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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, January, 1976

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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, January, 1976
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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News
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Santa Fe Trail
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Denver, CO
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Santa Fe Trail
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English

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U1S702
Santa Fe Trail
JANUARY 1976 • Issue #19
VVestside News
RTD System Raises Questions
by State Representative Richard Castro
Some time ago, West Denver residents met with officials from RTD to express their concern about an elevated mass transit system coming through our neighborhood. At that time there was a unanimous consensus of about 250 residents at a meeting at Baker Jr. High that the system should follow the railroad right of way from Englewood to Downtown Denver to avoid disrupting our residential community. -
RTD has explored the possibility of using either Broadway or Lincoln Street. The Broadway merchants and the residents of South Washington Park have come out against these plans, for the same reasons we in West Denver have opposed the elevated system.
The Planning Office recently indicated at a Mayor-Council meeting that they were abandoning the Lincoln-Broadway corridor in favor of the Railroad Right of Way. Indications are, however, that they may not have completely ruled out this corridor. 1 am therefore writing this article to alert you to this fact.
A report done by John Mollen-kopf on fixed guideways, raises some of the same questions and concerns I have had with the system. Specifically the report points out:
1. Fixed guideways basic function is to allow suburban residents, who are least in need of being subsidized by anybody, to get downtown quickly. (Therefore, those of us who live in South Washington Park or the Near Westside should not have to be burdened with a system in our communities that does not serve us.)
2. Although the system is claimed to have great flexibility, it is actually the most.inflexible form of transit. (Once the guideways are placed down, there is little opportunity for the system to serve other areas of town if population or business develop shifts in future years.)
3. Elevated systems or fixed guideways claim to reduce labor costs. (The BART system in San Francisco suggests the opposite — bus drivers are replaced by a technology that requires highly skilled and highly paid engineers.)
‘AMERICAN WAY’ MARKET
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
The American Way Market at 1115 W. 11th is now under new management due to the Consent Decree of September 30th in which the owners had the choice of 1) cleaning up the store, or 2) getting fines up to $200-$2,000 per day.
Other neighborhood stores will be inspected to see if health codes have been violated.
Thanks to you we have been able to get our neighborhood stores in shape.
Mel Martinez Consumer Counselor West Side Action Center
4. Every zone around a station will experience long term development. Many neighborhoods do not necessarily appreciate this impact. (The BART system in San Francisco has 52 stops and about 20 development battles on its hands, and many outlying areas are actually organizing to prevent BART's extension into their communities.)
5. Hidden costs, ranging from ugly elevated tracks and operational noise, to dislocation of poor neighborhoods and secondary business districts, delays in reaching full operational capacity. (BART is now in a $238 million lawsuit against equipment manufacturers, over 50% of its cars are in the shop, Bay Area families have paid $100 a year for almost 13 years — yet BART still does not operate at night, on weekends, or at promised holidays.
I believe what Denver needs is. an innovative and effective bus system. It is apparent that Denver is continuing with a plan to promote the Area Rapid Transit System (ART). I would hope, however, that you will reaffirm your position not to allow this elevated mass transit system to come through our residential streets, or to disrupt and destroy the Broadway commercial area-. Should RTD persist in its current posture of Broadway and/or Lincoln Streets as a corridor, instead of the Railroad Right of Way, 1 will be calling on you and your neighbors to come to a town meeting to make your voice heard.
Children's Christmas Parade
On the evening of December 1, 43 children from West Side elementary schools (Greenlee, Fairmont, and Del Pueblo) participated in a Christmas parade sponsored by Cook Bros., the Picadilly restaurant and KHOW radio station.
The evening started out with a parade through Larimer Square and then down 16th Street with the children riding on a float.
After the parade a roast beef dinner was served to the children and chaparones at the Picadilly restaurant. After dinner, Santa appeared and gave the children gifts which were down-vests from Miller Stockman.
Special consideration should go to Mel Martinez and Vickie Herrera from the West Side Action Center, and Jose Lujan, . a West Side resident who chaparoned the children. And thanks to Father Campbell from St. Joseph’s for the loan of their bus.
WHY WEST HIGH?
West High Suspension Ended
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MEETINGS SCHEDULED
Mike Reddy, director of citizen participation for the City and County of Denver, announces the following schedule of council district meetings and public hearings for the purpose of citizen participation under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act. This legislation is expected to bring Denver $44 million in Federal Funds over the next three years to develop viable urban communities by providing decent housing, a suitable environment and expanding economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income.
Public Hearings
Thursday, January 8, 7:00 p.m., Room 450, City and County Building (City Council Chambers)
^Monday, February 23, 7:00 p.m., Room 450, City and County Building (City Council Chambers)
For further information about district meetings or about procedures to be followed during the public hearings, contact Mike Reddy, 572-8121.
Dogs roaming the streets and loose have prohibited our carriers from delivering the paper the past two months. This editorial board does not wish to subject the youth who pass out our paper to dog bites, etc.
You may pick up your copy of the newspaper at Adeiante and other shops on Santa Fe Drive, churches, agencies and other community organizations.
Let us try to keep our dogs in our own yards. Dogs are often needed for our individual protection, not to harass neighbors and news boys!
At the end of November and early December, the Westside and other nearby communities were surprised and shocked that West High School had been suspended for inter-school music and sports activities by the Colorado High School Activities Association.
Now the suspension of West High School has been permanently lifted. At the December 11, 1975. meeting of the Executive Board of the Colorado High School Activities Association, West High was reinstated to the association. The board agreed that principal Edward Gallegos had taken the necessary and proper steps to correct the situation. The school's students are now eligible to participate in all inter-scholastic activities.
Coach Steve Chavez, who willfully violated the activities association ruling on eligibility, has been suspended from coaching by Superintendent Kishkunas of Denver Public Schools and has been transferred from West to another assignment.
A similar situation occurred at Kennedy High School, another Denver Public School in Bear
Valley. Coach DeTolla has also been fired from all coaching assignments. He will not be allowed to coach at Kennedy. There are still real questions about his remaining at Kennedy High School as a teacher. This paper's reporter was unaware that he had been reassigned as of the layout date.
A number of concerned parents and community leaders are presently disturbed by the difference in treatment for Kennedy and West high schools. Plans are being made to speak to the high school activities association at the next board meeting. Many are very grateful to Mr. Gallegos for getting the school reinstated for inter-scholastic activities because school spirit and enthusiasm of many youth would be dampened if they could not compete with other schools.
West High School this year is offering a wide variety of athletic, academic, and musical choices to those students who wish to be members of teams, choirs or clubs. This is a fine way to work together with students of West and to get to know students from across the city.
Older persons at the PASCO lunch program collected canned goods and money for turkeys which were given to Mullen Home. They also gave the home a basket at Thanksgiving. Westsiders help others!
Minority Projects Funded
The following youth from the West Side enjoyed the parade:
From Greenlee — Monica Joes-ten, Denise Ruiz, Jose Martinez, Oscar Colmunero, Darlene Vigil, Angela Solano, Catherine Torres, Jerry Smith, Laura Martinez, Gerald Vallejos, Kathy Gonzales, Estan Archuleta, Rebecca Orge, Norman Ruiz, Thomas Espinoza.
From Fairmont — Leroy Quin-tinilla; Danny, Willy and Charles Barnnet; Robert Martinez, Wendy Martinez, Margaret Vigil, Sammy Vigil, Patty Vigil, Robbie Archuleta, Albert Mathews, Francisco Reyna, John Thompson, Sandra Montoya, Victor Martinez, Russell Kelings.
From Del Pueblo — Carmen Belo, Linda Velasquez, Anita de-Herrera, Frances Aoyagi, Olga Gonzales, Sara deHerrera, Jose Gonzales, Sandra Montoya.
The Colorado Centennial-Bicentennial Commission presented three checks totaling $18,820 to ethnic minority projects Thursday, Dec. 18, at the Commission office. Commissioners Lincoln Baca and Juanita Gray made the check presentation.
Largest amount, $10,000, went to Loretto Heights College for its University Without Walls, Centennial-Bicentennial Scholars program. The money will match an equal amount advanced by the college to finance five scholarships for minority students who will complete work for their bachelor of arts degree in 1976.
The program will permit the student to utilize his life work experiences for partial credit. Each Centennial-Bicentennial scholar
will complete a thesis or other
We
Santa Fe Trail
major work on a Centennial-Bicentennial theme. Receiving the check on behalf of the college was the president, Adele Phelan.
A check for $4,900 went to Leslie Branch, project director for the Forum: Center for the Arts program. The Forum: Center for the Arts, located at 1570 Gilpin St., offers a daily after school program of arts instruction serving 200 minority students. Young instructors staff the program, using the arts as a means of developing relationships with children while encouraging their self expression.
Arnold Chavez, vice chairman of the Skyline Chapter, American GI Forum, received a check for $3,920 for the chapter's Un Dia Con La Raza, a cultural festival depicting the Mexican heritage, which was held at Lakeside Amusement Park last August 24.
Santa Fe Trail
430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204
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Page 2 - SANtA FE TRAIL
Alcoholism: Let's Be Aware
Over 9 million Americans drink too much and over 35 million Americans are affected by the abnormal drinking of someone close. And then there is the recent national survey which shows that 28% of the nation’s teenagers are problem drinkers. How many of these people live on the Westside?
It is a fact that many teenagers are turning from drugs to alcohol because it is both more accessible, more acceptable, and legal. How often do any of us drive past our local high school or La Alma Park and see our young people passing around either a 6 pack or a bottle? How many of us personally know people who are drunk everyday by the middle of the afternoon? How long are we going to let alcohol hurt our lives and the lives of those whom we love?
How long are we going to think drunk people are funny? Do we ever encourage our loved ones who drink too much to seek help? Do we support their attempts to help themselves when they do get help, or do we laugh at people who do not drink and think they are “sissies”? How. can we expect our youth to stop drinking when they see us adults celebrating everything we do with a drink in our hands? How can we expect them to drink responsibly when we say they are “cute” when they are drunk?
And what about those people who do want help but can’t get it because of the crime rates within our own neighborhoods? Take for example the 49-year-old man who lives in the North Lincoln Projects and was on his way to an A.A. meeting a few weeks ago. His beaten up body was found in a dumpster and he spent 3 weeks in an intensive care unit. He is now in a special hospital and may never talk again due to his many injuries. Many Senior Citizens would like to attend A.A. meetings but are afraid to go out at nights. What are any of us doing to make our community a safer and better place to live for these people?
There are many alcohol-related services available for people in the Westside who want them. There are bilingual A. A. programs around (ask for Ernie Martinez at 255-8574), the Auraria Alcohol Counseling Program (ask for Judy Bauer at 534-7614), the Denver Opportunity West Program (922-8473) and A.A. N. Lincoln (ask for Jesus Villa at 534-1427).
But before any of these services can be of use, as a community we must first become aware of the alcohol problem we have, and we must admit that it is here, and we must be willing to work at helping to get rid of it. We can do this by encouraging people who drink too much to get help for themselves. If we live with someone who has a drinking problem we can get help for ourselves (ALANON). Last, and perhaps most important, we can start setting an example for our young people by celebrating without a drink in our hands all the time. We need to show them that it is possible to have a good time without the use of a drug.
SPOT REMOVER
Scientists have discovered that alcohol will remove spots from different types of clothing. As a matter of fact alcohol will not only remove the spots from the clothing, but will also remove the clothing from the man’s back, the money from his pockets and food from his table.
It will also remove the clothing from little children and wives, furniture from the home, and will if its use is continual remove the man from society and will eventually remove to a Christless grave.
In fact, alcohol is the greatest remover known to man.
Commodity Recipes
Stretching a dollar these days is getting harder and harder. The Colorado State University Extension Service is helping folks in the community make their money go further.
Generally most people are interested in meal planning, food preparation, food buying, budgeting and using commodity foods.
These program assistants use whatever methods they feel will be effective to meet the needs of an individual or family. This could range from working with a client over a period of weeks or months through a series of home visits to organizing a group of interested individuals in an informal setting to learn more about a particular topic.
Milk should be an important part of everyone’s diet whether a preschooler or a senior citizen. The powdered milk which is distributed as a supplemental food is frequently pushed to the back of the shelf because people feel uncomfortable using it.
With this powdered milk, however, an inexpensive hot cocoa mix can be prepared.
HOT COCOA MIX 7 cups dry milk 1 cup sugar 1 cup cocoa 1 teaspoon salt
Add four heaping spoonfuls of the mix to a cup of boiling water. It tastes as delicious as any ready-to-use cocoa mix, and it is much aheaper.
Announcing the Opening of the
Rocky Mountain Family Practice Center
Leland E. Warren Division
875 Kalamath Street
Telephone: 572-1448
An Outpatient Unit of Rocky Mountain Hospital (An Osteopathic Institution)
HOURS:
10:00 a.m. -12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. 7 days per week
Rocky Mountain Physicians, P.C. Thomas M. Laughlin, D.O. John E. Raeder, D.O. Jay A. Swedloff, D.O.

w.
Santa Fe Trail
]
Resident of the Month:
by Pat Barajas
Home fudgesicles can also be made from this mix. Combine 3A cup mix with 2 cups boiling water. Pour into an ice cube tray. Place wooden popsicle sticks or plastic spoons in each case. Freze.
For those who dislike the taste of milk made from the powder, try Jello-Milk.
JELLO-MILK l Vs cups dry milk 1 small (3 oz.) pkg. Jello 4 cups water
Shake all ingredients in a jar or blend in a blender. Another variation is an Orange Chiller.
ORANGE CHILLER IV3 cups dry milk 1 can (6 oz.) orange juice concentrate
4 cups water
Shake all ingredients in a jar or blend in a blender. With the sweetness of the Jello and the orange concentrate, it is difficult to distinguish the dry milk flavor in either of these drinks. For those on the run each morning, an orange chiller provides a quick start.
Another just as easy idea provides a complete meal.
MEAL-IN-A-GLASS 1 cup water
5 T. dry milk
1 egg
2 graham crackers, crushed
1 teaspoon sugar
2 T. orange juice concentrate
Mix with a beater or a blender.
Pour in glass and drink.
