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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, October, 1975

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Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, October, 1975
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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News
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Santa Fe Trail
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Denver, CO
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Santa Fe Trail
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English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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City Budget Cuts Affect Westside
Reduced city revenues and inflated costs have forced Denver Department of Health and Hospitals officials to cut the agency’s proposed 1976 budget, which already was at a maintenance level, by $3.5 million.
The city health agency’s revised 1976 budget request of 529.3 million was presented to City Council in an Oct. 10 hearing session.
In presenting the revised request to council members. Manager of Health and Hospitals Dr. A.J. Kauvar described the reduced agency budget as * ‘totally inadequate.** Earlier he explained to a special Board of Health and Hospitals meeting that the cuts for 1976 would mean reduced services and longer waits for patients but he and other administrators were trying to “keep a core program going as something to build on.**
The $3.5 million cut for 1976 will mean the abolishment of 226 fulltime jobs in Health and Hospitals facilities; 162 of those jobs are now filled. The cuts will affect every division of the agency — coroner’s office, public health, mental health, Denver General Hospital, and Neighborhood Health Program.
The city’s environmental health inspection services in the areas of
housing and restaurant inspection, milk sanitation, meat processing, air pollution, and animal control will be cut 10-25%. The disease control program (TB, VD and other communicable diseases) will lose two cferks and a disease investigator.
The parochial school health program, which provides screenings, immunizations, health education and dental screening for 12,000 non-public school children, will be discontinued. Children may obtain immunizations from the disease control clinic at 605 Bannock St. and from well-child clinics.
The developmental evaluation center which provides diagnostic services for children with developmental problems will be eliminated.
Casita Esperanza Health Station at 5th and Inca will be moved to a smaller facility. The move will involve a cut of 10 jobs from the station staff.
Maternity and family planning sessions in health stations may be reduced.
Two of the agency’s four decentralized mental health clinics will be eliminated.
Two of the three receiving centers and halfway houses for alcoholics will be closed, and Visiting
Nurse Service home visits to alcoholics will be discontinued.
A VNS field office will be closed, and the responsibility of each VNS field supervisor will be increased.
Agency-wide personnel cuts will include the elimination of six fulltime physician positions.
Expanded inhalation therapy services for DGH patients, originally planned for 1975, will be postponed again in 1976.
The computerized EKG program used in DGH and the two neighborhood health centers will be discontinued.
DGH’s six-bed rooming-in unit, where mothers are allowed to keep their new-born babies in the rooms with them, will be closed. Also to be closed is the eight-bed adolescent unit on the pediatric floor.
Support for the chaplains’ services in DGH will be discontinued.
Mayor Bill McNichols, who has described the entire city budget package for 1976 as a “doomsday blueprint*’ for survival, said the city will request more state aid for Denver from the next session of the legislature, but neither he nor health and hospitals administrators believe such assistance, if forthcoming, would be in time to affect the cuts in the 1976 budget.
Santa Fe Trail
October 1975
Westside News
LUNCHES AT FAIRMONT
Lunches for older persons will be available at Fairmont Elementary School, 520 West 3rd Avenue according to Mr. William H. Bashor, assistant to the principal.
The lunches will cost 80 cents and milk, tea, or coffee will cost 15 cents. Lunch is served each day at. 12:30 noon, but reservations are to be called in before 9:30 a.m,, so that sufficient food can be prepared.
Menus for the meals will be in the newspapers on Wednesday and Thursday each week for the following week. If there are questions or if a person wishes to call in the reservation for that day, the number is 893-1957.
Persons should enter the school from the Fox Street entrance at the northwest corner of the building.
•This is a program sponsored by Denver Public Schools for older persons. Our schools are primarily for our children so that they will learn but they are also increasingly being a service for all people in the neighborhood: for learning and for special programs and needs.
Number 16
Assistance Center To Open
On October 6, 1975, the. Broadway Assistance Center will open its doors at 204 Broadway. This storefront crisjs center will provide counselling and other concrete services to the community centered around First and Broadway. The opening is especially exciting since the planning, the labor, and the materials to remodel the Broadway Assistance Center have come from members of this community. The storefront itself has been made available through the efforts of the Union Bank and Trust which makes the entire project a community effort.
Professional staff from various agencies will be available through the Broadway Assistance Center as well as volunteers from the community. Residents who are in-
Jaime Nelmeyer Is now manager for South Lincoln Housing. Office is 1000 Navajo and phone is 534-3731.
Westside Centennial Notes — SANTA FE DRIVE IN 1933
terested in participating with this community project are asked to stop in at the storefront office.
The Broadway Assistance Center has become a reality through the efforts of many individuals and agencies. People from the West-side Action Center spent an afternoon cleaning the building while members of the Denver Christian Community have worked on Saturdays to remodel, repair and paint.
Since the Broadway Assistance Center is designed as a self-help project, the help of everyone in the community is welcome and needed. The most immediate need is some additional furniture to equip the storefront. Persons who could contribute a chair, desk, rug, or table are asked to call 722-6959.
Discuss RTD with Planners
Mark down Thursday, October 2nd, 7:00 p.m., on your calendars for the Westside Improvement Association’s meeting at St. Jo* seph’s parish hall, 6th and Gala* pago. This Is a meeting for you to air your concerns, complaints, helpful comments, and notes of appreciation to persons from gov emment.
Councilman Sal Carpio, State Representative Richard Castro, Mayor William McNichols, representatives from city agencies, and several other officials will be there to answer questions and explain, services.
Refreshments will be served. Come and air your opinion. Your voice is important. This meeting Is for all Westsiders.
The Regional Transportation District (RTD) is planning to construct a 26 mile rapid transit system in the near future from Northglenn to Littleton with service to the Central Business District of Denver.
Previous discussions with the community indicated a desire to locate the rapid transit system near the railroad tracks. However, to meet federal laws for the protection of the environment, alternative locations for the system and stations must be studied. In meetings with the Denver • Planning Office (DPO), RTD was advised to study the Broadway-Lincoln area as an alternative. Thus, RTD and DPO are examining two different locations for the system on the edges of the near westside neighborhood: fa)'Along the railroad tracks, and (b) Along Lincoln and Broadway.
The rapid transit system will be studied as an elevated or at-grade system along the railroad tracks.
How will the rapid transit system serve your neighborhood? How can it help the community? RTD and DPO need your help to answer these questions!
RTD and DPO would like to talk to you ahd your neighbor, improvement associations, or organizations. If you or your organization are having meetings and would like to talk to RTD about its rapid transit plans, please call the RTD Planning Office, 759-1000, extension 376 for arrangements. A later meeting will be held during October by RTD and DPO in the community to discuss the results of the studies and service to the area. Please watch for this announcement in this paper.
Today’s grim marriage of unemployment and inflation added with tomorrow’s gloomy forecasts has caused a nation to look back at yesterday with considerable nostalgia and warmth as it acknowledges the problems of those days.
Your guide is a yellowed West-side Hustler which came out on Friday, May 26, 1933, and oddly enough the reporter who will take you on this trip had a large column and by-line in that same newspaper. Many Westsiders will follow her steps with longing even though in the windows of many of the stores of those days were the signs “We Take Blue Relief Orders*’.
There are so many interesting places advertised in this crumbling, yellowed paper. We’ll stop first at the A. Petersen Grocery Cb. at 734 Santa Fe Drive and go in after a dozen fresh eggs advertised at 11 Vi cents a dozen and a pound of Brimful Coffee advertised at 28 cents a pound. And who can resist veal roast at 10 cents a pound? Bi-Lows is close by at 711 Santa Fe and you might as well get four cans of Borden’s milk for 25 cents and a lb. of Meadow Gold butter for 26 cents. Since these are recession days you cannot help noticing their most popular item is that old standby hamburger, but here ground beef (pure) is advertised for 3 lbs. for 25 cents. Myers Drug Store lures you with an ice-cream soda for 5 cents and then you can go across the street on 8th and Santa Fe to Clarkes Drug where you can get a large bottle of mulsified cocoanut shampoo plus a heavy turkish bath towel, both for 39 cente.
The old newspaper was great on local news. Miss Marie Johnson of 443 Santa Fe Drive entertained with a luncheon and sewing party at her home. How many ftlople remember Miss Johnson and her kitchen so tantalizing with the aroma of good things baking? Mr. and Mrs..Frank Dunn are entertaining at a birthday party in honor of their daughter, Mildred Alice, aged eight, in their home at 763 Lipan. Fred Bennett, 807 West 7th Avenue, was taken to Denver General Hospital suffering from a , fractured ankle which he got when he was knocked to the ground when he attempted to crank his car.
The John Thompson store promises to give those whfth Blue Relief orders the most for their money.
They are not idle promises: Del Monte’s finest raisins at 3 boxes for 25 cents, 3 tall cans of Alaska Red Salmon for 50 cents, and a five lb. can of Del Monte Jam for 50 cents. But stretching Blue Refief orders was like stretching Food Stamps!
The Bargain Bazaar at 731 Santa Fe Drive screams for you to stop: a gallon of Amaizo salad oil for 90 cents, ginger snaps for 10 cents a lb., and % lb. tea for 10 cents. At Desserich’s Furniture Store further down the street you can get a ballbearing lawn mower and catcher for $4.50 and a fine porch glider for $9.50.
A double at 958 Inca Street that was clean with varnished floors and lawn asks for $13 a month rent. A six room apartment at 411 Gala-pago Street that claims built in conveniences and modem features asks for $20 a month in rent.
If you want a beauty treatment you can go to Mrs. Finni’s at 1170 Kalamath Street for a permanent at $2.50 cost or you can stay on Santa Fe Drive for at Lucille's Home Beauty Parlor at 1022 Santa Fe Drive a finger wave with shampoo costs 35 cents.
Penney*s, 859 Santa Fe Drive, advertises 300 new print dresses and are selling them at $2.00 each. Since hats were worn in church in those days, the hats for 88 cents were going fast. You can get any kind of hat you want at this price: wide brim, small shapes, straws, pique or felts.
The Santa Fe on the corner of West 10th is having give-away night on Saturday with Zane Grey’s movie, “Thd Mysterious Rider’*.
• All balcony seasts are advertised at 15 cents. Across the street, Le-from’s Hotel and Grill has a sign “Can you £at at home as cheap as this?*’ The menu begins with puree of lima beans soup, then the entree of braised tenderloin tips with fresh vegetables, mashed potatoes, tomato salad, bread and butter, and dessert also, your choice of ice cream or pie, and coffee, buttermilk, milk or beer. All this for just 25 cents. The sad thing about this wonderful offer was that many people passed it up, they didn’t have 25 cents.
—Flora Gasser
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Santa Fe Trail
CUTBACKS & REFLECTIONS
For the past several years, programs in the Westside have increased at the community centers with new projects, and through government agencies and programs. This past month we are experiencing cutbacks again only they aren’t from the federal government.
Denver City Government is cutting back the budget in every area and the Westside will be drastically affected. Denver Public Schools are going for a mill levy increase or they will have to cut back on services to the youth of our community. A number of programs may be cut off or have been threatened around the community and we may well see these agencies or programs close around the end of the year. Denver Welfare is cutting back on the social workers in the community although they are increasing children’s services. <
Here we go again!) “Let us sit on our laurels (behinds) and drink to the fall of all around us,” says the fatalist or the frustrated person. Again and again and again we get cut back just before we really get going.
It is true; we are getting less funding and fewer services. We can show reason for depression, but we also need to look ahead for ourselves, our older people and our children. We must survive and we must get the kinds of services we need for all of us.
A listing of the cutbacks from Denver General Hospital, the neighborhood health program, the mental health program, and city recreation would make any of us weep. But we are getting cut because we have so little control over our own destinies. We need to own and be more involved in our community and our programs.
This is true not only for the Westside but for Denver. According to statistics gathered by the city government and also by the public schools, 25% of all the assessed value of the State of Colorado is in the City and County of Denver. Denver also has approximately 14% of the total children in the state; Denver also has more facilities for social services and also for culture for which persons from all over the state come to the city. Yet with all of this Denver gets precious little from the state coffers. We get almost nothing from the suburbs except people coming into the city for their jobs and taking their payrolls back to the suburbs. We get very little from the rest of the state and yet the government offices and many, many buildings are here in the city — untaxed.
Inequities exist. The mental health program in the northwest district! of Denver takes care of 20% of the state’s mental health patients seen by; clinics and yet only gets 10% of the money. The public schools here have 14% of the state’s children and yet get only 11% of the state money. People come to live in Denver because we have services and they are a drain on our city’s economy. But do we say they can’t come or restrict them? No, we welcome them as friends, neighbors and relatives. We take care of them at the highest rate of taxation in the state.
What should we be about?
1) working with City Council and the Mayor’s office to ask the state government to look again at its priorities and assist Denver so that we do not become a poor city without services,
2) work for the new programs coming into our community and make 'sure they do a very good job,
3) find ways for people in the neighborhood to own their own homes and therefore begin to control some of the land,
4) work for the establishment of businesses and community organizations like Adelante and SANTA FE TRAIL which are self-" supporting and belong to the community,
5) stop the rip-offs that ape going on all around us vand keep us from getting beyond survival,
6) work with our youth so that they can get the proper education and become the doctors, teachers, businessmen, carpenters, mechanics, reporters, contractors, barbers, bankers, policemen, etc. for our neighborhood,
7) work for more jobs for friends, neighbors and relatives,
8) stick together regardless of race, religion, section of the community or age to work for the betterment of this area for all of us,
9) support each other and tell each other when a good job is done.
Let us dream new dreams in the midst of cutbacks and frustrations.
Let us become less dependent even though there is less money available. Let us own our own homes even though interest rates are high. Let us learn to know our neighbors even though we’re afraid. We have no alternative but to move on and to keep improving.
EDITORIAL BOARD
Charles Garcia, President; Becky Garcia, Vice President; Sr Rene Weeks, Treasurer; Brice Balmer, Editor; Flora Gasser, Don Bartek, Sam Abeyta, Craig Hart, Judy Bauer. â– 
Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause.
The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is also understood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail" against all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy.
All correspondence can be sent to;
SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 892-1039
SANTA FE TRAIL is looking for a person with skills in advertising. The job wotdd include both selling the ads and laying them out. Pay is on a commission basis. If interested, contact Brice Balmer at 892-1039 or Sr Rene Weeks at 623-0374. Person can begin immediately. Advertising responsibility is shared with other persops on the staff.
WELFARE
Cuando ud. aplica para el Welfare, lo siguiente es lo que neces-ita;
1. cualquier papel que verifique que cantidad de dinero ud. nesecita — reclbos de renta, etc.
2. el tamalffo de su familia y la edad de los nihos, certificados de naciemento, etc.
3. recibos de su pago de trabajo.
Serva mas facil si. ud. puede
llevar a enviar tanta informacioii que se le hago posible, pero si ud. tiene dificultad en reunir las papelqs necesarios, el departmento de Welfare le ayudara.
Vickie Herrera WESTSIDE HOME $1500 Under Appraisal NO DOWN — VA
Owner pay closing costs on this newly redecorated 2+2 bedroom home with new carpet in three bedrooms, nice hardwood floors in living room and formal dining room. VA appraised at $18,500. For quick sale at $17,000. Call Ed Woods - 452-0938.
Multi List Service Realtors *' JAMES HILL —9110 North Washington _____________287-3264___________
Renters: Check Out the Place
»
If you’re looking to rent a dwelling — be it a house, an apartment, a mobile home — here are some tips to consider to help you get the most for your money.
Even though your tenancy may be short-term, you want it to be headache-free. A careful physical inspection js of the utmost importance.
•ELECTRICAL: Are there ample outlets and ample voltage available to handle your customary needs (appliances, fans, and so on)? If not, the landlord will likely balk at the high price of bringing in extra service. You may balk too. It’s better to find out before you move in than after.
•SOUND: Test the acoustics. There’s nothing like paper-thin walls to drive you batty. If the adjoining apartments are empty, ask the landlord to let you in, where you can whisper, whistle, yell at the cat, imitate a stereo, whatever. If the adjoining apartments are occupied, I admit, it’s a bit ticklish to ask your would-be neighbors how loud or quiet they are. If you’re apartment hunting during the day, there may not be anyone home, and the landlord might let you in for your own testing. Play it
by ear, but don’t complain if you are later disappointed.
•EQUIPMENT: What’s the condition of the stove, disposal, water heater, dishwasher, laundry equipment, air conditioners, and so on? Who’s responsible for repairs? Replacements? If the apartment is new, are there any guarantees on the units? If so, will they adequately protect you? It may be worth it to hire an appliance repairman to give you an opinion.
Naturally, if you can discuss all of these items with the former tenant' (and neighbors) you’ll be that much better prepared.
Written agreements are always better than verbal agreements. That is why a lease agreement is important. Important matters to consider in the lease — which in all probability will have been prepared by the landlord’s attorney — are these:
•RENEWAL PRIVILEGE. Is it automatic or do you have to exercise the privilege in writing? An automatic renewal clause might unwittingly bind you to another term, should you fail to give proper notice of nonrenewal. Are the terms clearly stated or is the future rent left up in the air?
•SUBLET PRIVILEGE. Good to have, if you can get it, though you’d have to expect to still be liable for the rent if the sub-tenant didn’t pay.,
•SERVICES. Who provides what and at what cost? This includes utilities, taxes, maintenance, recreational facilities, parking, insurance. This should all be spelled out in the lease if future disputes are to be avoided.
