Citation
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, March. 1975

Material Information

Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, March. 1975
Series Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News
Creator:
Santa Fe Trail
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
Santa Fe Trail
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Special Recognition
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Santa Fe Trail
Fireman Richard Schiavone rescues two children during a recent West side fire.
On February 7th, group 2-19 responded to a residential fire at 704 Elati Street. After Engine 1 had taken their line into the building and Engineer Vincent had charged this line, he noticed Richard Schiavone from Squad 2 at a second story window with 2 small children, ages 2 years and 14 months. All the other firemen were inside the building searching for these dhildren who were reported trapped in the building. Engineer Vincent pulled an extension ladder and raised it to a
porch roof where he could reach Squad man Schiavone and the children. Schiavone passed one child to Vincent, and he took the child down the ladder to the ground. He then took the other child to safety, allowing Schiavone to reenter the window to help the mother, who he know was still in the room.
By this time the fire had been knocked in the room at the head of the stairs allowing the mother to be helped down the stairs to safety.
City Council approved several major improvement projects for the Westside on Tuesday, February 18th. These . monies will come from the Community Housing and Development Act which will bring approximately $44.3 million to Denver in the next three years.
Manuel Martinez, who was chairman of the taskforce for District 9 and served on the city-wide Mayor's committee, reported that a significant number of projects will come into District 9, which includes the Westside.
He highlighted the Westside Recreation Center south of Sixth Avenue, enclosure of the swimming pool at Lincoln Park, land and property purchase for neighborhood improvement, loans
and grants for housing repair, and a storm sewer in the neighborhood as major programs for the near future, these projects have yet to ge to HUD for approval, but several of the projects may begin before the end of 1975.
Other projects in District 9 which received funding are Globeville storm drainage, Northside Community Center expansion, and a new Northside Senior Center. Mr. Martinez emphasized that his taskforce and he himself had to work for all of District 9 in the priority setting of thsee projects.
Mayor William McNichols and his staff changed very few of the priorities that the city-wide committee had set. The city council changed a few projects but they were very minor.
Although initial planning has been done, there will be more taskforces
appointed at later times to set priorities on the monies to come to the city in future years. Although the money can only be used for physical improvement, the community groups and city council provided that it will go for the rehabilitation and improvement of a number of communities in the city. Westside appreciates the strong support and concern it received in this program.
Others who served on the city-wide committee from the Westside area were Fr. Pat Sullivan who was chairman of the committee, Minnie Conict who was Councilman Burke's appointee, and Marty Drew who represented the Citizen's Coalition. Manuel Martinez reported that he had good cooperation from others from District 9 and is excited about the projects which were approved. He was appointed by Councilman DiManna.
Call For Halt in Violence
The Food Stamp Mobile Van's appearance here in North Lincoln Homes, outside the management office, was a rare one.
Van Comes and Goes
After years of dealing with government bureaucracies, many Westsiders have acquired a large degree of skepticism toward government promises. In looking at cases such as that of the disappearing North Lincoln Food Stamp Van, it is easy to see why.
Last July, Mattie Nixon, a resident of North Lincoln Park, made a suggestion that a mobile Food Stamp office visit the Projects in order to serve Senior Citizens and others who were unable to get to the main Food Stamp Office on W. Byers Street. In this way, she reasoned, more persons would be able to make use of Food Stamps.
After a survey of residents demonstrated the need for such a van, a petition was circulated through the North Lincoln Senior Citizen's organization requesting a mobile Food Stamp office. Other groups, including the resident councils of both North and South Lincoln Park, gave their backing to the proposal. In October, Bob Jennings, head of the Denver Food Stamp program, announced that a Food Stamp van would come to North Lincoln on November 6 and November 8. Jennings also announced the dates for the December visits of the van and stated that the program would be evaluated in January.
Due to November 5th being election day, the Food Stamp van was unable to come as scheduled on November 6. However, due to late notification from the Food Stamp office, area persons involved in getting the van could not inform other residents of the change in plans. As a result, many persons waited on the 6th for a van that did not come.
The Food Stamp mobile unit came as scheduled on November 8th and returned oTTUecember 4, although
some persons were unable to get stamps because their records had not been transferred from the main office. On December 10, however, the Food Stamp van left at noon for a lunch break that lasted the rest of the day, leaving 10 people waiting for nothing. These persons included a number of Senior Citizens and at leastone person who had taken off time from his job in order to purchase stamps. When contacted, a Food Stamp official indicated that the van had left because too few people were buying stamps. North Lincoln persons involved with the program, however, pointed out that the small number of persons was largely attributable to the date being relatively late in the month, as well as a lack of faith in the program caused by the November 6th miss.
After many inquiries and complaints, the Food Stamp office agreed to allow the van to return to Lincoln Park in January, and the van came as scheduled, although attendance was down.
However, distrust of the program is still widespread. According to a reliable source, people feel they can't depend on the van. If the program is to succeed, they contend, the Food Stamp people must stand behind their commitments. Other persons go further in their criticism of the program. 'I honestly believe they're setting it up to fail,' says Jaime Neymeyer of the Denver Housing Authority. In addition, Neymeyer charges that residents were told their Food Stamp records would be automatically transferred to the van if they had signed the petition requesting the van. That was simply not the truth,' he says.
The Food Stamp Van is scheduled to come to North Lincoln March 5 and March 10, as well as ApTil 4th and 8th.
Anyone in the area, not merely North Lincoln residents, may purchase their Food Stamps at Lincoln Park if they ask the main Food Stamp office to transfer their records. There are no long lines at the van, unlike the main office, so area persons are encouraged to buy stamps at the van.
WHERES THE FOOD STAMP VAN
Claiming that not enough persons had shown up for the mobile food stamp office, the staff informed a number of persons in Lincoln Park that they would change the date in March.
Then February 10th, the mobile van did not show up at the regularly scheduled time. Persons in the community were waiting to purchase their stamps. There was no word from the staff of the van. There was no word from the food stamp officials. People waited and then people went home very discouraged.
Later in the day, several workers at Lincoln Projects received word that the mobile food stamp van staff had decided that they would change the date in February instead of March.
How are residents supposed to show up for this mobile van if it is so irregular? When it is not the problem of the purchasers but of food stamp bureaucracy, should the purchasers and Lincoln Park community be blamed?
Food stamps are a vital necessity of many families since inflation and unemployment are eating into many family budgets. Persons have taken off work, made special arrangements, and cancelled regular appointments to make sure that they can purchase their stamps at Lincoln Park. Why can't the van show up?
by Dave Graybill
After several violent deaths of West-side young men and a notable increase in burglaries and fights in the neighborhood, a press conference was called by a number of leaders in the Westside to highlight some issues that are presently before the city council, state legislature and each family in the Denver area.
The main appeal was to stop crime and violence both in the neighborhood and in the city. Policemen as well as neighborhood persons were called u-pon to decrease the use of guns and shooting and stabbing and to increase dialogue and communication among all persons who work and live in our community.
Some of the specific suggestions called for in the press release were:
1. Stop the sale of the midnight special gun.
2. Have a five day waiting period before a gun is sold.
3. Stop policemen from using hollow point bullets.
4. Buy bullet proof vests for police.
5. Ask police officers to stop overreacting and using unnecessary violence when detaining or questioning suspects.
6. Provide ways for community residents and police to talk with each other so there can be common understanding.
7. Stop community harrassment of police officers.
8. Find other ways to solve differences between people and groups than vengeance.
9. Train police in first aid.
'We live in neither a police state nor in a criminal culture. But as long as there are crimes, the police will be involved, so it is also up to us as Westsiders to prevent the crimes. The police still have the responsibility to be professionals and accountable for their behavior.
We do not approve of people resolving their differences with knives and guns nor do we approve of policemen becoming the jury and executor in a fraction of a second. We call upon both the police and the community to stop the violence that we see every day.'
The motto of the police is To serve and protect and never to shoot or kill, unless as the last resort' The neighborhood has to stop the crime that it can and find ways to protect each other from persons who would rob, steal or assualt Some in the community may be asked to testify in trials.
Westsiders-must work together, learn to know one another, look out for one another, and assist each other. There are many problems this year with so many out of a job and others not able to make their money stretch. We do not help each other by ripping each other off.
! We j^Santa Fe Trail j Westside l^ewrs^jjjjl

Santa Fe Trail
430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
Deliver to:


Page 2 • SANTA FE TRAIL
On February 18th Westside residents had a chance to be involved in the constructive change in the leadership and development of our community.
But again! we chose to stay at home and not make our voices heard by our constitutional right to vote.
We have many problems in our community. There is high crime, inadequate housing, poor sewage drainage, zoning, parking, lack of recreational facilities, and the lack of interest for our Senior Citizens.
Those of us who are involved with trying to bring about constructive change in our community, feel a sense of hopelessness at trying to get our people to stand up and show our solidarity in our concern for the betterment of our community. As long as we sit at home and discuss with others our problems, apd the unfairness and injustice that we see and feel everyday in our community, but don't get out and voice these opinions through the Ballot Boxes, there will never be any constructive change for us.
It is too bad that February 18th will go down as another dark day in the history of the Westside.
Can we not learn from our past mistakes and be a model for other communities. We must show our pride and concern, and the need to continually strive for a viable and concerned residential community.
Voting is the only tool by which we can hope to gain these changes that we all would like to see.
If you are not registered to vote please do so! If you are registered, please make it a point to be at the poles. May 20th, so that we can together show our concern for our community.
Becky and Jerry Garcia
We
Santa Fe Trail
vVestside [slews j
Ramiro Cruz Aedo, President; Adolfo Gomez, Vice President; Sr. Rene Weeks, Treasurer; Brice Balmer, Editor; Flora Gasser; Craig Hart; Charles Garcia; Becky Garcia; Maxine Singleton, Advertising; Anahuac Graphics, Art; Hasi Vogel,Photography.
Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause.
The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is also .understood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail" against all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy.
All correspondence can be sent to:
P. O. Bo* 4217 Denver, Colorado 80204 Telephone 825-T898
WjNTER
SPRING
CHANGES
Spring is the annual time for cleaning up, painting up, and planting inside and outside the house, so that things look bright and fresh for the rest of the year. As one looks around the Westside, there are many people who have painted their homes, put new porches on their hpuses, nad cleaned up around the property and house. This helps improve the value of all our property and also helps improve the image of our community.
Businesses have also made major improvements, especially in the appearance and cleanliness of the stores. Adelante, which just had its third anniversary, has done an extensive remodeling job with more services and large sales in the community. Del Farms Supermarket has remodeled the exterior of their building at First and Broadway. This is a handsome addition to the neighborhood. Rockybuilt Hamburgers and Santa Fe Pottery have also tastefully redecorated their buildings.
This newspaper hopes that all of us as residents, agencies, businesses and landowners in the community will continue to work together for the improvement of the housing and building stock in the area. This is another way that the Westside can continue to be a residential community where people care about themselves and others.
By the way, many of our men in the neighborhood are unemployed and yet have skills in painting, carpentry, electrical work, and brick or stone masonry. For those employed, this may be a good time to employ your nieghbor to get your jobs around the home done.
WATCH
OUT
PURSE
SNATCHER
Many older women in the Westside have had their purses taken and have also had arms broken, hips bruised, or other frustrations as a result of the robbery.
These purse snatchings can be prevented if a woman does not carry a purse. A recent letter in the Ann Lander's column was fronra lady who had had her purse taken several times; and had also had some injury during these robberies. She looked in her purse, found out that she was carrying many unnecessary things, and decided not to carry a purse any longer.
All of us need to work together to stop the violence, personal injury, and theft that is occurring in our neighborhood. One way to prevent some accidents and thefts is for women who are walking' to the store not to carry a purse. This not only prevents a loss of money and several bruises; it can also prevent a youth getting into the game of stealing or prevent a youth or adult from going to jail or a detention center.
Let us give one another clues on how to prevent violence, theft, and delinquency in our community. If you have ideas on how to lessen the violence and personal injury here in the area, please write a letter or an article for the Santa Fe Trail. Each suggestion may save both the victim and the criminal unnecessary expense, loss of life, and grief.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES $3.00........... 1 year
Foopr
STAMPS
LAS CASITAS AND SUN VALLEY
It all started during the January resident council meeting when an official from the food stamp office came to the meeting in order to answer any questions regarding food stamps. Many concerns were brought out, some of them being lack of personnel, location of the center as well as the condition of the building; these were of great concern but the projected March 1st deadline for rising costs of food stamps really brought protest. After much discussion the residents came to the conclusion that they could do some-thing-they decided to take Action.
Volunteers were willing to go to the newly acquired unit on 1160 Federal each morning from 10:00 to noon during the week of January 27th and help residents write letters to their senators and representatives. It was really thrilling to see the way this action spread. Some went to homes and helped while others called and reminded people to come and write a letter. Over 100 letters were sent,
AURAR1A
committee
ANNOUNCED
On Thursday, February 6, 1975, a press conference was held at the Fox Building, 1250 7th Street formally announcing the formation of theWest-side/Auraria Committee. The purpose of this committee is to make sure that the presence of the Auraria Higher Education Center will not threaten our community and to make sure that the AH EC will help the Westside Community remain and improve as a neighborhood.
The committee of thirteen will be working directly with the members of the AH EC's Board of Directors on such problems as housing, zoning, traffic problems, etc..The following people were selected to be committee members because of their interest and committment to the Westside.
Residents
Helen Lucero, Betty Koehler, Wilqia Dabrowski, Maxine Singleton, Ruben Leal, and Darlene Dominguez.
Agency Residents
Adolfo Gomez, Auraria Community Center; Gilbert Quintana, La Alma Recreation Center.
Elected Officials
Richard Castro, State Representative; Paul Sandoval, State Senator.
Student Resident Steve Cordova Student Non-Resident Muriel Ashmore Professional Dr. Dan Schler
This committee meets monthly. For more information regarding this committee contact Ms. Muriel Ashmore at 534-1280.

