & Rhonda Espinosa OCT. 6, 1974 Steven Ray Sena son of Victor & Jennie Sena Godparents are Edward & Mary Ann Duran OCT. 13, 1974 . Joaquin Clarence William Liebert son of William & Alberta Liebert Godparents are Joseph .. ------------. & Mary Romero JOHN P. DALEIDEN CO 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver, Colorado 80204 Tel : 534-8233 RELIGIOUS ARTICLES FREE PARKING OCT. 20, 1974 Marc Christopher Herrera son of Steven & Marian Herrera Godparents are William & Frances Plisga. FUNERALS AT S .T. JOSEPH ' S CHURCH OCT. 1, 1974 . Frederick Marquez of 726 Elatl passed away Sept. 28, 1974 . . OCT. 15, 1974 Bennie Martinez of 1219 Vf. Custer Pl. passed away on Oct. 8 , 1974. Max Sanchez from St. Joseph's Parish, Carlos Padilla from St. Elizabeth's and Phil Gonzales ._,from St. Cajetan's were ordained to the ministry of lector on October 19 at St. Thomas Seminary. This means that they can read the Word of God to the congregation in church, but more than that, for these three men it is a step towards their ordination as permanent lay deacons of the Catholic Church. They have been studying for more than a year now and will be ordamed as deacons . in April or May of next year. Mter that they can preach, witness marriages, preside at funerals, baptize and distribute Corrummion to the sick, and serve the Christian community in many other ways. It is not just the priest who is the Church. The continuation of Christ's work depends even more on the presence of dedicated people like these three men in our world today. New Bishop The Roman Catholic Ar chdiocese of Denver celebrated the ordination of Richard Hanifen as bishop on September 20,. 1974, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. He was ordained by ArcJ:lbishop James Casey with the help of Bishop George Evans of Denver and Bishop Carles Buswell of Pueblo. The ordination Mass was a celebration of joy and prayer fulness. The people joined in the singing with the Mariachi de Colores and the Cathedral Choir. Bishop Hanifen has chosen as his motto "de Colores", the theme of the Cursillo movement, with which he has been greatly involved. (IJe is the only bishop in the United States who has a motto in Spanish instead of Latin. ) Bishop Hanifen was born June 15, 1931; he graduated from Regis High School. He attended St. Thomas Seminary, Denver, and was ordained to the priesthood on June 6, 1959. Later he studied in Washington, DC, and in Rome. He sees his role as bishop as a postoral one, working among the people as Christ did. WOMEN'S ouTING (Columbus Day-Oct. 12th) . It was a rainy, cold mornmg when 17 women of Auraria Com munity Center headed for Camp Malo and a day in the Mountains. Wet snow four inches deep was on some cars coming off N . Turkey Creek Canyon, but the ladies drove on. And even though the sun never did come out, it was a real discovery for the womeh -a truly happy memorable day for all. The fireplace in Camp central building was the gathenng place. Jean Jackson directed lessons in the "Bump." Loyola Salazar Ceramics teacher at the Center,' showed the ladies how to produce plaques from the bark of pine trees. Everyone had brought a special dish for the 7 course break fast and scrumptious dinner. had been donated by the Aurana Center, a United Way agency. Its director Adolph Gomez had also donated other supplies. All of those who went agreed it was a worthwhile and very inex pensive day. We hope that there will be other occasions for the Women of Auraria 'to get out for a little "fun and games" . . . with more cooperation from the weather. Four parishes on the Westside, St. Cajetan, St. Elizabeth, St. Joseph and Presentation are sponsoring a Common Annointing of the sick at Presentation Church on Sunday, Nov. 3rd at 3 p.m. This will be during Mass. Any Catholic can receive the Sacrament of the sick as soon as he BEGINS to be in danger because of illness or advanced years. This includes elderly people if they are clearly weak, even though no dangerous illness has . diagnosed. A general rule would be those who, because they are elderly or infirm, are no longer able to live a completely active life. The Church NO LONGER regards this Sacrament as "Ex treme Unction" or the "Last Rites" because NO LONGER is this Sacrament reserved ex: clusively for those who are in extreme and immediate danger of dying. The Church does not want her children to worry as to whether or BAPTISMS AT ST. CAJETAN'S Guadalupe Kathleen, Joseph Gilbert, and Josephine Lynn Daughters and Son of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Carmen Reyther, 2959 W. 11th Avenue. not they qualify for this Sacrament. If there is any reasonable doubt, the Church wants to resolve the doubt in favor of receiving the Sacrament. Any eligible Catholic should receive this Sacrament because Jesus loves the elderly and the infirm NOW just as He loved them during the time of HIS public life on earth. The Sacrament of the sick is the continuation of His "Caring" for those growing older or more inform. The elderly or the infirm should receive this Sacrament because they need the deepening and strengthening of the life of Grace that every Sacrament brings. Also they receive the coinfort of Christ to sustain them in hours of loneliness and the courage of Christ, received through this Sacrament, to bear bravely, with dignity and serenity the sorrow and suffering wovwn into their life as it was woven into His life. Anyone needing a ride to Presentation Church Sunday 3rd, please call 534-4408, FIRST COMMUNION AT ST. JOSEPH'SClasses for the parents of children wanting to make their First Holy Communion Will begin Nov. 12th at 7:30p.m. in the Middle School building (6th & Fox) These classes are NOT for children, so please don't bring your child with you. . This nation is looking back on some very dark moments. But we can also look ahead to a new era of hope. . . Government is only effective when 1t places the needs of human beings above all other. needs, when-public interests never lose out to pnvate