•REMEDIES. Your rights against the landlord (and vice versa) for failure to perform under the lease should be clearly set forth. Lacking specific remedies, you might be left to bickering, hassling and court.
All lease terms are negotiable — more so if the landlord - has too many vacancies, less so if the units are full of tenants. The lease controls the agreement, and if there’s enough at stake it would be worth your while to have your own lawyer represent you in the negotiations. Remember all agreements made, especially those negotiated MUST BE IN WRITING.
The preceding article was -written by Mr. Robert S. Rosefsky and appeared in the Chicago News.
Business of Month —
EMPIRE CLEANERS
What is a newspaper doing featuring a business which is closing in the next two weeks? Well, the reason for closing is one which affects far too many of us here on the Westside and in other parts of the city.
Joe Trujillo and his wife have owned and operated Empire Cleaners for the past five years. The business is a family operation and Joe worked at other jobs while his wife ran the business during the day. At night they both worked. Business started slowly but during recent months, more people were bringing their clothing to be cleaned. Mr. Trujillo was about to begin a pension plan for his employees.
At the end of August and then again in September, Empire Cleaners was robbed. Since the Trujillos did not have insurance to cover the loss, they are doing what they have to do: close down this family operation in our neighborhood.
Mr. Trujillo has had other tragic experiences and in the end may have to declare bankruptcy before all is finished. First he lost a good job with a manufacturing company where he had worked for over two years. This layoff was because of the slowdown in business and industry. Then his mother-in-law became sick and had needed to stay with the family; this is a family obligation which he feels is important and is glad he can help.
After getting another job and things started to look better, the business was robbed twice. Stolen were a cash register, television, clothing from customers, a sewing machine, and many tools. The second robbery was the final blow.
His comment to this reporter was, “This is the worst recession and these, are the most troubled tithes I have- ever seen.” When asked if they compared to the depression, he said he had been so
Closing his business means people need to pick up their clothing, young at that time, he really couldn’t remember.
Joe Trujillo is an active member of St. Joseph’s Church and is the father of one daughter who .is now married. As soon as his mother-in-law has recovered, his wife hopes to begin to work again and they will be able to get “into the black” again. Presently he is at the cleaning business at 260 Bannock in the late afternoons. He’ll be there until all clothes have been picked up. v
These are troubled times, but ,we did have a good business developing on the Westside. Because of a theft, we deprived a family of a source of income, many people of their clothing (several jackets and coats*worth over a hundred dollars were stolen), a place of employment for some neighborhood persons, and the ownership of our own community through a neighborhood family.
Can we afford to lose all this for a robbery? But maybe the robbery was done by outsiders? But aren’t there too many robberies like this around our community? Aren’t we killing ourselves?
Resident of Month:
ANDY DOMINGUEZ MISSING^^^
_ Andy has been a resident of the Westside and South Lincoln Projects for 22 years. He came to the Westside from Santa Fe in 1953.
Andy worked for the Cosmopolitan Hotel as a cook uhtil 1964 when illness brought about his “retirement.” Since this “retirement” Andy has been active on the 11th Ave. block, especially by caring for the lawns of the Seniors around him. He is a faithful usher at the 9 A.M. Mass at St. Elizabeth each Sunday. In addition to this Andy hops a bus to the New St. Cajetan to usher for the 10:30 Mass.
On the side, he repairs some furniture and sells jewelry. This summer Andy got three gardens started and then continued to supervise them during the summer. Right now he is helping to reap the harvest.
We salute Andy Dominguez as a man who has made many contributions to the Westside and thank him for all that he has done to make the Westside a better place to live.
Last month’s resident of the month did not have her picture, in the paper and also had her name misspelled. Our apologies to Lela Swanson of Delaware Street.
This month there is not a picture for quite a different reason. The camera with pictures in it was stolen. This is not the only robbery we face in our neighborhood and not the only consequence for others who are not the thief.
Homes in the area are being burglarized with increasing regularity, persons are missing items and purses are being snatched. There are many consequences for us and for those around us. Unfortunately many of the thieves are among us and many are afraid to turn in names when police make investigations.
Hopefully this attack on ourselves will soon cease. How much longer can we live in fear? How much longer will young persons and some older people continue to make a living by robbing their own neighbors?
SOBRIETY HOUSE
Sobriety House, located at 121 Acoma Street, is a private, nonprofit corporation that deals with the problems of alcoholics in the Denver area. Since its foundation by Rev. Ernest Baber in 1967,. Sobriety House has provided a friendly, “home type” atmosphere for its residents along with counselling services both for individuals and groups.
The program, presently accommodating 22 persons, has been directed by Raymond G. Stewart since 1972. Aiding Mr. Stewart are Frank C. Farrell, Assistant Director, and Edward Michael Casey, Counselor.
Sobriety House welcomes financial donations as well as good, used clothing apd furniture.
Thank You for your Patronage UNION BANK & TRUST
1st & Broadway 744-3221


Teacher of Month — STEVE CHAVEZ
One hundred ten young men are on the football teams at West High School this year and if each of them works well at practice, each one will get to play in one game during the week. That’s the spirit of Steve Chavez, the head football coach at West.
When Steve started coaching at West five years ago, there were only 46 young men on the teams at the end of the year. Last year 95 finished the season and this year 110 will probably finish.
Although Steve insists on physical fitness, he does not drop fellows from the team if they are working and trying. If you give your all to the sport, then you will play in at least one game, he says.
“We need to overcome the doubt in our minds about winning,” says Steve. Winning is not the most important thing to this coach but he hopes that all his team will have greater confidence and that West will begin winning more games.
Part of West’s weakness is the doubt in the players’ minds, but another problem is size. In four years, Steve only had one fellow over 200 lbs. Now he has four on this team. “It's the best team that I have had.”
Our team lost to Kennedy which is the best team in the state, but now the group understands what happened and the results would be different if the two teams played again. West still might not win, but they would play much more effectively. Coach Chavez says that though they lost that game, they played hard! He’s hoping that the results will now be different with George Washington High School.
For the past several years, Steve Chavez has been the head of the physical education department at West. He has been the men’s physical education teacher although he is also qualified to teach English. For two years, he was also assistant to the boys’ advisor which is a disciplinarian position at the school.
Before coming to West, Steve
taught one year at Kunsmiller Junior High School. But his enjoyment of the sports, appreciation of the fellows and interest in West High School are long standing.
Mr. Chavez grew up on the Westside and attended St Joseph’s High School. For a number of years, his family lived at 14th and Mariposa.
In addition to teaching and football, Mr. Chavez is a baseball coach and also an assistant- baseball coach at Metro State College. He has won numerous awards for his baseball ability and record.
The day this reporter talked with Steve, he was expecting Jiis first child within several hours. Since the newspaper has to go to press » we’ll print the results of the birth under Neighborhood News next issue. This will be the first child for he and his wife, who is a business teacher at North High School.
Over the entrance to the football practice field, there is a sign which is the Chavez motto.
I’m here because I enjoy the game I am dedicated I have PRIDE WE CAN WIN
On the back of the Cowboy football entrance, it asks “Did you give 100%?”
.Good luck to Coach Chavez and his 1975-76 Cowboy football teams: Sophomore, Junior Varisty, and Varsity.
Del Pueblo News
Students and teachers are off to a busy start at Del Pueblo this fall. Children have been assigned to the five learning areas according to their age and learning needs. The learning areas are named after Mexican Indian tribes and are known as families. The Aztec family has approximately 60 students and includes 11 and 12 year olds. The Mayan family has approximately 90 pupils ranging in ages from 9 through 11. The Zapo-tec family has approximately 95 pupils ranging in ages from 7 through 9, and the Toltec family includes the 6 and 7 year olds, with approximately 95 pupils. The youngest family is known as the “Hijitos.” This includes kindergarten and the 4 year old children' in the Early Childhood Education program. Del Pueblo is fortunate to have an outstanding Early Education Program for 4 year olds. There are a few openings left for 4 year olds living in the Del Pueblo area. For more information call the school at 629-1473.
Mexican Independence Day on Sept. 16 was celebrated at Del Pueblo with an assembly for all children. Children from the Zapo-tec, Mayan, and Aztec families presented a skit which provided some historical background for the celebration of Sept. 16th. Some beautiful Mexican dances were performed for the students by Miss Beverly Garceau, dance instructor for the Guadalupe Mestizo Dancers, with Becky Villa and Rachael Martinez, also dancers from the Guadalupe group, all performing in very colorful costumes.
An orientation meeting Tor parents was held on Wednesday, Sept. 17 to inform parents of the many programs and activities at Del Pueblo. Parents were able to meet in small groups with teachers to discuss procedures for assigning pupils to the various family areas, the methods used for reporting children’s progress to parents, and
the special programs at Del Pueblo. If you were not able to attend the meeting feel free to come to the school at anytime to pick up the information given to parents.
Everyone at Del Pueblo is concerned with improving our children’s skills, especially in reading and arithmetic. Teachers will be working especially hard on these areas, and they would like all parents to encourage their children by stressing the importance of attending school regularly. Good attendance is necessary if our children are to make good progress at school. The teachers and staff at Del Pueblo would also like to extend an invitation to parents to visit the school so you can be informed and aware of what is happening at your “escuela Del Pueblo.”
HEADSTART
The Auraria Head Start Centers began classes on September 15th with phase-in. The classes are divided so that the three year olds attend morning classes and the four 'year olds the afternoon classes. There are still openings for children and you may inquire by calling the Centers (Auraria - 534-7614 and Raggedy Ann - 825-1169).
New staff members are: Teacher, Betty Quintana, formerly with the Margery Reed Nursery School; and Debbie Lopez, teacher assistant. Also on the teaching staff are student teachers Su Yun Yang of Taiwan and Glenda Guanella of Colorado State University.
Through a special grant, the Peanuts staff (Sam Abeyta, Director; Rosalie Padilla, Social Worker; Rita Mattingly, teacher; Joyce Edwin-son, developmental motor therapist; Patricia Burnside, teacher assistant; and Jennie Bustos, Driver/ Aide) attended a workshop in Houston, Texas from September 21-24 on “Mainstreaming the Handicapped.” *
Student of Month — YOLANDA QUEZADA
This month our student comes from Moore Elementary School, located at 9th and Corona. Each morning she boards the yellow school bus near her home on Mariposa with the other children from North Lincoln Homes for their ride to school.
She is one of the many delightful children from our area and was picked for the paper by some of the staff at the school. We’ll let the rest of her story be told in her own words and those of some of her teachers.
“My name is Yolanda Quezada. I live at 1377 Mariposa. I’m in the sixth grade. I go to Moore School. I used to go to Greenlee. I was born in Juarez, Mexico. My age is eleven.
“I have three brothers and two sisters. My dad and my mom’s names are Lucio and Angelina Quezada. My best subject is reading. When I grow up I want to be a hair dresser and manicurist.”
Her teachers say: “Yolanda is a delightful student. She’s interested in all kinds of activities and finds pleasure in many things.”
“Yolanda is fun to work with in class. She is always very helpful and quick to pick lip new ideas. One of her most endearing qualities is her thoughtfulness and kindness toward others. She always has a smile for you.”
“Yolanda’s smile brightens the whole classroom. She always is cheerful and happy. She has a fine sense of responsibility.”
Baker News
One of the prides of Baker for the year 1975-76 is the new IMC (Instructional Media Center). Combined with the books which have been in the library are all kinds of teaching aids, audio-visual, and study materials. There is a new green carpet with gold and rust accents, study carrels for individualized study and over 150 new books.
Baker has a new Community Liaison Counselor who is interested in getting to know the parents and community agencies in the Baker community. He is Mr. Gerry De-Petro, a graduate in sociology from C.S.U.
Students, teachers, and parents representing all areas of Baker’s community are combining their ideas to come up with objectives for the MBO (Management By Objective) Program at Baker. From one to three basic objectives will be chosen to be used as a basis for decision making throughout the year. If you did not get to a meeting and have an idea to contribute, call Mrs. Elfstrom 222-9718.
Back-to-School Night at Baker will be October 16, There will be no opening meeting but parents will take the schedule provided by their youngsters and start classes at 7:00 p.m. The function will end about 9:00 p.m. and will be followed by a Bake Sale. Contributions for the Bake Sale are welcome.
The Bilingual-Bicultural Center in Room 204 at Baker is planning a bilingual/bicultural club to focus attention on the ethnic populations at Baker. There will be activities centered around arts and crafts, food, language of different cultures. They invite parents to visit the center, or if they wish to donate some time, to serve on the Bilingual-Bicultural Advisory Committee. Call Julie Gomez or Patty Kirksey at Baker 222-9718.
NEW PROGRAM FOR 4 YEAR OLDS AT GREENLEE
Early Childhood Education, an exciting new program for four-year-old children, started at Greenlee School this fall.
The program is designed to help each child develop his natural curiosity and desire to learn. The teacher functions as a guide, providing every youngster the opportunity to experience new things Such as numbers, the alphabet, and language.
Individual attention is given in this small class size Situation. Each child is encouraged to progress at his own pace.
Also important in this program is the child’s finding out the importance of himself and his classmates. He learns to share in work and play with others.
The child begins to understand the functions of various people such as firemen, policemen, farmers and others. Greenlee children visited the neighborhood fire department on a recent field trip. Other trips are being planned, so the children can learn from direct contact.
Physical recreation is another significant program component because children develop strength, improve their coordination, and acquire new skills easily and quickly at this early age.
Twenty-two youngsters are currently enrolled in the Greenlee Early Childhood Education Program. Anyone with a four-year-old child is invited to contact Greenlee Elementary School (222-3531) for information.
Support the United Way It Spends Money in Westside
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 1898 SEALED PROPOSAL will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 152S Gherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 3:00 p.m.'MDT on the 7th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building.
PROJECT: AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER - BID PACKAGE 40-2, Elevator - Zone 40 Building 11, Denver, Colorado
1. The work shall be accomplished on or before 10/15/76 plus ten (10) calendar days from the date of the Notice to Proceed, including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract. The work is scheduled to start on or about October 21, 1975.
2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: Charles S. Sink & Associates, 3003 E. Third Avenue, Suite 103, Denver, CO. 80206
4. A Deposit of S50.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on tl\e required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his t Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he ' will, within the prescribed time, execute the
required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provide by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 18th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E. Klatt 9/18/75 for the Executive Director Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates:
First: September 22,. 1975
Second: September 29, 1975
or as soon as possible upon receipt of this ad.
Page 3 - SANTA FE TRAIL
Children are busy learning colors at Greenlee School.
WORK & STUDY
Cooperative Occupational Education is a cooperative arrangement between Denver’s business and industries and the Denver Public Schools.
This program is designed to provide training in an occupation on a part time basis for high school students.
The students alternate on a halfday basis between study in the classroom and the training station.
The student’s school time is devoted (a) to high school courses for graduation and (b) to a study of the technical and general related information to the occupation for which he is being trained.
Regular high school credit is granted for related classroom instruction and on-the-job training.
The student trainee will receive the on-going rate of pay for his field of training.
The divisions within this program at West High School are:
Distributive Education - Mr. De-ward Miller; Home Economics Occupations - Mrs. Karen Mendez; Industrial Cooperative Education • Mr. John Brunner; Office Education - Mr. Ralph Hill, and Cooperative Work Experience - Mr. A1 Blom.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 3:00 p.m. MDT on the 14th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and react aloud in Room 710, same building.
PROJECT: Student Services Facility, Bid Package 90-5 - Mechanical, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado
1. The work shall be accomplished on or before September 1, 1976 plus ten (10) calendar days from the date of the Notice to Proceed, including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract.
2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: CHILDRESS/PAULIN, Architects, 1865 South Pearl Street, Denver, Colorado 80210
4. A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Materials Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 16th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting ByL. E. Klatt, 9/16/75 / for the Executive Director
Division of Purchases By E. R. Roon, Director Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver' *â– *
Publication Dates:
First: September 18, 1975 Second: September 25, 1975 or soonest possible publication date upon recfipto^thjsaff., c !lWO


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Page 6 - SANTA FE TRAIL
VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE for West High School
Saturday, October 4, 2:00 p.m. - West vs South
Saturday, October 11, 10:00 a.m. - West vs East
Friday, October 17, 7:45 p.m. - West vs Loveland at Loveland
Friday, October 24, 3:15 p.m. - West vs Manual
Friday, October 31, 2:30 p.m. - West vs Thomas Jefferson
Saturday, November 8, 10:00 a.m. - West vs Lincoln
All games except for October 17th are at the All-City Stadium State Playoffs are November 15, 22, and 29
SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE for West High School
Friday, October 3, 3:15 p.m. - West vsSouth at West High School Friday, October 10,3:15 p.m. - West vs East at East High School Saturday, October 25,10:00 a.m. - West vs Manual at West High Saturday, November 1, 10:00 a.m. - West vs Jefferson at West Saturday, November 8, 2:00 p.m. - West vs Lincoln
at Abraham Lincoln High School
SOCCER SCHEDULE for West High School
Saturday, October 4,1:00 p.m. - West vs Lincoln at Lincoln High Saturday, October 11, 1:00 p.m. - North vs West at Huston Park Saturday, October 18, 1:30 p.m. - West vs Washington
at Washington High School Saturday, November 1,1:00 p.m. - South vs West at Huston Park
TENNIS SCHEDULE > for West High School
Thursday, October 2, 3:00 p.m. - West vs Washington
at Washington High School Thursday, October 9, 3:00 p.m. - South vs West at Huston Park
District meet begins at South High School and Washington Park on Friday, October 17th, at 12:30 p.m.
GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE for West High School
Wednesday, October 1, 3:15 p.m. - West vs Jefferson at West Friday, October 3, 3:15 p.m. - North vs West at North High Wednesday, October 8,3:15 p.m. - Kennedy vs West at Kennedy Friday, October 10,3:15 p.m. - East vs West at East High School Friday, October 17, 3:15 p.m. - West vs South at South High Wednesday, October 22, 3:15 p.m. - West vs Manual at West Friday, October 24, 3:15 p.m. - West vs Washington at West Wednesday, October 29, 3:15 p.m. - West vs Lincoln at West Friday, October 31, 3:15 p.m. - Jefferson vs West at Jefferson
WHS Cheerleaders
West High School Cheerleaders and Pep Club members prepare to cheer on the football team on September 18th. Unfortunately West was playing Kennedy High School — one of the best teams in die state — and lost.
Living for Learning
West Side Action Center will host one of the thirty-nine Learning for Living classes and workshops being offered in the Fall ’75 program. “Transactional Anaylsis for Everyday Use.” Abe Wagner, well-known Transactional Analysis teacher, will conduct the four session program on Monday evenings at the Center, 1100 Santa Fe, on October 6, 20, 27 and November 3 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. A special tuition for the four sessions i§ one dollar.
Chuck Garcia, Assistant Director of West Side Action Center, Marie Martinez, Patient Advocate at the center, and Larry Ricketts, a Member of Learning for Living’s Advisory Board, examine the Learning for Living brochure describing the course as “a practical method of talking with other people and understanding human behavior.” Free brochures are available
AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM BEGINS
Project Freedom began its afterschool program on the 8th of September for the 75-76 school year. We will be working with students from Baker and Byers Jr. High schools. We expect our first students on the 22nd of September. Our tutors are from CU at Denver and Loretto Heights College. They are Blanca Vigil, Mike Gomez, Kathy Lathan, Ted Medina, and Roger Ornales.
Project Freedom will be operating out of the Denver Inner City Parish at 9th and Galapago, from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday. On Fridays the students. will participate in cultural activities, field trips, and recreational activities. Wednesday evenings will also be used for tutoring. The hours will be from 7 to 8 p.m. So the student can choose whichever hours benefit him most.
The Cheerleaders have been selected this year at West High School. They are planning activities and practicing to cheer the team on to victory for the school.
Selected for cheerleaders this year are Pam Colvert, Ruth Hammond, Donna Kramb, Roberta Larez, Mary C. Martinez, Terry Montoya, Barbara Pierce, Faye Richardson, Deena Sanchez, Debbie Valdez, and Frances Suniga.
Pom Pons will also be working hard to assist the team and lead them on to victory and greater pride for school and themselves. Holly Barton, Patsy Ceja, Janice Hathaway, Chery Kunde, Joyce Montoya, Liza Munoz, Nickie Medrano, Joanne Sainz will be the pom pons this year.
Matha Guevara and Valerie Stoneking are the leaders of the pep club, the cheerleaders, and the pom pons. All the girls are now, in uniform and/or have sweaters, so that the W§st black and orange will show up at the games. The cheering squads have a lot to do with sophomore, junior varsity and varsity football teams’ activity.
West High School teams will face stiff competition this year and all hope that they are victors. But if they play a good game and still lose, the school and community are behind them and hope that the next game will see a winning team. The cheerleaders and pep club' activities keep us all in good spirits and keep us cheering and hoping.
We have thus far signed up six volunteer tutors for the Wednesday night sessions and are expecting more until we reach our goal of fifteen. All interested persons are welcome to volunteer their services. Call 892-1039 for information.
Mini-Library
The Mini-Library program checked out over 800 books this summer, three times more than in its 1974 program. Of the 194 children enrolled, 51 of them read 6 or more library books during the summer.
This year the library collection included Spanish language books.
It is interesting that four families with non-English speaking parents were among the outstanding users of the Mini-Library. The 11 children in these four families borrowed more than 50 books.
The _ activities of the 48 Junior Volunteers, those going into 4th Grade or above this fall, included painting the library wagon, reading to children, pulling the wagon to various neighborhoods, helping with the garden, collecting and smashing cans for recycling, and producing the plays and dance number for the party.
Outstanding Junior Volunteers included Michelle Reese, Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manzanares, Monica Joosten, Billy Rogers, Lori Rogers, Monte Chambers, Regina Borrego, Rnd Sophie Manzanares.
One family of three boys, David, Tommy and Paul Garcia, checked out and returned 40 books this summer.
Other outstanding library users were Camilo, Christina and Leanna Aguilero, David and Jack Barrientos, Bonita and Brannon Braggs who checked out 24 books, James Cordova, Uene Lisa Gallegos, Amanda and Yolanda Garcia, Regina and Lanette Gallegos and Delores Harris who read 23 books, Melissa Jones who earned 93 points, Ki Hyon Mun and Myong Hyon Mun, Lori and Peggy Rogers, Gina and Jessica Trevino, Rosemarie, Paul and Augustine Vigil, Debra Vigil, and Chaunetta Wilkins.
Special thanks go to Mrs. Mildred Wall and Mrs. Rudelma Zabala who bagged 300 sacks of popcorn for the party and to Carolyn Hawkins who donated seven full days off to help with the library.
Two plays presented by Auraria
Mini-Library members highlighted
the entertainment at the party held
August 21st in the Community
Center gym.
a Success
The play, The Stubborn Sillies, was performed by Regina Borrego, Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manzanares, Joann Borrego, Tina -Manzanares and Billy Rogers.
In the play, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the actors showed great ingenuity in designing props or using make believe ones. When the Huntsman (Willie Avila) shot the squirrel (Melissa Jones) with his bow and arrow (a soda straw with paper point), he discovered her ‘heart’ was missing. He was supposed to cut it out and take it to the beautiful but wicked queen (Ursula Romero). In great consternation, he woke the squirrel from the dead by asking, “Where’s your heart!?” The squirrel obligingly sat up, handed over her misplaced heart, and fell back dead again.
Lori Rogers was the beautiful Snow White; Michelle Reese was the mirror; Gene Garcia was the Charming Prince; and Monica Joosten was the Curtain. The seven dwarfs were Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manzanares, Billy Rogers, Mona Manzanares, Joann Borrego, Tina Manzanares and Regina Borrego.
St. Joe's News
St. Joseph School officially opened its school year on August 28 with 182 students. The school is made up of an elementary school with grades 1-5 and a middle school with grades 6-8.
Both the classes in the elementary school and those in the middle school have relatively small classes which insure individualized- instruction. The school also features tutoring programs in math and reading for those students who might profit from extra help in these subjects.
The middle school is again offering enrichment courses for the students. These classes are very popular with the students and consist of such classes as cooking, sewing, cycling, photography, woodwork, arts & crafts, and tennis.
The school is especially fortunate this year in having five students from Viet Nam attend school here.
at the West Side Action Center and in all public libraries. For information, phone the Center, 534-5141, or the Learning for Living office, 292-5970. Learning for Living is a community service program of Metropolitan State College. Classes and workshops are open to adults of all ages from 16 to past 80. There 'are no‘ credits, grades, tests or homework or educational requirements.
Aprenda un modo practico para communicar con otras personas como su familia, amigos o com-paheros de trabajo. Un modo para entender el conducto humano. Clases seran en ingles solamente. Registro Especial $1~.
Learn a practical method of talking with other people, family members or friends or co-workers. A sound way to understand human behavior. Classes will be taught in English. Special Tuition: SI.
Teacher is Abe Wagner who is also the consulting director of the O.K. Center for Teaching Disabled Youngsters.,
Forum for All
Westside Forum is a neighborhood group of residents and persons working in churches and agencies in the area. Discussions center around community planning and community problems. Meetings will be October 7th and 21st at noon at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa.
Discussions during the past month have resulted in action taken concerning the $1.00 charge by the health clinics, opening up the People’s Assistance Center on Broadway, working on the 11th Avenue Street closing, organizing a clean-up day for Westside, etc. The group has also met socially in Lincoln Path.
All are welcome to join the group and contribute to the discussions and the necessary follow-up activities to see our neighborhood made a better place for each family to live.
If you have questions about the Westside Forum, contact Marie Martinez at Westside Action Center (534-5141) or Adolf Gomez at Auraria Community Center (534-7614).
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received, from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 1S2S Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 3:30 p.m. MDT on the 9th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT: Student Services Facility — Bid Package 90-7 (Elevators) Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado 80204
1. The entire project shall be accomplished on or before May 31, 1976 including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete\the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in'' accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract.
2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: Childress/Paulin - Architects/Planners 1865 South Pearl Street, Denver, Colorado 80210
4. A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shalKbe made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor apd Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 11th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E. Klatt, 9/11/75 for the Executive Director
Division of Purchases By E. R. Roon Director
Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates:
First: September IS, 1975 Second: September 22, 1975 or soonest possible publication date upon receipt of this ad.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services ^Building, 1525 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 3:00 p.m. MDT on the 9th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT: Student Services Facility — Bid Package 90-6 (Electrical) Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado 80204
1. The entire project shall be accomplished on or before July 30, 1976 including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the.submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract.
2. The right is reserved to waive ;nformalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: Childress/Paulin - Architects/Planners 1865 South Pearl Street, Denver, Colorado 80210
4. A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction. -
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier's check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Materials Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 11th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E. Klatt, 9/11/75 for the Executive Director
Division of Purchases By E. R. Roon Director
Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates:
First: September 15, 1975 Second: September 22, 1975 Or soonest possible publication date upon receipt of this ad. >


CHURCH NEWS
(»»»»»¥»¥¥¥»»¥»¥¥»»¥»»»»»¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥<
Page 7 - SANTA FE TRAIL
PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA (del Snr)
910 Kalamath - Phone 825-7497 Rev. Job Maldonado, Pastor
Sundays:
10:00 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship Service 6:00 p.m. Church Training 7:00 p.m. Evening Service
Tuesdays:
1:00 to 3:00 p.m. — Bible Study, crafts, English (not in summer months)
Wednesdays:
7:00 p.m. Prayer meeting
(All our services are in Spanish and English to reach our community with the Gospel of Jesus.)
LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER
215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky,
Older Persons Ministry
SERVICES
Sunday: Worship service and Sunday School from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.
CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL)
126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor
SERVICES Sunday —
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon
Wednesday —
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion
SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
1230 Decatur \
825-0121
Lou Roossien, Pastor
Ted Koeman, Intern
Lupe Rodriguez, Social Worker
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m. Worship, 1 LOO a.m.
Monday, Cadets at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday —
Adult Bible Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up), 7:30 Friday — Teen Lounge, 8:30 p.m.
WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
West 5th and Galapago Jim Harris, Minister Jack Calderon, Associate
Sunday School — 10:00 a.m. Worship Service — 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service (Spanish) —
7:00 p.m.
Neighborhood Ministries —
' Jack Calderon - Coordinator
ADVERTISE TODAY IN
SANTA FE TRAIL (892-1039)
ST. JOSEPH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH
6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado 80204 Fr. Andrew Meiners. Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl Schwarz Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Thomas Ryan MASSES
12:10 and 6:00 p-m. Sat.
7:00, 8:30. 10:00 (Spanish, up stairs)
10:00 (English, hall)
12:00 noon
NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST)
325 W. Irvington Place
Don Davis, .Pastor
Jerry McCormick, Assoc. Pastor
SERVICES
Worship, 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. . Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening Meeting,
6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p.m.
CLUB PROGRAM Boy’s Club,
Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.
Girl’s Club,
Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
ST. ELIZABETH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
1060 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204
MASSES ^
Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:00, 5:00
CONFESSIONS
Daily — before 12:15 Mass
Saturday — 4:00 to 5:00
ST. CAJETAN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
Stuart & Alameda Denver, Colorado 80219 James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor
MASSES
Saturday evening, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00 (Spanish), 7:00 p.m. Weekdays, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish)
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN
120 East 1st Avenue 777-5375
Denver, Colorado 80203 Rev. Arnold Bloomquist, Pastor
Sunday School, 9:45 Morning Worship, 11:00 a.m.
Coffee House Faith Factory 25 Broadway
John Cox, Student Pastor Director
fTrst mennonite church
430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister-
Morning Worship, 9:00 a.m. Church School, 10:00 a.m.
Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038
FALL FIESTA
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RESTAURANT AND BAR
- 753 SANTA FE DRIVE
PHONE 534 - 9579
'Welcome
TO THE IWa HOME
OF THE IB\
October 10, 11, 12
Mexican Food
Fun for the whole family
$1000 Raffle
Mariachi Mass, Saturday, 6:00 p.m. Games for all ages
Friday, October 10,7:00 -11:00 p.m. Saturday, October 11,7:00 -11:00 p.m.
Mariachi Mass at 6:00 p.m. Sunday, October 12,1:00 -11:00 p.m.
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Have Fun at the Fall Festival Support St. Joseph’s Schools
BAPTISMS AT ST. JOSEPH’S
August 17 — Steven George Carrillo, son of Frances Carrillo. Godparents,- George Carrillo and Maria Ross.
Brian Michael Thompson, son of Gordon and Jape Thompson. Godparents, Frank and Mary Veldez.
August 23 — Lisa Marie Gonzales, daughter of Angel and Linda Gonzales. Godparents, Jerry and Mary Vargas.
September 14 — Armando Jose Carabajal, son of Lazorro and Ida Carabajal. Godparents, Tony and-Linda Kay Carabajal.
Michael Anthony Gutierrez, son of David and Kathy Gutierrez. Godparents, Alex and Loretta Elizalde.
James Padilla, son of Santiago and Rose Marie Padilla. Godparents, Jose and Evelyn Padilla.
September 19 — Linda Noel. Puentes, daughter of Fernando and Mary Puentes. Godparents, Lawrence Martinez and Mary Garcia.
September 21 — Michele Bernadette Sena, daughter of Lawrence : and Catherine Sena. Godparents, Alvin Sena and Lorraine Martinez.
WEDDINGS AT ST. JOSEPH’S
August 2 — Joseph Anthony Sandoval, son of Albert and Gladys Sandoval, to Theresa Trujillo, daughter of Jospeh and Cecilia Trujillo. Witnesses,' William and Lorraine Romero.
August 23 — Carlos Casias, son of Paul and Juanita Casias, to Tamara Job, daughter of Milton and Hazel Job. Witnesses, Anthony Casias and Deborah Job.
IN MEMORIAM
Jose Griego of 347 Galapago. Date of death - Aug. 16, 1975. Date of Funeral - Aug. 20, 1975. Cemetery - Mt. Olivet. Father of Mrs. George Gonzalez.
THextcOM wbj

Joe’s Buffet
Come and enjoy our: FAST LUNCHES From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The meal that's sure to fill
Our place is always AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS AND BANQUETS DANCING FRIDAYS. SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS FROM 8:00 p.m. UfcTIL 2:00 a.m. SUNDAYS FROM 7:00 p.m. UNTIL. 12:00 p.m. ,
Fall Festival
St. Joseph’s Church invites the community to join in the fun of its annual Fall Festival to be held in the Parish Gym and Hall on 10, 11 and 12 October. This year’s Festival promises to be bigger and better than ever. The Festival always provides a real community experience with fun for the whole family.
Thp Festival will feature games for all ages with many beautiful and useful prizes. This year will also provide special booths with real Mexican food for the Western Gourmet. The Grand Raffle with its thousands of dollars in prizes is another yearly feature. A high point in activities is the Mariachi Mass Saturday night at 6 p.m. And that good spirit and the entertainment of Dan Silva’s Mariachi’s spill over to the Festival Area.
The Festival is St. Joseph’s big fund raising event of the year. Proceeds from the Festival will benefit St. Joseph’s Grade and Middle Schools.
Times for the Festival are:
Friday, October 10, 7:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 11, beginning with the Mariachi Mass at 6:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 12, 1:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m.
WANT AD
BROTHERS REDEVELOPMENT, Inc. has secured funding to hire a carpenter, a plumber, an electrician, and a secretary.
We would like to hire skilled people who understand our concept of Pride, Spiritual Growth and Charity.
Please call Sharon Beyers, Manual Martinez, or Joe Giron at 573-5107 for more information.
Religious Formation Program
Parents interested in attending Bible Gasses are urged to contact Sr. Neomi. Also classes to help you prepare your children for the Sacraments.
A Special Catechist Formation Program will begin .Soon:
Where? 1160 Federal St.
When? October 2nd. (Thursday Evenings)
Time? 7:00 P.M.
* . * *
Sun Valley residents are very happy that Two Vietnamese Families will soon be moving to be their neighbors. Welcome, Friends.
The Denver Inner City Parish Preschool has been under repair since June. Preschool will start October 14th. Applications ,and Health forms may be picked up at the Denver Inner City Parish office.
RELIGIOUS
ARTICLES
JOHN P. DALEIDEN CO| 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver, Colorado 80204
534-8233 FREE PARKING
LUTHERAN PRE-SCHOOL
The Lutheran Community Center at 215 W. 5th Ave. is having a preschool again this year. It will be operating five days a week, and opens on October 1st through May 15. Anyone wishing to enroll their child should call 825-4862, leave your name and number and you will be contacted*
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DO THE TOWN FORANICKEL.