ANNA VIGIL, Denver, has joined the Colorado Department of Social Services' Division of Services for the Aging to assist Colorado communities and area agencies on aging in planning and establishing services for the state's 266,000 persons over 60. Mrs. Vigil wife of Gilbert E. Vigil, has been an activities director and social work consultant for several nursing homes and has been associated with Outreach Services for the Aging in Denver. We are glad that Mrs. Vigil will be working once again for our queridos y amados "viejitos".
RECALL DECIDED
After a brief vacation, DiManna announced that he would begin working to bring District 9 together and help it work together better. Sal Carpio conceded the election to DiManna at the councilman's home and was unsure if he would run in the May 20th election.
Cafpio restated that low voter turnout and the few days for voter registration after the Colorado Supreme Court decision that the recall was valid were reasons for not winning the election.
On February 18th, Eugene DiManna retained his seat as councilman for District 9 which includes most of the Westside. This recall election was the first recall for city councilman in the history of Denver.
The balloting was very light in the Westside and other neighborhoods— some areas had as low as 25% of their registered voters turning out for the election. This election was the result of petitions and legal contests which occurred over the past two years.
Your Options Listed
If a couple is going to have sex and doesn't want a baby, it is best to use a method of birth control. It is best not to have sex if you're not ready for it. But suppose you have sex without using any birth control--or your birth control method didn't work--and you think you are pregnant?
The first thing to do is to go to one of the health stations (Casita - 801 West 5th Avenue - 534-0657 or Mariposa - 1178 Mariposa Street - 623-8782); Denver General Family Planning - 893-7085; Planned Parenthood Eastside Clinic - 388-4777 or Westside Clinic - 2401 West 32nd Avenue - 458-5985; or your family doctor as soon as possible for a pregnancy test. A nurse or clinic .aide asks for a urine sample, runs a test on it and then tells if you are pregnant or not. Be sure to tell tne nurse or clinic aide if you are using pills of any kind, because this may change the test.
If the test is positive, and you are pregnant, there are three things you can do:
1. You can have the baby and keep it Ask the clinic or physician where you can go for medical care for you and your baby-to-be.
2. You can have the baby and put it up for adoption. Call Florence Crittendon (825-3283), Planned Parenthood or any of the above clinics or look in the yellow pages under Adoption Agencies. (It is also important that you go soon for good medical care while you are pregnant.
3. You can have an abortion. Abortion is the way to stop an unwanted pregnancy. Since an abortion is an operation, it should be done ONLY BY A DOCTOR. An illegal abortion, one done by yourself or by anybody with little or no training to do such an operation, can cause infection, sickness, and sometimes death. It may keep you from ever being able to have a baby again. Nothing that you can do yourself will give you a safe abortion.
It is very important for a woman to make arrangements for an abortion right away if having an abortion is what she has decided to do. An abortion, when done in the first twelve weeks is usually a safe and easy operation. A late abortion will probably cost more and there can be more problems for the woman. It may also be hard to get. EARLY ABORTIONS ARE SAFER ABORTIONS.
Most places that do these early abortions use the method called vacuum aspiration. In this method, a plastic tube and gehtle suction is used to clean out the inside of the uterus (womb.) The procedure does not take long and the woman can usually leave the hospital or Icinic the same day.
IT IS NOT TRUE THAT a woman can do a vacuum aspiration abortion with a vacuum cleaner.
IT IS NOT TRUE THAT drinking castor oil will cause an abortion. This may make you feel horrible, but you will still be pregnant.
IT IS NOT TRUE THAT drinking turpentine will cause an abortion. It will probably make you very sick, but you will still be pregnant.
If you aren't ready for a pregnancy, but find yourself pregnant, none of the three choices is going to be easy. If you keep the baby, you will have to care for it every day, you might not have time to go to school, or you might have a hard time keeping a job and taking care of a baby. If you put the baby up for adoption you might always wonder what happened to your baby. If you have an abortion you might feel that you have taken a life, you might feel later on that you really wanted the baby, or you might just be sad that this had to happen. There are doctors and counselors who can help you with these problems.
Remember, if you are pregnatn, be sure that what you do is what YOU fhink is best. Make a decision you feel you will be able to live with. IT IS YOUR RIGHT TO DECIDE!


SANTA FE TRAIL page 3
West side Resident Approaches to the Outstanding
Jean Jackson AUohol Problem YoUth
Jean Jackson attends an inter-agency meeting to discuss plans for more direct involvement in North Lincoln.
In the face of individual, corporate, and governmental exploitation, the Westside is fortunate to have a significant number of persons concerned about the rights of its people and involved in using and protecting these rights. Jean Jackson is such a person.
Orginally from-Texas, Jean Jackson has lived on the Westside for over a decade. Since coming here, she has worked with many programs and served on countless committees.
Mrs. Jackson's first committee assignment consisted of a position on a Law Enforcement Committee of the Urban Coalition, where she served under George Brown, who is now Colorado's Lt. Governor. She later ran for and won a seat on what was then known as the Citywide Health Council. Jean Jackson also served as a Patient Representative at the Mariposa Health Station. In the area of housing, Mrs. Jackson has been a representative of North Lincoln Park on the Central Resident Council, an advisory body to the Denver Housing Authority. Mrs. Jackson also served as the Council's secretary.
At the present time, the major part of Jean's community involvement comes through her position as the Community Aide of the North Lincoln Head Start Program, a job in which she serves as a liason between parents and and staff personnel. In addition, she
is interested in a local Brownie group, and works with Marty Drew on a commodities distribution program under which a member of any health center with children five years of age or younger is eligible to receive USDA food.
Mrs. Jackson lives in North Lincoln Park on Navajo Street. She has three children, ages 2, 7, and 9: the older two of whom are bused to school at Moore Elementary.
Mrs. Jackson likes the Westside and sees it as a nice place. Nevertheless, she is not blind to its problems, such as a need for more and better housing, and recreation for area children. In addition, she is concerned about what she feels is the danger of Lincoln Park becoming student housing.
For the future, Jean Jackson would like to see Westsiders become more aware of, and make more use of, the programs around them. She would also like to see more area persons vote, and she points out that it is possible for one member of a family to register all of the family's voting age members. Finally, Mrs. Jackson would like to see Westsiders make more use of their elected representatives. Doing these things, she feels, would be a positive step in the direction of enabling Westsiders to truly control their own destiny.
Westside Childcare
The months of January and February have been particularly exciting for parents, children and staff of Westside. We have seen presentations, screenings, and a couple of new faces.
Janice Trujillo has become our^acting center director until Mrs. Soto, our regular director, returns in March. Mrs. Trujillo is doing a fine job of organizing and running Westside. Esther Duran is our newest teacher in the four-year-old room. We welcome her aboard!
All 57 children received a free dental screening from Colorado University. Those who were found to have dental problems were given referrals to clinics or dentists in our area.
We had a presentation from the Rocky Mountain Poison Center about poison control. The children saw a film showing them things they must not touch.
Last week's feature was the Patch the Pony film. This informative presentation showed the children why they must stay away from strangers.
All rooms were busy with Valentine's Day activities. We made lots of hats, cards, paintings, and designs using
the Valentine's Day theme. We had a party on Friday with lots of cake and and cookies. We read books and discussed the importance of love and friendship among us.
Westside Center welcomes visitors and volunteers from the community, so stop by to see us and our facilities anytime. We operate from 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, phone 733-2473.
ALCOHOLISM EDUCATION COURSE
What can you do if you're worried that a family member may drink too much, or if you have questions about perhaps abusing alcohol yourself? If seeking treatment isn't the answer for you, the Alcohol Education Program, part of the Northwest Denver Mental Health Center of the Department of Health and Hospitals, may help you gain a better understanding of alcohol and alcoholism, and help you decide whether drinking is a problem you want to do something about.
The Alcohol Education Program with a staff of three counselors and
15 volunteers, conducts a 16-week course about alcohol and its effect on the body, the symptoms of alcoholism, and the effects of alcohol abuse on family and community. The course is open to anyone, and is especially relevant to those who are personally affected by alcohol (either their own problem drinking or a famjly member's) and agency workers whose clients are alcoholic or problem drinkers.
The class meets every Wednesday evening for two hours; the first hour consists of a film or lecture, and the second hour is a small-group rap session. Speakers from Alcoholics Anonymous, law enforcement agencies, and insurance companies, as well as AEP and other Mental Health Center staff, speak about the influence of alcohol from their areas of expertise. Volunteers act as discussion facilitators in the small group sessions; up to 12 groups of eight members each can be accomodated in the course.
To enroll in the course, you must make an individual 'intake appointment' with an AEP alcoholism counselor to discuss the reasons you want to take the course. If you are not already enrolled as a patient at Denver General Hospital, the counselor will give you instructions for obtaining a hospital number. You may then begin the course the first Wednesday after the intake appointment. The only requirement is a commitment to complete all
16 weeks of classes. The fee for the course is based on ability to pay, as determined by family size and income.
For more information, call AEP director Christy Nelson at 893-6166.
SUN VALLEY GIRLS’ CLUB
♦ The girls club at Sun Valley Community Church meets every Tuesday night at 7:00 p.m. As a project for the month of February the girls will study Black culture conducted by Ms. Ross, Educational Coordinator with Headstart.
The month of March is Chicano culture conducted by Esther Luven, Bilingual Bicultural teacher from Boulevard Elementary and Greenlee Elementary.
The girls are taking cussions and art displays.
part
Teacher of Month
the
6th. AVE.&SANTA FE CONOCO
SERVICE CALLS INSPECTION SERVICE WORK ★ ★ ★ ★
COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR
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Gladys Pensado Taylor, English as a Second Language Instructor for Right to Read, teaches ESL to about 60 students. Among some of the finest qualities that Gladys has is her enthusiasm for teaching, and her sincere concern for her students; she is always available when a student needs help with problems such as immigration, translation, jobs, legal matters, etc...
Gladys has been with us for over a year. She started out as a volunteer tutor and because of her ability to teach she was soon working full-time as an ESL Instructor.
Due to a car accident which hurt her vertebra, she went into the hospital February 13, and will be out of work for 3 weeks. Talking about concern for her students-one hour before entering the hospital she was out helping a student with residence papers! We all wish her a speedy recovery!
She is a dynamic teacher, well loved by her students and Right to Read Staff.
Gladys
Pensado
Taylor
ALCOHOL COUNSELING PROGRAM
In a homey, informal manner, alcoholics and persons arrested for driving under the influence can realize their power to control their drinking behavior. Auraria Community Center offers counselling in groups and for individuals in the Alcohol Counseling Program.
Don Bartek is the director of the counseling program and reports that no person in the program has been rearrested for the DUI charge after being in the program.
Most persons who have participated in the program have been referred through the probation department of the courts. Persons who wish to participate can come to the community center and talk with Mr. Bartek or another counselor if they feel that they have a problem with alcoholism. A family member can also refer a person to the service or talk with the staff about the problems that the family and the alcoholic are facing.
There are special group sessions and other activities in groups, but the staff and the center are flexible and willing to adapt their schedules to the work situation and other needs of each person or family.
Special services which are offered by the counseling program include marital! and family counseling, attempts to find employment for those out of work, Antabuse monitoring, etc...
If a person would like to find out more about the program, he can stop by Auraria Community Center at 1212 Mariposa or he can call 534-7614.
Drug Free Project
Auraria Community Center is now housing a new program; the Drug Free Educational Project. This program is designed to provide drug abuse counseling as well as to provide a community education program to serve the needs of the Westside area resident. Staffing the program are Minerva An-tuna, Robert Gazotti,and Ron Gon zales.
Some of the services offered are emergency crisis counseling, drug information and referral; individual, family, and group counseling as well as a drug resource center. In order to better serve the community, we have coun-selors who speak both English and Spanish.
If you would like to contact the center for further information and or service please call 534-7614 or 7615 or feel free to drop by at any time, we are located at 1212 Mariposa.
Gladys works with a student at Byer's Learning Center.
METHADONE in di* REGULATION
New regulations concerning methadone take-out privileges by clients of drug abuse treatment programs, for-ulated by the State Health Department and program directors, became effective early December.
Under the new regulations, the maximum take-out privilege allows for pick-up of the medication only three times a week. To be eligible for this privilege, clients must be taking no more than 50 mg of methadone daily, and must have been in the program at least six months. Other factors in relaxing the procedure of monitoring daily ingestion of the medication at the clinic are consistently negative urine checks for the drug of abuse, good clinic attendance, progress in treatment, and good 'social functlon-ing'-employment, enrollment in school or training program, parenting, and so on. A penalty, or loss of the take-out privilege, is imposed for violation of the regulations.
The State Health Department will develop a review board, comprised of one staff member from each drug abuse treatment clinic in Denver, to .consider and make decisions on exceptions to the regulations. Cecil Edie, PhD, director of the Northwest Denver Mental Health Center's drug abuse treatment program, believes the review board may revise the regulations^ periodically.
Jl.£ i.£.!i £± L = Jl 5 l ± L11! £ H z
CHRIS
TRUJILLO
The Southwest Denver Youth Services Bureau, under the direction of Larry G. Gonzales, has named Chris Trujillo as outstanding youth of the year of 1974. This award was presented in recognition of Chris's service to youth in Southwest Denver and her educational achievement.
Chris worked with the Southwest Denver Youth Services Bureau from June 1974 to Jan. 1975. Chris worked < at the YSB sponsored by the Neighborhood Youth Corp. The NYC Program provides part-time employment for youth that fit certain criteria and income. Joyce Archuleta who is the supervisor of the NYC's at the YSB says, 'Chris was a very dedicated and hard working youth. We miss her very much.'
Chris left the YSB when they helped her get into the HEP (High School Equivalency Program.) HEP is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor at Southern Colorado State College in Pueblo directed by Mr. Edward Tafoya. HEP offers a second chance for youth who have dropped out of high school, to complete their high school education. The ultimate goal of the program is to assist these youths in finding sustained, progressive employment by placing them on jobs with upward mobility, in vocational training' programs or in instituations of higher learning. To facilitate this placement process, thsee young people are provided with the skills necessary to pass the GED examination.
Chris was granted her GED and is now enrolled at Metro State College and will attend for two quarters. She is also currently preparing herself to take the College Entrance Examination so she can enroll in Stanford University in the fall of 1975 under the sponsorship of the HEP program.
Chris spends her spare time crocheting, knitting, playing pool, and reading.
Chris' paretns are Jose and Vera Trujillo. Chris has a younger sister and a younger brother.
CONSUMER
COUNSELING
AVAILABLE
At the Westside Action Center we have found that there is more to be done than meeting the people's needs in times of crisis.
Being a consumer today has major problems that continue to grow. For people on low or fixed incomes, the problems seem to be even greater. Therefore, we now have a Consumer Counselor within the Action Center to serve you in the event that you have any problems or questions.
We counsel consumers in: purchasing goods and groceries economically and nutritionally; the legality and/or reasons for increases in rents, utilities, gasoline, etc. We help consumers protect themselves from false advertising, loan sharks, unfair contracts or policies.
, j- p
If legfil assistance, is necessary we can refer you to Legal Aid, Small Claims Court or the District Attorney's Office on Consumer Affairs.
For help with consumer problems, contact Melisandro Martinez at 1100 Santa Fe Drive. The telephone number is 534-5141.
iUi i l z I U *» - ^ ~ -
. 101 lihifc it'2 b i Oy 9Vig I V


'fcfe. CARNICEMA
deadelante^
Meat Department Manager FEATURING
• U.S.D.A. Choice Beef
• Grade "A" Poultry
•Try our Pure, Lean GROUND BEEF It’s the finest Quality in Toun. find its LOUJ PRICE uiill save you IMffi!
We Always have a Fine Selection of
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Prices in this AD GOOD thru Sot. March 8th
Community 727 Supermarket santa fe drive