I
VVestside ^jewsJ^J EDITORIAL BOARD
Chock Garcia, president; Becky Garcia, vice president; Sr. Rene Weeks, treasurer; Brice Balmer. editor; Flora Gasser, Ross Brito, Judy Bauer.
Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause.
The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsabiiity for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is also understood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail against all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy.
All correspondence can be sent to:
SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 892-1039
Senate Bill 1 Is Bad for Poor
“Senate Bill 1 is a monstrosity such ' as was ever introduced in the Con-. gressional halls of our United States.” (Patrick E. Gorman, Secty. Treas., Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen)
“S.l is a bill which is unamendable — it needs to be killed, for under the protection of law the dark days of the Nixon years could return again with possible disastrous consequences. yv (United Steelworkers of America, published in STEEL LABOR)
■ ’ The' U-.S; Congress is now considering a 753 page law called Senate Bill 1 (S.l) which is supposed to reform the U.S. Criminal Code. This so-called reform is an attack on poor and working class Chicanos, poor and working class Blacks, and on poor and working class people as a whole. At the same time it will make it legal for the rich and for politicians to continue criminal activities such as Watergate. S.l takes away rights and freedoms such as freedom of the press, freedom of assembly, freedom to advocate change, and freedom to petition which are guaranteed under the U.S. Constitution.
Let’s take a look at some of the parts of S.l which are particularly threatening to the rights and freedoms of poor and working class people:
SUPPRESSION OF THE NEWS: Supression of the news for “reasons of national security” could become routine if S.l passes. Journalists receiving classified material would be required to turn it over to the government immediately and furnish the identity of the person who leaked it. Penalties are 7 years in jail and $100,000 fine to reporters, editors, or publishers involved. This violates the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution which guarantees the right of the public to know everything of importance which occurs within the government.
Michael and Irene Zuniga
‘All the children deserve Headstart experience. Both of us believe in the program, not only for our Michael, but for all the children of our race and all groups of people.” These are the very strong feelings of Michael and Irene Zuniga, who live on Fox Street here in the Westside.
Irene Zuniga serves on the policy committee for Auraria Headstart as an at-large member. Their son Michael was in Headstart last year and she served on the committee as a parent. Although she feels it is important to be very involved with her son’s activities at Del Pueblo, she wants to continue supporting and working with Headstart.
Michael and Michael Junior don’t always get the supper right on time, but they both know that the energies of their mother and their family are going for other people and important concerns.
“All people should be proud and self-confident; all children should be able to make it in school and later in life without some of the struggles I had to go through,” said Michael as he talked about his frustrating experiences in the public schools. He has been impressed with the amount of staff who help children with special concerns or problems like speech, hearing, gross' and fine motor development and health. If he had had these people helping him as a child, he’d be better off too.
Michael has worked for the City and County of Denver for several years and just received a promotion
PUBLIC DUTY: S.l will prohibit prosecution of “public, servants” for wrongdoings if illegal conduct is the result of “mistaken” belief that it was “required or authorized” or based on “written interpretation issued by the head of a government agency.” This sets a low standard of conduct for every federal employee from the President on down. It protects officials by relieving them of responsibility for. actions. This law is an invitation to federal employees to commit crimes without fear of prosecution.
WIRETAPPING: S.l allows wiretapping where “a danger to the structure” of the government is involved. S.l increases the areas where wiretapping is permitted. It directs landlords and telephone companies to cooperate with the government wiretappers and provides for payments for this cooperation.
DEMONSTRATIONS: Nearly every kind of civil rights, peace, and other protest action would be threatened with severe penalties. S.l makes physical interference with federal functioning a felony. This could be used against virtually every demonstration.
in the Traffic Engineering department this past year. Before that he worked for eleven years at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Samsonite. He has had to work since he was twelve years old and his father needed him on the farm to help with the work there.
Before they were married, Irene worked in a restaurant and then was a receptionist at the Westside Health Center for three years. They were married in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church on May 16th, 1970.
Both Michael and Irene have common interests. First priority is their home and their son, Michael. They have also helped Irene’s mother during the past several years as she lived with them. Michael and Irene feel that it is important that they do things together and that both Michaels have time to be together as father and son. Right now there isn’t much time for hunting, fishing, and other activities but that is a love that father wants to teach son.
“Many parents and adults say they are too tired or that it’s too much hassle to work in the schools and the Headstarts. We need more people in our community helping others and helping around the neighborhood.” Both Irene and Michael Zuniga hope that more and more parents will become involved with the schools and community groups, for the good of the neighborhood and for the good of all the children.
Las Posadas was celebrated at many times this Christmas season in the Westside. This celebration was sponsored by Westside Action Ministry and Auraria Community Center on Sunday, December 21st.
El Libro Que Responde A La Necesidad Fundamental De La Humanidad
Cual es? Si bien es cierto que la gente doquier anhela sentir que se le ama, todos los grandes profetas y maestros de la Biblia nos dicen que la necesidad mas grande es amar a Dios — con todo el corazon y con toda el alma y con toda la mente. Cuando sentifnos este amor por Dios, empe-zamos a percibir que El nos ama y nos cuida, eterna y compasivamente.
El Heraldo de la Ciencia Cristiana ayuda a discernir como amar a Dios total y completamente. Amamos a Dios mas al comprenderlo mejor. Los' articulos en el Heraldo ayudan a explicar la curacion por la oracion a Dios. Pueden cambiar su punto de vista hacia la vida.
Usted puede obtener un ejemplar libre en espanol. ENVIE ESTE CUPON SIN COMPROMISO A
Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist 3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colo. 80211
Por favor mandeme mi ejemplar libre del Heraldo de la Ciencia Cristiana.
Nombre__________________
Direccion________________________
Ciudad___________________________
Estado_______________Zip_________


SCHOOL NEWS
FAIRMONT SCHOOL NEWS WEST HIGH SCHOOL
During the month of November the Student Council and students of Fairmont School held a canned food drive to help fill Christmas baskets for needy families on the Westside. The overwhelming amount of 918 cans and other non-perishable foods were brought to school. We are very proud of the fine way our Fairmont students have helped the people of their community.
All classes brought many cans, but the largest number was brought by Miss Moore’s 5th and 6th grade classes. These boys and girls were given a small prize to reward them for their extra hard The Westside Action Center picked up all the food donated and distributed food baskets to needy families on the Westside during the holidays.
Parent-teacher conferences were held at Fairmont in November. We were pleased that so many parents could attend either the afternoon or evening conferences. We would like to remind parents that they should feel free to call their child’s teacher for a conference at any time during the school year. This is one of the better ways to find out how children are doing in school. It also shows your child that you really do care.
The Fairmont Parent Advisory Group has met various times since September. We are always pleased to have parents become involved and take the opportunity to give their feelings and help their school. The next meetings of the Parent Advisory Group will be on January 7th at 2:00 p.m. and on January 22nd from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Both meetings will be held in the school auditorium. Please plan to attend and become active in your school.
The holiday season made December a special month with many special activities. The boys and girls decorated two Christmas trees which were in the halls for all to enjoy. Many • classrooms also • had their own decorated trees. Auditorium programs were given by the Fairmont School Choir, the Spanish Choir, the Second Grade Choir, the Kindergarten Choir, and Instrumental Music classes. Bulletin boards and showcases were decorated with many examples of the children’s holiday artwork.
At the beginning of the New Year, we at Fairmont wish you the very best and prosperous New Year.
Monday through Thursday evenings there are many, many cars parked around West High School but few people from the Westside have ever known wh£t is going on at the high school.
In the evenings West High School is an extension of Emily Griffith Opportunity School and provides space for instruction for registered apprenticeship classes. The trades which conduct classes at West are: carpenters, boilermakers, glaziers, ironworkers, machinists, and roofers.
The apprentices enrolled in these classes work at their trades during the day and attend the related classes one or two nights a week depending on the requirements of their trades. A person must be an apprentice in the trade to enter the class.
For more information about evening classes at West High, interested persons can call Opportunity School at 1250 Welton (572-8218). There are some classes which are for non-union persons.
This year Community College of Denver and Metro State College are offering some of their clasps at West. A person enrolls for these classes just as for classes during the day, but you do not need to be a member of the union or any other organization for these classes. To obtain more information, call either Community College of Denver or Metro State College.
The gym is being used this year for adult league basketball. Ernie Rossie has the information about these leagues.
BAKER NEWS
NOCHE ALEGRE One of the highlights of the Noche Alegre celebration was two songs .sung in Italian by Teresa .Harper, the raide for Mrs. Riyera’s bilingual class. Ms. Harper studied Spanish at the Universidad Michoa-cana and Italian at Fleming College in Florence, Italy. She returned to the U.S. last March and found herself rather disoriented. However, she feels she has found a real niche at Baker tutoring Spanishspeaking students.
Another person working with Mrs. Rivera’s class in preparation for certification is Minnie Baldwin who brings to the class interesting ideas from her travels, places like Brussels, Belgium, Seattle, Washington, and Kansas City.
Congresswoman Pat Schroeder was at the Westside Action Center on December 23rd to help with the Christmas baskets and talk with community people. Irene Atwell, vice chairperson of the Action Center, greeted Ms. Schroeder.
Wishing You a
Prosperous and Happy New Year UNION BANK & TRUST
1st & Broadway 744-3221
YOUTH ADVOCACY
ANEW SERIES
Several months ago the Southwest Denver Youth Services Bureau began circulating questionnaires nation-wide in order to determine from youth and youth workers what their perceptions were regarding the highest priority problems confronting youth today.
The answers to these questionnaires formed the basis of a Youth Advocacy Handbook which was distributed to one thousand persons attending the National Conference on Delinquency Prevention, held in New York in October of 1975.
Persons attending the conference developed several issues additional to those in the Youth Advocacy Handbook. A total of twelve major issues were developed and endorsed by the conference.
Beginning in this issue of The Santa Fe Trail is part one of a six-part series of articles describing these issues.
Each article will describe the current problem situation, the specific elements of the problem, and advocacy goals to reduce or remove the problem.
BAKER NEWS
Flying paper airplanes may seem to be a frivolous pastime for mischievous students in the classroom. However, it became a serious business early in December, when students in the science classes at Baker undertook entry in the Wright Brothers Foundation Aeronautical Contest sponsored by McDonald Hamburgers. Baker youngsters put together some of the 2000 unassembled planes distributed for the contest and put them to flight in competition with each other.
Level one winners were Ernie Rojas, Steve Powell, Gus Linde-mann, Derrick Ford, Paul Flickin-ger, Karl Hruza, Re.nate Robey, Russell Binkowski, Karen Burman, Steve Shopket,. Trent OliverAlfred Camacho, Pat Klaus, Robin Peterson, Keith Kelton. All 15 of these proceeded to level two, where Gus Lindemann gained first rank with a flight time of 8.4 seconds. All pupils who reached first level received a certificate for a McDonald hamburger; all second level competitors received a free hamburger, a coke, french fries, and a T-shirt. Gus Lindemann, who went to the finals on December 15 and won third place, received a 10 speed bike, an over the shoulder tote and a McDonald’s big meal. Pupils who participated also helped the school because Baker as a result of winning third place will get $50 to spend on science equipment.
The Parent Advisory Committee will meet January 22 at 12:45 p.m. in Baker Jr. High Social Room. If your son or daughter is in either or both the Math or Reading Labs, we need your involvement in order to keep these programs.
Los Padres de los estudiantes en ESEA van a tener un mitin el 22 de enero a las 12:45 en la tarde en la escuela Baker en el cuarto 103. Si sus hijos estan en et lab de mate-maticas, de Leer, vengan uds. Por favor.
The ESEA Math and Reading Labs would like to welcome our new aides for this year. Shelly Trujillo is currently working in the Math Lab. Shelly is a graduate of West High, Class of *75, where she received several awards in art including the Principal’s Award, Alumni Award, and the Denver Art Museum Award. Shelly was recently married to Frank Trujillo, a former Bakerite and West High graduate. Shelly has plans to become a teacher in art on the secondary level. Rosalie Davis is the new aide in Reading. Rosalie, also a West High graduate of *73 and a former student at Baker, enjoys working with students in the Reading Lab and also outside of school. She has started a Girls Gub, working with 5th grade girls from Del Pueblo. Rosalie would like to become a Reading teacher at the elementary level.
YOUTH ADVOCACY PARTI A. YOUNG PEOPLE AND ALCOHOL Current Situation:
Various studies have indicated that experimentation with alcohol has become almost universaj among junior high and high schoo' students; that the number of regular drinkers, the quantity of alcohol consumed, and the frequency of use in this population increases proportionately with age; and that these trends have been accelerating in recent years.
A significant number of these young drinkers are misusing alcohol in ways that often disrupt their lives and threaten the health and safety of themselves and others. Misuse is documented by the increasing number of arrests of drunk driving fatalities involving youths and a rising number of arrests of youths for alcohol related offenses.
Elements of the Problem:
• Effective methods have not yet been developed which can assist in identifying youthful alcohol abusers before they have a full-blown alcohol problem.
• Though it is recognized that youthful alcohol abusers have a negative influence on their friends, there are not enough relevant treatment services available to youth who need attention.
• Youth-serving professionals (including mental health, youth services, social services, probation, etc.) do not have adequate training or expertise to identify/detect existence of substance abuse problems; and further, do not incorporate the substance abuse dynamic as a part of their treatment and/or service delivery.
• Alcohol “education” programs which emphasize “scare” tactics and “morals” simply do not work.
• Though it is well-recognized that
children of alcoholics have a higher risk of alcohol misuse than the general youth population, adult treatment programs tire inadequately staffed, trained and motivated to focus on the alcoholic’s children prior to their being in need of “treatment”. . „ ^ /
• Federal agencies aird prfvate organizations which deal with “substance” abuse (alcohol; other drugs) are inappropriately separated, thus disallowing for crossfertilization of ideas and comprehensive treatment and education services.
Advocacy Goals:
• Development of effective screening and detection methods‘ to identify youthful alcohol abusers and high-risk potential alcohol abusers.
• Development of a comprehensive network of treatment services for youthful alcohol abusers at federal, state and local levels.
• Development of comprehensive in-service training programs for all youth-serving professionals to assist them in detecting youthful alcohol abusers and developing treatment approaches responsive to the dynamics of substance abuse.
• Development and implementation of effective alcohol education
i programs which emphasize decision-making and allow for distinctions between alcohol use and abuse.