October 9th is Nickel Day on RTD. Ride downtown for five cents? All local service is five cents. Our brand new Town Rider costs a nickel. And the express buses are half a dime. All day long. Visit a friend, visit your hairdresser, visit your favorite doiwntown restaurant, for a nickel each way. Buy a dress, rent a chafing dish, pick up a bag of unbleached flour, by Riding for five.
RTD. Nickel Day October 9th.
*AII Boulder County service is included except local City of Boulder bus service.
The Ride


Page 8 - SANTA FE TRAIL
NEIGHBORHOOD
NEWS
Mr and Mrs. Fidel Puentes from Sun Valjey are the proud parents of a baby girl born on August 14, Eulalia Puentes was baptized at St. Cajetan’s Church on Sept.7. Her God parents were Maria E. Ocana and Rodrigo Castro. On Sept. 7 Shirley and Fidel Puentes celebrated their first anniversary of their marriage.
Especial thanks to Sister Neomi, Mr. Gonzales, Fr. Prohens and Fr. Thomas for all the help in preparing us for these meaningful ceremonies.
In the near future Mr. and Mrs. Puentes will travel to Mexico so the baby will meet her grandparents.
* * *
Pete and Helen Bonsell’s grand daughter, Kristina Lopez, was married to Mike Martinez on August 16, 1975 in the Church of All Saints. A reception and dance followed in the afternoon and lasted until midnight. Mrs. Bonsel had a full house with out-of-town guests, including her daughter and family, two sisters, other relatives from Colorado Springs, a niece and her family from Albuquerque, New Mexico, a nephew and his family from Alamosa, and Mr. and Mrs. Angelio Trusi and family from New Jersey.
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Auraria’s Wednesday morning Women’s Group went on three field trips during the month of August. They went to Loyola Salazar’s house for pot luck one week, to the Red Rocks on another week, and lastly, they went to Washington Park for a look at the flower gardens, to go swimming and to have a brown bag lunch. All three outings were enjoyed by everyone who went.
Mary Padilla, 1426 Osage, made ,a quick trip to Santa Fe on August 28. She enjoyed the drive with her nephew and especially the short visit to Chimayo on the way home. * * *
Obr sympathy to the Benito Armijo family, 1404 Osage, on the death of Mr. Armijo’s father, August 27. He was buried from St. Cajetan’s Church. Besides his son Benito, Filadelfio Armijo is survived by 8 other children, 41 grandchildren, and 25 great-grandchildren. He had lived at 4621 Grant.
* * *
Many people from North Lincoln spent time in various hospitals this month. Among them were Agapita Salazar, who had eye surgery, Mrs. Henry Torres, who also had surgery, Sarah Romero, who cut a tendon in a battle with her dirty dishes, Jesse Gibbs, who is home now after a stroke and doing well, Mattie Nixon, who is recovering from surgery at this time.
* * *
Several seniors from North Lincoln enjoyed Mass, a picnic lunch of chicken with all the fixings, and a visit to Mother Cabrini Shrine on August 27. Those making the mountain trip were: Martha Lowe, Lucia Gorman, Tita Dominguez, Anna Mims, George Gallegos, Mary Richardson, Emilia Jacquez, Josephine James, and Elizabeth Doyle.
* * *
" Stevie Pickens, son of Mary Pickens, 1443 Mariposa, was baptized on August 31 at St. Elizabeth’s.
* * *
Bill and Martha Moffit, 1444 Navajo, are proud of the new addition to their family, Dawn Kay, who arrived on September 1st. They already have one daughter Heather, who is also happy with her little sister.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Phillips in Apt. 302 Hirschfeld Towers, celebrated their 35th Wedding Anniversary Aug. 17. Their three sons gave them an Open House Party here in Hirschfeld’s auditorium. They both looked lovely — Dorothy in a long white dress and Howard in black suit and tie. Many of their mends- stopped by with cards and gifts. Howard and Dorothy were Night Managers at the Towers for several years. They topped their . celebration by going to Hawaii and had splendid time there.
Dorothy is active in two different singing groups: The Silver Sounds conducted by Mr. Raoul Tayon and the Hirschfeld Singers, a self-disciplined group that collects old favorite hymns and melodies. If they find one sheet of music in the library, they borrow it and type up sheets. The group practices and studies it, until it is as good asmon-professionals can get to singing it perfectly — then they go out and entertain Nursing Home patients. Malvina Langendorfer is pianist and Mattie Cochran is Chairman and schedules appointments.
The Silver Sounds have received four awards for performances they have given in recent years — one was in ’74 and another in ’75.
Della Denney
Agapita Sandoval had a two week vacation after almost two years working at the Senior Citizen’s Lunch Program. She visited with her daughter an.d the family in Pueblo and then went with her daughter’s family to Taos, New Mexico. She had a good time and comes back to work and to help people around the neighborhood rested and refreshed.
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Rosendo and Elvira Rael went with Atitano and Flora Ulibarri on a trip to old Mexico. They had a good time and enjoyed the trip.
* * *
Mr. Adolfo Gomez of Auraria Community Center took two vans of Senior Citizens to the Pueblo State Fair on August 22, 1975. The original plans were to return by 6:00 p.m., but many people were having such a good time that a decision was made to stay for the evening show. This van of happy fair-goers did not return to Denver until around midnight. The day’s outing was greatly enjoyed by all.
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Cathryn Fabian’s brother passed
away in Georgia.
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Mrs. Della Torres is in Denver General Hospital and will be operated on September 16, 1975.
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Patsy Fresquez of 1209 Upan had company from Bell Gardens, California and also her brother and sister-in-law from Yucca Valley, California. It was a beautiful visit for two weeks. So sorry they had to
leave so soon.
* * *
Seven Seniors of Lincoln Park enjoyed the picnic at Elitch’s August 21, 1975. We all enjoyed the Music very much.
* * *
Frances Garcia who is active at PASCO has a son and husband who have been hospitalized during the past month. She also lost a son-in-law rather recently. We hope that the Garcia family will soon encounter much better fortune.
* * *
Nellie Moralez had as her guest her sister Mrs. Leona Freeman the last two weeks of August.
* * *
SUBSCRIBE NOW !!!
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Yearly Rate $ 3.00
Gertrude Krueger has moved from 1351 Mariposa to an apart-, ment near Loretto Heights. She is missed by her neighbors, who enjoyed her cheeriness and her tasty German cooking.
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Mae Miller has moved from 1351 Mariposa to an apartment in Hirschfeld Towers. She invites her friends to visit her at her new home.
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William and Rita Nielson also have a new member of their family. Shontel Regina. Shontel was baptized at St. Cajetan’s on September 7. ‘
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Charles Borgman, formerly of 1220 W. Colfax and more recently living at 1011 Mariposa, died-at his home the • week .of September 14. He will be missed by both children and adults. Those who took time to know Charles found he had a good sense of humor and enjoyed having people around him.
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The Resident Council of North Lincoln met on August 28. Highlight of the meeting was the presentation of awards for outstanding lawn care. Those receiving the awards were: Leatha Williams, Francisco Perez, Elmer Rund, Cenaida Griego, Christine Mollen-dor, Lillie Thompson, Chris Tal-mich, John Vigil, Cathy Fresquez, Dorothy Molina, Senobia Trujillo, Rose Torres, Annette Lucero, Edith Lacour and Richard and Rhoda Richardson.
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
[We
Santa Fe Trail
Westside [Slews
Make checks payable to Santa Fe Trail, 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver Colorado, 80204
Name___________________________________________________________
Address City ___
State
Zip
SUBCRIPTI0N COUPON
On Wednesday, September 24, the PASCO program celebrated the birthdays during the month of September. Agapita Sandoval and Anita Duran both had birthdays this month. It was a very good celebration. Anita’s birthday was on the 24th, while Agapita had hers on the 10th.
Auraria Drug Program
The Auraria Drug Program has held groups every Tuesday night at 7:00 p.m. for 12 weeks. The turnout has been good, averaging about 10 clients a session. The group has achieved inter-personal relationships between clients, and individuals are confiding in the group.
There is not a definite plan followed during the groups. They are very flexible. If any individual wishes to share something with the group he is encouraged to do so regardless of what materials are being used. The-group is a good place to vent hostilities, talk about problems and get constructive feedback from the group, and "to listen and get good ideas on how to handle life’s hassles.
The groups are open to anyone who wishes to attend. We deal with real feelings. Age makes no difference. The age difference presently ranges from 15 years to 55 years. Types of drug problems are heroin, amphetamines, toxic vapors, hallucinogens, marijuana, alcohol. If anyone needs help, help is available. Observers are welcome also.
Groups are held on Tuesday .; nights at 7:00 to 8:00 at the Auraria
â–  Community Center. Groups are run !by Joe Diaz and Minerva Antuna. If lyou wish to attend or want more information call Joe or Minerva at ;the Auraria Community Center,
â–  1212 Mariposa St., 534-7614.
The Denver Inner City Parish
• staff say goodbye and good luck to-two-of their staff members. Ray Trujillo left the Parish to work as a Community Worker “at the West Side Youth Development Project.
' The Parish staff would like to wish him well. Maria Chavez has also left the Parish to stay home with her family. Good Luck to Ray and Maria.
Della Denney chats with Howard and Dorothy Phillips about upcoming Hirschfeld Towers events.
NEW SFT REPORTER
SANTA FE TRAQ, is pleased to announce that Della Denney of Hirschfeld Towers is a new reporter with the paper. Last month she wrote the obituary for Mr. O.G. Chandler and this month has begun to contribute a number of articles for persons at Hirschfeld.
She edits the newsletter of Hirschfeld Towers and is active in many groups in the recreation program and around the building.
We welcome Mrs. Denney and hope that we will be getting more and more news from Hirschfeld Towers, an important part of our Westside community.
^ATIENTS’ RIGHTS
There is a Patient’s Rights counselor at the Westside Action Center that is there to help you with any problems that you might be having as a patient who uses any of the health facilities in the area.
- There are rights you have as a patient, these are things^ you should know.
DIGNITY:
You have the right to have your dignity as an individual human being recognized and respected — You have a right to the same consideration and treatment as anyone else regardless of your: race, creed, color, beliefs, source of payment, sex, age, or type of illness. PRIVACY:
Ask that your doctor introduce himself and in-elude you in discussions about your situation.
Ask that you be interviewed in a place where there is as much privacy as possible.
Ask that the curtain or door be closed when being examined.
Ask that outsiders not involved in your case not be allowed to visit you unless you want them. CONFIDENTIALITY:
Your health records must be confidential, and you must give written permission for anyone else to see your records. ~
Maria Martinez
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 1898 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 2:00 p.m. MDT on the 9th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT: Finishes for Building 31A, Zone 35 - Bid Package 35-8, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado 80204
1. The work, shall be accomplished on or before 260 plus ten (10) calendar days from the date of the Notice to Proceed, including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the. final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract.
2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents
from: HALLER AND LARSON, LTD., 370T Cherry Creek North Drive, Denver, Colorado 80209 /
4. A Deposit of $75.00 will be required for
each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction. >
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as-a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in ful) force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages:
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 11th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E. Klatt, 9/12/75 For the Executive Director
Division of Purchases By E. R. Roon Director
Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates:
First: September 15, 1975 Second: September 22, 1975 or the soonest publication date upon receipt of this ad.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 1898 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 2:00 p.m. MDT on the 7th day of October, 1975 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT: AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER, BID PACKAGE 65-1, PARK-ING, ZONE 65, DENVER, COLORADO 1. The work ^hall be accomplished, on or before 60 plus ten (10) calendar days from the nate of the Notice to Proceed, including the delivery of any or all-guaranties and warranties,, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract. The work is scheduled to start on or about October 20, 1975. '
~ 2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: Stearns-Roeer Architects Ltd.. 1385 South Colorado Blvd., Suite 210, Denver, Colorado 80222
4. A Deposit of $50.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of, five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five. working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied afr the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accom-
-panied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced' or manufactured in Coloradoras provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established.
Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 17th day of September, 1975.
Office of State Planning and Budgeting L. E. Klatt tby AJC, 9/17/75 For the Executive Director Medium of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates:
First: September 19, 1975 Second: September 26, 1975 or soonest possible publication date upon receipt of this ad.