SANTA FE TRAIL page
6
^CHURCH NEWSâ„¢
ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH
1060.11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204
MASSES
Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:15, 5:15
CONFESSIONS
Daily - before 12:15 Mass Saturday - 4:00 to 5:00
DEVOTIONS
Tuesday - St. Anthony No vena Friday - St. Jude Novena (During the Mass)
ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHURCH
9th and Lawrence Denver, Colorado James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor
MASSES
Saturday evening 7:00 p.m.
Sunday 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00 (Spanish), 7:00 p.m.
Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (Spanish)
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN
120 East 1st Avenue
Denver, Colorado
Rev. Arnold Bloomquist, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45 Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Coffee House Faith Factory 25 Broadway
John Cox, Student Pastor Director
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH
430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Kermit Derstine, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Church School 10:00 a.m.
Various adult groups meet weekly.
For more information call 892-1038.
CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL)
126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon
Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Holy Communion and Bible Study
ST. JOSEPH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH
6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado Fr. Patrick Sullivan, Pastor Fr. Joeseph Campbell Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Martin Marquez
MASSES
Sunday: 7:00,8:30,10:00,12:00 10:00 a.m. service in Spanish held in the Church Hall also on Sunday. Weekdays: 6:00,7:00, and 8:00 a.m. iaqo BBBBQOP
NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST)
325 West Irvington Place Donald Davis, Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Spnday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Thursday Prayer Service 7:30 p.m. GROUP MEETINGS
Boys Club - Wednesday 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Girls Club - Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
AVONDALE LUTHERAN
Rev. Wm. R. Pape, Pastor West Colfax and Irving 534-4478 SERVICES
Worship Service: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER
215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado Rev. Dick Magnus, Pastor John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky, Older Persons Ministry
SERVICES
Sunday: Worship service and Sunday school from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.
SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
1230 Decatur 825-0121
Lou Roossien, Pastor
Ted Koeman, Intern
Lupe Rodriguez, Social Worker
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Monday Cadets at 7:15 p.m.
Tuesday Girl Scouts at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday Adult Bible Study 7:30 Wednesday Teen Time (13 and up)
7:30 p.m.
Friday Teen Lounge 8:30 p.m.
Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist
3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colorado
Lovingly , invites everyone to all its services:
Sunday 11:00 a.m.
Sunday school 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday testimonies 8 p.m.- »
Servicios en Espanol:
Domingo Primer y Tercer 4 p.m.
Escuela Dominical a la misma hora
Regular services in the Spanish language are now being offered at Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, 3101 West 31st Avenue. Knowing that the power of good is available through prayer to everybody is part of every Christian Science service. All services are open to everyone who wishes to worship and to seek the divine power of a loving God.
For over a year now special services in Spanish have been held for those who prefer this language on each first and third Sunday at 4:00 p.m. All are invited to visit these services that bring hope and healing.
The Santa Fe Trail would be happy to include information about your church and its services in its listing of Westside churches.
Please send the times of services and any special events to: Santa Fe Trail, 430 West 9th Avenue, Denver, 80204.
RELIGIOUS
ARTICLES
JOHN P. DALEIDEN CO 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver, Colorado 80204
534-8233 FREE PARKING
Also, a free Christian Science lecture to explain how to Use Your Spiritual Power will be given in English at Lake Junior High School, 1820 Lowell Blvd., at 2:30 p.m. on March 16th. A special invitation is given to hear the lecture, then come to Fourth Church at 4 p.m. to hear the Sunday service in Spanish.
WORSHIP AND WORK WITH YOUR
CHURCH
DODSCWMDS
Fr. Aquinas places ashes on the forehead of Mrs. Josephine James on Ash Wednesday, February 12th. This celebration, which occurred throughout the neighborhood, signaled the beginning of Lent
For Older Persons
Transportation
Transportation is being offered to all Westside older adults (60 years and older) by the Lutheran Community Center. Transportation is available to:
1. St. Joseph's Meal Program -12:30 Monday to Friday
2. Protestant Worship and Bible Study -10:00 a.m. Sunday
3. Doctor's appointments - call 24 hours in advance.
Pick-up Points
1. Hirschfield Towers - 333 West Ellsworth
2. Lutheran Apartments - West 3rd and Acoma
3. Lutheran Community Center - 215 West 5th
4. Private residence for doctor's appointments.
For further information, call 825-4862.
Transportacion se ofrece para todos los majores adultos (60 anos o major del e Westside par el centra de communidad Luterno. Transportacion a:
1. St Joseph's Meal Program -12:30 Lunes a vienes
2. Protestant Worship and Bible Study -10:00 domingos par la manana
3. Citas de doctor • Name 24 horas adelantado
Puntas de recojida para transportacion son:
1. Hirschf ield T owers - 333 West Ellsworth
2. Lutheran Apartments - West 3rd and Acoma
3. Residencia privada para cita de doctor
4. Lutheran Community Center - 215 West 5th
Para mas informacion, llame 825-4862.
One Lmge 1st Step
It was five years ago that the article A Prayer to St Jude for Old Santa Fe Drive appeared in a local newspaper. This appeal to St. Jude, the Saint of the Impossible came from one as she sadly contemplated the shabby street of boarded up buildings, dusty second hand stores and dirty gutters where papers and tumbleweed stirred listlessly in the breeze.
She remembered, as many remember, the Santa Fe Drive of bygone years when it was a busy bustling street; when it was the favorite shopping place of people from Barnum to the mountains. She remembered when the heart of Santa Fe beat strong and steady and the Westside people who made a living in the shops were safe and secure. Many feel that for the Westside to be secure again, the heart of Santa Fe Drive must beat strong again.
When one looks at the street now, one is almost inclined to say, 'Where have you been all this time, Saint Jude?' But one hesitates because in one step, there is proof that Saint Jude is at work.
This first step was taken by the West-side Action Center and didn't the sage say that a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step? For the Westside Action Council bought property on Santa Fe Drive and this with the further help of Saint Jude could be the beginning of something very wonderful fdr Santa Fe and the Westside.
The Action Center and its board of directors, the Westside Action Council recognize the fact that there are few streets in Denver with the potential of Santa Fe Drive and its accessibility from all directions. They can envision it as a Spanish Plaza with the warm architecture of old Spain; the color and beauty of old Mexico and the gay lur-
ing quality of old Olvera Street of Los Angeles.
Heretofore the dream of the Spanish Plaza has been a gossamer thing, at times obscured by the clouds of doubt; of timidity; of hopelessness. But with this first step, the foot on Santa Fe Drive firmly planted by the Action Center, the dream grows brighter, the obscuring clouds begin to fade away.
People of all nationalities, color and faiths walked together to build the Santa Fe of the past; people of all nationalities, color and faiths will walk together to build the Santa Fe of the future for it is significant that the ones of the Action Center that took the first step are such people.
These people have vision as well as hope and they know that if they give up their dreams for Santa Fe and their hopes for the Spanish Plaza, then Santa Fe's spirit will be crushed under the cold, blind buildings of an industrial center.
What a tragedy it would be to deprive the fine old street of its heritage and its potential; not only will the people of the Westside be the losers, but the people of all Denver will be the losers for there are many places in industrial parks for businesses; but only one place in Denver that is ideal for a Spanish Plaza.
By purchasing the building on Santa Fe and Eleventh, we have taken the first step. There are many, many steps to go and sometimes we will falter and almost give up. But with Saint Jude to help us', we will eventually reach our goal': the gay, bright, busy Spanish Plaza where all of our people have found their own particular niche.
by Flora Gasser
....................
Aurelia Simpson, Mary Richardson and Hazel Morgan concentrate on their cards at an afternoon of binqo for residents of their buildinq in North Lincoln.
SEND YOUR OPINIONS, SUGGESTIONS
LETTERS AND NEWS ITEMS TO "EDITOR" P. O. BOX 4217 OR 480 DELAWARE ST.
DENVER COLO. 80204.
BAPTISMS
Baptisms at St. Joseph's January 26, 1975
* Raymond David Leal son of Raymond and Marie Leal. The godparents are David and Gloria Lopez.
* Angel Veronica Sanchez daughter of Daniel and Lora Sanchez. The godparents are Joe and Virginia Sanchez.
* Denise Frances Torres daughter of Alejandro and Rumalda Torres. The godparents are Leroy and Frances Lucero.
February 2,1975
* Norma Raquel Tarin daughter of Geminiano and Constantina Tarin. The godparents are Willie and Josephine Vigil.
* Frederico Gilbert Valdez, III son of Frederico and Loretta Valdez. The godparents are Jerry and Irene Torres.
* Michele Louise Vigil daughter of Phillip and Carol Vigil. The godparents are Louie Hernandez and Debbie Montoya.
February 9,1975 0
* Estrellita Kimberlee Martinez daughter of Robert and Wendy Martinez. The godparents are Timmie Aragon and Elaine Perez.
* Paul Joseph Shahad Martinez son of Richard and Beverley Martinez. The godparents are John Martinez and Dorothy Mora.
*Dawn Kimberly Perez daughter of Donald and Sylvia Perez. The godparents are Alfred and Inez Sedillos. February 16, 1975
*Elgrine Geanne Raylene Gallegos daughter of John and Peggy Gallegos. The godparents are Joe and Victoria Arellano.
* Florentino Patrick Lee Martinez son of Florentino and Kathreen Martinez. The godparents are Raul and Joesfina Castillo.
* Monica Ramirez daughter ofAmbro-sio and Guillermina Ramirez. The godparents are John and Linda Armijo.
Baptisms at St Cajetan's January 19,1975
* Leticia Molina daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Molina of 1015 Inca.
January 26,1975
* Michael Anthony Garcia son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Garduno of 1445 Mariposa.
February 8,1975
* Vincenta Ramona Marie Correa daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Carlos Correa of 905 Mariposa.
February 9, 1975
♦Joseph Damian Eddie Archuleta son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Archuleta of 915 Bryant.
February 16,1975
* Monica Renee Hernandez daughter of Miss Della S. Hernandez of 1282 W. 10th Avenue.
* Garilynn Shane Manzanares daughter of Miss Connie Manzanares of 918 Clay Way.
Births
* Benjamin Silva, custodian for Byers Library, is the proud father of a baby girl, Veronica de las Angeles Silva. Congratulations!
L.C.C. POTLUCK WAS FUN
On Sunday February 16, the Lutheran Community Center, 215 W. 5th Avenue had an informal pot luck lunch and family get-together. The day began with the monthly Festival Worship. Also included in the day's activities were the installation of the new Executive Coordinators for the center, John and Diane Hushman, an" introduction of staff and board members, and an informative slide show that covered the center's activities, programs, and people involved in its operations.
A committee of five board members was responsible for the planning and preparation of the main dish, chicken mole. They were: Rose Lopez, Betty Wohl, Ardele Einspahr, Jose Lujan and Verne Conerton.
Approximately 130 people enjoyed a delicious meal to which everyone contributed. The atmosphere was warm, friendly, and one of a family unit.
All in all the day was a success and enjoyed by all. Our thanks to all that were able to share it with us.


SANTA FE TRAIL • Page 7
»CHOOL
Activities
February 5th# Mrs. Kirksey's semantics class went to Henry Jr. High for a practice spelling bee. In the final round. Baker was represented by five students out of the seven remaining. Those students were: John Ginsburg, Louis Serrat, Karen Burman, Shelley Madden, and Randy Erickson. Shelley Madden finished second in the meet
February 7th, six student council members, Dave Rivera, Greg Lopez Josephine Montoya, Lupe Carlos, Ramona Montano and Angie Gardner were accompanied by Barb Garling-house to a Mystery Breakfast sponsored by Lake Jr. High. Representatives from Skinner and Horace Mann also attended.
Students on the Honor Roll must have at least a B+ at Baker. 112 students made the Baker Honor Roll for first semester. Of these, 15 were straight A's: Louis Feher, Jody Gonzales, Mark Kelton, Steven Magana, Brenda Short and Sheri Stotts of the 9th grade; Michael Hebert, Christopher McKensie and Louis Serrat, 8th grade; Karen Burman, Janet Draper, Paul Flickinger, Kona Hays, Timothy Gallegos, and Karin Lopez of the 7th grade. Congratulations to all!
Band
Mr. Novy will have performances of the Baker instrumental groups: Feb.19-Advanced Band at Fairmont Elementary; Feb. 26-Advanced Band at Lincoln Elementary; and March 5-Jazz Band at Ebert Elementary. March 20th has been set aside for the All-School Show.
City-wide Band participants from 8th and 9th grade are: Shari Stotts, Diane Watson, Brad Kampmann, Harold Cline and Louis Serrat; 7th grade City-wide BAnd: Janet Draper who was 3rd chair first, both groups performed at George Washington High School on Jan.26. City-wide Orchestra members are: Jody Gonzales, Mark Kelton, and Diane Perry.
ROTC
Special honors to Jesus Quinones for his performance at the Manule Invitational Rifle Match. This match was in
honor of the late Martin Luther King; Jesus performed the kneeling, off hand,
* aggregate and prone positions. He was fist place in the first three events.
Congratulations Jesus!
Intermurals
Baker's 7th grade All Stars' basketball team is competing in an All-City Tournament. They have defeated Horace Mann, Place and lost their last game by 1 point. The team members are: Claude Burg, Alfredo Abad, John Romero, Phil Maes, Tim Gallegos, Ber-nie Rogers, Greg Flores, Mario Lopez, Pat Claus, Tom Herrera, and Fred Thomas.
Parent Group
Baker parents met Feb. 5th. The next meeting will be March 12th at 9:30 a.m. Discussions of Father-Son Night, Mother-Daughter Tea were left to the following meeting. Two mothers Milly Draper and Jane Craft volunteered to help with the Career Fair. Mrs. Carol Reynolds was selected as treasurer. Plans are in progress for a rummage sale on April 5th. Milly Draper, Pauline Quintana and Pat Pickering will make posters. Mary Esquibel will oe responsible for the newsletters.
At the next meeting final plans for the Rummage Sale will be made. Parents can begin saving items-if necessary contact Barb Garlinghouse at Baker (222-9718) or Jane Craft (777-7603) for donating items.
Bilingual-Bicultural
On January 24, Mrs. Rivera's class went to channel 6 to tape El Piojo y Liendre which will show on April 17th' at 1:00 p.m. El Piojo y La Leindre is one of the books written by Susan Rivera, teacher of Baker Jr. High bilingual program, which has been in effect for six years.
Some of the other activities of this group have been: decorative olla making (the present project); another is the chorus, which sings bilingual songs. The group also has a dance group which will be performing at various schools. A performance at Johnstown is scheduled for March.
Del Pueblo News
Estudiantina Del Pueblo
Our new choral director, Miss Naomi Martinez, has been very busy these past few weeks working with the new singing group which will be called Estudiantina Del Pueblo. Estudiantina groups are very popular in Spain and and Mexico.
Special performances are being scheduled for the group. Presently a uniform is being designed for the children. We hope to hear some good things from Estudiantina Del Pueblo.
Potluck Dinner
The ladies took out their favorite recipes and prepared them for our Potluck Dinner February 13, 1975. The children, parents, and teachers gathered together for a delicious meal. Our children from the Mexican Dance classes provided the entertainment. They performed the folk dances of Mexico beautifully.
am
, nera, who was principal at Bkaer Junior High School for many years and who will be remembered by many Westside residents and youth, passed away on February 18th, 1975, at St Joseph's Hospital.
Mr. Genera had been transferred to South High School this past summer and only recently found out that he had cancer. He served very little time at South High School.
If residents wish to express their sympathy to Mrs. Genera and the family, cards may be sent to 1722 South Forest, Denver 80222.