• Legislation mandating that all federal agencies which fund adult alcoholism treatment programs provide for research focused on, and services to, the children of clients receiving treatment.
• Federal agencies, specifically NI-AAA and NIDA, must combine,into a single agency and be held accountable for developing and providing comprehensive treatment and educational services to “substance” abusers.
Student of
the Month:
Denise Perez
Denise Perez is an example of a student with the school spirit that is found at St. Joe's. She is actively involved in sports, Student Council, and Mexican Dancing.
In the 2,/a years she has been at St. Joe’s, Denise has become one of the most responsible and outgoing students. She helped organize the recent slave day at school. She also was in charge of getting outdoor equipment for the playground.
For the past three years, she has participated in the Mexican Dancing Group at St. Joe’s. In January Denise will be traveling with the group to Boston to perform.
Among her favorite subjects in seventh grade this year, Denise lists spelling, reading, and social studies. In reading one of her recent projects was to make a -puppet stage and puppets and have them perform a story she created.
Some of her interests outside school include hiolding and painting ceramic figures, and writing to pen pals in other states and other countries.
Denise has a brother, Edward, who also attends St. Joe’s, and a younger sister, Bernadette, who attends pre-school at Del Pueblo. Also, Denise’s mother is involved in the math tutoring program at St. Joe’s.
§t. Joe’s is fortunate to ha^p a student like Denise, and luckily she will be at St. Joe’s for another year and a half.
WHS Gym Dedicated
West High School’s first league basketball game (West vs. George Washington) Friday, December 12, 1975, was the occasion for the inauguration of the school’s new gymnasium facility. The Master of Ceremonies, student Billy Rendon, dedicated the gym to the West High community and noted how proud both the school and community are to have such a fine facility located in the area. Vice-Principal, Dr. Travis Taylor acting on behalf of Mr. Edward Gallegos, West High Principal, introduced community leaders who were honored guests: State Representative, Richard Castro; Manuel Martinez, Director of Brothers Redevelopment; RFK Recreation Center Director, Nick Arguello; Denver Inner City Parish Director, Jerry Garcia; and Tony Salazar, Principal of Baker Junior High School.
The West High Pom Pons and Cheerleaders supported by the Pep Club presented a colorful half-time show involving dances and cheers, and ending with the traditional “On West Denver.”
Since the building of the facility, many sports activities as well as other student-related activities can be hosted at the school, which allows for more student body and staff participation and community
Dear Santa, I’ve been as good as a cream puff. And I want star-trek, and I want Evel Knievel and General Erkel from Planet of the Apes. Love, Patrick (Vigil, age 5) Dear Santa, I was a good girl. And now I want a sunshine family and a bicycle, and a pinata for my very own self arid my brother, and that’s all I want. Love, Kim (Baca,
fcg£ 41_________________________.
support.___________________________
Dear Santa, I love you. I wish you give me different toys. And I’m going to tell you that I am going bananas. Love, Jeremy (Bates, age 4)
Dear Santa, I've been a good boy. I want a playhorse, and a toy man on a horse, and a pop truck from K-Mart, and some crayons. Love, Manuel (Hinojosa, 5)


Hours
Sundays
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FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS SELDOM SERVICE SHOP UNDER THE BRIGHT SKII
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• Pan Dulce • Patas de Res
February • Chicharrones • Patas de Marrano
• Requeson •Manteca
Will Be • Menudo • Drejas de Marrano
Our 4th • Chorizo • Cabeza de Marrano
• Choc. Ibarra • Rinones
Anniversary • Hojas Tamaleras • Lengua de Res
• Cabeza de Borrego • Costillas de Cordero • Cesos ?

TIENDA
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We Welcome U.S.D.A. Food Coupons*
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LINE OF
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• Higado
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• Cola de Res
• Chaquegue
• Mole Poblano
• Chile Caribe
• Nopalitos
• Chyletas de Cordero
• Sopaipilla Mix -
• H aba's
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Watch for our
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CHURCH NEWS
ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado 80204 Fr. Andrew Meiners, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl Schwarz Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Thomas Ryan MASSES
12:10 and 6:00 p.m. Sat.
7:00, 8:30, 10:00 (Spanish, st&irs)
10:00 (English, hall)
12:00 noon
NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST)
325 W. Irvington Place
Don Davis, Pastor
Jerry McCormick, Assoc. Pastor
SERVICES
Worship, 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Meeting, 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p.m.
CLUB PROGRAM Boy’s Club,
Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.
Girl’s Club,
Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
ST. ELIZABETH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
1060 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204
MASSES
Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:00, 5:00
LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER
215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky,
Older Persons Ministry
SERVICES
Sunday: Worship service and Sunday School UP' from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.
CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL)
126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor
SERVICES Sunday —
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon
Wednesday —
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion
SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
1230 Decatur - 825-0121 Lou Roossien, Pastor John Algera, Intern Pastor (1039 Bryant - 893-5753)
Lupe Rodriguez, Social Worker
.Sunday School, 10:00 a.m. Worship, 11:00 a.m.
Monday, Cadets at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday —
Adult Bible Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up), 7:30 Friday — Teen Lounge, 8:30 p.m. •
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH
CONFESSIONS
Daily — before 12:15 Mass
Saturday — 4:00 to 5:00
PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA (del Sor)
910 Kalamath - Phone 825-7497 Rev. Job Maldonado, Pastor
Sundays:
10:00 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship Service 6:00 p.m. Church Training 7:00 p.m. Evening Service
ST. CAJETaN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
Stuart & Alameda Denver, Colorado 80219 James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor
430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister
Morning Worship, 9:00 a.m.
„ Church School, 10.-00 a.m- *
3-4 £ ^ > a -j” >- v s
M S
Various adult groups meet weekly.
For more information call 892-1038
WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
West 5th and Galapago Jim Harris, Minister Jack Calderon, Associate
Sunday School — 10:00 a.m. Worship Service — 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service (Spanish) —
7:00 p.m.
MASSES
Saturday evening, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:Q0 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00 (Spanish), 7:00 p.m. Weekdays, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish)
FOURTH CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colorado
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN
120 West First Ave.
777-5325
Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. A. J. Blomquist, Pastor Rev. Moicelio Cruz, Asst. Pastor
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship, 11 ’00 a.m.
Worship Services —
Sunday (English) 11:00 a.m. Sunday (Spanish) 4:00 p.m.
Services weekly in English Sunday 11:00 a.m.
Servicios en Espanol Domingo
primer y tercer — 4:00 p.m. Escuela dominical a la misma hora
“AZTECS” — PROUD TO BE ONE
Practice makes perfect, as Christine Berg, Joann Martinez, Joani Flores, Pamela Martinez and Anna Martinez work on their cheers. These girls got together, worked all night sewing their uniforms and then went out and :heered the Senior “A’s” football team “Aztecs” to an impressive ictory!
BAPTISMS
AT ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH Nov. 22,1975
Bonificio Ruben Armijo, son of Anthony and Mary Armijo. Godparents - Zeke and Cecilia Perez.
Nov. 23,1975
Crystal Ann Cothran, daughter of James and Alice Cothran. Godparents - Rick Cothran and Margie Quintana.
Jessica Yolanda Martinez, daughter of Orlando and Mary Ann Martinez. Godparents - Joe and Cordelia Martinez.
Nov. 30,1975
DeAnna Correen Martinez, daughter of Narciso and Jennie Martinez. Godparents - Lawrence and Cora Autoubee. Proxy-Godparents — Jesus Castor and Margaret Gonzales.
Dec. 7,1975
Theodore Leroy Elizalde, son of Theodore and Linda Elizalde. Godparents - Andrew and Virginia Puente.
Regina Rose Jovita Garcia, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Garcia. Godparents - Albert Garcia and Roseann Aragon.
Damian Isaiah Sailas, son of James and Bernadette Sailas. Godparents - Gerardino Gonzales and Margo Abeyta.
FIRST COMMUNION AT ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH
Dec. 7,1975
John Edward Aragon, son of Rimmie and Rosana Aragon.
John Gallegos, son of Ray and Esther Gallegos.
Bianca Gonzales, daughter of Julian and Maria Gonzalez.
Dec. 14,1975
Christopher Gallegos, son of Elmo and Gloria Gallegos.
Stephanie Gallegos, daughter of Elmo and Gloria Gallegos.
Teacher of the Month:
Mary Lee Philips
“The whole art of teaching is only Mary Lee is a real-life example of the art of awakening the natural Fairmont’s bilingual-bicultural pro-cariosity of young adults for the gram, as she speaks Spanish and purpose of satisfying it after- French fluently, and English im-wards.” peccably. Her teaching assignment
is a combination of classroom At Fairmont Elementary School teacher of Grade 5 and a reading there is a teacher who has the specialist in the High Intensity happy gift of the “whole art of Learning Systems reading proteaching.” She is Mary Lee Phil- gram. Under her supervision, the lips, and in the seven years she has HILS laboratory at Fairmont School taught at Fairmont she has touched has become a model for other the lives of your children in a way schools in the Denver system, which they remember fondly and When asked about her “favorite use productively. subject,” she replied without a
Miss Phillips, who was born and second’s hesitation, “Language!” raised in Kearny, New Jersey, This is true, but if you had the received her Bachelor of Arts chance to follow her through a degree from the University of school day, you would realize that Denver. She decided to remain in she gives of herself in many other our part of the country when she directions. The Coro Espanol is a started her teaching career. There favorite of all the children who sing are many reasons why a young man in the Spanish Choir, under Mary or woman chooses teaching as a Lee’s direction. The choir is also a profession, but to Mary Lee favorite of the entire Fairmont Phillips, one of its greatest rewards staff, as each member is serenaded is the opportunity to “share ideas by the children on his or her birth-with kids, because they are so day.
honest.” Apart from her teaching activi-
ties, she plays guitar, sings with the Mariachis de Colores, and enjoys “hiking, reading, watching ,n-Star Trek,: and sleeping/,’ ml -i
r It is with real pride and appreciation that the Santa Fe Trail salutes Mary Lee Phillips, one of our neighborhood’s outstanding young teachers.
“Letters to Santa” were from children at the Westside Child Care Center, 55 Elati. Thanks to the staff and children for making these gems available to the paper.
Articles and classified advertising must be into the office by Wednesday, January 21st. Advertisements must be in on Friday, January 23rd. The newspaper will be laid out on January 26th and be distributed January 29th - 31st.
Brother Tom Leaves St. Joe
Brother Tom Sanhuber will probably be leaving St. Joseph’s Church around the first of the year. He has not yet received his letter of transfer and isn’t particularly looking forward to leaving St. Joe’s and the Westside where he knows many people and has served so well for a number of years.
He will be going to Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, to work in a retirement home for priests arid brothers of the Redemptorist Order. The home also serves as a training ground for priests and brothers who are in the novitiate.
In addition to working with the staff at St. Joseph’s Church, Brother Tom knew most of the youth that attended the school and many worked with him to help clean the church or to assist in the mass. During the 12 years, Brother Tom has worked under five pastors.
His replacement will be Brother Allan Rudnitzki who started six weeks ago. The Westside will miss Brother Tom, but now welcomes Brother Allan and hopes that he will feel at home here and will become the friend of people as did Brother Tom.
Not everything about St. Joseph’s church and school has changed in 12 years, but Brother Tom Sanhuber can point to several signficant changes during his time in the Westside.
Most recently the church sanctuary was redecorated and repainted with Brother Tom in charge and doing most of the work. This has given the place a new look and has been much appreciated by many worshippers.
The high school is no longer in existence which is a very important change for the person in charge of maintenance. Also the new. addition to the high school building, which is now used by the junior high school students, was built within the last 12 years.
Dear Santa, I want a Baby Alive, fingernail polish, a doll you can pul makeup on, some plates, books, a weigher, a little Christmas tree, and a star. I am a good girl. Missy (Anderson, age 5)
Dear Santa, I have been a good girl. I want a baby alive, a buggy, and a wagon, and some clothes and snow boots. Raeann (Salas, age 5)
DO YOU QUALIFY TO BUY A HOME FOR 5% DOWN PAYMENT?
1024 Lipan Street, 2 story, 5 bedrooms, Price $15,000.00. Zone R2
842 Kalamath Street, 1 story,
4 rooms, Price 10,000.00. Zone R2
1259 Santa Fe Drive, 2 story, 3 units, price $16,500.00.
Zone B8
THE RICHARDS REALTY COMPANY
5 East 4th Ave. • 744-0073
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ARTICLES
JOHN P. DALEIDEN CO 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver, Colorado 80204
534-8233 FREE PARKING


SNOITAZINUMMI
“SNOITAZ1NUMMI** is “immunizations’* spelled backward. But so what? The "so what’* is that without immunizations, serious diseases can occur. Diphtheria can choke children to death; whooping cough will kill 70% of the children under 1 who contract the disease; polio can still paralyze and kill unprotected children; and rubella may cause severely crippled babies.
Westside residents, as well as all parents, should be concerned about all of these diseases and should make sure that their children have the proper immunizations. What do you, as a parent, need to know?
Diphtheria — Tetanus — Pertussis — First Signs: Diphtheria and pertussis cause sore throat, fever, cold, and cough. Tetanus or lockjaw causes fever, complications, and convulsions. Doctor’s supervision needed. Prevention: Vaccine given at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 18 weeks, 18 months, 3*/2 years, 12-14 years. (Shot at each age.) Diphtheria and tetanus every 10 years.
Measles — Fever; hard dry cough; running nose and red rash which starts at hair line and spreads down in patches. Small red patches with white center located in mouth. Consult physician because the seriousness of the disease is different in each case. Prevention: Vaccine at 1 year (12 months).
Mumps — First Signs: Fever, headache, vomiting. Glands near ear and toward chin at jaw line ache and have painful swelling. Keep child in bed until fever stops. Keep inside unless weather is warm. Prevention: Vaccine at 1 year (12 months).
Polio — First Signs: Slight fever, general discomfort, headache, stiff back. Hospital care required. Prevention: Sabin vaccine given at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, 18 months, 3*/2 years. (Oral dose given at each age.)