interests. . . Yes Pat Schroeder went to Washmgton wtth a desire to 'change things, with a will to fight for a better way to govern. , Yes, she challenged old fas?ioned ideas that stand in the way of the new solutiOns No, she will not forget the needs o! children, of elderly citizens, of consume.rs, of worktng people, of minorities, of the smjlll busmessman. . No she will not yield to the pressures of btg business to special lobby groups, to discriminatory attitudes, to powerful conglomerates. The reason we are raising hell is so that we can raise hopes. . . . Pat Schroeder will conttnue to ftght. for the things that are at the very .heart o! the tdea of a free strong and compassionate Amenca. ' And every single one of us can be very grateful that she will. Vote for Pat Schroeder . Democrat for Congress, Nov. 5 Schroeder for Cong;ess Committee, Steve Sakura Square , 18th & Lawrence , Denver, Colo :

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Commission Ready to Serve SANTA FE TRAIL 5 ticipation in all governmental a ctiv ities , and participating in the community aspects of the Denver Anti-Crime Council ( DACC). Specifically , the Commission is sponsoring some dozen DACC communitybased projects in volving some $1.6 million, which hopefully will reduce crime in the c ommunity and will help to protect residents of the city. Twenty-five years ago, then Mayor Qwgg Newton of Denver directed an earnest group of leading citizens to "go forth and do good " in the field of human relations. The original cadres, headed by the then Dean of St. John ' s Episcopal Cathedral, Rev . Paul Roberts, was made up of socially sensitive individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and of varying religious faiths, including Catholics, Jews, Buddhists and Protestants. They were a mixed group: prominent community personalities, businessmen , civic leaders, educators, labor people, race relations specialists , housewives, doctors, lawyers , and common ordinary folk concerned about the future of Denver. That was the common bond how could we keep Denver growing with its diverse populations and yet avoid disruptive tunnoil that was evident elsewhere? HEALTH STATION Mariposa Health Station offers a unique service to the people of this comm unity . Through a series of fortunate events, for Mariposa and the comm unity , we are privileged to have on our staff Josia Dodds, Professor at the University of Denver Child Study Center. In addition we have two advanced graduate students in Doctoral training in Child Clinical Psychology who are themselves Mexican American obtruning part of their training in a Chicano community. Far-sighted Quigg ewton wanted to deter violent con frontations in his beloved Denver . He knew that injustices in em ployment , h o using , education and all phases of human activities existed in Denver . Therefore , he called upon involved leaders in Denver to give of their best thinking and efforts to devise means of eliminating prejudice and discrimination , which led to conflicts in other cities. Thus the Mayor's Committee on Human Relations was born in Denver during 1949. The city fathers subscribed to the wisdom of these efforts, and in 1951 a statutory Commission on Human Relations was established by enactment of a municipal Ordinance by City Council . An Oglala Sioux Indian, Mrs. Helen Peterson, was hired as the first director, with a secretary to assist. Later a man designated in more polite circles as a Mexican American, Mose Trujillo , ( now deputy warden of Denver County Jail ), was added to the staff . From a modest beginning has grown the present Denver Corn mission on Community Relations (CCR) , now headed by Minoru Yasw, a Japanese American lawyer, with an energetic staff of some 40-50 personnel and a budget of about $300,000 annually. William L . Funk , vice-president for publi c affairs of the United Bank , heads the 15-member citizen commission, roughly a-. third of w hom are appointed each year by the Mayor. Individuals with wide ranging _ interests and concerns, from vanous racial, religious and ethnic backgrounds , are members of _ the Commission. Teachers, busmessmen, re.ligious leakers, lawyers , housewives , media representatives, and community leaders presently serve. Anyone interested in appointment to the Commission should contact the Mayor's office. Specifically, the Commission is c harged with responsibilities to ( 1 ) inform the public about com munity relations matters, ( 2 ) ad vise and assist city officials and departments in regard to com munity relations problems , ( 3 ) promote good order, peace and harmony in the community, and ( 4 ) assure equality of opportunity and treatment for all persons, regardless of race, color , creed or national origin . Because the Commission is a city agency directly under the Mayor, and smc.e the staff operates under the direct supervision of the Mayor ' s office , activities of the Commission reflect the immediate municipal concerns of the city administration . In conformity with directives from the Mayor, the CCR staff is presently involved in assisting the critical desegregation processes of the Denver Pub.lic Schools , attempting to establish a city-wide youth services system, developing planning and capabilities for citizen par-It must be emphasized , however, that the Denver Commission on Community Relations has no en forcement powers; its forte and accomplishments must come through persuasion, conciliation, negotiation , compromise, and because the cause supported is " right". Moreover, it must be kept in mind that the Commission does not attempt and indeed is not authorized to operate any specific programs as its own, but may assist, facilitate and support. Within these restrictions, the Denver Commission on Com Relations stands ready, willing and able to help make this Denver community a better place for all people . ow it's our turn Hart for Senate. Now, it's clearly our turn to bring our government back to the people . Gary Hart is the candidate