Full Text

PAGE 1

City Budget Cuts Affect Westsiae Reduced city revenues and in flated costs have forced D enver Department of Health and H ospi tals officials to cut the agency 's proposed 1976 budget, which al ready was at a maint e nanc e lev el. b y S3.5 million . The city h ea lth agenc y ' s r evised 1976 budget request o f S29 . 3 million W'!S presented t o Cit y Council in an O ct. 1 0 h ea rin g session. ln presenting th e r evised r equest to co uncil m e mb e r s, Mana ge r of Health and H os pit a l s Dr . A.J . Kauvar described the r educed agency budget as "totally i n a d e quate." Earli e r h e ex pla i n e d to a special Hoard of H ealt h and Hospi tals meeting that the c uts for 1976 would mean reduc e d services and longer waits for pati e nts but he and other administrators were trying to " keep a core program going as something to build on. " The S3. 5 million cut for 1976 will mean the abolishment of 226 full time jobs in Health and Hospitals facilities ; 162 of those jobs are now filled . The cuts will affect every division of the agenc y -coroner's offi ce, public health, _ mental health , Denver General Hospital, and Neighborhood Health Program . The city's environmental health inspection services in the areas of -l{le ho u sing and r es taurant inspection. m ilk sanitatio n . meat pr&cessing , air pollut i on. and animaJ conrro l will b e cut I0-2So/o. The disease contro l pr o gram (TB. VD and other c o mmuni c able diseases) will lose two clerks and a disease in ves tigator. The parochial school health pro gram. which provides sc r eenings. immunizati ons, h ealth education an d d e ntal screening f o r 12.000 no n-public school c hildr en. will b e discontinued . Children m ay obtain immunizations fr o m the disease cont rol clinic at 605 Bann ock St. and from well-chi ld clinics. Th e d eve lopmental evaluation center which provides diagnostic services for children with develop mental problems will be elim I nated. Casita Esperanza Health Station at 5th and Inca will be moved to a smaller facility. The move will in volve a cut of 10 jobs from the station staff. Maternity 'and family planning sessions in health stations may be reduced. Two of the. agency ' s four decen tralized mental heaJth clinics will be eliminated. Two of the three receiving cen ters and halfway houses for alco holics _will be closed , and Visiting urse Ser ice home visits to alcoholics will be discontinued. A V S field offiee will be closed. and the responsibilil) " of each VNS field supervisor will be increased. Agency-wide perso nnel cuts "';11 include the e limin atio n o f si.x full time physici . ao positions . Expanded inhaJation therapy ser vices for D G H patients. originally planned for 197 5. will be postponed again in 1 976. Th e computerized EKG prog ram used i . n DGH and the two neigh b o rhood health ce nt e rs will b e di s cont inu e d . DGH's si.x-b e d rooming-in unit . where mothers are allowed to keep their n ewborn b a b ies in the r ooms with them, will be clos e d . Also to be closed is the eight-bed adoles cent unit on the pediatric floor . Support for the chaplains' ser vices in DGH will be discontinued . Mayo r Bill McNichols, who has described the entire city budget package for 1976 as a "doomsday blueprint" for survival, said the city will request more state aid for Denver from the next session of th e legislature , but neither he nor health and hospitals administrators believe such assistance, if forth coming, wou ld be in time to affect the cuts in the 1976 budget. Santa Fe Trail October 1975 LUNCHES AT FAIRMONT _ ests lidl e Number 16 Lunches for older persons will be • available -at Fairmont Elementary ASSIStance Center T , o Open School, 520 West 3rd Avenue according to-Mr. William H. On October 6 1975 the. Broad Bashor , assistant the principal. way Assistance Center, will open its The _ lunches w1ll cost. 80 cents doors at 204 Broadway . This store and m1lk, tea,_ or coffee w1ll cost 15 front crisjs center will provide cents. Lunch ts served e _ ach day at_ counselling and other concrete 12 :3 0 noon_. but reservations are t o services to the community centered be called •_n before 9 : 30 a .m ., so around First and Broadway . The that sufficient food cal"! be pre-opening is especially exciting since pared. . . th e planning, the labor, and the Menus for the meals will be m materials to r e m o del the Broadwa y the newspapers on Wednesday and Assistance Cente r have come from Thurs_day each week for the m embers of this community . The followmg week . If there are ques-storefront itself has been made tions or if a wishes to call in available through the effort s of th e the reservation for that day , the Union Bank and Trust which mak e s number is 893 1957. . the entire project a community Per_sons should enter the s c hool effo rt . from the Fox Street entrance at the Professi o nalstaff various corner of the building. agencies will beavailable through Thts IS a sp<:>nsored by th e Broadwa y Assistance Center as Denv e r Pubhc Schools for older well as vo lunteers from the com persons. Our schools are primarily munity. Residents who are infor our children so that they will terested in participating with this community project are asked to stop in at the storefront office . The Broadway Assistan ce Center has become a reality through the efforts of many indivrduals and agencies. Pe o ple from th e West side Actio n Center s p ent an afternoon cleaning the building while members of the D e nver Christian C om munit y h ave worked o n Saturdays to r e mod e l , r epair and paint. Sin ce the Broadwa y Assi stance Cente r i s d esig n e d as a self-help p rojec t, the help o f everyone in the community is welcome and needed. The most immediate need is some additional furni ture to equip the -storefront. Perso ns who could con tribute a chair, desk, rug, or table are asked to call 722-69 59. learn but they are also increasingly D 1 • sc u ss RT D w 1 • t h pI anne rs beihg a service for all p eo ple in the neighborhood : for learning and for special programs and needs. Mark down Thursday, October 7:00p.m., on your calendars 1 .. o_r __ Westside Improvement me,ting at St. Jo seph's. parish hall, 6th and Galapago. This is a meeting for you to air your concerns, complaints, helpful comments, anll notes of appreciation to persons from gov ernment. CouncUman Sal ' Carpio, State Representative "Richard Castro, Mayor WUUam McNichols, repre sentatives from city agencies, and several other officials will be there to 8.nswer questions and explain services. Refreshments will be served. Come and air your opinion. Your voice Is important. This meeting is for all The Regional Transportati o n Dis trict (RTD) is planning to construct a 26 mile rapid transit system in the_ near future from Northglenn to Littleton wit h service to the Central Business District of Denver. discussions wJt h the community indicated a desire to locate the rapid transit system near the railroad tracks. Howe ver, to meet federal law s for the protection of the environment, alternative locations for the system and stations must be studied. In meet ings with the Den ve r Planning Office (DPO), RTD was advised to study the Broadway-Lincoln area as a'n alternative. Thus, RID and DPO are examining two different loca for the system on the edges of the near westside neighborhood: (a) ' Along the railroad tracks, and (b) Along Lincoln and Broadway. Th e rapid transit system will be studied as a n elevated or at-grade syst e m along the railroad tracks. How will the rapid transit system serve your n eig hborh oo d ? How can it help the community? RTD and DPO need your h e lp to answer these questi o ns! " RTD and DPO would like to talk to you ahd your neighbor, improvement associations. or organiza tions . If yo u or your organization are having meetings and would lik e to talk to RTD about its rapid transit plans, please call the RTD _Planning Office , 759-1000, exten sion 376 for arrangements. A later meeting will be held during October by RTD and DPO in .the commwlity to discuss the results of the studies and service to the area. Please watch for this announce ment in this paper. Ill 1 1 1 /fll(l/fllifllfUI I l l / ... U18702 0239807 Jaime Neimeyer Is now manager for South Lincoln Housing. Office I s 1000 Navajo and phone Is Westside Centennial Notes SANTA FE DRIVE IN 1933 Today's grim m a rri age o f un e mplo y m e nt and inflation added wi th tomorrow's gloom y forecasts h as ca used a nation to look back at yesterday with co n si derabl e nos talgia and warmth as it acknowl e dges the problems o f those da ys. Your guide is a ye llowed West side Hustler which came out on Frida y. May 26, 1933 , and oddly e nough the reporter who will take you on this trip had a large column and b y -line in that same news paper. Man y Westsiders will follow her steps with longing even though in the windows of man y of the stores of thos e days were the signs "We Take Blue Relief Orders". The y a re not idle promis es: D e l Monte's finest raisins at 3 b oxes f o r 25 ce nt s. 3 tall cans o f Alaska R ed SaJmon for SO ce nt s , and a five lb . can of Del Mont e Jam for SO ce nt s. But stret c hin g Blu e Refi e f orde r s was lik e str etc hin g Food Stamps! Th e Bar gai n B azaa r at 731 Santa Fe Dri ve screams for you to stop: a gaJ ion of Amai zo s alad oi l for 90 cents. ginger snaps for 10 cents a lb., and ' / • lb . tea for 10 ce nt s . At Desserich's Furniture Store further down th e street you can get a ball b eari n g l aw n mower and catcher for $4.50 a nd a fin e p orc h glider for $9. 50. A d o ubl e at 958 Inca Street that There are so man y int eresting wa s clean with va rni shed floors a nd pla ces a dvertis e d in this c rumbling, l aw n ask s for $13 a month rent. A ye llowed paper. We'll stop fir s t at six room apartm e nt at 411 Gala the A. P etersen Gr ocery Cb. at 734 pago Street that claims built in Santa Fe Driv e a nd go in after a co n venie nces a nd modern f eat ures do ze n fresh eggs a d vertise d at ll'/ 1 asks for $20 a month in rent. ce nt s a d oze n and a p o und of Brim If you want a beaut y t reatm e nt ful Coffee adve rti se d at 28 ce nt s a you ca n go to M rs. Finni's at 117 0 p o und : And who can r es ist veal Ka.lamath Street f o r a permanent at roast at 10 cents a pound? Bi-Lows $2.50 cost or you can stay on Santa is close bv at 71\ Santa Fe and vou Fe Driv e for at Lucine's Home might as-well get four cans" of Beauty Parlor at 1022 S anta Fe B or d en's milk for 25 ce nt s and a lb . Driv e a finger wave wit h shampoo o f M eadow Gold butter for 26 costs 35 ce nt s. ce nt s. Since these are recessi on P e nney's. 859 Santa Fe Drive, days you can n o t h e lp no ticin g their advertises 300 n ew print dresses m ost p opular it e m i s that o ld standand a r e sellin g them at $2.00 each . b y hamburger, but here ground Since h a t s were wo rn in churc h in beef (pure) is advertised for 3 lb s. those days, th e h a t s for 88 ce nt s for 25 cents. M yers Dru g Stor e were going fast. You can get a n y lures you with an ice-cream so d a kind of hat you want at thi s pric e: f o r 5 cents a nd then you can go w id e brim, s mall s h a pes, st r aws, across the street on 8th and Santa pique or felts . Fe t o Clarkes Dru g where you ca n The Santa Fe o n the co rn e r of get a larg e bottle of mul s ifi e d West lOth i s l}aving give-away cocoanut shampoo plu s a heav y nf"ght o n Sat urd ay w i t h Zan e Grey' s turkish bath towel, b ot h for 39 movi e, " Th(! M yste riou s Rid e r''. ce nts-. All balcon y seast s are advertised at Th e o ld newspaper was great on IS cents. A c ross the street, L e l oca l news. Miss Marie Johnson of from's H o t e l and Grill has a sign 443 S anta F e Dri ve entertained "Can you .eat at home as cheap as with a luncheon and s ew ing party this?'' Th e menu begins with puree a t h e r hom e. H ow many of lima beans soup, ttien th e entree r e m ember Mi ss J o hnson and h e r of braised tenderloin tips with fresh kitchen so tantalizing with the vegetables, mashed potatoes, aroma of good things baking? Mr. tomato salad , bread and butter, and Mrs . . Frank Dunn are enter-a nd dessert a ls o, yo ur choice of ic e tainin , g at a birthday in ho_nor c ream or pi e, and coffee, butter of their daug ht e r , M1ldred Ah ce, milk , milk or beer. All this for just aged eight, in their home at 763 25 cents. The sad thing about this Lipa n. Fred B e nnett, 807 West 7th wonderful offer was that many Av enue, was taken to Denver peopl e passed it up . they didn ' t General Ho s pital suffering from a have 25 cents. fractured ankle whi ch he got when he was knoc ked to the groun d when he attempted to crank his car. The John Thompson store prom ises to give those whith Blue Relief o rders t h e most for their mon ey. Deliver to: -Flora Gasser USE COUPONS IN THIS PAPER pages 4-5

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Page2 • SANTA FE TRAIL . ditorial: . • .... t, • ' CUTBACKS. & . REFLECTIONS For the past several years , programs in the Westside have increased at the community centers with new projects, and through government agencies and programs. This past month we are experiencing cutbacks aga.in only they aren't from the federal government . Denver City Government is cutting back -the in every area and . the Westside will be drastically affcrcted. Denver Public Schools are going for a mill levy increase or they will have to cut back on services to the youth of our community. A number of programs may be cut off or have been threatened around the community and we may well ' see these agencies or programs close around the end of the year. Denver Welfare is cutting back on the social workers in the community although they are increasing children's services. < Here we go again!! "Let us sit on our laurels (behinds) and drink to the fall of all around us," says the fatalist or the frustrated person. Again and again and again we get cut back just before we really get going. It is true; we are getting less funding and fewer services. We can show reason for depression, but we also need to look ahead for ourselves, our older people and our children . We must survive and we must get the kinds of services we need for all of us. A listing the cutbacks from Denver General Hospital, the ne\gh borhood health program, the mental health program; and city recreation would make any of us weep. But we are getting cut because we have so little control over our own destinies. We need to own and be more involved in our community'and our programs. . This is true not only for the Westside but for Denver. According to statistics gathered by the city government and also by the public schools, 25% of all the assessed value of the State of Colorado is in the City and County of Denver. Denver also has approximately 14% of the total chi! , dren in the state; Denver also has more facilities for social services and also for culture for which persons from all over the state come to the city. • Yet with all ofthis Denver gets precious little from the state coffers. We get a.lmost nothing from the suburbs except people coming into the city for their jobs and taking their payrolls back to the suburbs. We get very little from the f e .st of the state and yet the government offices and many, many buildings are here in the city untaxed . Inequities exist. The mental health program in the northwest distric t; of Denver takes care of 20% of the state's mental health patients seen by . clinics and yet only gets 10% of the money. The public schools here have 14% of the state's children and yet get only 11% of the state money. People come to live in Denver because we have services and they are a drain on o ur cit y' s economy. But do we say they can't come or restrict them? No, we welcome them as friends, neighbors and relatives . We take care of them at the highest rate of taxation in the state. What should we qe about? 1) working with City Council and the Mayor's office to ask the state government to look again at its priorities and assist Denver so that we do not become a poor city without services, 2) work for the new programs coming into 0ur community and make sure they do a very good job, ' 3) . find ways for people in the neighborhood to own their own homes and therefore begin to control some of the land, . 4) work for the establishment of businesses arid community organizations like Adelante and SANTA FE TRAIL which are selfsupporting and belong to the community, 5) stop the rip-offs that aJ'e going op all around us \ af\d keep us from getting beyond survival, 6) work with our youth so that they can get the proper education and become the doctors, teachers, businessmen, carpenters, mechan ics ; reporters, contractors, barbers, bankers, policemen, etc. for our neighborhood, . 7) work for more jobs for friends, neighJJOrs and relatives, 8) stick together regardless of race, religion , section of the commu nity or age to work for the betterment of this area for all of us, 9) support each other and tell each other when a good job is done. Let us dream new dreams in the midst of cutbacks and frustrations . Let us become less dependent even though there is less money available. Let us own our own homes even though interest rates are high. Let us learn to know our neighbors even though we're afraid . We have no alter native but to move on and to keep .. Business of Month , . . EMPIRE-CLEANERS What is a newspaper doing featuring a business which is closing in the next two weeks? Well, the reason for closing is one / EDITO .RLu BOARD Charles Garcia, President; !!ecky Garcia , Vice President; Sr Rene Weeks, Treasurer; Brice Balmer, Editor; Flora Gasser, Don Bartek, Sam Abeyta, Craig Hart, Judy Bauer. , which affects far too many of us . here on the Westside and in other parts of the city. Liability. for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error.-The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause. The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents . It is also ur•derstood that the advertise' r and the agency . placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail" agai .nst all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy. All correspondence can be sent to: SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 892-1039 SANTA FE TRAIL is .Iootditg for a person with skills in advertising • . job would include both selling ... e ads and laying them out. Pay is on a commission basis. If interested, contaCt Brice Balmer at 892-1039 or Sr Rene Weeks at 6230374. Person can begin inimedi ately. Advertising responsibility is shared with other persops on the staff. WELFARE Cuando ud. aplica para el Wel fare, lo siguiente es lo que necesHa: . 1. cualquier papel que veri . fique que cantidad de dinero ud. nesecita re c lbos de renta, etc. 2. el de su familia y Ia edad de los ninos, C!';!rtificados de naciemento, etc . 