Rubella (German Measles or 3-Day Measles) — First Signs: Mild fever, sore throat or cold may come before tiny rose-colored rash. Enlarged glands at back of neck and behind ears. Give general good care and rest. Prevention: Vaccine given at 1 year (12 months of age).
As you can see, all of the above diseases have vaccines (shots) that can be given to prevent your child from getting these diseases. The West Side Health District (West Side Health Center, Mariposa Health Station, Casita Esperanza Health Station, Westwood Health Station, and La Casa de Salute Health Station) is concerned about children and their immunizations. We have the staff and vaccines available for your use.
Why don’t you make sure that your children are properly immunized. Check with your doctor or nurse the next time you visit your health facility. Immunize and help to stop these harmful diseases.
DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY HAS LOW RENT HOUSING AVAILABLE
9 a.m. - 3 p.m. For Appointments 1425 Kalamath
On Dec. 18 the Denver Housing Authority will be accepting appointments for applications for certification in the Section 8 Existing Housing Program. Appointments can be made between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and every Tuesday and Thursday thereafter at the same times.
Appointments must be made in person for only the Existing Housing Program. Applicants will not lose their place on other public housing waiting lists.
This is a rent supplement program of 200 subsidized units for the year 1976 and includes assistance for units presently occupied by families.
The Denver Housing Authority also has other low rent housing units immediately available for qualified families.
An Equal Housing Opportunity
*
THE HEROIN OVERDOSE MYSTERY
A book that should be required reading for everyone is licit & Illicit Drugs by Edward M. Brecher and the Editors of Consumer Reports. One critic says it is a book for anyone who uses drugs or may potentially use them — and that includes just about all of us. One chapter of special interest to those who are aware of today’s scene deals with the "Heroin Overdose" mystery, which is described as a myth. Mr. Brecher says that there is no such thing as an "overdose death,’* rather that this has become a synonym for "Cause of Death Unknown". He cites six separate instances where research by Dr. Michael M. Baden, Deputy Chief Medical Examiner, New York City, presents evidence which overturns the "Heroin Overdose Theory’*: (1) When the packets of heroin found near the bodies of dead addicts are examined, they do not differ from ordinary packets. No qualitative or quantitative differences are found. This rules out-the possibility that some incredibly stupid processor may have filled a bag with pure heroin instead of the usual adulterated mix; (2) when the syringes used by addicts immedi-atedly before dying are examined, the mixture found in them does not contain more heroin than usual, (3) When the urine of addicts allegedly dead of overdose is analyzed, there is no evidence of overdose; (4) The tissues surrounding the site of the fatal injection show no signs of high heroin concentration; (5) Neophytes unaccustomed to heroin rather than addicts tolerant to opiates would be expected to be susceptible to death from overdose. Almost all of those dying of alleged "overdose" are long time users; (6) Addicts often "shoot" in a group, all using the same heroin supply and rarely does more than one addict die at such* a time.
Mr. Brecher points out that the above refutations of the overdose theory should have led to warning addicts that something other than "overdose" is causing hundreds $f addicts deaths annually and an intensive search for the true cause of these deaths should have been initiated. Since neither of these steps has been taken, the media go right on talking about "heroin overdose deaths".
Mr. Brecher suggests that even in cases where an addict takes an excessive dose, death usually can be prevented. During the minutes or hours following the injection of a potentially fatal overdose, death can be forestalled by administering an effective antidote: a narcotic antagonist known as nalorphine (Nalline). Nalorphine brings the victim of opiate overdose out of his stupor or coma within a few minutes. Since there is plenty of time and since nalorphine is stocked in pharmacies and hospital emergency rooms throughout the country, the death of anyone due to heroin overdose is rarely excusable.
If the reader finds himself involved in a situation where he must render emergency service to someone suffering from "overdose of heroin" there are some techniques which may help: (1) By placing ice on the addict’s groin or filling a bath tub with ice water and submerging the addict in it; (2) By walking the addict at a constant pace, talking him down, etc.; (3) By keeping the addict awake, keeping a close watch that his eyes do not start to roll back; (4) The most important is to get the addict to a hospital for medical attention.
Readers who are interested in further information or assistance in dealing with drug-related problems should call the Auraria Community Center Drug Free Educational Program .(534-7614) and ask for Minerva Antuna or Dave Ortiz.
Dear Santa, I have been a good girl. I want a big wheel for Christmas, Love you, Deseree (Buettner, 5)
Dear Santa, I have been a good girl. I want a Barbie doll with clothes, and some shoes for my Barbie doll, and some clothes and records for myself. Deedra (Tru-jillo, 6)____ , , .
Joan Infante leads the Tae-Kwon-Do classes In Auraria's gym. For more Information call 534-7614.
Karate at Auraria
The Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street, has opened a new recreation program to young people on the Westside. In addition to its wide range of activities, Auraria now offers Tae-Kwon-Do (the Korean form of the martial arts). Classes are free to all youth, and are instructed by Juan Infante, (First Dan) Black Belt, who is affiliated with Kim’s Tae-Kwon-Do Institute.
Two months ago, Juan offered to teach, free of charge, a class at the Center. The program became so popular that he now teaches two classes each Tuesday and Thursday.
Mr. Infante says Tae-Kwon-Do teaches discipline and self-confidence, adding that he’s glad to be doing something for the young people. Juan began training five years ago, receiving his Black
AMIGO
If you think that your manner of drinking is causing you inconvenience, if you have reached the point that it’s bothering you, maybe you would be interested in knowing more details concerning "Alcoholics Anonymous" and its programs of recovery; visit us.
Monday nites, 7:30 p.m., West-side Neighborhood Health Ginic, 10th and Federal, Rm. 214. Beginners Meeting: It’s Bilingual — Spanish - English. Call Ernie Martinez at 255-8574.
Belt earlier this year. His son. Little John, also received his Black Belt this year, and helps with the class, as Juan’s wife and two daughters.
Under the direction of Bert Martinez, Assistant Director of the Center, Tae-Kwon-Do has gone from a temporary program to permanent classes for children 6 to 11 years of age each Tuesday and Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., and an advanced classes on the wme two days, following the children’s classes.
Plans are now being made for the first part of the year, to begin demonstrations in fighting forms, breaking techniques, and Tae-Kwon-Do patterns.
Anyone interested in the Center’s Tae-Kwon-Do Program is invited to come watch a work out.
^Dea^Santallnav^Tee^^oS boy. I want a racing car. I want a coloring book, and a hat for Christ mas and that’s all. I love you Santa. Michael (Maestas, 5)
Dear Santa, I’ve been good. I want Evil Kneivel and I guess I want a racing car, and a fire truck with a ladder. Love, Jamie (Ema-miurch, 4)
Dear Santa, I’ve been a good joy. I want a Evil Kneivel, and a Star Trek, and a training wheel bike, and a Planet of the Apes.
Do You Qualify?
Supplemental Security Income is a Federal program that pays monthly checks to people in financial need who are age 65 or older and to needy people at any age who are blind or disabled.
The aim of the program is to provide monthly checks so that anyone who is 65 or older or blind or disabled can have a basic cash income. The amount is $157.70 monthly for one person or $236.60 for a married coupleY
This does not mean that every eligible person gets this amount in his Supplemental Security Income (SSI) check every month. Some people get less because they already have other income. Some people get more than these a -mounts because they live in a state that adds money to the Federal payment.
In most states, a person who is eligible for SSI also qualifies for Medicaid and other social services provided by the state. In Colorado, people who are on SSI usually receive a small supplemental check from the county they live in, and also are entitled to Medicaid.
People whose monthly income is under $180 and who have savings of less than $1,500 may qualify for SSI, depending on whether other requirements are met.
Eligibility based on blindness or disability depends on the severity of the applicant’s condition. To be considered disabled, a person must be unable to do substantial gainful work because of an impairment which is expected to last at least 12 months or result in death.
Blindness is defined as 20/200 or less in the better eye with a corrective lens, or visual field restriction (tunnel vision) of 20 degrees or less.
People who think they may qualify for SSI payments can apply or get more information by contacting any Social Security office. The number in Denver for information is 232-3650. Se habla Espanol.
BOYS CLUB
Karate: Tues. & Thur. nights, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.
Archery: Wed. nights, 6:30 -9:00 p.m.
Wrestling (team): Mon. & Wed., 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Boxing (team): Tues. & Thur., 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Swimming: Mon. & Fri., 6:30 -9:00 p.m.
Basketball (team): Starts in January.
The above programs are for boys between the ages of 7 and 18 years of age. For further information concerning these classes contact Ronnie Maynes at 936-7342 or drop in at the Boys* Club at 721 West 8th Ave.
Tenants Have Rights
Most of us are concerned about the conditions of the building we live in and the conditions of the buildings around us. There are two departments of the City and County of Denver that are concerned with these areas: Health & Hospitals (which deals with occupied buildings). and the Building Department (which deals with unoccupied buildings). This month's article will deal with Health and Hospitals.
The Housing section of Health and Hospitals is responsible for administration and enforcement of Denver’s Housing Code. The housing codes are concerned with how people live and set minimum standards for safe and healthful housing. This includes utilities, sanitary facilities, insect and rodent control, maintenance and accident prevention. Specifically, the housing code requires that your residence have a kitchen sink, a toilet, wash basin, bathtub or shower, hot and cold water, windows and ventilation, and heat, all of which must work properly. Landlords are also responsible for common areas like halls and stairs. If a tenant thinks there are housing code violations in their unit, they can call 893-6144 to ask an inspector to come and inspect the unit. Health and Hospitals will cite the landlord for any violations of the housing code. It has been our experience that Health and Hospitals responds very quickly when called to inspect a unit, and in issuing citations for violations. However, sometimes it may take several months to get violations of the housing code repaired. The reason for this is that Health and Hospitals gives the landlord a certain amount of time to repair things, and the landlord has the right to appeal. Thus, the case could drag on and on.
Also, if you are a tenant who is thinking of reporting your landlord for housing code violations, there is one very important thing to remember. Colorado law states that a tenant may be evicted for no reason at all, as long as the landlord does it properly. This means that if you report housing code violations, and your landlord doesn’t like it, you may be evicted at the end of the month, or at the end of your lease. This may sound very discouraging, but that’s the way it is in Colorado. The only way to change that is to change the laws. If you are interested in supporting changes in the law, please let us know. Call Betty Koehler or Wendi Schneider at 534-5141.
Next month, we will explain the functions of the Building Department.
YWCA Has Preschool Programs
Registration for two mother-child programs of the YWCA of Metropolitan Denver will be accepted through January 7.
In Mommie and Me, mothers and their children who are at least two years of age share together a weekly morning of activities. The first part of the morning is spent in mother-child physical activities in the gym or pool.
In the second part of the morning, mothers listen to speakers and discuss topics of interest to them, while children participate in creative activities in the YWCA playschool.
Participants may enroll in Mommie and Me for -8 Wednesdays starting January 7 from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. or for 8 Thursdays, starting January 8 from 9:15 to 11:30 a.m.
In Fit by Five, children aged four to six enjoy a weekly morning or. afternoon of gymnastics instruction and creative dramatics. While their children are in these activities, mothers participate in a program of speakers, discussions, and crafts. Mothers must attend with their children.
Mothers and their children may enroll for 8 sessions on Friday mornings from 9:30 to 11:30 or Friday afternoons from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., beginning January 9.
The YWCA playschool is available for younger children. The cost of the program is $16.00 for one mother and child, with a charge of $5.00 for each additional child in the program, the playschool, or the nursery. YWCA membership is required.
For further information, call the YWCA, 825-7141. A United Way
BARGAINS AVAILABLE
“OUR
NOW AT
TTIC”
3190 West Alameda (Thrift Store) 922-0837
_________Clothing, household items, and other fun things.
HOURS: 9am-5pm Mon.-Sat. PARKING IN THE REAR


Page 8 - SANTA FE TRAIL
NEIGHBORHOOD
Joseph Ihle made the doll house and most of the furniture. He takes small orange juice cans and other small cans and makes chairs, tables, sofas, and beds. A good Westside craftsman.
Brochure Readied
NEWS
60th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
Mr. and Mrs. Celestino LaFore of 825 Mariposa Street celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on October 5th. They renewed their vows at Mercy Hospital due to the illness of Mr. LaFore. Fr. Campbell from St. Joseph’s Church was there for the renewal of vows.
They were married October 5th, 1915, at Walsenburg, Colorado. They lived there a few years; then moved to Longmont where Mr. LaFore farmed for many years. He quit farming and went to work for the Burlington Railroad from which he retired and moved to Denver.
Mrs. LaFore suffered a stroke in 1965 and has not been well since. They have three daughters: Mrs. Evelyn Padilla of Lakewood, Mrs. Vivian Cook and Mrs. Geneviene Perez of Denver. They have four sons: Benjamin of Longmont; Robert, George and Tom of Denver. Tom is in business for himself and owns Mr. T’s Beauty Shop located at 2495 Youngfield Street in Golden, Colorado. They have 18 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.
If you have neighborhood News from your friends, relatives and neighbors, mail them to SANTA FE TRAIL before the 20th of the month. Your news is the news we want and need!
About half of all Denver residents are afraid to walk in their own neighborhood at night, a survey commissioned by Neighbors Against Crime Together (Neigh-bors-ACT) revealed recently.
Dave Martin, executive director of Neighbors-ACT, a major Denver program aimed at reducing crime through citizen action and education, released the results of the survey.
“The survey shows that Denver people realize crime is a problem that police alone cannot solve and that they are ready and willing to pitch in to help themselves and their neighbors,” Martin said.
R. F. Falk Associates of Denver conducted the survey. It is part of the Neighbors-ACT campaign to acquaint people with the nature of the crime problem and involve them in a variety of ways to help each other avoid becoming victims of crime. Neighbors-Act, a $1.1 million federally funded program sponsored by the Denver Anti-Crime Council and endorsed by Denver Mayor Bill McNichols, was launched in October and will continue through next October.
The study consisted of 1,083 interviews throughout the city. Of those interviewed, 67 percent were household heads, 57 percent were homeowners and 61 percent were employed. The ethnic breakdown was 57 percent Anglo, 25 percent Spanish-surnamed and 16 percent black.