who can give Colorado true representation in the United States Senate. Now, it's our turn. The people's turn. The need for this type of a service was originally identified by the Pediatritians at Mar:iposa, who . found that there many' . -.r. behavior problems, child rearing problems, school problems, etc. The following people are for GARY HART: Greg Archuleta, Lakewood Barbara ArgUello, Denver Mary Armijo, Denver J. Carlos Lucero , Boulder Yvonne Lucero, Boulder Leo Lucero, Pueblo The physicians felt a need to be able to refer to someone knowledgable in these areas. This service is now available, upon referral from any Mariposa Physician. Anyone in the com munity wishing to utilize this service must simply call for an appointment with any of the Primary Care givers at Mariposa. A preliminary history and physical will be done and a referral initiated to Dr . Dodds and his staff. Mary Kay Bael Station Director Mariposa NEWS ON GALLO Good news on the Gallo boycott! 270 workers, who had been working as strike-breakers, joined the picket lines last week in protest of the low , terrible working con diiions, and general treatment they had been receiving from the company and their Teamster allies. On top of this , the Gallo boycott continues to take a heavy toll on Ernest and Julio 's profits , as they have dropped in sales about 15 per cent, despite a very pensive public relations campaign on their part which attempts to fool people into believing that Gallo workers can make " up to $9 an hour " and are houSed in "spacious accommodations! " In response to the success of the boycott, the Gallo company has begun to come out with many new wines which will not have the name Gallo on the label. An example is Madria Sangria, which is made to look like a Spanish import. Rememter before you buy a bottle of wine, check the label for the city of "Modesto, California." If you find it, remember that it has scab :grapes in it and is very harmful to your health! Mary E. Baca, Denver Pete Candelaria, Denver Craig Hart, Denver Tim Flores, Denver Steve Garda, Lakewood Bob Hernandez, Denver Peggy Hernandez, Denver Larry Lopez, Denver Patty Lopez, Denver Jesse Luna, Denver AI Montoya, Denver Chris Munoz, Pueblo AI Roybal, Wheatridge Ethyl Sandos, Denver Ralph Sandoval, Denver Roger Sisneros, Denver Ruben Valdez, Denver Charles Vigil, Denver Gary Hart, Democrat for the United States Senate This Ad paid for by: GARY HART Senate Campaign Committee, Inc. Hal Haddon, Campaign Manager.

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6 SANTA FE TRAIL -. ' ------. . . . . . ' _ j ' ------THINR ADELANTE! Think ADELANTE Think. ADELANTE _ Think_ ADELANTE Think ADELANTE Think ADELANTE Think ADELANTE THE SUPERMARKET WITH A DIFFERENCE! WHERE WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE ! WHERE YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME! LOCATED -IN YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD TO BE THERE! YOUR COMMUNITY OWNED COMMUNITY OPERATED SUPERMARKET! FOR A BETTER COMMUNITY! YOUR KIND OF STORE! YOUR KIND OF PEOP.LE! Think ADELANTE FEATURING HUNDREDS OF MEXICAN FOOD-SPECIAL TIES!, Think LETs woRK TOGETHER! LETs KEEP ouR ADELANTE COMMUNITY GROWING! EVERYO-NE BENEFITS! FOR SHOPPiNG ADE:LANTe!!

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START STOCKING UP NOW FOR THE THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY AT THESE LOW PRICES! SOLE : . SANTA FE TRAIL 7 i Wednesday Oct. 30th thru Monday Nov. 4th , I ............................................................................................................................................... ...................................... _., _ ........................................ ..... .......................... _ ................... . ......................... : ! C b II' No.1 Can Skyland 1/2 gallo n , amp e s 22 . . I . . Mushroom Soup Apple C1der 89 j Campbell's _ No.1 Can Food King Bi g I • . Chicken 2for Yellow Cling Ca \ . Noodle Soup 49 Peaches 49 I ---------,-----+--__;:;;_,_ ________ ; ., Sh urfresh' llb. Box 112 gallon I ' CLOROX 49 Crackers 35 S h urfi ne 10 lb. Bag TEXUM unsweetened -I $165 Orange 46oz. Can • . Flour Juice 53 van Camp's Viva Jumbo Roll Grated Tuna 45 TOWELS 49 welch's 20oz. Jar Shurfine 3lb. Can Grape Jelly 73 Coffee $39 -.. ............................................. -. FOR YOUR THANKSGIVING DINNER! WE WILL FEATURE AN ABUNDANT SUPPLY OF TURKEYSGEESE-DUCKS-CAPONSCHICKENSPUMPKIN PIES-MINCE MEAT PIES All Priced Right at ADELANTE! ADELANTE Community Super Market 727 Santa Fe . ' Plenty Of FREE Parking In Rear Of_ Store . . . .. '

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lliAIDST FOR[ED .USIDii E X .. Q D p . U . ... E _ E * A * D R * . L * I I * I * c E * F * A N I T c E E E D D D • • •••• • . . . . .. . ----____ _ FRIDH SOUTHWORTH ---------southworth for congress conunittee ,rftilt6ervasinimgro Cellhouse Seven Seventy-five people gathered together at the Westside Action Center and were actively con cerned about the approximately 200 inmates presently in Cellhouse Seven at Colorado State Penitentiary in Canon City. Since early September the ad ministration of the Colorado State Penitentiary at Canon City has been operating the institution under a program known as "Operation Return." "Operation Return" is based upon un substantiated allegations that at one time the inmate population had complete control of the prison, including armed guards, and thus it became necessary to return the institution to the control of the guards. "Operation Return" dramatically went into effect on September 12th of this year with the transofrmation of Cellhouse 7 from a general housing unit to a segregated unit surrounded by a barbed wire fence. Without any investigation or due process, some 200 inmates were either retained in or transferred to Cellhouse 7 following a fire in the prison gymnasium. The fire was allegedly set by inmates and endangered the lives of six guards. Since the in cident, facts have been discovered raising doubts about the truth of these allegations. To date these 200 men are still in "deadlock" which consists of the following con ditions: 1. confinement in a cell for 22-24 hours each day. 2. no access to showers, hot water or toilet articles 3. two meals a day 4. confiscation of monies, legal materials and personal property 5. restricted visitation without notification to family or visitors (who often made the 200 mile trip to be denied visits) 6. discontinuation of educational, vocational, religious programs, including hobbies used as a source of income. 