TV Stars at Del Pueblo
Several children from the Zapotec Family at Del Pueblo were invited to participate in the video taping of an educational television program for the Department of Instructional Television at KRMA TV' Channel 6.
The television lesson, Children of Mexico, may be seen April 17th at 1:00 p.m.
The children who participated in the taping were Connie Rodriguez, Richard Perez, Veronica Martinez, Tammy Rivera, Janet Martinez, Denise Aragon, Johnny O'Canna, and Anthony Padilla. They will be doing Mexican songs and games. Patricia Carpio and Jeanne Phi-pers, teachers at Del Pueblo, assisted the children in preparing for the program.
Mariachi Contest
The children of Del Pueblo are spending a lot of time doing research to find the answers to the questions featured in the Mariachi Contest. The questions are designed to reinforce cultural understanding among people. There will be two lucky winners: one from the Aztecs and Mayas and one from the Toltecs and Zapotecs. The prizes are a beautiful sarape and a straw painting. The winners will be announced the first part of March.
Greenlee
'I say to you today, even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'
The ab'ive quote is from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) whose birthday on January 15th was observed in the IMC and individual classrooms at Greenlee Elementary School. A special display was exhibited in the showcase on the first floor by Mr. Brown's fifth and sixth grade class.
African folktales were told in the IMC as a part of our Black Awareness observances. On February 19th, Mr. Paul Stewart showed slides on Black Cowboys of the West. On Friday, February 21st, Gerri Clark from the Commission on Community Relations gave a slide presentation of her recent visit to Africa. This was done in individual classrooms so that children could ask questions as well as share in the discussion on a personal level.
Susan Garcia, multi-culture aide for Greenlee, has shown a series of filmstrips on African Art, African Sculpture, and African Masks to different classes throughout the school. The children as well as the teachers found them interesting and innovative.
On March 5, the choir of Manual High School, conducted by Mrs. Joyce Davis, will present an auditorium program for the entire school from 9:30 to 10:10 a.m. Many people in our community remember and love Mrs. Davis who taught music at Greenlee for twelve years. Parents are invited to attend.
Student of
Angelo
Academia de la Gente is the school Angelo Ramirez attends. Academia is an alternative junior high and senior high school at Denver Inner city Parish with thirty students attending classes and other activities.
Angelo has attended Academia for one and a half years and is now president of the student council. He has done very well at the school and is ahead of the class both in points earned (each student earns points for a day's activities) and in achievement in several subjects.
In April, Angeltf hopes to begin classes at Community College of Denver on a special program for persons over 18 who do not have a high school diploma. He will be taking electronics and other courses which will help him prepare for a trade.
Being an honor student hasn't always been the role that Angelo Ramirez played. Before coming to Academia, he had a long record with the juvenile court and police. Then when he was sent to a group home, he began showing his potential. He succeeded so well at the group home that they had to create a special classification for him on their point system. After one month at the home, he had scored more points than any other person attending there.
'I don't think it's right to pull off stuff,' said Angelo when asked about the changes he has made. He has other interests now like playing the guitar by
Rosalie Padilla brings enthusiasm and concern to her work.
WESTSIDER AND A
HEADSTART WORKER
New staff members at the Raggedy Ann Head Start Center are Priscilla Pino and Rita Giron. Priscilla is the morning teacher replacing Harvey Benas. She holds a B.A. from Denver University and comes to us with ten years teaching experience. Rita has been hired as the community aide to coordinate parent activities. The Aur-aria centers also boast a new staff member, Linda Abeyta, who has replaced Juanita Trujillo as secretary. Linda is a former student of the University of Northern Colorado.
This year, the Raggedy Ann parents have already raised approximate ly seven hundred dollars in different activities. As yet, the parents have not decided how to spend the money. January 31st, the group gave Mary Whitten a surprise baby shower.
The Auraria Center has begun and has openings in both macrame and cooking classes. Call Marie, 534-7614 for more information.
A spunky little five footer in Denver's West Side Community coordinates social services for Auraria Head Start Centers. Rosalie Manes, as she was named at birth, is a product of the West Side and a good example of someone working through and for the system.
Interested in people, Mrs. Padilla began volunteer work in a Head Start program nine years ago. She was originally hired as a teacher aide, received a G.E.D., became a community aide, attended college classes, and is presently the social worker for the Auraria, Raggedy Ann, and Peanuts Head Start Centers. Rosalie holds an Associate Degree from Loretto Heights College and is working on a B.A. Degree from Metro State.
One might say that Rosalie is NOT the typical social worker. She is very efficient, accurate, responsive to individual needs, and a real go getter.
Fairmont News
JOIN
The Student Council has been active in revising our Pupil Conduct Rules. Each member discussed the rules with their classes so that everyone will understand the rules and why we need them.
In addition, the Student Council has written a Code of Ethics. Each student will receive a copy of their own. The Code of Ethics is:
We.....
1.
2.
3.
4.
Respect others and their Have pride in our school. Have pride in ourselves. Show good sportsmanship.
ideas.
5. Take care of school property and
equipment.
The Fairmont Elementary School Chior (now enlarged to 60 students) will be quite busy this spring providing music for many events.
They have been invited to sing at four other schools, besides the annual spring concert at Fairmont in May.
On Thursday, March 13, Fairmont will participate in the national observance of Music in Our Schools Day, by having a big talent show.
JOIN (Juvenile Offenders in Need), a volunteer program sponsored by Action and the Denver Junior League, and in cooperation with Denver Juvenile Court, is working to help Juvenile Court probation officers meet basic living needs of young offenders. Volunteers help the youth obtain clothing, food, transportation, health care and other services at the request of probation officers.
For more information about JOIN, call coordinator Carla McLendon at 892-3651.
the Month
Ramirez
ear. He can play both box and electric guitar. He also plays pool at recreation centers around the neighobrhood and on Broadway.
Before coming to the Westside where Angelo attended both Greenlee and Baker, he lived on the Eastside with his mother, Alice Montoya. He has one brother and four sisters. Angelo is the older brother but has an older sister, Maria.
For the past year, Angelo has been working with Neighborhood Youth Corps, but is presently looking for a part time job that he can continue with when he begins college.
Academia has provided a place to get schooling that he needs. Angelo is not a drop-out because he is finishing his schooling and going on to college.
He hopes that there will be more programs in the neighborhood for youth like the school and Project Freedom which is beginning an after school program for junior high students. Youth need an opportunity to earn more credits and be able to get a good education.
Last year the Academia students earned a trip to Mexico. While there Mr. Ramirez was impressed by the pyramids and decided to write his name on them when he saw all the other names. This almost landed him in jail because he was seen by the park patrol while the others were not. The pyramids were still the most impressive thing although he enjoyed the subways and churches in Mexico City.
N Lincoln ft ads tart
Headstart Parents are a very involved gruop. On January 17th they went on an excursion to the stock show. It was a very interesting trip for the children. Afterwards the children had their pictures taken by a photographer free of charge.
On January 22nd cooking classes with an Opportunity School teacher began for Headstart Parents. Parents are very excited about attending the classes. They learn how to make nutritious meals at a very low cost and how to use the USDA Commodities they recieve. After each parent participates in making the meal they also sit down and eat what they cooked. They feel very pleased and relaxed and find their classes helpful to their families.
The kitchen classes are held every Wednesday morning at Helen Conn-ally's home from 9:00 to 12:00. Parents will each receive a certificate after the 12-week course from Opportunity School. Participating parents are Helen Connally, Angie Agurrie, Mary Barr-ieutos. Ruby Finninyinne and Community Aide Jean Jackson.
Communication classes are going on also and Helen Connally is the only Headstart Parent taking the class. After she completes the classes she will receive her certificate from Emily Griffith Opportunity School.
On January 30th, all Headstart Parents met at Headstart Center and went out to dinner and a movie. A very exciting night for all! We were very pleased to have men and women come out and enjoy a beautiful evening banquet at the Royal Fork. All parents found it refreshing and enjoyable.
February 7th was a Bake Sale and a Burrito Sale. The chairwoman of the Bake Sale was Mary Barrientos, the chairwoman of the Burrito Sale was Angie Agurrie, and Helen Connally and Carol Quintana were responsible for advertising the event. All parents participated in some way to make the sale a success.
On February 13th, a parent meeting was held with a special guest speaker, Helen Lucero, from Justice Information Center. Ms. Lucero was very good in informing the group on legal matters and what their center is all about; court information, arrest information, etc. Parents were very responsive and very pleased to have her share their evening with them. They found Ms. Lucero very helpful as their speaker.