The survey also studied attitudes about crime and crime prevention and gathered information about public views of the criminal justice system, including attitudes toward
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ihle had a display of their tin cutting work — miniature chairs, tables, dressers, settees, foot stools — and a complete doll house assembled completely with doll. This is a craft of delicacy and skill worthy of publicity, which is a part of “Pins and Needles” — a lot of talent and work by the elderly generation.
In 1970 Mr. Ihle was in a period of depression, following a prolonged healing of a broken leg. He was shown a book on tin craft and was asked to make some vigil candles. He became interested in the work and made many things for the Washington Park Community Center. He is affiliated with the St. Francis deSales Catholic Church and very active in the work of the “Legion of Mary”. He also belongs to the Holy Name Society.
Their home here in Hirschfeld is so compact that it looks like a small factory with tin cans everywhere. You would not recognize the coffee table — it’s his work bench.
Immigration
Publicacion espanol:
El nuevo foieto del westside action center de immigracion esta listo para su uso. La informacion esta fundamental, para que cum-ples y registrar con el servicio de immigracion. Tambien tiene lo que necesitas para entrar legalmente.
El foieto tambien habla del pro-ceso de deportacion y que encuen-tras con el servicio de immigracion y naturalizacion y sus derechos.
El foieto se puede aprovechar, en la calle once y Santa Fe. Si tiene usted preguntas hable al 534-5141.
the police and the courts.
The study shows that crime is among the top three concerns of Denverites, ranking with inflation and unemployment. In terms of what bothers citizens about their own neighborhood, crime ranks with the environment and “problems with fellow neighbors” as the top concerns:
Other trends and feelings revealed, Martin said, are these:
• three out of five people feel their home is vulnerable to burglary.
• seven out of ten people “have not” cut back or changed activities during the past year because of crime, indicating possibly that changes happened before a year ago and that fear of crime has become a way of life for city residents.
• half of those interviewed felt that nothing can be done to prevent an assault on themselves, but 68 percent felt they could protect their home from burglars.
• 71 percent believe that Denver citizens must help the police prevent crimes.
At the same time, the survey showed, “Denver residents appear very willing to become involved in activities which may prevent crime,” and they have, on balance, a favorable attitude toward the Denver Police Department.
The survey also found that, although people see police “in a positive light,” more citizens were “reluctant to answer questions about the police than any other set of questions.”
The new West Side Action Center Immigration brochure is available for your use. The information in it is useful to have you fill out and register with the Immigration Naturalization Service. It also contains what is required for your legal entry.
The brochure also speaks about Deportation hearings and what goes on throughout your encounter with the Immigration Naturalization Service and your rights.
The brochure is available at 1100 Santa Fe Drive. If you have any questions, feel free to call 534-5141. Ask for the Immigration counselor.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 1898
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the Director, State Buildings Division, Room 626 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 2:00 p.m. MST on the 15th day of January, 1976 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in Room 710, same building.
PROJECT: AURAR1A HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER, BID PKGS. 40-4, 5, & 6; Mechanical, Electrical and Enclosure of Science Building, Denver, Colorado 80204.
1. The work shall be accomplished as scheduled including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling. for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract. The work is scheduled to start on or about January 21, 1976.
2. The right is reserved, to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: CHARLES S. SINK & ASSOCIATES, 3003 East Third Avenue, Suite 103, Denver, Colorado 80206.
4. A Deposit of $100.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier's check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier's or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established. Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 22nd day of December, 1975.
OFFICE OF STATE PLANNING AND BUDGETING STATE BUILDINGS DIVISION By Joh L. Mason 12/22/75 Acting Director
Media of Publication: Daily Journal, Denver; Denver Weekly News; Santa Fe Trail Publication Dates:
First: December 24, 1975 Second: December 31, 1975
SUBSCRIBE NOW !!!
Start loving your Neighborhood.
Yearly Rate $ 3.00
Make checks payable to Santa Fe Trail, 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver Colorado, 80204 â– 
Name______________________________________________
Address__________________ _____________________
City ----------------State__________Zip___________
SUBCRIPTI0N COUPON
Fear and Insecurity Found in Survey
OBITUARIES —
Edith Gomez of 102 West 4th Avenue died on November 15th, 1975. She was born in Taos, New Mexico, in 1921. She was a widow.
The service and burial were at Mt. Olivet Cemetery on November 20th.
* * *
Manuel Padilla of 614 West 4th Avenue died on December 1st, 1975. He was bom in 1916 in Colorado. He never married.
Mass was celebrated at St. Joseph’s Church and burial was at Ft. Logan Cemetery on December 5th.
His brothers and sisters were Jose A. Mattias (Pueblo), Eugenio Padilla (Pueblo), Rose Anaya (Denver), and Frances Gallegos (Denver).
* * *
Nicomedez J. Vigil of 916 West 9th Avenue died on December 7th, 1975 in Ocate, New Mexico, where he was bom in 1900. He was the husband of Adelina Vigil.
Mass was at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church on December 10th, and burial was at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. * * *
Rudolph (Rudy) Delgado of 710 Elati Street died on December 15th at home. He was the husband of Cathy Delgado and was only 34 years old at the time of death. He was born in Pueblo.
Mass was at St. Joseph’s Church with burial at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. * * *
Louis Pinedo, 88 years old, 1254 Kalamath Street, died September 5th in Mercy Hospital of heart failure. He had been in failing health since his wife Matilda was also ill.
Matilda Pinedo, 74 years old,
died October 4th, in St. Luke’s
Hospital of cancer.
Mr. Pinedo was born in Mexico in 1887 and came to the United States when he was fourteen years old. He was a Westside resident for 74 years. Mrs. Pinedo was born in Trinidad, Colorado, in 1901 and moved to Denver when she married Louis Pinedo on September 3, 1917.
They are survived by three children: Faustino Pinedo, Lillian Tafoya, and Jenny Hernandez, all of Denver. They had nineteen grandchildren and twenty-four great-grandchildren.
Both funerals were at St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Church and burials were at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
* * *
Manuelita Castro of 1014 West 9th Avenue died on November 6th, 1975. She was 93 years old and was born in Mexico. She was a widow and was survived by her children: Antony R. Castro and Louise Duran, both of Denver. She had 5 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren and 6 great-great-grandchildren.
Burial was at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
* * *
• Classified Ads •
NEW PINTO BEANS, double clean 100 pound sack is $32.50.
Call 733-2958, day or night. Will deliver.
SANTA FE TRAIL will continue to have a special column for classified ads. Please call 892-1039 weekdays between 9:00 and 12:00 a.m. or write to Classified Ads, SANTA FE TRAIL, 430 West 9th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204. All classified ads are 50 cents per line and must be submitted by December 22nd at noon.
Rights Under Welfare
Are there any rights to which all general-assistance recipients are entitled?
General-assistance recipients have no uniform substantive rights — that is, rights to specific items or amounts of money — but wherever they live they are entitled to equal treatment and fair procedures.
The states are not required to run any kind of general-assistance program at all but once they do establish such a program it must follow these rules:
1. No one may be refused general-assistance because he has not been in the state or county for some specified period of time as long as he is there now and intends to stay.
2. No one may be refused general-assistance because of his race or because he is not an American citizen.
3. Everyone must be told the rules that govern general-assistance, be allowed to apply for general-assistance, be given a decision within reasonable time, and be given a chance to appeal and a fair hearing. Once a person starts receiving general-assistance, his benefits may not be cut off until he has been given a notice of the reason for the proposed termination and the opportunity for a fair hearing.
Vickie Herrera West Side Action Center
Sewing Classes
Need to use a sewing machine in the mornings to mend or make something?
Would you like to learn to sew?
Do you need to make clothes and other things economically?
Sewing sessions at- First Men-nonite Church community center are open to people from the West-side community. Several women and nine sewing machines are available for your project.
Each Tuesday the machines and help is available from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. or 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Everything is geared to your needs and the needs of others there that Tuesday.
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RESTAURANT AND BAR
- 753 SANTA FE DRIVE
'Welctone
TO THE /IQ
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Joe’s Buffet
The meal that's sure to fill Come and enjoy our:
FAST LUNCHES
From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Our place is always
AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS AND BANQUETS DANCING FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS FROM 8:00 p.m. UNTIL 2:00 a.m. SUNDAYS FROM 7:00 p.m. UNTIL 12:00 p.m.
PHONE 534-9579
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r ltle U18702 0239873 Santa Fe Trail JANUARY 1976 • Issue #19 _ estsl ide RTD System Raises Questions COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MEETINGS SCHEDULED by State Representative Richard Castro Som e time ago, West Denver r esidents met with officials from RTD to express their concern ab o ut an elevat e d mass transit syst e m coming through our neighborhood . At that time th e r e was a unanimous consensus of about 250 resid e nts at a meeting at Bak e r Jr. High that th e s y s t e m should follow th e rail road rig ht of wa y from En g l e wood t o D owntown D enve r t o avoid di srupiing our resid ential com muni ty. RTD ha s e xpl o r e d th e po s sibilit y o f u sing e ith e r Broad w ay or Linc oln Street. Th e Br o adwa y m e r chants and th e resid e nt s o f S o uth Wa sh ing t o n P a rk h ave co m e o ut against these plan s , f o r th e sam e reasons we in W es t D e n v e r h ave opp ose d th e e l e vat e d s ys t e m . Th e Pl anning Office recentl y indi ca t e d a t a M ayo r -Co un cil meet ing th a t t h ey we r e a b a nd o nin g Linc o ln Broadwa y corrido r in favor o t th e R a ilroad Right of W ay . Ind icat i o n s a r e . h o wever , th at th e y m ay n o t h a v e compl e t e l y rul e d o ut thi s co rrid o r. I a m th e r e for e w ritin g thi s arti c l e to a l e rt y ou t o this fac t. A report don e b y John Moll e n k opf o n fixe d g uideway s . raises so m e of the s a m e qu e stions and c on ce rns I h ave had with th e syst e m. Specifically the r e p o rt points o ut : I . Fix e d guide wa y s basi c fun c tion is to allow suburban resid e nt s. who are lea s t in need of bein g s ubsidized b y anybod y , t o g e t down town quickly. (Therefore , thos e of us who live in South Washington Park or the Near W estside should not have to be burde n e d with a system in our c o mmuniti e s that does not serve us . ) 2 . Although th e s ystem is claim' e d to have great flexibility , it is actually the most.inflexible form of transit. (Once the guideways are placed down , there is little oppor. tunity for the s ystem to serve other areas of town if population or business develop shifts in future years.) 3 . Elevate d s ystems or fix e d guide wa y s claim to reduce labor costs. (The BART s ystem in San Francisco suggests the opposite bus drivers are replaced b y a tech nology that requires highly skilled and highly paid enginee rs . ) 'AMERICAN WAY' MARKET UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 4 . Ever y zone around a station will experience long term develop m e nt. Many neighborhoods do not nec e ssaril y appreciate this impact. (The BART s ystem in San Fran cis c o has 52 stops and ab0ut 20 d e v e lopm e nt battles on its hands, and many outlying areas are a ctually organizing to prevent BART's extension into their com muniti e s.) 5 . Hidden costs, ranging from ugl y el e vated tracks and op e ra tio nal n o is e , to disl o cation of poor n e i g hb o rho ods and seco ndary busi ness di s tri c ts. d e la y s in reac hing full o p e rational capac it y. (BART is n o w in a $238 million law s uit a ga inst e quipm e nt manufacture r s . o v e r SO% o f it s ca rs a r e in th e s h o p . B ay Ar ea families h ave p aid $100 a y ear f o r almos t 1 3 yea r s y e t BART s till do e s n ot ope r at e at nig ht , o n week e nd s. o r a t p ro mis e d h o lid ays. I b elieve wha t D enve r need s I S a n inn o v ative and e ff ective bus sys t e m. It i s appa rent th a t D e nver is eomlnuing with a p la n to p r o m ote t h e Ar e a R a pid Tran s i t Syst e m ( AR T) . I would h o p e , h ow e ve r. th a t y o u will r e a ffirm y o ur p os iti o n n o t to allo w thi s e l e v a t e d mass tr a n s it s ystem t o co m e thro u g h our resid ential s treet s. or t o disrupt and destroy th e Br oa dwa y comm e r c ial are a . Should RTD p e rsist in its current p osture o f Br o ad w a y a nd / or Lin coln Streets as a corridor , ins t ead o f th e Railroad Rig ht of Wa y. I will b e ca llin g on y o u and your neigh b o rs t o com e t o a town me e ting to make your v oice h e ard. Mike Redd y , director of citizen participation for the City and County of Denver. announces the following schedule of council dis trict meetings and public hearings for the purpose of citizen participa tion under Title I of th e Housing and Community Development Act. This legislation is expected to bring D e nver $44 million in Federal Funds over the next three years to d e velop viable urban communities b y providing decent housing , a suitable environment and expand ing e conomi c opportuniti e s. prin cipall y for p e r sons o f low and m o d erate incom e. Public Hearings Thurs d ay . J a nu a r y 8. 