7. limited access to mail and legal counsel, including jailhouse lflwyers. The administration has indicated that these conditions will continue for an indefinite period of time. In essence, they have locked the doors and thrown away the key. This situation has been allowed to exist for too long. It is only fair to ask how long a man can be caged for 24 hours each day, fed two small meals, and allowed one shower in a period of two and a half weeks without expecting some type of reaction to this adverse en vironment. ...Julius Martinez chaired the meeting to discuss the repressive conditions for these prisoners. Speakers and others at the meeting were lawyers, children, wives and families of the prisoners, former prisoners, the press and concerned community residents. Black, Anglo and Chicano were all represented !!! the group . Carl Shames compared the Cellhouse Seven situation to the . aftermath of Attica in New York and other situations around the country where prisoners are realizing that they have some rights, such as the right to three meals per day and some exercise each day. The National Council of Black Lawyers has filed a suit with several other organizations and the process of the law suit was ex plained to the group. Since the filing of the suit, the prisoners are getting three meals a day and 15-30 minutes of exercise out-ofrdoors which had not been the case before. Loretta Martinez spoke of her husband 's situation and her feelings. William Martinez was the manager of the radio station and did not go to the medium security prison because he was learning about radio technology and wanted to keep his job . Now he is in Cellhouse Seven. Though he would have been eligible for parole in ten months, she was not sure how much longer he would have , to serve because other charges had been brought against his previously good record. . . . Demonstrations are being planned by the group at activities where the governor will be at tending or speaking. The group hopes to raise the interest and concern of many citizens and especially those who have family or friendship connections with the prisoners. If persons desire further in formation about the Cellhouse Seven situation and activities to get different viewpoints in the newspapers, they may contact Maria Luz Quayle (534-5141) or Joan Zimko ( 892-0904). WE URGE ALL CITIZENS to join us in our demands to: 1. End the massive and arbitrary lock-up in Cellhouse 7; 2. Establish disciplinary proceedings commensurate with due process of law, whether these proceedings are applied to inmates or guards; 3. Commence an independent investigation of the general prison lock-up and the deaths of Herman Brickhouse and William Padilla that occurred during the lock-up period; 4. That such independent investigative body be composed of three inmates, the representatives of the Corrections Department and lay citizens; and 5. expunge all records of these transfers to Cellhouse 7 so that none of the inmates will suffer adverse actions before the parole and / or commutation board. Tuesday 9:30a.m. -12:00noon Sewing Classes at Inner City Parish Beginning on November 5th Sponsored by: Heads tart Inner City Parish Auraria Commmlity Center Mennonite Urban Ministry Opportunity School lnmigraciOn El General Leonard F. Chapilegaln1ente eso es importante man, Comisionado de Inmigracio'n porque para el estas personas son estuvo en Denver el dia 17 de educadas. Lo que quiere decir que Octubre. El General Chapman esta bien si inmigrantes de otros tuvo una conferencia en el edificio paises esten en los Estados Unidos Federal en el Centro y estubo porque son educados y hablando de Ia situacion de inposiblemente los Estados Unidos migrantes ilegales en Denver. podra beneficiar de. ellos. Pero que El General Chapman dijo que no esta bien que inmigrantes de aproximadaffiente 2,800 trabajos Mexico esten aqw porque serian realizados inmediatamente solamente estan desafiando Ia si todos los "mojados" fueran econonlia de los Estados Unidos y percibiodos y mandados a Mexico. no tienen nada que ofrecer a este El General Chapman esti en pais. El comisonario esta con favor de el Rodino Bill que lo vencido que Ia base del problema hiciera ilegal que patrones emes en el crecimiento de Ia plearan mojados. Tambien dijo populacioh de Mexico y que no -que el Director de Inmigracio'n en peuden acomodar todas las per Denver, El Sr. Edwards tiene un sonas con trabajos. programa que se llama Projecto Es verdad que Ia mayoria de Ia Cooperacion que tiene el apollo de gente que viene a los Estados 12 negocios de empleo en Denver. Unidos a trabajar es para ganar . Pro jecto Cooperacio'n es para mejores sueldos y . para poder eliminar mojados de empleo con mantener a sus familias en sus companias. El Sr. Edwards Mexico. dice que no hay discriminacion Una realidad que es negada por encontra ninguna raza proque todo Ia inmigracion son los malos tratos los aplicantes reciviran las que algunos de los investigadores mismas preguntas. les dan a los "mojados" cuando los El General Chapman dijo que agarran. Estos casos han sido mojados no nomas tienen trabajos observados por varias personas que pagan poco sueldos pero que han estado presente cuando tambien los encuentran trabajando arrestan ,a estas personas que en contrucio'n, fabricas, hoteles y esta"n aqui ilegalmente. restaurantes. Hay veces que ganan Es una vergiienza que estas de $4 a $5 dolares por bora. Pero _personas no puedan ser tratadas luego