Page 8 - SANTA FE TRAIL
Your Neighbors
♦ The following 23 teenagers from Las Casitas and Sun Valley attended the Mile Hi Religious Education Youth Congress at Currigan Hall: Tivo Montoya, Helen Montoya, Joyce Montoya, Beverly Barela, Roberta Barela, Jeannette Lobato, Valerie Garcia, Roxanne' Garcia, Bonnie Deralta, Judy Lucero, Nick Sandoval, Julian Salas, Cindy Hernandez, Mike Gallegos, Daniel Cordova, Pam Lopez, Tina Lopez, Pete Montoya, Ed Montoya and Elaine Bar-ros as well as Rose Padilla, Gloria Perez and Linda Perez from the area. Sister Neomi and Sister Jean also attended. All seemed to have felt it was a day well spent.
♦ Juan B. Ortega, 1350 Osage, died late in January. He was the husband of Annie Ortega, Pueblo, father of Mary and Gilbert Ortega of Denver, and of Lee, Ruth and Joe Ortega, Mrs. Julia Mills, Mrs. Gladys Cornelison, and Frank Masciotra, all of Puebol. He had 24 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. The funeral was held at St. Cajetan's with burial in Mount Olivet Cemetery.
♦ We extend our sympathy to Nellie Morales, North Lincoln Homes, who lost a sister during the month of January. Nellie made a trip to Omaha for the burial.
♦ Luis Luna Perez went to Tampice Tamulypas, Mexico for vacation.
♦ Mrs. Fannie Ornelas had a death in her family. Her brother Macario Herrera died in Riverton, Wyoming. She went to the funeral.
♦ Mr. Robert Ornelas was in Denver for the holidays visiting with all his relatives in Denver. Mr. Ornelas is from Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and is the brother of Josephine Ornelas Perez and the son of Mrs. Fannie Ornelas.
♦ Charles Borgman, North Lincoln Homes, is currently in a nursing home for a period of rest and recuperation. He says he is doing fine and likes the care he is getting very much.
♦ Our sympathy to-Mrs. Rebecca Armijo and Mrs. Amelia Aluarado, both of North Lincoln Homes, who lost their mother on February 10. She had been sick in a Greeley hospital for some time with pneumonia. She was 78.
♦ Mrs. Gertrude Krueger has been very ill with flu. She is better now after three weeks.
♦ Daisy Stithem's son Keith is here on vacation from the Navy. He is stationed in California, and it is six years since she has seen him.
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INVITAMOS A USTED Y A SUS AMISTADES a los SERVICIOS RELIGIOSOS en ESPANOL de la CIENCIA C FUSTIAN A el PRIMER y TERCER domingo de cada mes a las 4 de la tarde t t % t t
CUARTA IGLESIA DE CRISTO CIENTIFICO
3101 W. 31ava Avenida, Denver, Colorado * * * # *
Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, 3101W. 31st Avenue welcomes everyone to all its services in English or Spanish i PROBLEMAS? APRENDA COMO LA ORACION TRAE ESPERANZA Y SALUD
BOVS CLUB
The Lincoln Park Boy's Club located at 721 West 8th Avenue, will begin some sessions in mid-March for boys and girls ages fourteen through eighteen years of age.
The sessions are as follows:
1. Junior Staff Training: skills will be taught for working with younger kids. Also placement in some community agency working with younger kids will be an activity.
2. Human Survival Training: this session will have a first aid course. Nutrition raps, skills for bachelor and family living, and child-baby care.
3. Values Clarification Raps: helping teens know and express feelings in areas such as marriage, family, sex venereal disease or any topic the group wants to discuss.
The. central thrust of Help-a-Kid program is a Boy's Club sponsorship of activities which encourages teenagers to learn about and become involved with younger children throughout their community. It is hoped that this program will provide the means and encouragement for identifying these opportunities and utilizing them to get kids caring about other kids and about themselves as future parents.
To sign up for the sessions or for more information contact Ronnie May-nes or Debbie Horvat at 936-7341.
2 furnished rooms. Lady pensioner; only. Share bath. G.F. Hobson, 319; W. 5th Avenue; 255-7872
THE WEST SIDE NEEDS YOUR HELP! SUPPORT YOUR
*892-0853!
1825-1898?
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NEIGHBORHOOD! ADVERTISE IN THE SANTA FE I KAIL
H. Lincom EVENTS
Several events and new activities have livened up the dull months of January and February in North Lincoln. The Resident Council met on January 30 to discuss the current high rate of vandalism and purse-snatchings in the area and to make some concrete plans for dealing with it. Officer Ortiz from the Police Storefront explained Operation ID and showed a film which pictured ways to combat theft. The residents decided to proceed with Operation ID, and a committee consisting of Betty Pappas, Connie Sepulveda, Mary Mora, and Linda Coco will contact people throughout the project explaining the program and how to use the marking equipment. The use of the equipment is free. Statistics have shown that homes marked through this program are less likely to be vandalised because resale of stolen goods becomes more difficult.
A new class has begun in North Lincoln. Every Friday morning from 9:00 to 11:00 several people gather in what used to be the warehouse to learn English with Jaime Neimeyer and Sister Rene. The class was begun at the urging of Mrs. Lupe Aguilera, who recruited both teachers and students. More students are invited-justdrop ini
On Tuesday evenings a group of ten to twelve parents of teenagers meets to discuss mutual concerns about their children, the schools, the neighbor-
hood. Through various means, such as role-playing, the group tries to find more effective ways of working out problems. (They have also discovered some hidden acting ability!) On Monday, February 10, this same group visited Byers Junior High School to see first-hand their children's educational situation and to discuss concerns with the staff. The school treated everyone to lunch, and then the parents were able to sit in on thier children's classes during the afternoon. It was a real surprise to both children and teachers, none of whom knew the group was coming.
Every Monday morning the senior citizens of one of the square buildings are invited to meet for coffee and^ doughnuts in one of the apartments in that building. These coffees, sponsored by Elsie Padilla and Sister Rene, give the residents an opportunity to meet the people they don't already know and to express their concerns and seek solutions. In one building the gruop felt a need for more activities to pass long afternoons, and the outcome was a plan to gather once a month in someone's unit to play bingo, cards, or to sew.
The Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club had a lovely meeting the first part of February. The tables were decorated for Valentine's Day. On February 18th the club celebrated Washington's Birthday.
• INCOME TAX SERVICE • INCOME TAX SERVICE
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LOBATO’S INCOME TAX SERVICE 526 GALAPAGO PHONE - 534-8463 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
ACCURATE - EXPERIENCED - DEPENDABLE (Sf Hablamos Espanol)
Feel Free to Call about any Questions or an
Appointment- - _
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SERVICE • INCOME TAX SERVICE • INCOME TAX SERVICE •
VOLUNTEERS
FOR
SENIOR COIV/PANIONS
Sixteen new Senior Companions were honored at a luncheon at Beth Israel Hospital on January 17. They have completed 40 hours of orientation to prepare them to work with isolated, lonely adults in need of socialization.
Senior Companions work through recognized social agencies which serve as Volunteer Stations, assigning Companions to persons who need them. Companions now work through Beth Israel Hospital, Julia Temple North Continuing Care Center, Veterans Administration Hospital, Fort Logan Mental Health Center, Visiting Nurses, Park Avenue Home, and the Nursing Home Services Unit of the Denver Department of Social Services.
The Senior Companions Program is funded by Action and sponsored in Denver by Senior Services, Inc. The local project is funded for 40 volunteers who receive a stipend of $1.60 per hour. Applications are being accepted for the final orientation session. Eligible persons are men and women over 60 years of age who have a maximum income of $2,630 for a single person or $4,510 for a couple.
Persons from all ethnic groups are encouraged to call for appointment at the Senior Companions office 572-0958.
Bi-lingual persons are needed in many areas.
Elsie Padilla, Tiny Quintana, Rachel Vasquez, Marie Romero and Sister Fran plan meeting with school officials from Byers Junior High.
Senior’s
Lunch
If you stop by St. Joseph's Catholic Church any weekday around 1:00 you will probably see a group of Senior Citizen's enjoying lunch in the Parish Hall. The St. Joseph's lunch program is part of a citywide nutrition project sponsored by the Volunteers of America.
Under the program, which is funded through the Colorado Department of Service' for the Aging and the United Way, over 1,000 meals a day are served on a donation basis to Senior Citizens at 24 different sites throughout the Denver Metropolitan area. Of all the sites, St. Joseph's is third in the total number of meals, served according to the program's latest figures.
This reporter visited St. Joe's on a Monday recently, and found over 80 Senior Citizens talking amiably in two languages, enjoying good company and good food. 'Our friends come here,' was a common response when I asked several persons why they had come there to eat. A friendly, pleasant atmosphere was very much in evidence.
Following the meal, a project Council meeting was held, attended by representatives from all the sites, as well as Project Director Dianna Kunt and a representative of United Way.
Chairman Harold Moore commented that he understood the new March guidelines for Food Stamps would not be as harsh as had originally been stated (Food Stamps can be used as the donation for Senior Citizens' meals.) Moore also praised the new .25 Senior Citizens' bus fare, which gives older persons opportunity to get out to take advantage of sales and special programs.
Also discussed at the meeting were plans for a Recognition Dinner to honor all the program's volunteers and special letters of congratulation the program has received. These included a letter of appreciation from President Ford, and notes from Senator Haskell and Denver Mayor Bill McNichols.
LA ALMA
La Alma Recreation Center in conjunction with Inner-City Parish and Auraria Community Center will organize a summer (June-Sept.) slow pitch softball league. Sponsors and/or teams interested in participating in the Men's Open, Men's over 30, or Women's Open Slow Pitch League, are requested to contact Vic De Leon, 297-3460, Ben Berg, 629-0636 or Bert Martinez, 534-7614.
office (Room 111 in City and County Building) from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Persons with cash bonds or bail bondsmen can post bail at either jail from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m.
3. Each cash bond deposited with the clerk or jailer has a $1.50 filing fee which must be paid and is not returned. Make sure that the receipt for the bond is made out to the person to whom the money should be returned. Be sure to keep the receipt.
4. Any person signing a bond should take care he understands the terms. The primary purpose of the bond is to assure the appearance of the defendant in court. If he fails to appear., the bond is forfeited.
Bondsmen charge a fee of 10% or a minimum of $20.00. The bondsman's BOND fee is not refundable. Clerks and jailers
have a list of bondsmen if you need . _ . . their service. They are not permitted to
INpORMATION recommend one. Bondsmen almost always require a responsible person to sign a guaranty agreement, promising to repay him for any losses in the event of a forfeiture.
Helen Lucero suppies information on bonds to a client.
Making or getting a bond is a problem for many persons if a family member gets arrested or ends up in the city or county jail. Some helpful hints in making bail below are from the Justice Information Center.
1. The amount of bail can be obtained from the City Jail (297-2825) or the County Jail (297-2111.) Call whichever jail holds the prisoner.
2. Bonds can be posted at the clerk's
RIGHTS
Are you tired of renting an apartment that doesn't have proper heat? Tired of paying high rent for an apartment with a ceiling that's falling down? And most of all tired of not having any remedied to these problems? Well, things may change come May 20, 1975. And it's up to you to make them change. On that day you will have a chance to vote on an ordinance which would make it legal for you to make minor repairs in your apartment or house and deduct the cost of these repairs from your rent. Next month's issue of the Santa Fe Trail will have more details about this ordinance. In the meantime, if you are having housing code problems or if you want more information on this ordinance, please notify West Side Action Center, 534-5141, and ask for Betty Koehler.
SUBSCRIBE NOW III
Start loving your Neighborhood.
Yearly Rate $ 3.00 '
If you need to post a cash, real este, or other bond and need information, contact the Justice Information Center. They will explain the procedure, the risk and answer questions that you may have about bonds and the bonding system. They are located at 825 West 11th Avenue and may be called at 893-2347.
Thank You
The following churches and agencies have contributed money and/or ih-kind service to make this issue of Santa Fe Trail possible:
Denver Inner City Parish Westside Action Center and Council St Joseph's Catholic Church Mennonite Urban Ministry St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church Neighborhood Church of the Master First Mennonite Church Auraria Community Center Lutheran Community Center Core Team Ministry Archdiocese of Denver
Also thanks to the many neighborhood residents and other community persons who contributed news and articles to this paper.
We
Santa Fe Trail
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llillllt l Special Recognition U18702 0239792 l5e Santa Fe Trail VOLUME 9 MARCH 1975 Westside Projects !pprcnd Fireman Richard Schiavone rescues two children during a recent West side fire. On February 7th, group 2 -19 res ponded to a residential fire at 704 Elati Street. After Engine 1 had taken their line into the building and Eng ineer Vincent had charged this line, he noticed Richard Schiavone from Squad 2 at a second story window with 2 small children, ages 2 years and 14 months. All the other firemen were inside the building searching for these children who were reported trapped in the building. Engineer Vincent pulled an extension ladder and raised it to a porch roof where he could reach Squad man Schiavone and the children. Schia vone passed one child to Vincent, and he took the child down the ladder to the ground. He then took the other child to safety, allowing Schiavone to reenter the window to help the mother, who he know was still in the room. By this time the fire had been knock ed in the room at the head of the stairs allowing the be helped down the stairs to safety. . City Council approved several major Improvement projects for the Westside on Tuesday, February 18th. These . monies will come from the Community Housing and Development Act which will bring approximately $44.3 million to Denver in the next three years. Manuel Martinez, who was chairman of the task force for District 9 and served on the city-wide Mayor's com mittee, reported that a significant num ber of projects will come into District 9 , which includes the Westside. He highlighted the Westside Recrea tion Center south of Sixth Avenue enclosure of the swimming pool at Lin: coin Park, land and property puFChase for neighborhood improvement, loans .. The Food Stamp Mobile Van's appearance here in North Lincoln Homes, outside the management office, was a rare one. v -an Comes and Goes After years of dealing with govern ment bureaucracies, many Westsiders have acquired a large degree of skepti cism toward government promises. In looking at cases such as that of the disappearing North Lincoln Food Stamp Van, it is easy to see why. Last July, Mattie Nixon, a resident of North Lincoln Park, made a suggestion that a mobile Food Stamp office visit the Projects in order to Senior Citizens and others who were unable to get to the main Food Stamp Office on W. Byers Street . In this way, she reasoned, more persons would be able to make use of Food Stamps. After a survey of residents demon strated the need for such a van, a petition was circulated through the North Lincoln Senior Citizen's organ ization requesting a mobile Food Stamp office. Other groups, including the resident councils of both North and South Lincoln Park, gave their backing to the proposal. In October, Bob Jennings, head of the Denver Food Stamp program, announced that a Food Stamp van would come to North Lincoln on November 6 and November 8. Jennings also announced the dates for the December visits of Jhe van and stated that the program would be evaluated in January. Due to November 5th being day, the Food Stamp van was unable to come as scheduled on November 6. However, due to late notification from the Food Stamp office, area persons involved in getting the van could not inform other residents of the change in plans. As a result, many persons waited on the 6th for a van that did not come. The Food Stamp mobile unit came as scheduled on November 8th and returned Dill1eceni6e r 4, although sc)m e pe.rsons were unaliTeto get stamps because their records had not been transferred from the main office. On December 10, however, the Food Stamp van left at noon for a lunch break that lasted the rest of the day, leaving 10 people waiting for nothing. These persons included a number of Senior Citizens and at least one person who had taken off time from his job in order to purchase stamps. When con tacted, a Food Stamp official indicated that the van had left because too few people were buying stamps. North Lincoln persons involved with the pro gram, however, pointed out that the small number of persons was largely attributable to the date being relatively late in the month, as well as a lack of faith in the program caused by the November 6th miss. After many inquiries and complaints, the Food Stamp office agreed to allow the van to return to Lincoln Park in January, and the van came as scheduled, although attendance was down. However, distrust of the program is still widespread. According to a reliable source, people feel they can't depend on the van. If the program is to succeed, they contend, the Food Stamp people must stand behind their commitments. Other persons go fur ther in their criticism of the program. 'I honestly believe they're setting it up to fail,' says Jaime Neymeyer of the Denver Housing Authority. In add ition, Neymeyer charges that residents were told their Food Stamp records would be automatically transferred to the van if they had signed the petition requesting the van. 'That was simply not the truth,' he says. The Food Stamp Van is scheduled to come to North Lincoln March 5 and March 10, as well as April 4th and 8th. Anyone in the area, not merely North Lincoln residents, may purchase their Food Stamps at Lincoln Park if they ask the main Food Stamp office to transfer their records. There are no long lines at the van, unlike the main office, so area persons are encouraged to buy stamps at the van. WHERES THE FOOD STAMP VAN Claiming that not enough persons had shown up for the mobile food stamp office, the staff informed a number of persons in Lincoln Park that they would change the date in March. Then February 1Oth, the mobile van did not show up at the regularly scheduled time. Persons in the com munity were waiting to purchase their stamps. There was no word from the staff of the van. There was no word from the food stamp officials. Pepple waited and then people went fiome very discouraged. Later in the day, several workers at Lincoln Projects received word that the mobile food stamp van staff had de cided that they would change the date in February instead of March. How are residents supposed t9 show irregular? When it is not the problem at the purchasers but of food stamp bureaucracy, should the purchasers and Lincoln Park community be blamed? Food stamps are a vital necessity of many families since inflation and unemployment are eating into many family budgets. Persons have taken off work, made special arrangements, and cancelled regular appointments to make sure that they can purchase their stamps at Lincoln Park. Why can't the-van show up? by Dave Graybill and grants for housing repair, and a storm sewer in the neighborhood as .major programs for the near future. These project s have yet t o ge to H U D for approval, but several of the projects may begin before the end of 1975. Other projects in District 9 which received funding are Globeville storm drainage, Northside Community Center expansion, and a new Northside Senior Center. Mr. Martinez emphasized that his taskforce and he himself had to work for all of District 9 in the pnority setting of thsee projects. Mayor William McNichols and his st.aff changed very few of the prior 1t1es that the city-wide committee had set . . The city council changed a few projects but they were very minor. Although initial planning has been done, there will be more taskforces appointedatlater times to set prior ities on the monies to come to the city in f uture years. Although t e money can only be used for physical improve ment, the groups and city counc.il. provided that it will go for the rehab1htat1on and improvement of a number of communities in the city. Westside appreciates the strong sup port and concern it received in this program. who served on the city-wide committee from the Westside area were Fr. Pat Sullivan who was chairman of the committee , Minnie Conict who was Councilman Burke's appointee, and Marty Drew who represented the Cit izen's Coalition. Manuel Martinez re ported that he had good cooperation from other s from District 9 and is ex cited about the projects which were approved. He was appointed by Coun cilman DiManna. Cr.tll ForHalt in Violence After several violent deaths of West side young men and a notable increase in burglaries and fights in the neighbor hood, a press conference was called by a number of leaders in the Westside to highlight some issues that are presently before the city council, state legislature and each family in the Denver area. The main appeal was to stop crime and violence both in the neighborhood and in the city. Policemen as well as neighborhood persons were called u pon to decrease the use of guns and shooting and stabbing and to increase dialogue and communication among all persons who work and live in our community . Some of the specific suggestions call ed for in the press release were: 1. Stop the sale of the midnight special gun. 2. Have a five day waiting period be fore a gun is sold. 3 . Stop policemen from using hollow point bullets. 4. Buy bullet proof vests for police. 5. Ask police officers to stop over reacting and using unnecessary violence when detaining or questioning suspects. 6. Provide ways for community res idents and police to talk with each other so there can be common under standing. 7. Stop community harrassment of police officers. life Santa Fe Trail Deliver to: 8. Find other ways to solve differ ences between people and groups than vengeance. 9. Train police in first aid. 'We live in neither a police state nor in a criminal culture. But as long as . there are crimes, the police will be involved, so it is also up to us as West siders to prevent the crimes. The po lice still have the responsibility to be professionals and accountable for their behavior. We do not approve of people re solving their differences with knives and guns nor do we approve of police men becoming the jury and executor in a fraction of a second. We call upon both the police and the community to stop the violence that we see every day.' The motto of the police is 'To serve and protect and never to shoot or kill, unless as the last resort.' The neigh borhood has to stop the crime that it cah and find ways to protect each other from persons who would rob, steal or assualt. Some in the com munity may be asked to testify in trials. Westsiders. must work together, learn to know one another, look out for one another, and assist each other. There are many problems this year with so many out of a job and others not able to make their money stretch. We do not help each other by ripping each other off. '\