7 :00 p . m .. Room 450. C it y and Co unt y Build ing ( Cit y Co un.cil C h a mb e r s) , M o nd ay . F ebrua r y 23, 7 :00p.m .. Room 4 5 0 . City a nd C o unt y Build ing ( City C o un cil C h a mb e r s ) For furth e r inf ormatio n a b o ut d is tri c t meetings o r ab o ut pro c edures t o b e f o llo we d durin g th e public hearings. con t act Mike Redd y, 5728 21. Dogs roaming the streets and loose have prohibited our carriers from delivering the paper the past two months. This editorial board does not wish to subject the youth who pass out our paper to dog bites, etc. You may pick up your copy of the newspaper at Adelante and other shops on Santa Fe Drive, churches, agencies and other community organizations. Let us try to keep our dogs in our own yards. Dogs are often needed for ow individual protection, not to harass neighbors and news boys! Children's. Christmas Parade On the evening of Dec ember 1 , 43 children from West Side ele mentary schools (Gr eenlee, Fair mont. and Del Pueblo) participated in a Christmas parade sponsored b y Cook Bros . , the Picadill y res taurant and KHOW radio station . The evening started out with a parade through Larimer Square and then down 16th Street with the children riding on a float. The following youth from the West Side enjoyed the parade: From Greenlee Monica Joes ten , Denise Ruiz, Jose Martinez, Oscar Colmunero, Darlene Vigil , Angela Solano, Catherine Torres, Jerry Smith, Laura Martinez, Ger ald Vallejos, Kathy Gonzales, Estan Archuleta, Reb e cca Orge, Norman Ruiz, Thomas Espinoza. From Fairmont Leroy Quin tinilla; Dann y, Will y and Charles. l -{ WHY WEST HIGH? West High Suspension Ended At th e end o f ove m be r and ea rly Decembe r. th e W e t ide an d o th e r n ea.rbv mmuntl tes were urpri e d a nd h oc k e d t h a t W e t H i g h S c h ool h a d b ee n su p e nd e d f o r int e r c h oo l mu i c and po n a ctivit i e s b y th e C o l o r a d o H i g h School A c tivities A soc i ario n . ow th e s uspe nsi o n o f " ' ' est High S h oo l h as been p e r manentl y lifte d . At th e D e ce mb e r II. 1 9 5 . m ee t i n g o f th e Exec u tive Board o f th e Co l o r a d o Hig h S c hool A c t i ities A sSJ>Ci atio n, W est Hig h was re inst a t e d t o th e associa tion . Th e board a g reed that prin c ipal Edward G allego s had t a k e n th e necessa ry and pr o p e r st e ps t o con ect th e situati o n . Th e sch oo l' s stude nts a r e n o w eligible t o p a rti c ipat e in all int er-s ch o lastic a ctivities . Coach St eve Cha vez . w h o w ill full y v iolated th e acti v ities a ssoc i a tion rulin g o n e ligibili ty. has been suspended fr o m coa c hin g b y Sup e r int endent Kishkunas o f D e n ve r Publi c S c h oo l s and has been t ran s f erre d fr o m West t o anothe r assignme nt . A similar situ a ti o n o c c urr e d at K enne d y Hi g h S c h oo l, anothe r D e nv e r Public Scho ol in Bear alley. a h D e T oll h as also been fired fro m a l l aching a ss i gn m e nt . H e " ill n o t b e allo w e d t o ac h t K e nn edy. Th e r e are t ill real q uest i n abOu t hi r e m ai ning a 1 K e nn e d y H i h h oo l as a t e a c h e r . Th i p a p r's report e r wa un aware t h a t he had b e en r e as igned as of th e la y out d te. A num b e r f con ce rn e d parent an d co mmunit y leade r are pre s e ntl y d isturbed b y th e di ff e r e n e in treatm e nt f o r K e nn e d y an d W e t hi g h schoo l . Pla n s a r e bei n g mad e t o s p eak t o th e h ig h c h oo l acti v i t ie s assoc iati o n a t the n xt board m eeting . M a n y are ery g r a t eful to Mr. Gallego f o r gettin g th sc h oo l reins t a t e d f o r int e r -sch o l astic ac tiv ities b eca use sch oo l pirit a nd e nthu s iasm o f man y youth would b e dampe n e d if th e y could n o t co mp e t e w ith o th e r c h oo l s. West Hig h S c hool thi s year i s o ff e rin g a w id e varie t y o f athl e tic , ac ad e mi c . a nd mu s i cal c h o ices t o th ose t ud e nt s w h o w i s h to b e m embe r s o f team s . c h o ir o r club s . Thi s i s a fin e w a y t o work togeth e r with stude nt of West and t o get to kno w s tud e nt s fr o m a c ro ss th e c i ty. ... Older persons at the PASCO lunch program collected canned goods and money for turkeys which were given to Mullen Home. They also gave the home a basket at Thanksgiving. Westsiders help others! Minority Projects Funded Th e C o l o r a d o C e nt e nnial -Bic e n t ennia l C ommis si o n presente d three ch ec k s t o t a lin g $ 1 8 , 820 t o ethnic min o rit y pro j e ct s Thurs d a y , D ec . 1 8 , at th e Commission o ffice . Commission e r s Lincoln Baca and Juanita Gra y made the c heck pre sent atio n . Largest am ount, $10 , 000 , w e nt t o Lor e tt o H e i g ht s Coll e g e for it s Uni ve r s it y With out Wall s. C e n t e nnial-Bi ce nt e nnial S c holars pro gra m . The m oney will match an e qual amount advanc e d b y th e college t o finan ce five s c h olarships f o r min o rit y students wh o will co mpl e t e w o rk for the ir bac h e l o r o f arts degree in 1976. The program will p e rmit th e student t o utili z e hi s lif e w o rk e xp eriences for partial credit. Each Centennial-Bicentennial scholar will complete a thes is or other m a j o r w o rk o n a C entennia l Bicente nnial th e m e. R ece i ving th e c h ec k o n b e h a lf of th e college wa s th e presid ent, Ad e l e Ph e lan . A c h ec k f o r $4,900 w e nt t o Leslie Branch , proj ec t dir ec t o r f o r th e F orum: C ente r f o r the Art s pro gram. Th e Forum: C enter for the Art s, l ocate d at 1570 Gilpin St., o ff e r s a dail y afte r school program o f arts instruc tion serv in g 200 min o rit y stude nt s . Young instruc tor s staff th e program, using the a rt s as a means o f dev e loping r e lation s hip s w ith children while e ncouraging t h e ir self expre ssion. Arn o ld Chav ez, v i ce c h airman of th e Sky lin e C h apte r . Ame r ic an Gl F orum, recei ve d a c h ec k f o r $3 , 920 f o r the c h apter's Un Dia C on La Raza, a c ultural festival d e picting th e Mexican h eritage . whi c h was h e ld at Lak eside Amuseme nt Park last August 24. The American Way Market at 1115 W. lith is now under new management due to the Consent Decree of September 30th in which the owners had the choice of I) cleaning up the store, or 2) get ting fines up to $200-$2,000 per day. After the parade a roast beef dinner was served to the children and chaparones at the Picadill y restaurant. After dinner, Santa appeared and gave the children gifts which were down-vests from Miller Stockman. Barnnet; Robert Martinez, Wendy ....,.,.....__"""'\ Othei neighborhood stores will be inspected to see if health codes have been violated . . Thanks to you we have been able to get our neighborhood stores in shape. Mel Martinez Consumer Counselor West Side Action Center Special consideration should go to Mel Martinez and Vickie Herrera from the West Side Action Center, and Jose Lujan , . a West Side resident who chaparoned the child ren. And thanks to Father Camp bell from St. Joseph's for the loan of their bus. Martinez, Margaret Vigil, Sammy Vig il. Patty Vig il, Robbie Archu leta , Albert Mathews. Francisco R eyna, J o hn Thompson, Sandra Montoy a. Vict o r Martinez, Russell Keling s . From Del Pu e blo -Carmen Belo , Linda Vela squez, Anita de Herrera, France s Aoyagi, Olga Gonzales , Sara deHerrera, Jose Gonzales, Sandra Monto y a .' Fe Trail . 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Deliver to:

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Page 2SAN 'TA FE TRAIL Editorial: Alcoholism: let's Be Aware Over 9 million Americans drink too much and over 35 million . Americans are affected by the abnormal drinking of someone close . And then 'there is the recent national survey which shows that 28% of the nation's te.enagers are problem c\rinkers . How many of these people live on the Westside? It is a fact that many are turning from drugs to alcohol because ii. is both more accessible, more acceptable, and legal. How often do any of us drive past our local high school or La Alma Park and see our young people passing around either a 6 pack or a bottle? How many of us personally know people who are drunk everyday by the middle of the afternoon? How long are we going to . Jet alcohol hurt our Jives and the lives of those whom we love? How long are we going to think drunk people are funny? Do we ever encourage our loved ones who drink too much to seek help? Do we support their attempts to help themselves when they do get help , or do we laugh at people who do not drink and think they are "sissies"? How can we expect our youth to stop drinking when they .see us adults celebrating everything we do with a drink in our hands? How can we expect them to drink responsibly when we say they are "cute" when they are drunk? And what about those people who do want help but can't get it because of the crime rates within our own neighborhoods? Take for example the 49-year-old man who lives in the North Lincoln Projects and was on his way to A . A . meeting a few weeks ago. His beaten up body was found in a dumpster and he spent 3 weeks in an intensive care unit. He is now in a special hospital and may nev _er ta1k again due to his many injuries . Many Senior Citizens would like to attend A . A. meetings but are afraid to go out at nights. What are any of us doing to make our community a safer and better place to live for these people? There are many alcohol-related services available for people in the Westside who want them. There are bilingual A.A . programs around (ask for Ernie Martinez at 255-8574), the Auraria Alcohol Counseling Program (ask for Judy Bauer at 534-7614), the Denver Opportunity West Program (922-8473) and A.A. N. Lincoln (ask for Jesus Villa at 534-1427). But before any of these services can be of use, as a community we . It1Ust first become aware of the alcohol problem we have, and we must admit that it is here, and we must be willing to work at helping to get rid of it. We can do this by encouraging people who drink too ll)UCh to get help for themselves. If we live with someone who has a drinking problem we can get help for ourselves (ALANON). Last, and perhaps most important, we can start setting an example for our young people by celebrating without a drink in our hands all the time. We need to show them that it is possible to have a good time without the use of a drug. EDITORIAL BOARD Chuck Garcia, president; Becky Garcia, vice president ; Sr. Rene Weeks, treasurer; Brice Balmer . ed it o r ; Flora Gasser, Russ Brito , Bauer. Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not published for any cause. The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is_ also understood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail" against all expense loss or damage sustained by reason of prtnttng such copy. All correspondence can be sent to: SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 892-1039 Senate Bill 1 Is Bad for Poor "Senate Bill I is a monstrosity such as was ever introduced in the Con . gressional halls of our United States." (Patrick E. Gorman, Secty. Treas., Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen) Resident of the Month: and Irene Zuniga A.! the chtldren deserve a : th T ffi E d Headstart experience. Both of us m e _ra c ngmeenng epartbelieve in the program , not only for ment thts past year. Before that he . . . worked for eleven years at St. our Mtchael, but tor all the chtldren J h' H 't 1 d S 't of o'ur race and all groups of osep s ospt a an . amsont e. People " Th th t He has had to work smce he was . ese are e very s rong 1 ld d h' f h feelings of Michael and Irene twe ve o an ts at er Zuniga, who live on Fox Street here htm on the farm to help in the Westside. wtth the work there. . Irene Zuniga serves on the policy Before_ they were marned, Irene committee for Auraria Headstart as worked m a. and an at-large member. Their son was a recept10mst at the Weststde Michael was in Headstart last year Health for_ three years. and she served on the committee as were _marrted m St. Joseph s parent. Although s _ he feels it . is Ca;hohc Church on May 16th , tmportant to be very mvolved wtth 19 0 her son's activities at Del Pueblo Both Michael and Irene have -she wants to continue supporting common interests. First priorit y is and working with Headstart. their home and their son, Michael. Michael and Michael Junior They have also helped Irene's don't always get the supper right mother during the past several on time , but they both know that years as she lived with them . the energies of their mother and Michael and Irene feel that it is their family are going for other important that the:y. do things people and important concerns. together and that both Michaels ''All people should be proud and have time to be together as father self-confident; all children should and son. Right now there isn't be able to make it in school and much time for hunting, fishing, and later in life without some of the other activities but that is a love "S.l is a: bill which is unamendable struggles 1 had to go through," that father wants to teach son . it needs to be killed, for under said Michael as he talked about his "Many parents and adults say SPOT REMOVER the protection of law the dark days fr'ustrating experiences in the they are too tired or that it's too Scientists have discovered that alcohol will remove spots from of the Nixon years could return public schools. He has been much hassle to work in the schools different types of clothing. As a matter of fact alcohol will not only remove again with possible disastrous con-impressed with the amount of staff and the Head starts We need more the spots from the clothing, but will also remove the clothing from the sequences.,. (United Steelworkers who help children with special people in our community helping man's back, the money from his pockets and food from his table. . of America, concerns or problems like speech ,' others and helping around the It will also remove the clothing .from little children and wives, .. -hearing ; g t os s ' and fine motor neighborhood." Both Irene and furniture from the home, and will if its use is ' continual , rewove the man , . . . . . . I development and' health . If he had Michael :Zuniga . hope that more and from society and will eventually ' remove to ' a Christiess gr' av'e. ' . U -.S.: Congress ts now conhad these people helping him as a more . parents will become involved fn fact, alcohol is the greatest remover known to man. stdermg a _ 753 page law called child, he'd be better off too. with the schools and community Senate Btll 1 (S.l) which is Michael has : orked for the City groups, for the good of the neigh, Commodity Recipes . -stretching a dollar these days is by Pat getting harder and harder. The Home fudgesicles can . also be Colorado State University Exten-made from this mix. Combine * sion Service is helping folks in the cup mix with 2 cups boiling water. community make their money go Pour into an ice cube tray. Place further. wooden popsicle sticks or plastic Generally most people are inspoons in each case . Freze . . terested in meal planning, food For those who dislike the taste of preparation, food buying, budgetmilk made from the powder, try ing and using commodity foods. Jello-Milk. These program assistants use JELLO-MILK whatever methods they feel will be . 