3 . recibos de su pago de trabaju. Serva mas facil sL ud. puede llevar a enviar tanta informacion que se le hago posible, pero si ud. tiene dificultad enreunir lo,s necesarios, " el departmento de Welfare le ayudara : . Vickie Herrera WESTSIDE HOME $1500 Under Appraisal NO DOWN-VA Owner pay closing costs on this newly redecorated 2 + 2 bedroom home with new carpet in three bedrooms, nice hardwood floors in living room and formal dining room. VA appraised at $18,500. For quick sale ar $17,000. Call Ed Woods Multi List Service Realtors JAMES HILL 9110 North Washington 287-3264 Joe Trujillo and his wife owned and operated Empire Clean ers for the past five years. The business is a family operation and Joe worked at other jobs while his wife ran the business during the day. At night they both worked . Business started slowly but during recent months, more people were bringing their clothing to be cleaned. Mr. Trujillo was about to begin a pension plan for his employees. At the end of August and then again in September , Empire Clean ers was robbed. Since the Trujillos did not have insurance tocover the loss, they are doing_ what they have . to do: close down this family opera tion in our neighborhood. Mr. Trujillo has had other-tragic experiences and in the end may have to declare bankruptcy . before all is finished . First he lost a good job with a manufacturing company where he had worked for over two years. This layoff was because of the slowdown in business and industry. Then his mother-in-law became sick and had needed .to stay with the family ; this is a family obligation which he feels is impor tant and is glad he can help. After getting another job and things started to look better, the business was robbed twice. Stolen were a cash register, television, clothing from custt>mers, a sewing machine , and many tools. The second robbery was the final blow. His to this reporter was, ''This is the worst recession and these. are the most troubled times I have-ever se.en." When asked if they compared to the depression, he said he had been so Closing his business means people need to pick up their clothing. young at that time, he really couldn't remember. Joe Trujillo is an active member of St. Joseph's Church and is the father of on . e daughter who .is now married . As soon as his mother-in law has recovered, his wife hopes .. to begin to work again and they will be able to get "into the black" again. Presently he is .at the cleaning business at 260 Bannock in the late afternoons. He'll be there until all clothes have been picked up. These are troubled times, but did have a good business develop ing on the Westside. Because of a theft, . we deprived a family of a source of income, many people of their clothing (several jackets and coats • worth over a hundred dollars were stolen), a place of employ ment for some neighborlrood per\ sons, and the ownership of our own community through a neighborhood family. Can we afford to lose all this for a robbery? But ma ybe the robbery was done by outsiders ? But aren't there too many robberief like this around our community? A"l'en't we killing Resident _ of Mont' h: ANDY DOMINGUEZ MISSING PICTURES . Andy has been a resident of the ' Last month's resident of the Westside and South Lincoln Promonth did not have her picture . in jects for 22 years . He came .to the the paper -and also had her name Westside from Santa Fe in 1953 . misspeUed. Our apologies to Lela Andy worked for the Cosmo polSwanson of Delaware Street. itan Hotel as acook uhti11964 when This month there is not a picture illness brought about his ''' retirefor quite a different reason. The ment. " Since this "retirement" camera' with pictures in it was Andy has been active on the 11th stolen. This is not the only robbery Ave. block, especially by caring for we face in our neighborhood and law11:s of !he Seniors around . not the only consequence for others htm. He ts a fatthful usher at the 9 who are not the thief. A.M. Mass at St. Elizabeth each Homes in the area are being Sunday. In addition to this Andy burglarized with increasing regu hops a bus to the New St. Cajetan larity, persons are items , to usher for the 10:30 Mass. and purses are being snatched. Renters: Check Out the Place On the side, he repairs some fur-There are many consequences for tiiture and sells jewelry. This us and for those around us. Unfor summer Andy got three gardens tunately many of the thieves are started and then continued to among us and many are afraid to supervise them during the sum-tum in names when poUce make mer. Right now he is helping to reap the harvest. , Hopefully this attack on ourWe salute Andy Dommguez selves will soon cease. How much who has made ?'lany contrtbulonger can we Jive in fear? How h?ns to the W eststde and thank much longer wiD young persons htm for all _that he has done to m _ ake and some older people continue to the Weststde a better place to hve. make a Uving by robbing their own If you're looking to rent a dwell ing-be it a house, an apartment, a mobile home -here are some tips to consider to help you get the most for your money. Even though your tenancy may be short-term, you want it to be headache-free. A careful physical inspection j s of the utmost impor tance. •ELECTRICAL: Are there ample outlets and ample voltage available to handle your customary needs (appliances, fans , and so on)? If not, the landlord will likely balk at the high price of bringing in extra service . You may balk too. It's better to find out before you move in after. •SOUND : Test the acoustics. There ' s nothing like paper-thin walls to drive you batty ' . If the adjoining apartments are empty, ask the landlord to let you in, where you can whisper , whistle , yell at the cat, imitate a stereo , whatever. If the adjoining apartments are occupied , I admit, it's a bit ticklish to ask your would-be neighbors how loud or quiet they are. If you're apartment hunting . during the day, there may not be anyone home, and the landlord might let you in for your own testing. Play it . , by ear, but don't complain if you are later disappointed. •EQUIPMENT: What's the con dition ofthe stove, disposal, water heater, dishwasher, laundry equip , ment, air c<; mditioners, and so onj Who's responsible for repairs? Re placements? If the apartment is new, are there any guarantees on . the units? If so, will they adequate ly protect you? It may be worth it to hire an appliance repairman to gjve you an opinion. Naturally, if you can discuss all of these Hems with the former tenant (and neighbors) you'll be that much better Written agreements are always better than verbal agreements. 1hat is why a lease is important. Important matters to consider in the 'lease which in all probability will have been prepared by the landlord ' s attorney are these: •RENEW AL PRIVILEGE. Is it automatic or do you have to exer cise the privilege in writing? An automatic renewal clause might unwittingly bind you to another term, should you fail to give proper notice of nonrenewal. Are the terms clearly stated or is the future rent left up iii the air? •SUBLET PRIVILEGE. Good to have, if you can get it, though you'd have to expect to still be liable for the rent if the sub-tenant didn't pay. , •SERVICES. Who provides what and at what cost? This includes utilities, taxes, maintenance, recre ational facilities, parking, in-sur ance. This should all be spelled out in the lease if future disputes are to be avoided. •REMEDIES. Your rights against the landlord (and vice versa) for failure to perform under the' lease should be clearly set forth. Lacking specific remedies, you might be left to bickering, hassling and court. All lease terms are negotiable more so if the landlord has too many vacancies, less so if the units are full of tenants. The lease the agreement, and if there's enough at stake it would be worth your while to have your own lawyer represent you in the negoti ations. Remember-all made, especially those negotiated MUST BE IN WRITING. The preceding article was written by Mr. Robert S. Rosefsky and appeare d in the Chicago News. neighbors? SOBRI"ETY HOUSE Sobriety House, located at 121 Acoma Street, is a private, non. The program, presently accomprofit corporation that deals with 22 persons, has been the problems of alcoholics in the dtrected by Raymond G. Stewart Denver area. Since its foundation since 1972. Aiding Mr. Stewart are by Ernest Baber in 1967, . Frank C. Farrell, Assistant Direc Sobnety House has provided a tor, and Edward Michael Qasey, friendly' "home type" atmosphere Counselor . for its residents along with coun_ Sobriety House welcomes finan selling services both for individuals cia! donations as well as good used and groups . clothing apd furniture. ' Thank You for your Patronage UNION BANK & TRUST 1st & Broadway 744-3221 . '

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Teacher of Month STEVE CHAVEZ One hundred ten you n g men are on the f ootball team s at We st High Schoo l this yea r and if each of them works well at practi ce, each one will get to pla y in o n e game during the week. That's the s pirit o f Steve Chavez , the head f ootball coach at W est. When Ste ve start e d coac hing at W est five yea r s ago, there were only 46 young men o n th e teams at the e nd o f th e year. yea r 95 finis h ed the seaso n and this yea r I 1 0 will probabl y finis h . A lth o ugh Steve ins i sts on ph ysi ca l fitness, h e d oe s n ot dr o p fello ws from the team if they a r e working and t r ying. lf you give your all to t h e s p ort, then you will pla y in at least one gam e, he says. " W e need to ove rcome the doubt in o ur minds about winning," says Steve. Wi. nnin g i s not the most important thing to this coach but he hopes that all his team will have greater confidence and that West will begin winning more games. Part of West's weakness is the doubt in the players ' minds , but a not h e r problem is size . In four years, Steve only had one fellow ove r 200 lbs . Now he has four on thi s team . "It's the best team that I have had. " Our team lost t o Kennedy which is th e best team in the state, but now th e group understands what happe n e d and the re s ults would be diff e r e nt if the two team s played again. West still might not win, but they would play much more effec tiv e ly. Coach Chavez sa y s that t ho u g h they lost game, they played hard! He's hoping that the result s will now be different with George Washington High School. F o r the past several years, Steve Chavez has bee n the head of the ph ys ical education department at West. He has bee n the men's phys !cal e ducation teacher although h e i s also qualified to teach E n g lish . For two yea r s, he was also assistant to the boys' advisor which i s a disciplinarian position at the sc hool. B e fore coming to West, Steve taught o ne year at Kun miller Juni o r High School. But his enjoy ment of the sports, appreciarion of the fellows and interest in West High S chool are long standing. Mr . Chave z grew up on the Westside and attended St J ose ph's High School. F o r a number of years. his family lived at 14th an d Marip osa . In addition to teaching and foot ball, Mr . Cha vez is a baseball coach and also an assistant base ball coac h at Metro State College . H e h as won num e r o u s awards for his baseball ability and r eco rd . The day this reporter talked with Steve, he was expecting pis first child within several hours . Since the ne wspaper has to go to press, we 'll print the results of the birth under Neighborhood News next issue . This will be the first child for he and his wife , who is a business teacher at North High Scho ol. Over the entrance to the football practice field , there is a sign which is the Chavez motto . I'm here because I enjoy the game I am dedicated I have PRIDE WE CAN WIN On the back of the Cowboy foot ball entrance, it asks "Did you give 100%?" , Good luck to Coach Chavez and his 1975-76 Cowboy football teams: S o phomore , Junior Varisty, and Varsity . Del Pueblo News ; the special programs at Del Pueblo . If you were not able to attend the meeting feel free to come to the school at anytime to pick up the information given to parents. Everyone at Del Pueblo is con cerned with improving our chil dren's skills, especially in reading and arithmetic. Teachers will be working especially hard on these areas, and they would like all parents to encourage their children by stressing the importance of attending school regularly . Good attendance is necessary if our chil dren are to make good progress at school. The teachers and staff at Del Pueblo would also like to extend an invitation to parents to visit the school so you can be informed and aware of what is happening at your "es(:uela Del Pueblo. " HEADSTART Stud e nts and t e achers are off to a bu sy start at Del Pueblo this fall. Children have been assigned to the ' five learning areas according to their age and learning needs. The learning areas are named after Me x ican Indian tribes and are known as families. Th ' e Aztec family has approximately 60 stu d e nts and includes ll and 12 year olds. The _Mayan family has approximately 90 pupils ranging in ages from 9 through 11. The Zapo t ec family has approximately 95 pupils ranging in ages from 7 through 9 , and the Toltec family includes the 6 and 7 year olds , with approximately 95 pupils. The youngest family is known as the "Hijitos." This includes kinder garten and the 4 year old children in the Early Childhood Education program . Del Pueblo is fortunate to ha ve an o _utstanding Earl y Educa tion Program for 4 year olds. There are a few openings left for 4 year olds living in the Del Pueblo area. The Auraria Head Start Centers For 'more information call the began classes on September 15th school at 629-1473. with p _ hase-in. The classes are Mexican Independence Day on divided so that the three year olds Sept. 16 was celebrated at Del attend morning classes and the Pueblo with an assembly for all four -year olds the afternoon children. Children from the Zapo-classes. There are still openings for tee , Mayan, and Aztec families prechildren and you may inquire by sented a skit which provided some calling the Centers (Auraria 534historical background for the cele7614 and Raggedy Aim 825-1169). bration of Sept. 16th. Some beauti-New staff members are: Teacher, ful Mexican dances were performBetty Quintana, formerly with the ed for the students by Miss Beverly Margery Reed Nursery School; and Garceau, dance instructor for the Debbie Lopez, teacher assistant. Guadalupe Mestizo Dancers, with Also on the teiching staff are Becky Villa and Rachael Martinez, student teachers Su Yun Yang of also dancers from the Guadalupe Taiwan and Glenda Guanella of group, all performing in very Colorado State University. colorful costumes. Through a-special grant, the PeaAn orientation meeting . for par-nuts staff (Sam Abeyta, Director; ents was held on Wednesday, Sept. Rosalie Padilla, Social Worker; Rita , 17 to inform parents of the many Mattingly, teacher; Joyce / Edwin-programs and activities at Del son, developmental motor !hera-Pueblo. Parents were able to meet pist; Patricia Burnside, teacher asin small groups with teachers' to sistant; and Jennie Bustos, Driver / discuss procedures for assigning Aide) a workshop in pupils to . the various family areas, Houston, Texas from September the methods used for reporting 21-24 on "Mainstreaming the children's progreSs j o parents, and Handicapped." _ _...,. ___ ..... ,.,:W R1!'"114 :ti" Student of Month YOLANDA QUEZADA This month our student comes from Moore Elementary School , located at 9th and Corona. Each morning she boards the yellow school bus near her home on Mari posa with the other children from North Lincoln Homes for their ride to school. She is one of the many delightful children from our area and was picked for the paper by some of the staff at the school. We'll let the rest of her story be told in her own words and those of some of her teachers. " My name is Yolanda Quezada . I live at 1377 Mariposa . I'm in the sixth grade. I go to Moore School. I used to go to Greenlee . I was born in Juarez, Mexico. My age is eleven. " I have three brothers and two sisters. My dad and m y mom ' s names are Lucio and Angelina Quezada. M y best subject is r e ad ing. When I grow up I want to be a hair dresser and manicurist. " Her teachers say: "Yolanda is a delightful student. She's interested in all kinds of activities and finds pleasure in man y things . " "Yolanda is fun to work with in class. She is alwa ys very helpful and quick to pick up new ideas . One of her most endearing quali ties is her thoughtfulness and kindness toward others. She always has a smile for you.'' "Yolanda's smile brightens the whole classroom. She always is cheerful and happy . She has a fine sense of responsibility.'' Baker News One of the prides of Baker for the year 1975-76 is the new IMC (In structional Media Center) : Com bined with the books which have been in the library are all kinds of teaching aids, audio-visual, and study matetials. There is a ne'!:Y green carpet with gold and rust accents, study carrels for individ ualized study and over 150 new books . Baker has a new Community Liaison Counselor who is interested in getting to know the parents and community agencies in the Baker community . He is Mr. Gerry De Petro, a graduate in sociology from c.s.u. Students, teachers, and parents representing all areas of Baker ' s community are combining their ideas to come up with objectives for the MBO (Management By Objec tive) Program at Baker. From one to three basic objectives will be chosen to be used as a basis for decision making throughout the year. If you did not get to a meeting and have an idea to contribute, call Mrs. Elfstrom 222-9718. Back-to-School Night at Baker wiii be October 16 , There will be no opening meeting but parents will take the schedule provided by their youngsters and start classes at 7:00 p.m. The function wiii end about 9 :00p. m. and will be followed by a Bake Sale. Contributions for the Bake Sale are welcome: 1 The Bilingual-Bicultural Center in Room 204 at Baker is planning a bilingual / bicultural club to focus attention on the ethnic populations -at Baker. There will be activities ceptered around arts and crafts, food, language of different cul tures. They invite parents to visit the center, or if they wish to donate some time, to serve on the BilingualBicultural Advisory . Com mittee. Call Julie Gomez or Patty Kirksey at Baker 222-9718. NEW. PROGRAM FOR 4 YEAR OLDS AT GREENLEE Earlv Childhood Education. an e citing new program for four year-old children. started at Green lee S chool this fall. The program is designed to help each c hild develop hi natural curi osit;' and desire to learn . The teacher functions as a guide. pro v idin g e ery youngster the oppor tunit y to experie n ce new thing S uch as numbers. the alphabet , a . nd language . Individual attention is given in this small class size ituari on. Each c hild is enco uraged t o progress at his own pace. Also imponant in this program is the chil d's finding out the impor ta,nce of him self a nd hi s class m a t es. He learn s to share in work and pla y with others. Th e c hild b egins to underst a nd the fun c tions of various p eo pl e such as firemen, policemen, farm ers and others. Greenlee c hildr e n visited the neighborhood ftr e d e partment on a r ece nt fie ld trip. Other trips are being planned , so the children can learn fro m dir ec t contact. Ph ys ical recreati o n is a nother significant program component b e cause children d eve lop strength , improv e their coordination, and acquire new skills easily and quickl y at this early age. Twenty -two youngsters are cur rently enrolled in the Greenlee Earl y Childhood Education Pro gram. Anyone with a four -yea r old child is invited t o contact Greenlee Elem entary School (222-3531) for informati o n. Support the United Way It Spends Money in Westside ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Proj ec t No. 1 898 SEALED PROPOSAlS will b e re ceive d fr o m qualified contractorS by the Diiector , Office o f State Planning and Budgeting, Room 630 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street . D e n ver. Colorado 80203 until 3 :00 p.m . • MDT o n th e 7th day o f October. 1975 a nd the n a nd the r e publicl y ope n e d a nd r ead aloud in Room 7!0, same building. PROJECT: AURARIA HIGH E R EDUC A TION CENTE R -BID PAC KAGE 40-2 , Elevator . Zo n e 40 Building II. D e nver , Colo rad o I . The w ork s hall b e accomplished o n o r before 10/ 1 5176 plu s ten (10) calendar days fr o m th e date of the N ot i ce to Proc ee d , includin g th e delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, th e s ubmittal of sales and use tax payment forms, th e calling for the final ins p ect ion and the co mpleti o n of the final pun c h list. Failure to complete th e work a s pr esc ribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Com ple ti o n and Liquidated Damag es, in accor dance with Article 47 of The G eneral Conditi o ns of the Contra c t. The work is sc heduled to start on or about October 21, 1975. 2 . The rig ht is r e served to waive informalities and t o rej ec t any Propo s al. 3. Bidd e r s may procure Bidding Documents fr om: C harles S . Sink & A ssoc iat es, 3003 E. Third Ave nue , Suite 103, Denver , CO. 80206 4 . A Depo s it of SSO.OO will be required for eac h complete set of Contract D oc uments . Thi s d eposi t s hall be a guaranty that the d ocu m e nt s will be r e turned in good co ndition. S u c h d e p osi ts will b e r e turned to (I) Actual bidd e r s who r e turn the documents b e fore the termination o f five working da ys after the o p e ning o f the Propo sa ls, (2) Other interested parti es who return th e documents within five working da ys after c hecking them o ut. Addi tional copies of any documents , drawings or spec ificati o n s will b e supplied at the actual cost of r epro duction . 5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on tl\e r e qu i r e d Proposal F o rm and must be accom panied b y a Pro posal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5"1o of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (I) a cashier ' s c heck or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond o n State Form SC-6 .14. Cashier's or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado . The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project . 