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..... Z • SANTA FE TRAIL Editorial!: fD) Lr' ill[J u On February 1Sth Westside residents had a chance to be involved in the constructive change in the leadership and development of our community. But again! we chose to stay at home and not make our voices heard by our constitutional right to vote. We have many problems in .our community. There is high crime, inadequate housing, poor sewage drainage, zoning, parking, lack of recreational facilities, and the lack of interest for our Senior Citizens. Those of us who are involved with trying to bring about constructive change in our community, feel a sense of hopelessness at trying to get our people to stand up and show our solidarity in our concern for the betterment of our community. As long as we sit at home and discuss with others our problems, a,nd the unfairness and injustice that we see and feel everyday in our community, but don't get out and voice these opinions through the Ballot Boxes, there will never be any constructive change for us. It is too bad that February 18th will go down as another dark day in the history of the Westside. . __ _C_an.we not learn from our past mistakes and be a model for other com munities. We must show our pride and concern, and the need to continually strive for a viable and concerned residential community. Voting is tiieorify too'f fiy whfcli wecim hope to gain thesechanges that we all would like to see. If you are not registered to vote please do so! It you are registered, please make it a point to be at the poles, May 20th, so that we can together show our concern tor our community. Becky and Jerry Garcia WINTER SPRING_ CHANGES Spring is the annual time for cleaning up, painting up, and planting inside and outside the house, so that things look bright and fresh for the rest of the year. As one looks around the Westside, there are many people who have painted their homes, put new porches on their hpuses, nad cleaned up around the property and house. This helps improve the value of all our property and also helps improve the image of our Businesses have also made im provements, especially in the appear ance and cleanliness of the stores. Adelante, which just had its third an niversary, has done an extensive re modeling job with more services and large sales in the community. Del the extenor of theJr bUJidmg at F1rst and Broadway. This is a handsome addition to the neighborhood. Rockybuilt Ham burgers and Santa Fe Pottery have also buildings:.. _ This newspaper hopes . that all of us as residents, agencies, businesses and landowners in the community will con tinue to work together for the im provement of the housing and building stock in the area. This is another way that the Westside can continue to be a residential community where people care about themselves and others. By the way, many of our men in the neighborhood are unemployed and yet have skills in painting, carpentry, elect rical work, and brick or stone masonry. For those employed, this may be a good time to employ your nieghbor to get your jobs around the home done. WATCH OUT PURSE SNATCHER Many older women in the Westside have had their purses taken and have also had arms broken, hips bruised, or other frustrations as a result of the robbery. These purse snatchings can be pre vented if a woman does not carry a purse. A recent letter in the Ann Lander's column was from a lady who had had her purse taken several times ; and had also had some injury during these robberies. She looked in her purse, found out that she was carrying mjlny unnecessary things, an d decided not to carry i! purse any longer . All of us need to work together to Stop the vldlimce; personal injury, and theft that is occurring in our neigh borhood. One way to prevent some accidents and thefts is for women who a re walking to the store not to carry a 'purse. This not only prevents a loss of money and several bruises; it can also prevent a youth getting into the game of stealing or prevent a youth or adult from going to jail or a detention center. Let us give one another clues on how to prevent violence, theft, and delin quency in our community. If you have ideas on how to lessen the violence and personal injury here in the area, please write a letter or an article for the Santa Fe Trail. Each suggestion may save both the victim and the criminal un necessary expense, loss of life, and grief. IT'S TIME TO PICK A WINNER! BANK AT YOUR Coronado National Banlf "DENVER'S ONLY MEXICAN-AMERICAN OWNED BANK : SERVING THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY OF METRO DENVER" 1400 Irving Street • Den_., Colorado 80204 • (3031 572-3811 Near Colfax Federal • Ramiro Cruz Aedo, President; Adol fo Gomez,V ice President ; Sr. Rene Weeks, Treasurer; Brice Balmer, Edi tor; Flora Gasser; Craig Hart; Char les Garcia; Becky Garcia;. Maxine Singleton, Advertising; Anahuac Gra phics, Art ; Hasi Vogei,Photography. . . Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause . The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is also understood that the advertiser and the a gency . placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail" against all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy. All correspondence can be sent to: P . 0 . Bo x 4217 Denver , Colorado 80204 Telephone 825.-l-898 SUBSCRIPTION RATES $3.00 . .' ........... . 1 year !FOOD S _TAMPS LAS CASITAS AND SUN VALLEY It all started during the January resident council meeting when an of ficial from the food stamp office came ANNA VIGIL, Denver, has joined the Colorado Department of Social Ser vices' Division of Service' s for the Aging to assist Colorado communities and area agencies on aging in planning and establishing services for the state's 266,000 persons over 60. Mrs. Vigil wife of Gilbert E. Vigil, has been an activities director and social work consultant for several nursing homes and has been associated with Outreach Services for the Aging in Denver. We are glad that Mrs. Vigil will be working once again for our queridos y amados "viejitos" . RECALL DECIDED to the meeting in order to answer any On February 18th, Eugene D iManna After a bnef vacation, DiManna an-questions regarding food stamps. Many retained his seat as councilman tor nounced that he would begin working concerns were brought out, some of District 9 which includes most of the to bring District 9 together and help it them being lack of personnel, location Westside.' This recall-efection was the work together better. Sal Carpio con of the center as well as the condition first recall for city councilman in the ceded the election to. DiManna at the of the building; -these. were of great history .of Denver. councilman's home and was unsure it concern but the projected March 1st ... he-would run in. the May 20th election . . deadline for rising costs of food stamps The balloting was very light in the really brought protest. After much dis-Westside and other neighborhcrnds--Catpio restated that low voter turn-cussion the residents came to the some areas had as low as 25% of their out and the few days for voter re conclusion that 1hey could do some . registered voters turning out for the gistration after the Colorado Supreme thing-they decided to take Action. election. 'This election was the result of . Court decision that the recall was valid petitions and legal contests which ocwere reasoris' . 'no' t winnin' g the Volunteers were willing to go to the .. curred over the past two years. election. newly acquired unit on 1160 Federal each morning from 10:00 to noon during the week of January 27th and help residents write letters to their senators and representatives . . It was really thrilling to see the way this action spread. Some went to homes and helped while others called . and reminded people to come and wnte a letter. Over 100 letters were AURA RIA C _OIVIM ITTE:E ANNOUNCED On Thursday, February 6, 1975, a press conference was held at the Fox Building, 1250 7th Street formally announcing the formation of the West side/Auraria Committee. The purpose of this committee is to make sure that the presence of the Auraria Higher Education Center will not threaten our community and to make sure that the AHEC will help the Westside Com munity remain and im.prove as a neigh borhood. The committee of thirteen will be working directly with the members of the AHEC's Board of Directors on such problems as housing, zoning, traffic problems, etc .. The following people were selected to be committee mem bers because of their interest and com mittment to the Westside. Residents Helen Lucero, Betty Koehler, Wilma Dabrowski, Maxine Singleton, Ruben Leal, and Darlene Dominguez. Agency Residents Adolfo Gomez, Auraria Community Center; Gilbert Ouintana , La Alma Recreation Center. Elected Officials Richard Castro, State Representative; Paul Sandoval, State Senator. Student Resident Steve Cordova Student Non-Resident Muriel Ashmore Professional Dr. Dan Schier This committee meets monthly. For more information regarding this com mittee contact Ms. Muriel Ashmore at 534-1280. Your Options listed If a couple is going to have sex and doesn't want a baby, it is best to use a method of birth control. It is best not to have sex if you're not ready for it. But suppose you have sex without using any birth control--or your birth control method didn't work--and you think you are pregnant? The first thing to do is to go to one of the health stations (Casita 801 West 5th Avenue 534-0657 or Mari posa -1178 Mariposa Street -623-8782); Denver General Family Plan ning 893-7085; Planned Parenthood Eastside Clinic -388-4777 or Westside Clinic-2401 West 32nd Avenue-458-5985; or your family doctor as soon as possible for a pregnancy test . A nurse or clinic .aide asks for a urine sample, runs a test on it and then tells if you are pregnant or not. Be sure to tell the nurse or clinic aide if you are using pills of any kind, because this may change the test. If the test is positive, and you are pregnant, there are three things you can do: 1. You can have the baby and keep it. Ask the clinic or physician where you can go for medical care for you and your baby-to-be. 2. You can have the baby and put it up for adoption. Call Florence Crittendon (825-3283). Planned Parenthood or any of the above clinics or look in the yellow pages under Adoption Agencies. (It is also important that you go soon for good medical care while you are pregnant. 3. You can have an abortion. Abor tion is the way to stop an un wanted pregnancy. Since an abor tion is an operat i on, it should be done ONLY BY A DOCTOR. An illegal abortion, one done by yourself or by anybody with little or no training to do such an operation, can cause infection, sickness, and sometimes death. It may keep you from ever being able to have a baby again. No thing that you can .do yourself will give you a safe abortion . It is very important for a woman to make arrangements for an abortion right away if having an abortion is what she has decided to do. An abortion, when done in the first twelve weeks is usually a sate and easy oper ation . A late abortion will probably cost more and there can be more problems fcir the woman. It may also be hard to get. EARLY ABORTIONS ARE SAFER ABORTIONS. Most places that do these early abor tions use the method called vacuum aspiration . In this method, a plastic tube and gentle suction is used to clean out the inside of the uterus (womb.) The procedure does not take long and the woman can usually leave the hospital or lcinic the same day. IT IS NOT TRUE THAT a woman can do a vacuum aspiration abortion with a vacuum cleaner. IT IS NOT TRUE THAT drinking castor oil will cause an abortion. This may make you feel horrible, but you will still be pregnant : IT IS NOT TRUE THAT drinking turpentine will cause an abortion. It will probably make you very sick, but you will still be pregnant : If you aren't ready for a pregnancy, but find yourself pregnant, none of the three choices is going to be easy. If you keep the baby, you will have to care for it every day, you might not have time to go to school, or you might have a hard time keeping a job and taking care of a baby. If you put the baby up for adoption you might al ways wonder what happened to your baby. If you have an abortion you might feel that you have taken a life, you might feel later on that you really wanted the baby, or you might just be sad that this had to happen. There are doctors and counselors who can help you with these problems. Remember, if you are pregnatn, be sure that what you do is what YOU UJink is best. Make a decision you feel you will. be able to live with. IT IS YOUR RIGHT TO DECIDE!