1 YJ cups dry milk effective to meet the needs of an 1 small (3 oz.) pkg. Je'llo individual or family. This could 4 cups water range from working with a client Shake all ingredients in a jar or over a period of weeks or months blend in a blender. Another varia through a series of home visits to tion is an Orange Chiller. organizing a group of interested ORANGE CHILLER individuals in an informal setting to 1 YJ cups dry milk learn more about a particular topic. 1 can (6 oz.) orange juice Milk should be an important part concentrate . of everyone's diet whether a pre4 cups water schooler or a senior citizen. The Shake all ingredients in a jar or powdered milk which is distributed blend in a bler.der . With the sweet as a supplemental food is fre-ness of the Jello and the orange . quentl y pushed to the back of the concentrate, it is difficult to dis shelf because people feel un-tinguish the dry milk flavor in comfortable using it. either of these drinks. For those on With this powdered milk, how-the run each morning, an orange ever, an inexpensive hot cocoa mix chiller provides a quick start. can be prepared. Another just as easy idea proHOT COCOA MIX vides a complete meal. 7 cups dry milk MEAL-IN-A-GLASS 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 1 cup cocoa 5 T. dry milk 1 teaspoon salt 1 egg Add four heaping spoonfuls of 2 graham crackers, crushed the mix to a cup of boiling water. It 1 teaspoon sugar tastes as delicious as any ready-to2 T. orange juice concentrate use cocoa mix , and it is much Mix with a beater or a blender. ... Pour in glass and drink. Announcing the Opening of the Rocky Mountain Family Practice Center Leland E. Warren Division 875 Kalamath Street Telephone: 572-1448 • An Outpatient Unit of Rocky Mountain Hospital (An Ost eopathic Inst itution) HOURS: 10: 00 a . m.12:00 noon and I :00 p .m.-6:00p.m. 7 da ys per week Rocky Mountain Physicians, P.C. Thomas M. Laughlin, D.O. John E. Rae d er, D . O . Jay A. S wedloff, D . O . supposed to reform the U.S . and County of Denver for several borhood and for the good of all the Criminal Code This so-called years and just received a promotion children. reform is an attack on poor and working class Chicanos, poor and working class Blacks, and on poor and working class people as a PUBLIC DUTY: S . 1 will prohibit whole. At the same time it will prosecution of "public servants" make it legal for the rich and for for wrongdoings if illegal conduct is politicians to continue criminal the result of "mistaken" belief that activities such as Watergate. S.l it was "required or authorized" or takes away rights and freedoms based on ''written interpretation such as freedom of the press, issued by the head of a government freedom of assembly, freedom to agency." This sets a low standard advocate change, and freedom to of conduct for every federal em petition which are guaranteed ployee from the President on down. under the U.S . Constitution. _ It protects officials by n ; Jieving Let's take a look at some of the them of responsibility for . actions. parts of S . l which are particularly This law is an invitation to federal threatening to the rights and freeemployees to commit crimes with dams of poor and working class out fear of prosecution . people: WIRETAPPING: S . 1 allows wireSUPPRESSION OF THE NEWS: tapping where "a danger to the Supression of the news for "rea-structure" of the governm ent is sons of national security" could . involved. S.l increases the areas become routine if S . l passes. where wiretapping is permitted. It Journalists receiving classified directs landlords and telephone material would be required to turn companies to cooperate with the it over to the government immedgovernment wiretappers and pro iately and furnish the identity of vides for payments for this co the person who leaked it. Penalties operation. are 7 years in jaii and $100,000 fine DEMONSTRATIONS: Nearly to reporters , editors, or publishers every kind of civil rights, peace , involved. This violates the first and other protest action would be amendment to the U .S. Constitu-threatened with severe penalties . tion which guarantees the right of S.1 makes physical interference public to know everything of with federal functioning a felony. tmportance which occurs within the This could be used against virtually government. every demonstration. Las Posadas was celebrated at niany times this Christmas season in the Westside. This celebration was sponsored by Westside Action Ministry and Auraria Community on Sunday, December 21st. Ellibro Que Responde A La Necesidad Fundamental De La Humanidad Cual es? Si bien es cierto que Ia gente doquier anhela sentir que se le ama, todos los grandes profetas y maestros de Ia Biblia nos dicen que Ia necesidad mas grande es amar a Dios con todo el corazon y con toda el alma y con toda Ia mente. Cuando sentimos este amor por Dios, empe zamos a percibir que El nos ama y nos cuida, eterna y compasivamente. El Heraldo de Ia Ciencia Cristiana ayuda a discernir como amar a Dios total y completamente. Amamos a Dios mas al comprenderlo mejor . Los articulos en el Heraldo ayudan a explicar Ia curacion por Ia oracion a Dios . Pueden cambiar su punto de vista hacia Ia vida . Usted puede obtener un ejemplar libre en espanol. ENVIE ESTE CUPON SIN COMPROMISO A Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist 3101 West 31st AvenuE Denver, Colo. 80211 Por favor mandeme mi ejemplar libre del Heraldo de Ia Cienc ia Cristiana. Nombre D ireccion C iudad Estado Zip

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SCHOOL NEWS YOUTH ADVOCACY Durin g th e m onth o f ove mber t h e Stude nt C o un cil and stud e nt s of Fairm o nt S c h oo l h e l d a ca nn e d f oo d dri ve to h e lp fill Christ mas ba s kets f o r ne e d y f a milies o n t h e Westsid e. Th e ove rwh el m i n g amount o f 9 1 8 can s and o th e r n o n p e ri shable f oo d s we r e bro u g ht to sch ool. W e a r e very pro ud o f t h e fine w ay o ur F a irm o nt stud e nt s ha ve h e lp e d t h e people o f th e ir co m m uni ty. All classes bro u ght man y c ans, but the largest numbe r was bro u g ht b y Miss M oore's 5th a . nd 6 th g r a d e c lasses. These b oy s and g irl s we r e g i ve n a small prize t o reward th e m f o r th e ir extra hard The West s id e Action Center pic k e d up all the food donated and dis tribut e d food baskets to needy families on the W estside during the h o lida y s . Pare nt-t e ac h e r conferences we r e h e ld at Fairmont in November. W e we r e ple a sed t hat so man y parents co uld attend either t h e afternoon or e v e nin g c onferences. W e would like to remind p a r e nts that th ey s h o uld f e el free to call their c hild ' s t e ach e r for a confe r en c e at a n y time during the s c h oo l year. This is o n e o f th e better ways to find o ut h ow c hildren a r e doing in sc h ool. It al so s h o ws yo ur c hild that yo u really d o care. Th e Fairm . o nt P a r e nt Advisory G r o up has met vario u s times since S eptember. W e a r e always pleased t o h av e p a r e nt s b eco m e in vo lved and tak e the opportunit y to give the ir feelings an d h e lp their sc hool. Th e n e xt meetings of th e Parent Advisory Group will b e on January 7t h at 2:00 p . m . and on January 22nd from 6:00-8:00 p . m. Both meetings will be h e ld in the school a uditorium . Please plan to attend a nd become active in yo ur sc hool. Th e h o lid ay season made Dec e m ber a s p ec ial m onth with many special activities . Th e bo ys and g irl s decorated tw o Christmas trees whic h were in the h a lls f o r all ta enjoy . Many , also "had their ow n d eco r a t e d •trees. Audi torium programs were g iven b y th e Fairmont Sc h oo l Choir, the Sp a ni s h C h o ir . th e Second Grade Choir, the Kind ergarten C h o ir , and Instru mental Music classes. Bulletin boards a nd s howcases were d eco r a t e d with m a n y exa mples of th e childre n's h o lid ay artwork. At the b e gin nin g of th e New Y e ar. we at Fairmont w i s h yo u th e v e ry best and prosper o u s New Y e ar. WEST IDGB SCHOOL Monday t hro ugh Thur day eve nings th e r e a r e many. many cars p a r ke d a round W est Hjgh S chool but few p eople from the \ estside have e e r known whlt is going o n at the h igh school. I n the evenin g W e t High S chool is a n exten ion o f Em i l y G riffith Oppo rtun ity S c h oo l and provi d e s pa ce f o r in tructi o n f o r regi s t e r e d appre n t i ces hip classes. Th e t r a des whic h co ndu c t cia ses at West are: carpente rs. boile r makers. glaz i e r s . ironworkers, m ac hini s ts. and r oo f e r s . Th e appre ntices e nr olle d in th e s e classes wo rk at th e ir trade s during th e day and atte nd the related cla s s e s one or tw o nights a week d epending on th e requirements of th e ir trade s. A p e rson must be a n apprentic e in th e trade to en ter the c lass . For more information about eve nin g classes at West Hi g h , int e r ested persons ca n call Oppo r tunit y S c h oo l at 1 250 W e lt o n (57282 1 8). There are some classes w hi c h are for n o n-uni o n p e r so n s. This year Community College of D e n ve r a nd Metro State College are offe rin g so m e of their at W e s t. A p e r so n enrolls for these classes jus t as f o r classes during the d ay, but yo u d o n o t need to b e a m e mber of th e uni o n or a n y oth e r o rgani z ation f o r these classes. To o bt ain m o r e informatio n , call e ith e r Community College of Den ve r o r M etro State College . The gy m is b eing us e d this year for adult leagu e basketball. Ernie Rossi e has th e information about these leagues. BAKER NEWS A NEW SERIES e e ra! month ago the uth we t Denver Yout h er.c i B ur-eau began cir ulatin question naires nation-wide in order t determine from youlh and vouth worker what their per ep-tion we r e regardjng th e h ighest prio r ity p ro b lem confronti n g youth t o d ay . Th e a n ' ers to the e que t ion nair e f orme d t h e b asi o f a Y o u t h d ocacy H andbook w hi c h was di t r i but e d to o n e th o u an d p e r so n s a n enc,ling t h e a ti o n a l C o n f e r e n ce o n D e linqu e n cy Pr e e n ti o n . h e ld in ew Y o rk in O c t o b e r o f 19 5. P e rson s a tt e ndin g th e confe r e n ce d eve l o p e d sever a l issu e s additi o nal to those in th e Y o uth Ad voc ac Handbook. A total of twelv e maj o r issues w e r e d e v e l o p e d and en dorsed b y th e conf e r e nce . Beginning in this issue o f The Santa Fe Trail is part o n e of a six part series of articles describing th e s e issu e s. Eac h a r ticle will desc rib e t h e curre n t problem situation , the specific e lement s of the problem, an d advocacy goals to r e du ce or r e m ove the prob l e m. BAKER NEWS Flying pape r airplanes m ay seem t o b e a frivolous pastim e f o r mi s chievous students in th e classroom . However, it becam e a serio u s business earl y in Decembe r , when s tudents in the scie n ce classes at Baker undertoo k entry in the Wri g ht Br others Foundatio n Aero nautical Contest s p o nsor e d b y M c D onald Hamburgers. Bake r yo ungsters put together so m e of th e 2000 unassembl e d planes di s tribute d for the contest and put NOCHE ALEGRE fhem to flight jn competition with 0 f h h . hi' ht of the each ot her. ne o t e •g •g s Level one winners were Ernie N oche celebration was two R ojas, Steve Powell, Gus Lind e songs .sung tn. Itaha n b y T eresa D k F d p 1 Fl . k ' h d f M R ' , m a nn , erne or , au t c m-}farpe r,. t e ,at e rs. tl!era s l< 1 H o R b ey b . 1 1 M Ha _., d ger , ar. ruza, o , c ass. stuwe Binkowski. Kare n Burman, Spams h at the Umv e rstdaj::l Mt c hoaSt Sh k t T t 01 .Aif d d 1 r Fl Coli eve oc e , r e n tver , w , r e an ta ;at Camacho,' Pat Kl a us. R o bin Peter-111 o r e n ce, ta Y e r e urne 0 so n . K e ith K e lton. All 15 of these the U.S. last March and f ound h If h d . t d H proceeded to level two, w h e r e Gus e rse rat e r ts o n e n e ow-Lindemann gained first r a nk w ith a ever , s h e f e e l s s h e has found a real n ht t . f 8 4 d All h B k S h t g tm e o . secon s. m e e . at a e r tutonng_ pams -pupils w h o reached first level s peakm g stud ents . . . received a ce rtificate for a M c M An oRthe r pers1 on wcrkm g wtith D o n a ld h amburger ; all second level rs. tvera s c ass m prepara ton d f h f fi f M ' B ld . competitors recet ve a ree amo r ce rtl tea ton I S a ':"111 burger , a co ke. french fries , and a bnngs t o th e c lass mte restt _ n g T-shirt. Gus Lindemann, w h o went tdeas fr o m h e r travels, places hk e t o the fin a l s o n Dec embe r 15 and B e l g tum , Wash-wo n third place, received a 10 m g t o n , and K a nsas Ctty. speed bike, a n over the shoulder t o t e and a M c Donald's bi g meal. Pupil s who puticipated a lso h e lp e d the sc h oo l because B a k e r as a result of win nin g third place will get $50 to spe••u U • J scier.c e equip m e nt. The Parent Advisory Committee w ill meet Janua r y 22 at 1 2:45 p . m . in Baker Jr. Hi g h Social R oo m . If your so n o r d a u ghter i s in eith e r or both the Math or Readin g Labs , we need your in vo lvem ent in order to keep these programs. Los Padres d e los estudiantes e n ESEA van a tener un mitin e l 22 de e n e r o a las 12 : 45 e n Ia tarde e n Ia escuela B a ker en e l cuarto 103 . Si sus hijo s estan e n et l a b d e mate maticas, de Leer, vengan uds. Por fav o r . Congresswoman Pat Schroeder was at the Westside Action Center on December 23rd to help with the Christmas baskets and talk with commu nity people. Irene Atwell , vice chairperson of the Action Center, greeted Ms. Schroeder. The ESEA M ath and Reading Lab s would like to welcome our new aides for this year . Shell y Trujillo i s curre ntl y working in the Math Lab . Shell y i s a graduate of West High, Class of '75, where she received several awards in art in cluding the Principal's Award, Alumni Award , and the Denver Art Museum Award. Shelly was recent l y marrie d t o Frank Trujillo , a Wishing You a Prosperous and Happy New Year UNION BANK & TRUST 1st & Broadway 744-3221 form e r Bakerite and West High graduate. She ll y has plans to become a teacher in art on the secondary level. Rosalie Davis is the new aide in Reading. Rosalie , also a West High graduate of '73 and a former student at Baker, enjoys working with students in the Reading Lab imd also outside of school. She has started a Girls Club, working with 5th grade girls from Del Pueblo. Rosalie would like to become a Reading teacher at the elementary level. YO