dijo que muchas veces los con dignidad y respeto que otros mojados estan recibiendo Welfare. inmigrantes ilegales de otros Yo no estoy en acuerdo con esto paises reciben. Un modo de porque yo se que el Departamento garantizar que mojados van hacer de Welfare en Denver reporta a tratados como seres humanos y no personas que ellos piensan que como unos animales seri'a que estan aqui ilegalmente. quitaran personas del servicio de El General Chapman tuvo el Inmigracio'n, como este General descaro de decir que hay personas Chapman, que tiene una actiud de otors paises que estan aqui racista . MARY BARRON CONQUERS ILLNESS Not too long ago, it looked very much as though Mary Barton was on the losing side when she was struck down with acute pan creatitis. Her life was despaired of, but Mary Barron has ne:ver been a quitter and she fought as hard for her life as she has fought for all of the things that she believed m. Mary fought not only for the sake of her farpily, but also for her community. After a quarter of a century of living in it, she was fully aware of its needs and frustrations. Because it didn't look like Mary Barron would ever be out cam paigning again, Gerard Trujillo was designated as the legislative candidate of district 6. Trujillo, however, suddenly moved to Wheatridge, and the Republicans were left without a candidate. A miracle then happened; aided by her three D's: Desire, Deter mination and Destiny. Mary Barron got well. For she had the Desire to live; to leave her bed and get out among people again; the Determination to help the com munity in which she lived which was floundering about with many problems; and the Destiny that she felt the good Lord had endowed her with by giving her health again so she could set out on their goal of reaching the Hill where she felt the solution to the problems of District 6 were. . . The Republican Party gave her the go-ahead by appointing her as their candidate through the vacancy committee, and Mary was on the road to the Hill again. Like so many West Denver residents, Mary is a native of Trinidad where she received her education and began her career as As a member of Cooperative Endeavor, she is fully aware that the police and the community have to learn to better communicate with one another . As a census taker and nurse she often came upon the problem of child abuse and she feels that the legislature should do more to protect the helpless, little children who could be exposed to child abuse. Mary Bax:ron is on her way now, reaching for the Hill, her goal, the State Legislature. Up there on that Hill are many legislators who know Mary and like and respect her. With their help and cCK>peration she feels that she truly can do something for her community. And those of us who watched her battling for her life, never giving up, know what a truly courageous person she is and how sincere she is in her concern for the welfare of the people of district 6. Sunday School Youth at First Mennonite Church, collected over $500 in canned goods and money for Action Center emergency assistance.

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PEANUTs "'tEACHER Counselin g from St. Thomas College, and is currently working on another M . A . 111 Educationally Handicapped with emphasis on Lea rn ing Disabilities an d Behavior Diso rd ers . In additio n , she has receive d grants fr o m t he a tional Sci en ce Fo unda tio n to study at Notr e Dame U ni ver s i ty and from the E DPA Inst i tu t e to stud y a t Adams State College. Ms. Mattingly ' s experience includes twelve years teaching experience in various states as well as the head of the guidance and counseling department at Saint Joseph ' s High School from 1967-1970. Her travels have taken her throughout the United States, Europe, and Mexico. Chi ldren use new playground at West Side Child Car e . Special Projects take Special People and thus is the case of Rita Mattingly, Head Teacher of the Peanuts Head Start Center. As a truly involved educator, Rita ' s voh.nteer work has included summer teaching at various churches, tutoring , and she has served on a committee for the Denver Archdiocese in developing a curriculum for sex education in the primary grades. Her membership in various organizations includes the Council for Ex ceptional Children, the Colorado Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Colorado Association for Children with Learning Disabilities. Right to Read Ms. Mattingly joined the program three years ago and refined the only Special Heal Start for emotionally disturbed children into a very unique program. She has done various workshops for teachers and administrators from ' throughout the state in the area of " Children with Special Needs" . Rita received her B.A . in education from the College of Saint Mary,-her M . A . in Guidance and Dance Program at Peanuts We are happy to announce that our Right to Read Program has been refunded for another year, till August , 1975. We hope to have an increasing amount of students and volunteer tutors in the coming year. For those of you who are not familiar with our program, let. me briefly tell you what services we provide. We work with adults only, 16 years and older, and teach the following classes: ( 1 ) English as a Second Language English is taught to those who speak another language (mainly Spanish ) . (2) Reading Helps improve the basic skij.ls of English, and teaches up to the 6th grade level of reading. These sessions are taught one tutor to one student. The children enrolled in Peanuts ( 3 ) Drivers Education-A 3 day Head Start this year are parspring She hopes to enhance the course ( 3 hours a day) which helps ticipating in an exciting new self-concept of the children and you pass the written drivers exam. program in Developmental Dance. enrich their emotional experiences It is taught in both Spanish and The teacher for this innovative through fundamental dance English . For more information call project is Mrs. Jo Keel, dance movements. This class is being 