6 . The Bidder promises , in submitting his Proposal , that if issued a Notice of Award , he ' will, w it hin the prescribed time , the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certifi cates of Insurance , or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages . Page 3 SANTA FE TRAil Children are busy learning colors at Greenlee School. WORK&STUDY Cooperative Occupational Ed u ca rion is a cooperative arrangement between Denver' business and industries and the Denver Publi c Schools. This program is designed to p ro vide trainin g in a n occ upa tion on a part ti m e b asis for high schoo l stud ents. The stude n ts a lt e rna te o n a half day b asis between stud y in the classroom and the trai nin g statio n. Th e student's sc hool ti m e is devoted (a) to high school courses f o r graduation and (b) to a study of t h e technical and general related informa ti on to the occ upation for which h e is being train e d. R egular high school credit is grante d for r e lat e d classroom in struction and on-the -jo b training. The student trainee will receive the on-going rate of pay for his field of training. The divisions within this program at Wes t High School are: Distributiv e Erlnc.atio n Mr. D e ward Miller; Home Economics Occ upations-Mrs. Karen M endez; Indu s trial Cooperative Education -Mr. J o hn Brunn e r ; Office Educa tion-Mr. R a lph Hill , a nd Coopera tive Work Experience : Mr . AI BJorn. Proj ect No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received f rom qualified contra ctors b y the Dir ecto r , Offi ce of State Planning and Budgeting , Room 630 State Services Bu i ld i ng , 1 525 Sherman Street , D e n ver, Co l orado 80203 until 3:00 p . m . MDT on the 14th day of October , and then and the r e publicl y ope n ed and r eao a l o ud in Room 7!0. same building. PROJECT : S tud ent S e rvi ces Facility. Bid Pa c kage 905 Mechanical. Auraria Higher Education Ce nt e r . D e n ve r , Colorado I. The work s hall b e acco mpli s hed o n or bef o r e September I , 1976 plu s ten (10) ca l e nd a r days from the date of th e N otice t o Pr ocee d , including the d elivery of any or all g u a ranties and warranties, th e s ubmittal of sales and u se tax pa y m e nt f o rm s, the ca llin g f o r th e final ins p ec tion and th e co mpl etion o f the final pun c h list. Failure t o complete the work as rresc ribed s hall b e considere d as a br eac h o the Co ntra c t and s ubject t o Tim e of Completion and Li9uidated Damag es, in accordance with Arttcle 4 7 of The General Conditions of the Contract. 2 . The right is reserved to waive informalities and to rej ect any Proposal. 3. Bidders ma y pr oc ure Bidding Documents from : CHILDRESS I PAULIN , Architects, 1865 South Pearl Street, D e nver , Colorado 80210 4. A Dep os it of S25.00 will be required f o r each complete se t of Contract Documents . This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will b e return e d in good condition . Such deposits will be returned to (I) Actual bidders who return the d oc uments before the termination of five working days after the o pening of the Proposal s, (2) Other interested partie s who return the docum e nts within five working days after checking th e m out. Additional copies of any documents , draw ing s or s pecification s will be supplied at the actual cost of r e production . 5 . Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accom panied b y a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5 "1o of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (I) a cashier's check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6 .14. Cashier's or certified check shall b e made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado . The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will b e maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project. 6 . The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal ' , that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond , Labor and Materials Payment Bond , Insurance Policy and Certifi cates of Insurance , or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages. 7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufac tured in Colorado, as provide by law . 7 _ Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufac tured in Colorado, as provided by law. 8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project , if such rates have been established . 8 . The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if s uch rates have been established . Dated at Denver, Colorado , 18th day of September , 1975 . Office of State Planning and Budgeting B y L. E . Klatt 9 / 1817S for the Executive Director Medium of Publication : Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates: First: September . 22. , 1975 Se c ond : September 29, 1975 or as soon as UJ?OJ' of ad . Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 16th day of September, 1975. Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E . ' Klatt, 9/16175 , . for the Executive Director Division of Purchases By E . R. Roon , Director .. Medium of Publication : Santa Fe Trail, Denver • Publication Dates : First : September 18, . 1975 Second : September 25 , 1975 or soonest possible publication date u ' pon 1;, •r.Vo/1.1 HI'"\ -(If t :._1,)

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Page 6SANTA FE TRAIL VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE for West High School Saturday, October 4, 2:00p.m. -West vs Saturday, October 11, 10:00 a.m. -West vs East Friday, October 17, 7:45 p.rn. -West vs Loveland at Loveland Friday, October 24, 3:15p.m. -West vs Manual Friday, October 31, 2:30p.m. -West vs Thomas Jefferson Saturday, November 8, 10:00 a.m. -West vs Lincoln All games except . for October 17th are at the All-City Stadium State Playoffs are November 15, 22, and 29 SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE for West High School Friday, October 3, 3:15p.m.West vs$outh at West High School Friday, October 10,3:15 p.m.-West vs East at East High School Saturday, October 25, 10:00 a.m.-West vs Manual at West High Saturday, November 1, 10:00 a.m. -West vs Jefferson at West Saturday, Novernbt!r 8, 2:00p.m. -West vs Lincoln . at Abraham Lincoln High School SOCCER SCHEDULE for West Hlgh School Saturday, October 4, 1:00 p.m.-West vs Lincoln at Lincoln High Saturday, October 11, 1:00 p.m.-North vs West at Huston Park Saturday, October 18, 1:30 p.m. -West vs Washington at Washington High School Saturday, November 1, 1:00 p.m.South vs at Huston Park TENNIS SCHEDULE for West High School Thursday, October 2, 3:00p. m. -West vs Washington , at Washington High School Thursday, October 9, 3:00p.m. South vs West at Huston Park District meet begins at South High School and Washington Park on Friday, October 17th, at 12:30 p.m. GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE for West High School Wednesday, October 1, 3:15 p.m. -West vs Jefferson at West Friday, October 3, 3:15p.m. -North vs West at North High Wednesday, October 8, 3:15p.m. Kennedy vs West at Kennedy Friday, October 10,3:15 p.m.-East vs West at East High Friday, October 17, 3:15p.m.-West vs South at South Htgh Wednesday, October 22, 3 :15p.m. -West vs Manual at West Friday, October 24, 3:15p.m. -West vs Washington at West Wednesday, October 29, 3 :15p.m.-West vs Lincoln at West Friday , October 31, 3:15p.m.-Jefferson vs West at Jefferson Mini-Library a Success The Mini-Library program check ed out over 800 books this summer, three times more than in its 1974 program. Of the 194 children enrolled, 51 of them read 6 or more library books during the summer: This year the library collection included Spanish language books. It is interesting that four families . with non-English speaking parents were among the outstanding users of the Mini-Library. The 11 chil dren in these four families borrowed more than SO books. The activities of the 48 Junior Volunteers, those going into 4th Grade or above this fall, included painting the library wagon, reading to children, pulling the wagon to various neighborhoods, helping with the garden, collecting and smashing cans for recycling, and producing the plays and dance number for the party. Outstanding Junior Volunteers included Michelle Reese, Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manzanares, Monica Joosten, Billy Rogers, Lori Rogers, Monte Chambers, Regina Borrego, hnd Sophie Manzanares. One family of three boys, David, Tommy and Paul Garcia, checked out and returned 40 books this summer. Other outstanding library users were Carnilo, Christina and Leanna Aguilero, David and Jack Barrien tos, Bonita and Brannon Braggs who checked out 24 books, fames Cordova, Ilene Lisa Gallegos, Amanda and Yolanda Garcia, Regi na and Lanette Gallegos and Delores Harris who read 23 books, Melissa Jones who earned 93 points, Ki Hyon Mun and Myong Ityon Mun, Lori and Peggy Rogers, Gina and Jessica Trevino, Rose marie, Paul and Augustine Vigil , Debra Vigil, and Chaunetta Wil kins. Special thanks go to Mrs. Mildred Wall and Mrs. Rudelrna Zabala who bagged 300 sacks of popcorn for the party and to Carolyn Hawkins who donated seven full days off to help with the library. Two plays presented by Auraria Mini-Library members highlighted the entertainment at the party held August 21st in the Community Center gym. The play, The Stubborn Sillies, was performed by Borrego, Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manza nares, Joann Borrego, Tina Man zanares and Billy Rogers. In the play, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the actors showed great ingenuity in designing props or using make believe ones. When the Huntsman (Willie Avila) shot the squirrel (Melissa Jones) with his bow and arrow (a soda straw with paper point), he discovered her. 'heart' missing. He was supposed to cut it out and take it to the beautiful but wicked queen (Ursula Romero). In great conster nation, he woke the squirrel from the dead by asking, "Where's your heart!?" The squirrel obligingly sat up, handed over her misplaced heart, and fell back dead again. Lori Rogers was the beautiful Snow White; Michelle Reese was the mirror; Gene Garcia was the'; Charming Prince; and Monica Joosten was the Curtain. The seven dwarfs were Joseph Montoya, Sammy Manzanares, Billy . Rogers; Mona Manzanares, Joann Borrego, Tina Manzanares and . Regina Bor rego. St. joe's News St. Joseph School officially open ed its school year on August 28 with 182 students. The school is made up of an elementary school with grades 1-;; and a rniqdle school with grades 6-8. Both the classes in the elemen tary school and those in the middle school have relatively small classes which insur. e individualized' in struction. The school also features tutoring programs in math and reading for those students who might profit from extra help in these subje,cts. The middle school is again offer ing enrichment courses for the stu dents. These classes are very populv with the students and consist of such classes as cooking, sewing, cycling, photography, ""oodwork, arts & crafts, and tennis. The school is especially fortunate this year in having five students from Viet Narn attend school here. West High School Cheerleaders and Pep Club members to cheer on the football team on September 18th. Unfortunately West was playing Kennedy High School -one of the best teams in the state -and lost. Living for Learning -West Side Action Center will host one ofthe thirty-nine Learning for Living classes and workshops being offered in the Fall '75 pro gram. "Transactional Anaylsis for Everyday Use." Abe Wagner,. well-known Transactional Analysis teacher, will conduct the four session program on Monday even ings at the Center, 1100 Santa on October 6, 20, 27 and November 3 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. A special tuition for the four sessions one dollar. ' Chuck Garcia, Assistant Director of West Side Action Center, Marie Martinez, Patient Advocate at the center, and Larry Ricketts, a Member of Learning for Living's Advisory Board, exa-mine the Learning for Living brochure des cribing the course as "a practical method of talking with other people and understanding human behavior." brochures a& available at the West Side Action Center and in all public libraries. For inforrna. tion, phone the Center, 534-5141, or the for Living office, 292-5970. learning for Living is a community service program of Metropolitan State College. Classes and workshops are open to adults of all ages from 16 to past 80. There are no credits, grades, tests or homework or educational require ments. Aprenda un modo practico para cornrnunicar con otras personas como su familia, arnigos o cornpineros de trabajo. Un modo para en tender el conducto hurnano. Clases sen(n en ingles solarnente. Registro Especial $f . . Learn a practical method of talk ing with other people, family mem bers or friends or co-workers. A sound way to understand human behavior. Classes will be taught in English. Special Tuition: $1. Teacher is Abe Wagner who is also the consulting director of the O.K. Center for Teaching Disabled Youngsters. _ AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM BEGINS Project Freedom began its after school program on the 8th of September for the 75-76 school year. We will be working with .students from Baker and Byers Jr. High schools. We expect our first students on the 22nd of September. Our tutors are from CU at Denver and Loretto Heights College. They are Blanca Vigil, Mike Gomez, Kathy Lathan, Ted Medina, and Roger Ornales. Project Freedom will be opera ting out 'of the Denver Inner City Parish at 9th and Galapago, from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday thrll Friday. On Fridays the students. will partici pate . In cultural activities, field trips, and recreational activities. Wednesday evenings will also be used for tutoring. The hours will be . from 7 to 8 p.m. So the can choose whichever hours benefit him most. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Project No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planning and Budgeting , Room 630 State Services Building; 1525 Sherman Street , Denver, Colorado 80203 until 3:30 p . m. MDT on the 9th day of October, 197 5 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT: Student Services Facility Bid Package 90-7 (Elevators) Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado 80204 L The entire project shall be accomplished on or before May 31, 1976 including the delivery of any or all guaranties and war ranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the; calling for the final , inspection and the completion of the final punch list . Failure to complete--the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Com pletion and Liquidated Damages , in'-ac cordance with Article 4 7 of The General Conditions of the Contract . 2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal. 3 . Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from : Childress / Paulin -Architects/Planners 1865 South Pearl Street, Denver, Colorado 80210 Forum for AU _ 4. A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out . , Additional copies of any documents, draw ings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction . S. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accom panied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than S o/o of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier's check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14 . Cashier's or certified check shal"-be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project. Westside Forum is a neighbor hood group of rei!iidents and persons working in churches and agencies in the area. Discussions center arowid community planning and community problems. Meet ings will he October 7th and 21st at noon at Auraria Community Cen ter, 1212 Mariposa. Discussions during the past month have resulted in action taken concerning the $1.00 charge by the health clinics, opening up the People's Assistance Center on Broadway, on the lith Avenue Street closing, organizing a clean-up day for Westside, etc. The group has also met socially in Lincoln Park. AU are join the group and contribute to the discussions and the necessary follow-up activi ties to see our neighborhood made a better place for each family to live. H you have questions about the Westside Forum, contact Marie Martinez at Westsicfe Action Cen ter (534-5141) or AdoH Gomez at Auraria Community Center (5347614). 6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor apd Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certifi cates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages. 7 . Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufac tured in Colorado, as provided by law. 8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established . Dated at Denver, Colorado, this ll th day of September, 197S. Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E . Klatt, 9 /ll/7S for the Executive Director Division of Purchases ByE. R. Roon Director Medium of Publication : Santa Fe Trail, Denver Publication Dates : First : September IS, 197S Second: September 22, 197S ' or soonest possible publication receipt of this ad . _ r-date upon 'J WHS Cheerleaders The Cheerleaders have been selected this year at West High School. They are planning activities and practicing to cheer the team on to victory for the school. Selected for cheerleaders this year are Pam Colvert, Ruth Ham mond, Donna Krarnb, Roberta Larez, Mai:y C. Martinez, Terry Montoya, Barbara Pierce, Faye Richardson, Deena Sanchez, Deb bie Valdez, and Frances . Suniga. Porn Pons will also be working hard to assist the team and lead them on to victory and greater pride for school and themselves. Holly Barton, Patsy Ceja, Janice Hathaway, Chery Kunde, Joyce Montoya, Munoz, Nickie Me drano, Joanne Sainz will be the porn pons this year. Matha Guevara and Valerie Stoneking are the leaders of the pep club, the cheerleaders, and the porn pons. All the girls are now _ in uniform and/or have sweaters, so that the Wc;st black and orange will show up at the games. The cheer ing squads have a lot to do with sophomore, junior varsity and varsity football teams' activity. West High School teams will face stiff competition this year and all hope that they are victors. But if they play a good game and still lose, the school and community are behind them and hope that the next will see a winning team. The cheerleaders and pep club activi ties keep us all in good spirits and keep us cheering and hoping. We have thus far signed up six volunteer tutors (or the Wednesday night sessions and are expecting more until we reach our goal of fifteen. All interested persons are welcome to volunteer their serv ices. Call 892-1039 for information. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS ' Project No. 2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, Office of State Planninland Budgeting, Room 630 State Services uilding, 1S2S Sherman S{reet , Denver, olorado 80203 until 3:00 p.m. MDT on the 9th day of_October, 197S and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building. PROJECT : Student Services Facility Bid Padage 90-6 (Electrical) Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver, Colorado 80204 L The entire project shall be accomplished on or before July 30, 1976 including the delivery of any or all guaranties and war ranties, the . submittal of sales and use ' tax payment forms , the calling for the final inspection and the completion of th e final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a brea c h of the Contract and subject to Time of Comple tion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 4 7 of The General Conditions of the Contract . 2. The right is reserved to waive ; nformalities and to reject any Proposal. 3 . Bidders may procure Documents from : Childress / Paulin-Architects / Planners 186S South Pearl Street, Denver, Colorado 80210 . 4 . A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition . Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out . Additional copies of any documents, draw ings or specifications will be supplied at the actua: cost of reproduction. ' S . Each PropQsal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accom panied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than S o/o of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (I) a cashier ' s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier's or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado . The Proposal Guar anty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project . 6. The Bidder promises, in submitting . his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, wijhin the prescribed time , execute the requirea Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Materials Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certifi cates of Insurance , or 'forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages. 7. Preference _ shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufac tured in Colorado, as provided by law. 8. The rate of wages to be pa1d for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established . Dated at Denver , Colorado, this ll th day of September, J97S . Office of State Planning and Budgeting By L. E. Klatt, 9 /lli7S for the Executive Director ' Division of Purchases Medium of Publication : Santa Fe Trail , Denver Publication Dates : First : September IS, 197S Second: September 22, 197S By E. R . Roon Director Or soonest possible publication date upon receipt of this ad. ' 1 , '