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SANTA FE TRAIL page 3 Westside Resident Approaches to the Jean Jackson Alcohol Problem Outstanding Youth Jean Jackson attends an inter-agency meeting to discuss plans for more direct involvement in North Lincoln. In the face of individual, corporate, and governmental exploitation, the Westside is fortunate to have a signi ficant number of persons concerned about the rights of its people and in volved in using and protecting these rights. Jean Jackson is such a person. Orginally from Texas, Jean Jackson has lived on the Westside for over a decade. Since coming here, she has worked with many programs and ser ved on countless committees. Mrs. Jackson' s first committee assign ment consisted of a position on a Law Enforcement Committee of the Urban Coalition, where she served under Geo rge Brown, who is now Colorado's Lt. Governor. She later ran for and won a seat on what was then -known as the Citywide Health Council. Jean Jackson also served as a Patient Representative at the Mariposa Health Station. In the area of housing, Mrs. Jackson has been a representative of North lincoln Park on the Central Resident Council, an advisory body to the Denver Housing Authority. Mrs. Jackson also served as the Council's secretary. At the present time, the major part of Jean's community involvement comes through, her position as the Community Aide of the North lincoln Head Start Program, a job in which she serves as a liason between parents and and staff personnel. In addition, she is interested in a local Brownie group, and works with Marty Drew on a commodities distribution program un der which a member of any health center with children five years of age or younger is eligible to receive USDA food. Mrs. Jackson lives in North lincoln Park on Navajo Street . She has three children, ages 2, 7, and 9 : the older two of whom are bused to school at Moore Elementary. Mrs. Jackson likes the Westside and sees it as a nice place. Nevertheless, she is not blind to its problems, such as a need for more and better housing, .and recreation for area children. In addition, she is concerned about what she feels is the danger of Lincoln Park becoming student housing. For the future, Jean Jackson would like to see Westsiders become more aware of, and make more use of. t .he programs around them. She "VOuld also like to see more area persons vote, and she points out that it is possible for one member of a family to register all of the family's voting age members. Finally, Mrs. Jackson would like to see Westsiders niake more use of their elected representatives. Doing these things, she feels, would be a positive step in the direction of enabling West siders to truly control their own des tiny. Westside Childcare The months of January and February have been particularly exciting for par ents, children and staff of Westside. We have seen presentations, screen ings, and a couple of new faces. the Valentine's Day theme. We had a party on Friday with lots of cake and and cookies. We read books and disc ussed the importance of love and friendship among us. Westside Center welcomes visitors and volunteers from the community, so stop by to see us and our facilities anytime . We operate from 6 :30 a.m. to 6 :00 p.m. Monday through Friday, phone 733-2473. ALCOHOLISM EDUCATION COURSE ALCOHOL COUNSELING What can you d o i f you're worried PROGRAM that a family member may drink too I n a homey, inform a l manner, alto much or if you h a w questions a bout holies and persons arr ested lor dri v ing perhaps abusing yourself? If under the influence can realize thei r seeking treatment 1sn t the answer lor power to control thei r drinking beyou the A lcohol Education Program, havior. Aurari a Community C enter of-part' of the Northwest Denver Mental lers counselling i n groups and lor i n d -Health Center of the Department o f ividuals i n the Alcohol Counseling Pro-Health and Hos p itals, may help you gram. gain a better understanding of alcohol Don Bartek i s the directo r of the and alcoholism, and help you dec1de whether drinking is a problem you counseling program and reports that want to do somethin_ g about. no person in the program has been re-arrested for the DUI charge ahe r being The Alcoho l Educat ion Program in the program. with a staff of three counselors and 15 volunteers, conducts a 16-week Most persons who haw participated course about alcohol and its effect on in the program haw been referred h through the probation department of the body, t e symptoms of alcoholism, the courts. Persons who wish to partici -and the effects of alcohol abuse on f d T pate can come to the community amily an commun1ty. he course IS center and talk with Mr. Bartek or open to anyone, and is especially reanother counselor if they feel that they levant to those who are personally af-fected by alcohol (either their own haw a problem with alcoholism. A Problem drinking or a famjly mem-family member can also refer a person ber's) and agency workers whose elito the service or talk with the staff ents are alcoholic or problem drinkers. about the problems that the family and the alcohol it are facing. The class meets every Wednesday evening for two hours; the first hour consists of a film or lecture, and the second hour is a small-9roup rap ses Sion. Speakers from Alcoholics Anon ymous, law enforcement agencies, and insurance companies, as well as AEP and other Mental Health Center staff, speak about the influence of alcohol from their areas of expertise. Vol unteers act as discussion facilitators in the small group sessions; up to 12 groups of eight members each can be accomodated in the course. To enroll in the course, you must make an individual 'intake appoint ment' with an AEP alcoholism counsel or to discuss the reasons you want to take the course. If you are not already enrolled as a patient at Denver General Ho spital, the counselor will give you instructions for obtaining a hospital number. You may then begin the course the first Wednesday after the intake appointment. The only require ment is a commitment to complete all 16 weeks of classes. The fee for the course i s based on .ability to pay, as determined by family size and income. For more information, call AEP dir ector Christy Nelson at 893 6166 . SUN VALLEY GIRLS. CLUB • The girls club at Sun Valley Com munity Church meets every Tuesday night at 7:00 p . m . As a project for the month of February the girls w ill study Black culture conducted by Ms. Ross, Educational Coordinator with Head start . The month of March is Chicano culture conducted by Esther luven, BilingualBicultural teacher from Bou levard Elementary and Greenlee Elem entary. The girls are taking part in dis cussions and art displays. There are special group sessions and other activities in groups, but the staff and the center are flexible and willing to adapt their schedules to the work situation and other needs of each per son or family. Special services which are offered by the counseling program include marital I and family counseling, attempts to find employment for those out of work, Antabuse monitoring, etc ... If a person would like to find out more about the program, he can stop by Aura ria Community Center at 1212 Mariposa or he can call 534-7614 . Drug Free Pr9ject Auraria Community Center is now housing a new program; the Drug Free Educational Project. This program is designed to provide drug abuse cnun seling as well as to provide a com. munity education program to serve the needs of the Westside area resident the program are Minerva. An tuna, Robert Gazotti, and Ron Gon zales. So me of the services offered are emergency crisis counseling, drug in formation and referral ; individual, family, group counseling as well as a drug resource center. In order to better serve the community , we have coun _selors who speak both English and Spanish. If you would like to contact the center for further information and or service please call 534-7614 or 7615 or feel free to drop by at any time, we are located at 1212 Mariposa. METHADONE REGULATION CHRIS TRUJILLO The Southwest Denver Youth Ser vices Bureau, under the direction of larry G . Gonzales, has named Chris Trujillo as outstanding youth of the year of 1974. This award vvas pre sented in recognition of Chris's service to youth in Southwest Denver and her educational achievement Chris worked with the Southwest Denver Youth Services Bureau from June 1974 to Jan. 1975. Chris worked. at the YSB sponsored by the Neigh borhood Youth Corp. The NYC Pro gram provides part-time employment for youth that fit certain criteria and income. Joyce Archuleta who is the supervisor of the NYC's at the YSB says, 'Chris vvas a very dedicated and hard working youth . We miss her very much.' Chris left the YSB when they helped her get into the HEP (High School Equivalency Program.) H EP is funded by the U.S. Department of labor at Southern Colorado State College in Pueblo directed by Mr. Edvvard Tafoya. HEP offers a second chance for youth who ,have dropped out of high school, to complete their high school edu cation. The ultimate goal of the pro gram is to assist these youths in finding sustained, progressive employment by placing them on jobs with up)'Vard mobility, in vocational training' pro grams or in instituations of higher learning. To facilitate this placement process, thsee young people are pro vided with the skills necessary to pass the GED examination. Chris vvas granted her GED and is now enrolled at Metro State College and will attend for two quarters. She is also currently preparing herself to take the College Entrance Examination so she can enroll in Stanford University in the fall of 1975 under the sponsor ship of the HEP progr'am. Chris spends her spare time cro cheting, knitting, playing pool, and reading. Chris' paretns are Jose and Vera Trujillo. Chris has a younger sister and a younger brother. CONSUMER Janice Trujillo has acting center director until Mrs. Soto , our regular director , returns in March. Mrs. Trujillo is doing a fine job of organizing and running Westside. _Esther 0 uran is our newest teacher 1n the four-year-old room. We welcome her aboard! All 57 children received a free den tal screening from Colorado University. Those who were found to have dental problems were given referrals to clinics or dentists in our area. Teacher of Month the New regulations concerning metha done take out privileges by clients of drug abuse treatment programs, for ulated by the State Health Department and program directors, became effect ive early December. COUNSELING AVAILABLE Under the new regulations, the max-At the Westside Action Center we We had a presentation from the Rocky Mountain Poison Center about poison control. The children saw a film showing them things they must not touch. last week's feature was the Patch the Pony' film. This i nformative pre sentation showed the children why they must stay away from strangers. All rooms . were busy with Valen tine's Day activit ies. We made lots of hats, paintings, and designs using 6th. AVE.&SANTA FE CONOCQ SERVICE CALLS INSPECTION SERVICE WORK **** COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR . •n 255-4076 Gladys Pensado Taylor , English as a Second language Instructor for Right to Read, teaches ESL to about 60 students . Among some of the finest qualities that Gladys has is her enthus iasm for teaching, and her sincere concern for her students ; she is always available when a student needs help with problems such as immigration, translation, jobs, legal matters , etc ... Gladys has been with us for over a year. She started out as a volunteer tutor al)d because of her ability to teach she vvas soon working full-time as an ESllnstructor. Due to. a car accident which hurt her vertebra ; she went into the hospital February l3, and will be out of work for 3 weeks. Talking about concern for her students-one hour before entering the hospital she vvas out helping a student with residence papers! We all wish her a speedy recovery! Slie is a dynamic ' te acher ; well loved by -her students and Right to Read Staff. . . Gladys Pensado Taylor . ' i!'_--., ... Gladys works with a student at Byer's learning Center. ifium take-out privilege allows for have found that there is more to be plck-up of the medication only three done than meeting the people's needs times a week. To be eligible for this in times of crisis. privilege, clients must be taking _no Being a consumer today has major more than 50 mg of methadone da1ly, problems that continue to grow. For and must_ have been m the people on low or fixed incomes, the at SIX months. Other 1n . problems seem to be even greater. the _ procedure of Therefore , we now have a Consumer dally 1 _nQest10n of med1cat10n. at Counselor within the Action Center chn1c are consistently negative to serve you in the event that you unne cheoks for the drug of abuse, h bl r uestions good clinic attendance , progress in ave.any pro ems 0 q treatment, and good 'social function-We counsel consumers in: purchasing ing'-employment, enrollment in school goods and groceries economically and or training program, parenting, and so nutritionally; the legality and/or rea on. A penalty, or loss of the take-out sonsfor increases in rents, utilities, privilege, i s imposed for violation o.f gasoline, etc . We help consumers pro the regulations . teet themselves from false advertising, loan sharks, unfair contracts or polThe State Health D apartment will icies. develop a review board, comprised of , . 1• . one staff member from eacli drug . If I i s we abuse treatment clinic in Denver , to refer you to legal A•d; Small Cla1ms .. consider and make decisions on exCourt or the District Attorney's Of ceptions to the regulations. Cecil Edie, lice on Consumer Affairs . . . PhD, director of the Northwest Denver . For help with consumer problems, Mental Health Center's drug abuse contact . Melisandro Martinez at 1100 treatment program, believes the review Santa Fe Drive. The telephone number may revise the regulations , per-is 534-5141. 10d1cally. . . JI.Z' _; = !1 = J l = u t-:.11 :11 '!: .!i.U !!...l! I ;_1J t!': \'..;' t l .: J !: ;. . • ....

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'. 4 -SANTA FE TRAIL . . CAaNICEaiA . DE ADELANTE Meat Department-Manager FEATURING . • U.S.D.A. Choice Beef -• Grade "A"Poultry • Try our Pure, Lean GROUND BEEF It's the finest Quality in Town. And its lOW PRICE will save you monEY!!!! We Always have a Fine Selection of • LAMB HEADS! • BEEF HEARTS! • CARNE ADOVADA! • LONGHORN CHEESE! . . • BEEF BRAINS! • CHORIZO! . . /

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Barden Fresh PitC>BI:IeE V.S.No.t . SANTA FE TRAIL 5 :DEL MoNTE Sut:eD I. FLA.,. 'foo ., .... $ ..,. , C01ff.f. Z '198 s --I Bl6 1f UNIIJII . $HURFIN L'hC L/3. 29f BIG .ftc 2fz CAN 47' CoLUMBINE ; ' 'FRESH-. 2Y: CAN ONLY : . SHURFIII i We gladly acuept Llfj) 99; , Gov't Food Stamps B,& ar. JAR ! ; Store WEEKDAYS Hours 1 8:30 a.m:uN!!s 8:30 p.m. Prices in this A , D ii 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. GOOD thru Sat. March 8th ONLY ,;---: i Community 727 . Supermarket sANTA n DRIVE - • ---D-• •