477-1043 or 572-1149. instructor employed through planned in conjunction with Joyce We depend greatly on volunteers C . S . U . ! s Urban Extension Division. Edwinson , developmental motor to tutor our students and are Jo chose Peanuts as a pilot therapist, and replaces her regular always in need of good tutors. The school after meeting and wor:king gross motor periods on Tuesdays only requirement is that you have with the only last and Thursdays of each week . the _!!esire to help and can work at least two hours a week with a student. Any one interested or w anting more information about our program, please call 572-1149 or come down to our office at 675 Santa Fe Drive . Tenemos el placer de in formarles que nuestro programs "El Derecho de Leer " ofrece los siguientes clases : Ingles -para todos los que no sepan hablarlo . Lectura-para los que ya saben hablar en ingles y les interesa aprender a leer. Leyes del transito clases donde le ensenan todo lo que necesitan saber para el examen escrito . Todo el que este interesado en . ser estudiante o tutor voluntario en neustro programa, por favor comuniquese con cualquiera de nosotros : Jorge Gallegos, Maria Rumaitis , Diana Davalos, Gladys Pensado . Neustro telefono es el : 572-1149. 0 venga a nuestra oficina situada en la biblioteca Byers -675 Santa Fe Drive. SA NTA FE TRAIL 9 HEADSTART A bigger and better Head Program is planned this year f or the West Side . enter operated b y the Auraria Community Center are Peanuts , 430 West Avenu e, 534-8573 Auraria 1212 Mariposa , 534-7614; and Raggedy Ann an d Andy 430 West 9th Avenue . Teachers are Rita Matting ly, Harvey Benas, Patricia Car l o s, Eleano r Lucero, a nd N an cy Baca. They will be assisted b y Pam Burn si de, Jenni e B ust os , Loyola Arellano , Virginia Darro w, Len ore N ieto , and Fabian Arellano. In structi onal staff includes Joyce E dwinson as M otor Therap ist and the following as Foster Grand parents : Cecil King , Mary Nelson , Helen Gurule , Cannen Hodges, and Rose Coleman . The Social Serivces will be done b y Rosalie Padilla, Social Worker; Marie Martinez and Marlene Sena , Community Aides . Other staff includes Jennie De w ald , Book keeper; Juanita Trujillo, Secretary; Psychologists Barbara Pollack and Grace Ogden ; Nutritionists -Mary Anthony and Betsy Palin; Nurses Laurie Brodie and Carol Root; Speech Therapists Betty Hebold, Nieves Mcintyr e, and Carla Yim. The program is administered by Sam Abeyta , Director . Many of the staff members are presently expanding their ex pertise in childhood programs. Ms . Bustos and Ms . Mattingly are going to " Clown School", Pan Burnside is involved in learning to become a ventroliquist, Ms. Edwinson is developing a " Body Movementand Awareness Program", and Ms. Carlos is finishing her Olild Development Associate Degree . Staff plans include First Aid Training and . Therapy. Throughout the year, some in dividuals will be conducting workshops in "Working with tbe VOTE ON NOV. 5 MARY BARRON VOTE FOR. CASTRO Tuesday November5th MARY BARRON LIFTS HER EYES TO THE HILL TO SEEK Understanding for Problems of Elderly and Needy of the Inner City TO RENEW Hopes of Meaningful Aid for Youth of the I nner CityTO FIND Solutions for the Frustrations of Tax Payers Inner City TO TURN Eyes towards Working . Programs in Crime Control , Drug Abuse and Child Abuse of the Inner City TO BEGIN Era of Close Co-operation between all Legislatures and the Representative of the Inner City . REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR 6 . Richard Castro State Repre .sentative Dist. b DEMOCRAT A VOTE FOR CASTRO, IS A VOTE FOR QUALITY . LEG I S L A TlO N EDUCATION : Annunciation High School St. Thomas Seminary Trinidad State Jr. College A.A.Degree Education Metro State College B.A . Degree Sociology & Psy chology Denver University M .S.W.Degr ee Community Org . EXPERIENCE : Group Worker Curtis Park Community Center Youth Worker Denver Youth Services Bureau Mental Health Counselor Boulder County Director Westside Coalition Part-time Instructor . Metro State College -COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT : Chairman, Auraria Community Center Vice Chairman, Student_ Association School of Social Work , D . U . Chairman , Denver University Scholarship Cimm Menber,_ Colorado Heart Association Member ; Mayors Manpower Advisory Committee Member Westside Youth Development Project Member, Project Common Cause Member, Plan Metro Denver .. \. I ' I 1964 1965 1967 1970 1972 1968-69 1970 1971 1972-74 1973 1'971-72 1972 1973 1973-74 1974 1973-74 1973-74 1973-74 'l

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10 -SANTA FE TRAIL .S
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SANTA FE TRAIL -11 SPORTS Boy of the Year On October 8, 1974 The Boys ' Clubs of Denver held their Annual Awards Banquet at the Brown Palace . At this banquet s ome thirty six boys from the Lincoln Park Boys' Club had a dirmer and received a troph y . But these fine young boys worked hard to achieve this award. The y earned this by being picked boy of the month this past year, and to be picked boy of the month the boys had to meet the following criteria: Good attendance at the club, good attitude, show some leadership, good participation , loyalty to the club, and above all citizens hip . Out of these boys the club picks one boy to represent the club as boy of the year. And this year Charlie Bargas received the award. Charlie lives at 715 Elati St., with his parents Mr . and Mrs. Joe Bargas who are retired. He has one older sister at home and one older brother in the Navy. Charlie has been a member of the club since 1963. His par ticipation at the club is as follows: He' s played football at the club. He was active in the boxing program. He' s a member of the Keystone Club , worked in the library, played soccer and baseball for the club . Charlie also made several projects in the arts and crafts shop as well. He has worked as a counter boy at the club and in the corrununity worked at Adelante Super Market