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CHURCH NEWS PRJMEllA IG LESIA BAUTISTA (del Sur) 910 Kalamath Phone 825-7497 Rev. Job Maldonado , Pastor Sunda ys: 10:00 a . m . Sunday S c h oo l II :00 a.m. W orship Service 6:00 p . m. Church Training 7:00 p . m. Evening Service Tuesdays: I :00 to 3:00 p .m. B ib l e Stud y, crafts, English ( not in summer months) Wednesdays: 7 : 00 p . m. Pra-yer meeting (All our services are in Spani s h and English to reach o ur commu nity with the Gospel of Jesus.) LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER 215 West 5th Avenu e Denver, Colorado John Hushman, Youth Minister Bru ce Klitzky, Older Persons Ministry SERV ICES Sunday : Worship service and Sunday School from 10 : 00 to 11:30 a . m . CHURCH OF ST. PETER {E PISC _ OPAL ) 126 West 2nd Ave nu e Denver, Co l o rado 80223 R ev. George Castono , Pastor SERVICES Sunday8:00a.m . H o l y Communion 10 :30 a.m. Mornin g Praye r s and S e rmon W ednesday1 0:00 a . m . H o l y Communion SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY .CHURCH 1 230 Decatur 825-0121 Lou R oo ssi e n , Pastor Ted Koeman, Intern Lupe Rodri g u ez, Sociai Work e r Sunday Sch oo l , 10 : 00 a.m. Worship, 11:00 a.m. Monday. Cadets at 7:15p.m. W ednesday-Adult Bibl e Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up) , 7:30 Frida y -Teen Lounge , 8:30 p . m . WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH West s th and Galapago Jim Harris, Minister Jack Calderon, Associate Sunday School10 : 00 a . m . Worship Service11: 00 a.m. Eve nin g Service (Spanish) 7 :00p. m . ST. JOSEPH'S cAmouc CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver. Colorado 80204 Fr . Andrew Meiners, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl Schwarz Fr . Lero y Burke Fr. Thomas R yan MASSES 12: 10 and 6:00p.m. Sat. _ 7:00, 8 : 30. 10 : 00 ( Spanish , stairs) 10:00 (English. hall) 12:00 noon up-NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST ) 325 W . Irvin gto n Pla ce Don Davi s , .Pastor J e rry McC o rmick , Assoc . Pastor SERVICES Worship, 8 : 30 and ll:OO a . m. Sunday SchMl, 9:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Meeting, 6:00p.m. Prayer Meeting, Thursday, 7 :30p. m. CLUB PROGRAM Boy ' s Club, Wednesday, 6 :30p. m . Girl's Club, Saturday, 9 : 30 a.m. ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 1060 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES We e kday: 8: 00 , 12 : 15 , 5 : 15 . Sunday: 8:00, 9:00 , 11:()0, 12: 15 Saturday: 12 : 00 , 5:00 C ONF ESS IONS Dail y b efore 12: I S Mass Saturday 4:00 to 5 : 00 ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHURCH Stuart & Alameda Denver, Colorado 80219 James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor MASSES Saturday evening, 7 : 00 p . m . Sunday, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10 : 30 12: 00 (Spanish) , 7:00 p . m . Weekdays, 8:00 a . m . (Spanish) FIRST A VENUE PRESBYTERIAN 120 East 1st Avenue 777-5375 Den ver, Colorado 80203 Rev . Arnold Bloomquist , Pastor Sunday School , 9:45 Morning Worship, 11: 00 a.m. Coffee H o us e Faith Factory 25 Broadway J ohn Cox, Student Pastor Director FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH ,.: ,• I . ... : ,-' . ' : ',' .'" . . . . . } . ."' ., FALL FIESTA October 10, 11, 12 Mexican Food Fun for the whole family $1000 Raffle Mariachi Mass, Saturday, 6:00 p.m. Games for all ages Friday, October 10, 7:0Q -11:00p.m. Saturday, October 11, 7:qo -11:00 p.m. Mariachi Mass at 6:00p.m. Sunday, October 12, 1: • 11:00 p.m. Have Fun at the Fall Festival SupportSt. Joseph's Schools BAPTISMS A;r ST. JOSEPH'S August 17 -Steven George Carrillo , son of Frances Carrillo . Godparents,George Carrillo and Maria Ross. Brian Michael Thompson, son of Gordon and Jane 'Thompson. God parents, Frank and Mary Veldez. August 23 Lisa Marie Gon d aughte r of Angel and Linda Gon za les. Godparents, Jerry and Mary Vargas. S eptember 14 -Armando Jose Carabajal, son of Lazorro and Ida Carabajal. Godparents, T o n y and Linda Kay Carabajal. Mi chae l Anthony Gutierrez, son of David and Kathy Gutierrez. Godparents, Alex and Loretta Elizalde. James Padilla, son of Santiago and Rose Marie Padilla. God parents, Jose and Evelyn Padilla. September' 19 Linda Noel. Pu entes, daughter of Fernando and Mary Puentes. Godparents, Law rence Martinez and Mary Garcia. September 21 Michele Berna dette Sena, daughter of Lawrence ; and Catherine Sen a . Godparents, Alvin Sena and Lorraine Martinez. WEDDINGS AT ST. JOSEPH'S August 2 -Joseph Anthony Sandoval , son of Albert and Glady s Sandoval, to Theresa Trujillo, daughter of Jospeh and Cecilia Trujillo . Witnesses, William and Lorraine Romero . August 23 Carlos Casias, son of P a ul and Juanita Casias, to Tamara Job, daughter of Milton and Hazel Job. Witnesses, An thony Casias and Deborah Job. IN MEMORIAM Fall Festival St. Joseph's Church invites the community to join in the fun of its annual Fall Festival to be held in th e P a rish G y m a nd H all on 10 , 11 and 1 2 October. This year's Festi val promises to b e bigger and better than ever. The F estival a l ways provi des a real community ex p e ri e nce with fun for the whole famil y . Festival will feature games for all ages with many beautiful a nd useful prizes. This year will a lso provid e special booths with real Mexican food for the Western Gourmet. The Grand Raffl e with its thousands of dollars in prizes i s another yearly feature. A high in activities i s the Mariac hi Mass Saturday night at 6 p.m. And that good spirit and the entertain ment of D a n Silva's Mariachi's spill over to the Festival Area. The Festival is S t. Joseph's big fund raising event of the year. Proceeds from the Festival will benefit St. Joseph' s Grade and Middle Schools . Times for the Festival are: Friday, October 10 , 7:00 p . m. until 11:00 p.m. Saturday, October 11 , beginning with the Mariachi Mass at 6 : 00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Sunday, October 12, 1:00 p . m. until 11: 00 p.m. WANT AD BROTHERS REDEVELOPMENT, Inc. bas secured funding to hire a carpenter, a plumber, an elec trician, and a secretary. Rellglous Formation Prog:ram Parents interested in attending Bible Classes are urged to contact Sr. Neomi. Also classes to h e lp you prepare your children for the Sac raments. A Sp ecia l Catechist Formation Program will begin....Soon : Where? 1160 Federal St . When? October 2nd. (Th ursd ay Evenings) Time? 7:00 P . M . • • • Sun Va\1ey residents are very happy t hat Two Vietnamese Fami lies wi\1 soon b e moving to be their neighbors. W e lcome, Friends. I The Denver Inner City Parish Preschool has bee n under repair since June. Preschool wi\1 start O ctober 14 t h . " Appli cations ,and Health forms may be pi cked up at the Denver lnne r City Parish office . RELIGIOUS ARTICLES JOHN P . DALEIDEN CO 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver , Colorado 80204 534-8233 FREE PARKING LUTHERAN PRE-SCHOOL Neighborhood Ministries -Jack Calderon Coordinator ADVERTISE TODAY IN 430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister Morning Worship, 9 :00a.m. Church School , 10 : 00 a.m. Jose Griego of 347 Galapago. Date of death Aug. 16 , 1975. Date of , Funeral Aug. 20, 1975 . Cemetery Mt. Olivet. Father of Mrs. George Gonzalez . We would Uke to hire skilled people wbo understand our concept of Pride, Spiritual Growth and Char ity. Please call Sharon Beyers, Manual Martinez, or Joe Giron at 573-5107 for more Information. The Lutheran 'Community Center at 215 W. Sth Ave. is having a pre school again -this year. It will be operating five days a week, and opens on October 1st through May 15. Anyone wishing to enroll their child should call 825-4862 , leave your name and number and you will be contacted.' .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. , .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. SANTA FE TRAIL (892-1039) Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038 RESTAURANT AND BAR 753 SANTA FE DRIVE -\< H The meal that's sure to fill PHONE * • 534 . 9579 : .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Our place is •lways AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS AND BANQUETS .. .. .. .. .. It Corrie oncl Of1joy our : FAST LUNCHES DANCING FRIDAYS , SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS FROM 8:00 p . m . UNTIL 2 :00a. m . SUN!lA'\'S FROM 7 : 00 p.m. UNTII, _)l:OO ":'!' 1 Jt lfo From 11 1 . m . to 2 p . m . DO THE FOR A NICKEL • October 9th is Nickel Day on RTD. Ride downtown for five cents!' All local service is five-cents. Our brand new Town Rider costs a nickel. And t.he express buses are half a dime. All day long. Visit a friend, visit your hairdresser, visit your favorite downtown restaurant, for a nick'el each way. Buy a dress, rent a chafing dish, pick up a bag of unbleached fl_our, by Riding for five • RTD. Nickel Day October 9th • *All Boulder County service is included except local City of Boulder bus service •

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Page 8 SANTA FE TRAIL Mary Padilla, 1426 Osage, made NEIGHBORHO .OD .a trit? to Santa on 28. She enJoyed the dnve w1th her NEWS Mr and Mrs. Fidel Puentes from Sun Vall ey are the proud parents of a baby girl born on August 14, Eulalia Puentes was baptized at St. Church on Sept. 7. Her God parents were Maria E. Ocana and Rodr_igo Castro . On Sept. 7 Shirley and Fidel Puentes cele brated their first anniversary of their marriage. Especial thank_s to Sister Neomi, Mr. Gonzales, Fr. Prohens and Fr. Thomas for all the help in prepar ing us for these meaningful cere monies . In the near future Mr. and Mrs. Puentes will travel to Mexico so the baby will meet her grandparents. * * * Pete and Helen Bonsell's grand daughter, Kristina Lop'ez, was married to Mike Martinez on August 16, 1975 in the Church of All Saints. A reception and dance followed in the afternoon and lasted 1,1ntil midnight. Mrs. Bonsel had ' a full house with out-of-town guests, _ including her daughter and faiJlily, two sisters, other relatives from Colorado Springs, a niece and her family from Albuquerque, New Mexico, a nephew and his family from Alamosa, and Mr. and Mrs. Angelio Trusi and family from New nephew -and especially the short visit to Chimayo on the way home. * * * Our sympathy to the Benito Armijo family , 1404 Osage , on the death of Mr. Armijo's father, August 27. He was buried from St. Cajetan's Church. Besides his son Benito, Filadelfio Armijo is sur vived by 8 other children, 41 grand children , and 25 great-grandchil dren . He had lived at 4621 Grant. * * * Many people from North Lincoln -spent time in various hospitals this month. Among them were Agapita Salazar, who had eye surgery, Mrs. Henry Torres, who also had sur gery, Sarah Romero, who cut a tendon in a battle with her dirty dishes, Jesse Gibbs, who is home now after a stro)ce and doing well, Mattie Nixon , who is recovering from surgery at this time. * * * . Several seniors from North Lin coln enjoyed Mass, a picnic lunch of chicken with all the fixings, and a visit to Mother Cabrini Shrine on August 27. Those making. the mountain trip were: Martha Lowe, LU<;:ia Gorm _ an, Tita Dominguez, Anna Mims, George Gallegos, Mary Richardson, Emilia Jacquez, Josephine James, and Elizabeth Doyle. * * * Jersey. * * * Stevie Pickens, son of Mary Aurari'!.'s Wednesday morning Pickens, 1443 Mariposa, was hap Women's Group went . on three tized on August 31 atSt. Eliza field trips during the month of beth ' s. August. They went to Loyola Saia* * * zar's house for pot luck one week, Bill and Martha Moffit, 1444 Mr. and .floward Phillips in Apt. 302 Hirschfeld Towers, cele brated their 35th Wedding Anni versary Aug. 17. Their three sons gave them an Open tJ.ouse Party here in auditorium. They both looked lovely Dorothy in a long white dress . and Howard in bhick suit and tie. any of their menas. stopped by with cards and gifts. Howard and Dorothy were Night Managers at the Towers for sev e ral years. They topped their . celebration by going to Hawaii and had splendid time there. Dorothy is active in two different singing groups: The Silver Sounds conducted by Mr. Raoul Tayon and the Hirschfeld Singers, a self disciplined group that collects old favorite hymns and melodies. If they find one sheet of music in the library, they borrow it and type up sheets. The group practices and studies it, until 'it is as good as-non professionals can get to singing it perfectly -then they go out and entertain Nursing Home patients. Malvina Langendorfer is pianist and Mattie Cochran is Chairman anti schedules appointments. The Silver Sounds have received four awards for performances they have given in recent years one was in '74 and another in '75. DeUaDenney Agapita Sandoval had a two week vacation after almost tWo working at the Senior Citi zen's Lunch Program. She visited with her daughter an . d the family in Pueblo and then went with her daughter's family to Taos, New Mexico. She had !1 good time and comes back 'to work and to help people around the neighborhood rested and refreshed. * * "' to the Red Rocks on another week , Navajo, are proud . of the new and lastly , they went to Washingaddition to their family, Dawn Kay, ton Park for a look at the . flower who arrived on September 1st. Rosendo and Elvira Rael went garden.s, to go swimming and to They already have one daughter witli Atitano and Flora Ulibarri on a have a brown bag lunch. All three Heathe r, who is also happy with trip to old Mexico. They had a good . outings were enjoyed by everyone her little sister. time and enjoyed the trip. who went. '!' * A * * * * * * Gertrude Krueger has moved On Wednesday, Septemb.er 24, Della Denney chats with Howard -anct Doroth_y Phillips abo.;t uPcmlng Hirschfeld Towers events. NEWSFT REPORTER. SANTA FE TRAI,J, is pleased fo announce . that Della Denney Of Hirschfeld Towers is a new ' re porter with the paper. Last month . she wrote the obituary for l\-;fr. O.G. Chandler and this month has begun to contribute a number of articles for persons af Hirschfeld. -She edits fhe. newsletter of Hirschfeld Towers and is active in many groups in the recreation program and around the building. We welcome Mrs. Denney and hope that we will be getting more and more news from Hirschfeld Towers, an important part of our Westside community. "ATIENTS' RIGHTS There is a Patient's Rights coun selor at the Westside Action Center that is there to help you with any problems that you might be havi.pg as a pat-ient who uses any -of the health facilities in the ... There are rights you have as a patient, are things you should know. DIGNITY: . You have the-right to have your . dignity an individual human being recognized and respected You have a right to the !!arne consiOeration and treatment as aQyone else regardless of your: race, creed, color, J>eliefs, of pay ment, sex, age, ortype of illness . . PRIVACY: Ask that your doctor introduce himself and i.ii..lude you sions about your situation. ,.. Aslc that yoU be interViewed in a ' place where .there is as much pri: vacy as _ Ask that d1e curtain or door be closed when being examined. Ask that outsiders not mvolved _ in your case not be allowed to visit you unless you want them. CONFIDENJ'IALITY: Your health records .must be c . onfidential, and you must give written permission for anyone else to see your records. . Maria Martinez •. • 4 Mr. Adolfo Gomez of Auraria from 1351 Mariposa to an apart, the PASCO program celebrated tbe Community Center took two vans of ment near Loretto Heights. She is birthdays during the month of ADVERTISEMENT 1898 . ADlERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Senior Citizens to the Pueblo State by her neighbors, who September. Agapita Sandoval and PROPOSALS will be _received from ProjectNo . 1898 Fair on August 22, 1975. The enjoyed her cheeriness and her Anita Duran both had birthdays qualified contractors by the Dtrector, Office SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from original plans were to return by tasty German cooking. this month. It was a very good of State .I;Judgeting , Room 630 qualified contractors by the Direct. or, Office * * * State Servtces 1525 of State P!al)ning and Budgeting, Room 630 6:00 p.m., but many people were celebration. Anita's birthday was Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until -,2: 00 State Building, 1525 she.rman having such a good time that a Mae Miller has moved from 1351 on the 24th, while A.gapita had hers p.m. MDT on the 9th of October, ' 1975 Street, Denver , Colorado 80203 until 2:00 decision was made to stay for the Mariposa to an apartment in on the lOth. and and there publicly and read p.m. MDT on the 7th day of october, 1975 aloud m _ 710 , same and !hen and there publicly opened and read evening show. This van of happy Hirschfeld Towers. She invites her PROJECT : Fmtshes for Buddmg 31A, Zone aloutl in Room 710 same building. . fair goers did not return to Denver friends to visit her at her new 35 Bid Package 35-8, Auraria Higher PROJECT : AURARIA HIGHER EDUCA-until around midnight. The day's home . ' Education Center, Denver, 802ersonal relationContract. accordance with Art i cle 47 of The General . Patsy Fresquez , of 1209 . Lipan living at 1011 Mariposa, died . at his ships between clients, and indi-2. The right is reserved to waive informalities Conditions of the Contract. The w ork is had company from Bell Gardens, home the. week . of September 14. vi duals are. confiding in the grouo. and to reject any scheduled to start on or about October 20 3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents 1975. . . ' California and also her brother and He will be missed by both children There is not a definite plan from : HALLER AND LARSON, LTD., 370 / 2 . :rhe right is reserved to waive informalities sister-in-law from Yucca Valley, and adults. Those who took time to followed during the groups. They Cherry Creek North Drive, Denver , Colorado and to rejeet any California. It was a beautiful visit know Charles found _ he had a good are ver.l/ flexible. If any individual 80209 . I . , . 3. Bidders may p,r ocure . Bidding Docll\llents ' ;; 4 . A Deposit of $75. 00 will be required for from: Stearns-Roi!er Architects Ltd.. 1385 for two weeks . So sorry they had to of humor and enjoyed having wishes to share something with the each complete set of Contract Documents . South Colorado Blvd . , Suite 210 Denver leave so soon. people around him. gro_up he is encouraged to do so This deposit shall be a . guaranty that the Colorado 80222 ' ' * * * , * * * regardless of what materials are documents ':"ill returned in gooc;l condition . 4 . A Deposit of $50 . 00 will be required for S S f L ' I deposits will be returned to (1) Actual each complete set of' Contract Documents. even emors o mco n Park The Resident Council of North being used. The group is a good btddc;rs ':"ho return the do:cuments before the This deposit shall be a guaranty . that the ' enjoyed the picnic at Elitch' s Lincoln met on August 28. Highplace to vent hostilities, talk about term!nat10n of five workmg days. after the documepts will be returned in good condition . August 21, 1975. We all enjoyed light of the meeting was the pre-problems and get constr -ucti've. ofthe Proposals, (2) O!_her mterested S . uch be returned to (1) Actual h parties who return the documents Witilin five bidders who return the documents before the t e verl sentation of awards for outstanding feedback frQ.m the group, and ' to worki!'g days . after checking them out. termination of . five working days after the lawn care Those recei i th )' 1: d t d d h t of docume'!ts, drawopening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested Frances Garcia who is active at v ng e IS en an ge goo 1 eas on ow 0 mgs or specificatiOns wtll be sup plied at the parties who return the documents within five . PASCO has a son and husband who awards were: Leatha Williams, handle life's hassles. actual cost of reproduction . . working days after checking them out. have been hospitalized during the Francisco Perez, Elmer Rund, The groups are ' open to anyone 5 . Proposal shall be submttted on the Additional copies of any doculllents, dr.awCe aid G Ch f M ll h h d W d 1 'th Proposal Form and be accomings or speciftcations will be suppliell aHhe past month. She also lost a son-inn a nego, ns me 0 enw 0 WlS es to atten e ea WI pamed by a Proposal Guaranty man 'a mount actual cost of reproduction . . _ law rather recently . We hope that dor, Lillie Thompson, Chris Talreal feelings. Age makes no differ-not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The 5 . Each Proposal shall be submitted on the the Garcia family will soon encounmien, John Vigil, "Cathy Fresquez, ence. The age difference presently Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier's required Proposal Form and must be accomD th M r S b ' T "11 f 15 55 check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond -panied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount ter much better fortune . oro Y o ma, eno Ia fUJI o, ranges rom years to years. on State Form SC-6 .14. Cashier's or certified not less th l m 5% of .:the total Proposal. The * * * Rose Torres, Annette Lucero, Edith Types of drug problems are hero 1 n, check shall be made payable to the Treasurer P-roposal Guaranty may be (1) a c a shier's Ne_ llie had as her guest Lacour and Richard and Rhoda amphetamines, toxic vapors, halluof the of _ Colorado . . The Proposal check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bbnd R " h ' Guaranty IS submitted as a guaranty that the on State Form SC-6 .14. Cashier's or certified her Sister Mrs . Leona Freeman the IC ardson. cinogens, marijuana, alcohol. If Proposal will b _ e in fu!J force and check shall be made payable to th e treasurer last two weeks of August. SUBSCRIBE TODAY anyone needs help, help is availeffe<:! f!Jr a penod of thtrty (30) after the of the State of Colorado . The Proposal * * * able. Observers are welcome also. opemng