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SANTA FE TRAIL page 6 ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 1060 . 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8 : 00,9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Sat.urday: 12:15, 5 :15 CONFESSIONS Daily before 12:15 Mass Saturday 4 :00 to 5 :00 DEVOTIONS Tuesday -St. Anthony Novena Friday -St. Jude Novena (During the Mass) ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 9th and Lawrence Denver, Colorado James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor MASSES Saturday evening 7:00p.m. Sunday 8:00a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00 (Spanish) , 7:00p.m. Weekdays 8:00a.m. (Spanish) . . FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN 120 East 1st Avenue Denver, Colorado Rev. Arnold Bloomquist, Pastor Sunday School 9 :45 Morning Worship 11 :00 a . m . Coffee House Faith Factory 25 Broadway J _ohn Cox, Student Pastor Directo!_ _ _ FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Kermit Derstine, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister Morning Worship 9 : 00a.m. Church School 10:00 a.m. Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038. CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL) 126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion J 0:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon Wednesday 10:00 a.m. Holy Comm union and Bible Study ST. JOSEPH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado Fr. Patrick Sullivan, Pastor Fr. Joeseph Campbell Fr. leroy Burke Fr. Martin Marquez MASSES Sunday: 7 : 00,8 : 30,10:00, 12:00 10:00 a.m. service in Span ish held in the Church Hall also on Sunday. Weekdays: 6:00, 7:00,
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J/H/l () "' .. . . . February 5th, Mrs . K1rksey s Jesus performed the kneehng, oH hand, and who will be remember-ed by tics class went to Henry Jr . H 1qh for a • and prone pos1t10ns. He was many Westside residents and youth, practiCe spellmg bee. In the final f1st place 1n the f1rst three events. passed away on February 18th , 1975, round, Baker was represented by f1ve Congratulations Jesus! at St. Joseph' s Hospital. students out of the seven remaining. Those students were: John Ginsburg lntermural s Louis Serrat, Karen Burman, Shelley Baker's 7th grade All Stars' basket-Madden, and Randy Erickson. Shelley ball team is rompeting in an All-City Madden f1n1shed second in the meet Tournament. They have defeated Her-Mr . Genera had bet!n transferred to South High School this past summer and only recently found out that he had cancer. He served very little time at South High School. If residents wish to express their sympathy t o Mrs. Genera and the fam ily, cards may be sent to 1722 South Forest, Denver 80222 . February 7th, six student council ace Mann, Place and lost thei r last members, Dave Rivera, Greg Lopez game by 1 point. The team members Josephine Montoya, Lupe Carlos, Ra-are: Claude Burg, Alfr edo Abad, John mona Montano and Angie Gardner Romero, Phil Maes, T i m Gallegos, Ber were accompanied by Barb Garling nie Rogers, Greg Flores, Mario Lopez, house to a Mystery Breakfas t sponsor-Pat Claus, Tom Herrera, and Fred .. -------------•• e d by Lake Jr. High. R epresentatives Thomas. from Skinner and Horace Mann also attended . Students on the Honor Roll must have at least a B + at Bake r . 112 students made the Baker Honor Roll for first semester. Of these, 15 were straight A's: Louis Feher, Jody Gonzales, Mark Kelton, Steven Magana, Brenda Short and Sheri Stotts of the 9th g r a de; Michael Hebert, Christopher McKensie and Louis Serrat, 8th grade; Karen Burman, Janet Draper, Paul Fllck1nger, Kana Hays, Timothy Gallegos, and Karin Lopez of the 7th grade. Congratulations to all! Band Mr. Navy will have performances of the Baker instrumental groups: Feb.19-Advance d Band at Fairmont Element ary; Feb. 26-Advanced Band at Lincoln Ele m e ntary ; and March 5 -Jazz Band at Ebert Elementary_ March 20th has been set aside for the All-School Show. City-wide Band participants from 8th and 9th grade are: Shari Stott s , Diane Watson, Brad Kampmann, Harold Cline and Louis Serrat; 7th grade City-wide BAnd: Janet Draper who was 3rd chair firs t . both groups performed at Geo rge Washington High School on Jan.26. City-wide Orchestra members are: Jody Gonzales, Mark Kelton, and Di ane Perry. ROTC Special honors to Jesus Quinones for his performance ' at the Manule Invitat ional Rifle Match. This match was in Parent Group Baker parents met Feb. 5th. The next meeting will be March 12th at 9 :30 a.m. Discussions of Father -Son Night, Mother-Daughter Tea were lett to the following meeting. Two mothers Milly Draper and Jane Crah volun teered to help with the Career Fair. Mrs. Carol Reynolds was selected as treasurer . Plans are in progress for a rummage sale on April 5th . Milly Draper, Pauline Quintana and Pat Pick ering will make posters. Mary Esquibel will be responsible for the newsletters. At the next meeting f inal plans for the Rummage Sale will be made. Par ents can begin saving items-if necessary contact Barb Garlinghouse at Baker (222-9718) or Jane Craft (777-7603) for donating items. Bilingual-Bicultural On January 24, Mrs. Rivera's class went to channel 6 to tape El Piojo y Liendre which will show on April 17th at 1 :00 p . m . El Piojo y La Leindre is one of the books written by Susan Rivera, teacher of Baker Jr. High bilingual program, which has been in effect for six years. Some of the other activities of this group have been: decorative olla mak ing (the present project) ; another is the chorus , which sings bilingual songs: The group also has a dance group which w ill be performing at various schools. A performance at Johnstown is scheduled for March. Del Pueblo News Estudiantina Del Pueblo Our new choral director , Miss Naomi Martinez, has been very busy these past few weeks working with the new singing group which will be called Es tudiantina Del Pueblo. Estudiantina groups are very popular in Spain and and Mexico. Special performances are being scheduled for the group. Presently a uni form is being designed for the children . We hope to some good things from Estudiantina Del Pueblo. Potluck Dinner The ladies took out their favorite recipes and prepared them for our Potluck 0 inner February 13, 1975. The children, parents , and teachers gathered together for a delicious meal. Our children from the Mexican Dance classes provided the entertainment . They performed the folk dances of Mexico beautifully . SUPREME HUSKY SERVICE 570 Kalamath Street DENVER, COLORADO 80204 * * * * * INSPECTION SERVICE WORK **** HAPPY NEW YEAR 19 7 5 ! (fiU8K'!J JOB PRINTING (Since 1921) FORMS • STATIONERY BOOKLETS • • • • • nelson the printer 555 SANTA FE DRIVE . 623 2476 623-6006 TV Stars at Del Pueblo Several children from the Zapotec Family at Del Pueblo were invited to participate in the video taping of an educational television program for the Department of Instructional Television at KRMA TV' Channel 6 . The television lesson, Children of Mexico, may be seen April 17th at 1 :00 p . m . The children who participated in the taping were Connie Rodriguez, Richard Perez, Veronica Martinez, Tammy Riv era, Janet Martinez, Denise Aragon, Johnny 0 'Canna, and Anthony Padilla. They will be doing Mexican songs and games. Patricia Carpio and Jeanne Phipers, teachers at Del Pueblo, assisted the children in preparing for the pro gram. Mariachi Contest The children of Del Pueblo are spend ing a lot of time doing research to find the answers to the questions featured in the Mariachi Contest. The questions are designed to reinforce cultural un derstanding among people. There will be two lucky winners : one from the Aztecs and Mayas and one from the Toltecs and Zapotecs . The prizes are a beautiful sa rape and a straw painting. The winners win be announced the first part of March. Fairrmnt -'l:he Student Council has been active in revising our Pupil Conduct Rules. Each member discussed the rules with their classes so that everyone will understand the rules and why we need them . In addition, the Student Council has written a Code of Ethics. Each student will receive a copy of their own. The Code of Ethics is: We ..... 1. Respect others and their ideas. 2 . Have pride in our school. 3. Have pride in ourselves. 4. Show good sportsmanship. Greenlee ' I say to you today, even though we face the difficulties of today and to morrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted i n the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truth s to be selfevident , that all men are cre:.ted equal.' The ab,ve quote is from Or. Marti n Luther r
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Page 8 SANTA FE TRAIL Your Neighbors • The following 23 teenagers from Las Casitas and Sun Valley attended the Mile Hi Religious Education Youth Congress at Currigan Hall: Tivo Montoya, Helen Montoya, Joyce Montoya, Beverly Barela, Roberta Barela, Jean nett , e Lobato, Valerie Garcia, Roxanne' Garcia, Bonnie Deralta, Judy Lucero, Nick Sandoval, Julian Salas, Cindy Her nandez, Mike Gallegos, Daniel Cordova, Pam Lopez, Tina Lopez, Pete Montoya, Ed Montoya and Elaine Bar ros as well as Rose Padilla, G Ioria Perez and Linda Perez from the area. Sister Neomi and Sister Jean also attended. All seemed to have felt it was a day well spent. • Juan B. 0 rtega, 1350 Osage, died late in January. He was the husband of Annie Ortega, Pueblo, father of Mary and Gilbert Ortega of Denver, and of Lee, Ruth and Joe Ortega, Mrs. Julia Mills, Mrs. Gladys Cornelison, and Frank Masciotra, all of Puebol. He had 24 grandchildren and 8 great-grand children. The funeral was held at St. Cajetan's with burial in Mount Olivet Cemetery. • We extend our sympathy to Nellie Morales, North Lincoln Homes, who lost a sister during the month of January. Nellie made a trip to 0 maha for the burial. • Luis Luna Perez went to tampice Tamulypas, Mexico for vacation. • Mrs. Fannie Ornelas had a death in her family. Her brother Macario Her rera died in Riverton, Wyoming. She went to the funeral. • Mr. Robert Ornelas was in Denver for the holidays visiting with all his re latives in [}enver. Mr. Ornelas is from Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and is the bFOther of Josephine Ornelas Perez and the son of Mrs. Fannie Ornelas. • Charles Borgman, North Lincoln Homes, is currently in a nursing home for a period of rest and recuperation. He says he is doing fine and likes the care he is getting very much. • Our sympathy to. Mrs. Rebecca Arm ijo and Mrs. Amelia Aluarado, both of North Lincoln Homes, who lost their mother on February 10. She had been sick in a Greeley hospital for some time with pneumonia. She was 78. • Mrs. Gertrude Krueger has been very ill with flu. She i s better now after three weeks. • Daisy Stithem's son Keith is here on vacation from the Navy. He is sta tioned in California, and it is six years since she has seen him. INVITAMOS A USTED Y A SUS AMISTADES a los SERVICIOS RELIGIOSOS en ESPANOL de Ia CIENCIA CRISTIANA el PRIMER y TERCER domingo de cada mes a las 4 de Ia tarde :j: :j: :j: :j: :j: CUARTA IGLESIA DE CRISTO CIENTIFICO 3101 W. 31ava Avenida, Denver, Colorado * * * * * Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, 3101W. 31st Avenue welcomes everyon!'l to all its services in English or Spanish i. PROBLEMAS? APRENDA COMO LA ORACION TRAE ESPERANZA Y SALUD * * * :a2s-1a9a: * * * * * :892_0853! NEIGHBORHOOD! ADVERTISE IN THE SANTA FE 1 HAIL THE WEST SIDE NEEDS YOUR HELP! SUPPORT YOUR * * BOYS CLUB The Lincoln Park Boy's Club located at 721 West 8th Avenue, will begin some sessions in mid-March for boys and girls ages fourteen through eighteen' years of age. The sessions are as follows: 1. Junior Staff Training: skills will be taught for working with younger kids. Also placement in some community agency working with younger k ids will be an activity. 2. Human Survival Training: this ses sion will have a first aid course. Nutrition raps, skills for bachelor and family living, and child-baby care. 3. Values Clarification _Raps: helping teens know and ex(!ress_ areas such as marriage, family, sex venereal disease or any topic the group wants to discuss. The_ c . entral thrust of Help-a-Kid pro gram is a Boy's Club sponsorship of activities which encourages teenagers to learn about and become involved with younger children throughout their community. It is hoped that this pro gram will provide the means and en couragement . for identifying these op portunities and utilizing them to get kids caring about other kids and about themselves as future parents. ro sign up for the sessions or for more information contact Ronnie May nes or Debbie Horvat at 936-7341. 2 furnished rooms. lady pensione only. Share bath. G .F. Hobson, 319 W. 5th Avenue; 255-7872 Senior's Lunch If you stop by St. Joseph's Catholic Church any weekday around 1:00 you will probably see a group of Senior Citizen's enjoying lunch in the Parish Hall. The St. Joseph's lunch program is part of a citywide nutrition project sponsored by the Volunteers of Am-erica. N. LINCOLN E II EN T S Under the program, which is funded through the Colorado Department of Service for the Aging and the United Several events and new activities have livened up the dull months of January and February in North Lincoln. The Resident Council met on January 30 to discuss the current high rate of vandalism and purse-snatchings in the area and to make some concrete plans for dealing with it. Officer Ortiz from the Police Storefront explained Oper ation I D and showed a film which pictured ways to combat theft. The residents decided to proceed with Operation ID, and a committee con sisting of Betty Pappas, Connie Sepul veda, Mary Mora, and Linda Coco will contact people throughout the project explaining the program and how to use the marking equipment. The use of the equipment is free . Statistics have shown that homes marked through this program are less likely to be vandalised because resale of stolen goods becomes more difficult. A new class has begun in North Lincoln. Every Friday morning from 9 :00 to 11:00 several people gather in what used to be the warehouse to learn English with Jaime Neimeyer and Sis-. ter Rene. The class was begun at the urging of Mrs. Lupe Aguilera, who re cruited both teachers and students. More students are invited--just droll in! hood. Through various means, such as role-playing, the group tries to find more effective ways of working out problems. (They have also discovered some hidden acting ability!) On Monday, February 10, this same group visited Byers Junior High School to see first-hand their children's educational situation and to discuss concerns with the staff. The school treated every.one to lunch, and then the parents were able to sit in on thier children's classes during the afternoon. It was a real surprise to both children and teachers, none of whom knew the group was coming. Every Monday morning the senior citizens of one of the square buildings are invited to meet for coffee .and doughnuts in one of the apartments in that building. These coffees, spon sored by Elsie Padilla and Sister Rene, give the residents an opportunity to meet the people they don't already know and to express thelrconcerns and seek solutions. In one building the gruop felt a need for more acti vities to pass l9ng afternoons, and the outcome was a plan to gather once a month in someone's unit to play bingo, cards, or to sew. Way, over 1,000 meals a day are served on a donation basis to Senior Citizens at 24 different sites throughout the Denver Metropolitan area. Of all the sites, St. Joseph's is third in the total number of meals, served according to the program's latest figures. This reporter visited St. Joe's on a Monday recently, and found over 80 Senior Citizens talking amiably in two languages, enjoying good company and good food. 'Our friends come here,' was a common response when I asked several persons why they had come there to eat. A friendly, pleasant at mosphere was very much in evidence. Following the meal, a project Council meeting was held, attended by representatives from all the sites, as well as Project Director Dianna Kunt and a representative of United Way. Chairman Harold Moore commented that he understood the new March guidelines for Food Stamps would not be as harsh as had originally been stated (Food Stamps can be used as the donation for Senior Citizens' meals.) Moore also praised the new .25 Senior Citizens' bus fare, which gives older persons opportunity to get' out to take advantage of sales and special pro grams. • INCOME TAX SERVICE • INCOME TAX SERVICE • z n 0 m LOBATO'S INCOME TAX SERVICE 526 GALAPAGO • .... l> X PHONE 534-8463 • •••• z n 0 =: ACCURATE EXPERIENCED DEPENDABLE m . VI m ll < 0 (SI Hablamos Espaiiol) );! X m Feel Free to Call about any Questions -or an VI • m Lppointment. -::c DON'T WAIT! < n SERVICE. INCOME TAX SERVICE. INCOME TAX SERVICE -. VOLUNTEERS FOR SENIOR COIVPANIOI\IS The Senior Companions Program is funded by Action and sponsored. in Denver by Senior Services, Inc. The local project is funded for 40 volun teers who receive a stipend of $1.60 per hour. Appl_ications are being ac cepted for the final orientation session. Eligible persons are men and women over 60 years of a9e who have a max imum income of $2,630 for a single person or $4,510 for a couple. Persons from all et hnic groups are encouraged to call for appointment at . the Senior Companions office 512-0958 . ' Bi-lingual persons are needed in many areas. = c c c c c c c c c c c ac: office (Room 111 in City and County Building) from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Persons with cash bonds or b all bonds men can post. bail at either jail from 5:00p.m. to 7:00a.m. 3 . Each cash bond deposited with the clerk or jailer has a $1-.50 f iling fee which must be paid and is not return ed. Make sure that the receipt for the bond is made out to the person to whom the money should be returned. Be sure to keep the receipt. 4. Any person signing a bond should take care he understands the terms. The primary purpos. e of the bon. d is to assure the appeara-.lce' of the defendant in court. If he fails to appear., the bond Helen lucero suppies information on is forfeited. bonds to a client. Bondsmen a fee of 10% or a minimum of $20.00. The bondsman.'s fee is not refundable . Clerks and jailers have a list of bondsmen if you need BOND INFORM AT I 0 N their service. They are not permitted to recommend one. Bondsmen almost al ways require a responsible person to Making or getting a bond is a pro-sign a guaranty agreement, promising blem for many persons if a family to repay for any losses in .. member gets arrested or ends up in the of a forfeiture. city or county jail. Some helpful hints If you need to post a cash, real este, in making bail below are from the or other bond and need information, Justice Information Center. contact the Justice Information Cen1. The amount of bail can be ob-ter. They will explain the procedure, tained from the City Jail (297-2825) the risk and answer questions that you or the County Jail (297-.2111.) Call may have about bonds and the bonding whichever jail holds the prisoner. system. They are located at 825 West 11th Avenue and may be called at 2. Bonds can be posted at the clerk's B93-2347. RIGHTS Thank : You Are you tired of renting an apart-ment that doesn't have proper heat? The following churches and agencies Tired of paying high rent for an have contributed money and/or ib apartm.:nt with a ceiling that's falling kind service to make this issue of down? And most of all tired of not Santa Fe Trail possible: having any re_medies" to these prob-Denver Inner City.Parish . lems? .Well, thmgs m_ay come Westside Action Center and Council May 20, 1975. And 1t s up to you to St. Joseph's Catholic Church them change. On that day yoll Mennonite Urban Ministry Will. have a _chance to vote _on an St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church ordmance which _It legal Neighborhood Church of the Master for you to make mmor repa1rs m your First Mennonite Church apartment or and deduct the Auraria Community Centercost of thes! from your rent. Lutheran Community Center n:'onth s 1ssue of t _he Santa F _ e Core Team Ministry . w1ll have more a_bout th1s Archdiocese of Denver ordmance. In the meantime, 1f you are . having housing code problems or if Also thanks to the many you want more information on this hood residents and other commumty ordinance, please notify West Side persons who contributed news and Action Center, 534-5141, and ask for articles to this paper. Betty Koehler. On Tuesday evenings a group of ten to twelve parents of teenagers meets to discuss mutual concerns about their children, the schools, the neighbor The Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club had a lovely meeting the first part of February. The tables were decorated for Valentine's Day. On February 18th the club celebrated Washington's Birth day_ . Also discussed at the meeting were plans for a Recognition Dinner to honor all the program's volunteers and special letters of congratulation the • • • • • • • • • • • • • ,.,_ • • • • • • • - • Elsie Padilla, Tiny Quintana, Rachel Vasquez, Marie Romero and Sister Fran plan meeting with school officials from Byers Junior Higl\. program has received. These included a ' SUBSCRIBE NOW !!! letter of appreciation from President Ford, and notes from Senator Haskell and Denver Mayor Bill McNichols. LA ALMA La Alma Recreation Center in con junction with Inner-City Parish and Auraria Community Center will or ganize a summer (June-Sept.) slow pitch softball league. Sponsors and/or teams interested in participating in the Men's Open, Men's over 30, or Wo men's Open Slow Pitch League, are requested to contact Vic De Leon, 2973460, Ben Berg, 629-0636 or Bert Martinez, 534-7614. ' . Start loving your Neighborhood. l Santa/ Fe Trail estside t-Jews Yearly Rate $ 3 .00. Make checks payable to Fe Trail, 430 W . 9th Avenue, Denver Colorado, 80204 Name Address --------State Zip------SUBCRIPTION COUPON . . . ------.. .. -----------------.. .. -----... ------.. --.... ------.... -..