and as a sweeper boy at Baker. Charlie, fifteen years of age, is a sophomore at West High School. He carries an A and B average in his school work . He plays trumpet for the advanced band . He is also a member of the R.O.T.C. and holds a rank of Corporal. He ' s won medals for the following : Boulder competit ion, Color Guard, Voluntary Service, Cadet of Month, and Pro-Marksman. Charlie ' s ambitions are to finish high school , earn a scholarship to a military school, and hopefully make a military career for him self . Congratula tions Charlie and c ongratulations to the following boys who done a fine job this past year and received awards at the Banquet: David Becerra, Alex Becerra, Anthony Becerra, Manual Hernandez, Harold Rutherford, Robert Rutherford , Marty Archibeque, Albert Vigil, Danny Quintanilla, Ronald Gregory, Manuel Mossinan, Vincent Torres, Paul Torres , Manuel Basquez, Johnny Montoya, Leonard Montoya, Billy Decker, Pat Castellano, Anthony Pacheco, Ray Gomez, Johnny Rivera, Marvin Trujillo, Danny Varela, Victor Barros, Ricky Milten berger, Larry Munoz, Joe Munoz, Carl Camacho, Torruny Solano, Steven Hernandez, Harvey Gray, Dale Oswald, Teddy Romero, Robert Trujillo, Frank Hernandez and Gerald Gonzales. SUPPORT YOUR AZTECS DESERVE SUPPORT Football is once again upon us, and it is most rewarding to see so many children sign up for football this year. We rope that o ur youths not only learn football tacti cs, s portmanship and de v elop a sense of unity , but enjoy themselves as well. It is the opinion of this writer that the enthusiasm expressed is the b es t way to solidify cooperation betwee n agencies, coaches , and youth of this Westside Corrununity . Home game schedules are being posted at the Auraria Corrununity Center bulletin board . Staunch football fans scoff at surruner time trial and tribulations, to point out that there are weeke nds w hen Aztecs football teams will attract more than 1,500 spectators collectively for the Senior " A 's", Senior " B ' s", Intermediate, Jr. " A's" and Jr. " B's". Auraria Corrununitv Center as well as all other. recreati.on agencies congratulates e8ch football player and coach and hopes each division has a suc cessful football season. First Game I don ' t know about you but I can't remember watching a muddier game than the one the Sr "A" Aztecs and Hawks staged Saturday afternoon (12 Oct 74). This contest, phsycially played with a heavy measure of brutality, contained a little bit of everything. A great team effort produced a lone Aztee touchdown on a fake punt by Alonzo Mota, thiS was easily the Aztecs game's big play. Coach Koehler was pleased with the overall play of the team, but feels that a lot more hard work must be accomplished before a championship team can be developed . Asked how the team was responding to the hard workouts: Koehler's reply was " sweat, exhaustion, and im provement". In addition to the Sr. ''A's " the other four Aztec teams, all got off to a slow start, but improvement by the offensive and defensive lines is noticeable and their respective coaches are optimistic that the end results will be a winning season . So patience is the word to all Aztec fans, our coaches are working very hard to bring the West Side some Championship Football. Youth Project The Westside Youth Develop ment Project received a con tinuation grant on Tuesday night, September 17, 1974, from the Denver Anti-Crime Council for the amount of $119,000.00. The previous amount requested was $468,000. Sonny Soriano , Project Director , attended several meetings with DACC staff regarding the above stated monies . However, because we are not a law enforcement agency , we were denied the total amount. The DACC staff then recorrunended that the Westsid e Youth Development Project revise its budget to continue functioning at the present level of operation . Consequently, the Project at this point is unable to develop the vocational program, Camp Malo or an increase in staff. We will, however, continue with Project 20 and Project Freedom . . The Westside Youth Develop ment Project will continue to work witb youth in the near west Denver corrununity and will continue to T E AM draw up new and innovative • • • • • • l>t
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I .< 12 SANTA FE TRAIL .Your Neighbors Mrs. Melody Moseley, and children arrived in Tokyo, Japan September 4, 1974. Her Sp4-Stephen Moseley is at Yama Hospital. They Wlll be m Tokyo for 3 years. Melody is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs . . Frank Dabrowski who live at 1115 Inca. Stephen is the son of Mrs. Ida Moseley, . she lives . at 1140 Mariposa. Action on Stores Within the last two years the Stamp Investigator s offerred only Mrs. Margot Serwrigard of 1247 Lipan Street recently honored an old friend and neighbor, Mrs. Mary Galli, who turned 102 years old. Mrs. Galli who now resides in an nursing home in Westminister, formerly lived at 1242 Lipan Street. There fifteen guests present including the Swiss Consul, Robert Gasser and his wife, for Mrs. Galli is of Italian and Swiss descent. Mrs . Serumgard provided a beautiful birthday cake, and the guests brought lovely gifts for Mrs. Galli. The Mayor of Denver, William McNichols, Jr. sent a lovely basket of roses to Mrs. Galli. Jewell Howard has moved from 1427 Mariposa to a trailer home.in Aurora. However, she will c . ontinue as president of the North Lincoln Senior Clubs so we know we'll see her in the area at least twice a month. Many people will miss Jewell, both for her friendship and for the many times she has helped people by giving to . various places as well as asststmg m many other ways. Sylvia Perrin visited her two older sisters in Iowa for about ten days this last month, returning to Denver on October 15. Emma Lucero of 1211 Kalamath passed away on September 3, 1974. She lived at this address for 12 years : She is the mother of Mrs. Mary Ann Trujillo and Toby Espinosa, formerly of the West side. Mag Maydral of 1212 Lipan is in St. Luke's Hospital. He suffered a heart attack on September 20, 1974 . . He is the son of Mrs. Euladea Maynoe of 1110 Inca St. Westside Action Center has little help. received numerous complaints on A meeting was held at the ' some of the neighborhood stores on District Attorney's Office on the Westside. The majority of the Consumer Affairs. All store owners complaints have been on the with the exception of Jack's . following stores: Baker Corner Grocery attended. ' Others in at Grocery , American Way Market, tendance were Mr. with Third Avenue Market, K & B, Public Health, Dr. Larson with Jacks Corner Grocery and K & N Meat Inspection, Mr. Lucas with Supermarket. The complaints the D.A.'s Office and Rita Lucero have ranged from spoiled food, and Pat Gibson with the Westside bugs in food, dirty stores, short Action Center. -.The F.D.A. was changing, not giving food stamp asked to attend since-they do have change, and disrespectful attitudes a Consumer They did not towards customers. . a representative, as they had Surveys have be.en taken of these an overload of work, to my stores and it is felt that the estimation the F.D.A. does not majority of the complaints are the poor. Nellie Morales was proud to Mrs: Kay . of meet her first great-great Phoerux, Anzona, grandson, Brian, in her mother, Mrs. Anrue W:•lliams, California this past month. Brtan of 365. Delaware Street wtth her was born in Alaska where his new little four month daughter, father was then stationed with the Rachel Annie. Mrs. Bloch's Coast Guard. other children, Kenny, Melarue Father Aquinas from St. Elizabeth's Church and Lincoln Park Senior Citizen's Group went on an aspen drive Sept. 27. There were 23 people in all. We went to Georgetown, Colorado then on toward St. Mary's Glacier and then justified. Many ways A hst of demands was have been tried to straighten out to the store employers. They Wlll these stores. A boycott was called be given one week . to clean up their on Baker Corner Grocery stores stores and . make other . im last year but was pr?vements. They did agree to do Meetings have been held with this. . Health and Meat Inspectors and _ also the Federal DrU:g Ad-Things are looking better, ministration. These meetings Rita Lucero and Pat Gibson resulted in little or no action. Food Westside Action Center and Jennie Sue Brott are well remembered on the Westside for they lived at the 365 Delaware address for many years while they attended Fairmont School. Jennie Sue is now enrolled in Brigham Young University in Utah; Melanie is studying nursing in a San Francisco hospital and Kenny plans to become a psy<;hiatrist. Westsiders are reminded not to forget to send a birthday card to Mrs. Bertha Lynch who will celebrate her 85th birthday next month. Her address is now the Valley Hi Nursing Home, 4686 Asbury Circle, Denver, Colo. She formerly resided at 326 Galapago Street. Mrs. Irene Patty of .316 Galapago Street just returned from visiting her mother and her old home in' New York. Laura Henderson, who works in bac}t to Idaho Springs. The aspens the office of the Lincoln Homes, _ were in full splendor! We.had lll!lch was hospitalized in Fitzsimmons in Idaho Springs. and while eatmg, Army Medical Center for several it started to ram and . snow. We days this month and is now at home enjoyed the snow .and nde so very STOP INFLATION recuperating. Laura is missed by much, thanks to Stster Rene and to Let us unite together now to kill nation wide demonstration -on many of the residents because her Sister Jean. . . . the monster _ INFLATION! November 16th. This demon-: quick smile and helpfulness make Lincoln Park Semor Cttizens h:ad People from all over the country stration will t:ake Denver the office a warmer place. We wish another trip on October 5 to are forming together in the fight at . bwlding. (The you a speedy recovery, Laura! Buckingham Square -for lunch. against inflation. These people are location ts subJect to change, __ Lunch was at the club's expense known as Citizens Against In. watch Y?ur newspapers and TV for _ Mr. Orwin Coffman, formerly of and a good was. had by all. flation . A chapter has been . _ 1319 w. 13th Avenue, died on Oc-Luncheon ts still bemg served in Denver and is now actively Lets stop the ncb from tober 9 1974. He had moved to the 1212 Mariposa at the Aurarta taking part in the battle. Roseanne richer and the poor. from getting Nursing Home a short Community Center . . Afterwards Washington has been elected It is getting any better time before his death. there is Spanish . by chairwoman. and 1t never wtll end the Armya and Davtd Seruors On October 18th, Citizens people stand up and JOID the ftght. may also play bmgo, . tra1_1Against Inflations picketed the Come to the demonstration and sportation to . go shoppmg ts Safeway store on 26th and Federal. show your support! If you ' are provided . Approximately th irty people came interested in joing up with the Ruby Barros, Osage, died at Denver General on October 12, 1974. Her was at Sacred Heart Church on October 15. She was taking care of Virginia Duran, a granddaughter, until the time she died. Mrs. Barros had many relatives on the West Side. and gave their support from dif-Citizens Against Inflation please call Rita Lucero or Pat Gipson at ferent agencies and groups across the Westside Action Center. (534Denver. The Westside was also there artd will continue in the fight 5141) LET'S KILL THAT MON against inflation. There will be a STER BEFORE IT KILLS US! COME TO OUR SCOTTrS MEXICAN, SPECIALS ON SUNDAYS! ENJOY OUR DAILY SPECIAL TIES ALWAYS WITH OUR COUPON Buy 1 TACO get 1 free Taco Good only on NOV. 3 1974 COUPON Buy 1 TOSTADA get 1 free Good only on NOV. 17 1974 "BUY ONE AND GET ONE FREE" WITH THE COUPON ON INDICATED DATE. COUPON Buy 1 any kind of BURRITO get 1 free any of Burrlito Good only on NOV. 10 1974 COUPON Buy 1 SMOTHERED BURRITO get 1 free Smothered! Burr lito Good only on NOV. 24 1974 NEWLY REMODELED TO SERVE_ YOU BETTER!!! Sean Bienvenidos a esta su Casa. 959 W.&thAve. at Kalamath