H ADVOCACY PART I . YO G P P LE AND AL OHOL Current i t :uation : ari u studie h ' ' e in d i that e perimentat i n with aJ ha be ome almo t univer a mong j un io r h ig h and hi h ch tud nt : that the number dri n kers. the q u a nr ity o f n umed. a .nd lhe fre q u e n cy o f u e i n lh i po pul ati n i n c r a e p ropo rti o nat e ! ' w ith a an d th a t th e e trends h ave been ac e l e r a tin g in recent years. i n ificant numbe r o f th e e o un g drink e r a r e mi u in aJ h o i in wa s that ofte n di r u pt th ei r li es and thre at e n th e health and saf e t y of th e m e l v and other . Mi use i doc um e nt e d b th e in c r e a in g numbe r of arre t o f drunk dri ving fataliti e in volv in g youths and a rising numbe r of arrests of o u th for alcohol related o ff e n e . Elements of the Problem: • Eff ec tive methods have not yet b een developed whic h c a n as i t in id e nti f ying yo u t hful al c o hol abus ers b e fore they have a full-blown alco h o l problem. • Though it is r ecognized that y o uthful alco h o l abusers have a negative influ e n ce o n t h e ir friends, there a r e n o t e nou g h r e levan t treat m e nt ser v ices available to youth who need attention. • Youth-serving pro fessi o n a l s (i n cluding m e nt a l health , yo uth serv ices. socia l services, pro bati o n , etc.) d o not hav e adequate training o r expertise t o identify/ d e tect existence of substance abuse pro b l e m s ; and furthe r , do not in corp orate the substance abuse d y n a mi c as a part of th e ir treat m e nt and/ o r servi ce d elivery . • "education" programs w hi c h emphasi z e "scare" tactics and " morals" s impl y d o not work. • Though it i s well-recognized that childre n o f alcoholics have a higher ri s k of alcohol misuse than the gen e ral youth population, adult p r'og r 'ams are inade-' quately staffed, tniin e , d moti vated to f oc u s o n the alco h olic ' s children prior to th '! i r being in need of "treatment " . . . . • ._, : • F ederal agencies a n d private o rgani zati o n s whic h deal with "substance" abuse (alco h o l ; ot her drugs) are inappropriately s epar ate d, th u s disallowing for c ross f e rtili zati o n of ideas and compre h e n siv e treatment and educatio n services. Advocac y Goals: • Devel opment of effectiv e screen ing and detection methods "to identify yo u t liful alcoho l abuser s and high-risk potential a lcoh ol abuser s. • D ev e lopment of a compre h e n s i ve network of treatme n t serv ices for you thful alcoho l abuse rs at federal, state and lo c a l l e ve l s . • Dev e lopment of compre h e n s ive in-s e r v ic e training programs for all youth -servin g professi o n a l s to as sist th e m i n dete cti n g yo uthful alco h o l abuser s and developing treatment approac hes respon s iv e t o the dynamics of substance abuse. • Development and .implementa t i o n o f effecti ve alco h o l education :progr a m s which emphasize d e c i sio n m aki n g and allow fot di s tinctions between alcohol u-se and abuse. • Legi s lati o n m andating that all federal agencies which fund adult alcoholism treatment programs provide for resear c h f ocuse d o n , and ser v ice s to . t h e childre n of clients r eceiving treatment. • Federal agencies, specifically NI AAA and NIDA, must combine, into a single agency and be held accountable for developing and providing comprehensive treat ment and educational s ervices to "substance" abuse rs. Dear Santa, I've been as good as IS cream puff. And I want star-trek, I want Evel Knievel an.i General Erkel from Planet of tht Apes. Love , Patrick (Vigil , age 5) Dear Santa, I was a good girl. And now I w;mt a . sunshine family pnd a bicycle, and a , pinat11 for my jvery own self and my brother, and hat's all I want. Love, Kim (Baca, . Student of the Month: Denise Perez D eni P e rez i an xample f a tudent with th ch I pirit that i fou . nd at St. Joe' . She i a c ti e l in ol ed in ports. Student Coun cil , and Mexican Dancing. ln the 2 • ; , years she has been at St. J oe ' , Deni e has become one of the most responsible and out going students. She h e lped or ganize the recent lave day at school. She also was in charge of g e tti n g o utdoor equipment for the pla y ground. For t h e past three years. s h e has participated in the Mexican D a n ci n g Group at St. Joe's. In January D e nise will be traveling with the group to Boston to perform. Am o n g her favorite s ubjects i n seventh grade this year , Denise lists spelling, readin g , and socia l studies. In readin g o n e of h e r recent projects was to make a -puppet stage and puppets and have them perform a story s h e created. Some of her interests outside sc h oo l includ e molding and paint ing cer a mi c figures, and writing to pen pals in other states and other countries. D e nise has a brother, Edward, who also attends St. Joe's, and a younge r sister, Bernadette, who attends pre-sc hool at D e l Pl,leblo. Also , D e nise's mother is involved in the math t u to rin g program at St. Joe's. Joe' s i s fortunate to hav,.e a s tudent lik e D e nis e , and lu ckily s h e will be at St. Joe's for another year and a h a lf. WHS Dedicated . West Hi g h School's first leagu e oasketball game ( West vs. George Washington) Friday, Decembe r 12, 1 975, was the occasi on for the in auguration of t h e school's new gymnasium facility. The Master of Ceremonies, student Bill y Rendon, dedicated th e gym to the West High communi t y and noted h ow proud both the school and commu nit y are to have s u c h a fin e f aci lit y located in the a rea. Vice-Principal, Dr. Travis Taylor actin g on b e h a lf of Mr. Edward Gallegos, West Hi g h Princ ip a l , introduced co m munity leaders w h o were honored g uest s: State Representative, Rich ard Castro; Manue l Martinez, Director of Brothe r s Redevelop m ent; RFK Recreation Center Director . Nick Argue llo ; Denver Inn e r City Parish Director, Jerry G a r cia; and Tony S alazar, Principal . of Bak e r Junior High School. The West High Pom Pons and Cheerleaders supporte d by the Pep Club presente d a co lorful half-time s h ow involving dances and cheers, and ending with the traditional " On Wes t Denver." Sinc e the building of the facility, many sports activities as well as other student-related activities can b e hosted at the school, which allows for more student body and staff participation and community suppo.rt. Dear Santa; I love you. I wish you give me different toys. And I'm going to tell you that I am going bananas. Love, Jeremy (Bates, age 4) Dear Santa, I've been a good boy. I want a playhorse, and a toy man on a horse, arid . a pop truck from K-Mart, and some crayons. Love, Manuel 5) .

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Store Hours Mon. th.ru Sat.-8:30 to 8:30 Sundays 9:00 to 6:00 -FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS WELCOMI SERVICE SHOP UNDER THE BRIGHT SKII o RED . _ POl A IOES ................... 10 ROME BEAUTY APPLES ........................ :. 3 -LEMONS .................. ' ....... 6 FOR BANANAS .................... 3 LBS PINTO . BEANS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LB February Will Be Our 4th Anniversary • Pan Dulce • Patas de Res • Chicharrones • Patas de Marrano • Requeson • Manteca • Menudo • Drejas de Marrano • Chorizo • Cabeza de Marrano • Choc. Ibarra • Rinones • Hojas Tamaleras • Lengua de Res • Cabeza de Borrego • Cesos - • Costillas de Cordero 87( 49( $1 69( 29( 0 JA TIENDA O DELA 0 0 GENTE 0 0 • *0 St CH '' s 81 COMPLET ETHNIC ITEM ONLY AT

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We Welco111e u.s.D.A. Food Coupons. TO A NEW YEAR OF SAVINGS AND OF YOUR COMMUNITY SUPERMARKET * • 0 I * etst : K A . 0 0 0 * IVE JAN. 1-15 • * • 0 * 0 0 • * * "ill.J/otv 0 -1J\ts 0 * * * * FINEST IN TOWN We Cut Prices To The Bone QUARTER LOIN PORK CHOPS ....................... LB $148 STEAK .................... . LB 89( MO]lll 12 0 B CON . ................................. $149 LONGHORN CHEESE ................................ ' LB CARNE ADOYADA ............. LB $129 • H igado • Haba ' s LINE OF AVAILABLE ANTE • Mollejas • Camarones Secos • Cola de Res • Harina de Panocha • Chaquegue • Posole • Mole Poblano • Canela • Chile Caribe • Pi _loncillo • Nopalitos • Chicos • Chyletas de Cordero • A tole • Sopaipilla Mix _ • Carne Adovada Watch for our Fantastic Daily Specials Next Month on Our 4th. Anniversary

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. . ' CHURCH NEWS ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado 80204 Fr. Andrew Meiners, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl Schwarz Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Thomas Ryan MASSES 12:10 and 6:00p.m. Sat. 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 (Spanish , up stairs) 10:00 (English, hall) 12:00 noon NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST) 325 W. Irvington Place Don Davis, Pastor Jerry McCormick, Assoc. Pastor SERVICES Worship, 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m. Sunday Evening Meeting, 6 :00p.m. Prayer Meeting, Thursday; 7:30 CLUB PROGRAM Boy's Club, Wednesday, 6 :30p.m. Girl's Club, Saturday, 9:30a.m. ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOUC CHURCH 1060 11th Street Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES Weekday : 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:00, 5:00 CONFESSIONS Daily-before 12:15 Mass Saturday 4:00 to 5:00 LUTHERAN . COMMUNITY CENTER 215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky, Older Persons Ministry SERVICES Sunday: Worship service and Sunday School from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL) 126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor SERVICES Sunday-'-8:00 a.m. Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon Wednesday10:00 a.m. Holy Communion SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH 1230 Decatur 825 -0121 Lou Roossien, Pastor John Algera, Intern Pastor (1039 Bryant 893-5753) Lupe Rodriguez, Social Worker .Sunday School ; 10:00 a.m. Worship, 11:00 a.m. Monday , Cadets at 7:15p.m. Wednesday-Adult Bible Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up), 7:30 Friday Teen Lounge, 8:30 p.m. FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH_ 430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA (del Sur) ' . Morning Worship, 9:00a.m. 910 Kalamath Phone 825-7497 .Rev. Job Maldonado, Pastor Sundays: , 10:00 a.m. Sunday School ; 11:00 a.m. Worship Service 6:00 p.m. Church Training 7:00p.m. Evening Service ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHUl
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SNOITAZINUMMI "S OITAZI MMI" is "im-munizations" spelle d backwa rd . But so what? The "so what" is that w ith o ut immunizati o n s. serious d is eases c an occ ur . D iph th eria ca n choke c hildr e n to d ea th ; w h oo ping cou g h will k.ill 70"/o o f th e chi ldr en und e r I who contract the d isease; polio ca n still paral yze and kill unpr otecte d children; and rub e lla ma y cause sever ely cripple d babies. West ide reside nt s, as well as all pare nt s. sho uld b e con ce rn e d about all o f these di eases and should mak e s ur e th at their c hildr e n have th e prope r immunizations . W hat d o you . a a pare nt. need to know? Diphth e ria Tetanus Per tussi s First Sig n s: D i phtheria and p e rtu ss i s ca use so r e throat , f e v e r , cold. and cou g h . Teta nu s o r lockjaw ca us es f eve r , co mpl ica tio n s . and convulsio n s. D octo r's s up erv i s i o n n ee de d . Pr eve ntion : Vaccine give n at 6 wee k s . 1 2 weeks. 18 week s . 1 8 mont h s . 3'/ , yea r s. 12-I 4 ye ars. (Sh o t at eac h age.) Dipht h eria and tetan us every I 0 yea r s. Measles Fever; ha rd dry cou g h; run n ing nos e a nd r e d r as h w hi c h start s at h ai r l i n e and s pr eads d o w n in p a t c hes. Small r e d pat c hes w i t h white ce nt e r l oca t e d in mou t h . Con s ult ph ys i c ian be ca use the ser io u s ness o f t h e dis ease i s differe n t in eac h c ase. P r eve nti o n : V accine a t I yea r (12 m o nth s). Mumps Firs t S i g n s: F eve r , heada c h e, vom itin g. Gla nd s near ear and towar d c h i n a t j aw lin e ac h e and hav e pain ful swe llin g . K ee p chil d i n b e d un til f eve r s t o p s. Keep ins i de unless weath e r is warm . Pr eve ntion : V accine a t I year (12 m o n t h s). Polio-Fir s t Sig n s: Slig ht f eve r, g e neral disco mf o rt , h eadac h e, s tiff ba c k . H os pit a l ca r e r equire d . Pr e v e nt i o n : Sa bin vaccine g i v en at 6 week s, 1 2 week s . 6 m onths, 1 8 m o nth s. 3 y , yea r s. (Ora l d ose given a t eac h age.) Rubella (German Measles or 3 Da y Measles) First Sign s: Mild f eve r . so r e throa t o r co ld ma y com e b e f o r e tiny r ose-co l o r e d ras h . Enla rged g l a nd s a t bac k of n ec k a nd b e hind ea r s . Give general good ca r e a nd rest. Pr eve nti o n : Vac cin e g i ve n at I yea r (12 m o nth s of ag e ) . As yo u ca n see, all o f th e abo ve diseases have vaccines (s h o ts) that ca n b e g i ve n t o pr e v e nt your c hild f r o m get ting these dis e as e s . Th e . West S i d e H e alth Dis tri c t (W est Side Health Center. Maripos a Hea lth St atio n . Ca sita Esperanz a Health St a ti o n , West woo d Health Stati o n , a nd la Ca s a de Salut e Health Stati o n) i s con cerned about c hildr e n and th e ir immunizations . W e have th e staff a nd vaccine s a vailable f o r y o ur use. Wh y d on't yo u mak e s ure that your c hildr e n a r e pro p erly immu nize d . C h ec k w ith your doctor or nurse th e n e xt tim e yo u visit your health f ac ilit y . Immunize and help to stop these harmful diseases. DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY HAS LOW RENT HOUSING AVAILABLE 9 a.m. 3 p.m. For Appointments 1425 Kalamatb On Dec. 18 the Denver Housing Authority wiU be accepting ap pointments for applications for certification in the Section 8 Exist ing Housing Program. Appoint ments can be made between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and every Tuesday and Thursday thereafter at the same times. Appointments must be made in person for only the Existing Housing Program. Applicants wiU not lose their place on other public housing waiting lists. This is a rent supplement pro gram of 200 subsidized units for the year 1976 and includes assistance for units presently occupied b y families . The Denver Housing Authority also has other low rent housing units immediately available for qualified families. An Equal Housing Opportunity THE HEROIN OVERDOS E MYS'TERY A book that should be required reading f o r e eryone is Licit Dlich Drug b y Edward M . Br echer and the Editors of Consumer R eports. On e critic say it is a book f o r an yo ne who uses drugs o r ma y pot entially use them and that includes just abo ut all o f us . One c hapt e r of special int e rest t o those w h o are aware o f t oday's scene d eals with th e " H eroi n 0 e rdose" myst e r y. which is d escri b e d as a m yt h . Mr. Br ec h e r says that there is n o s u c h thing as an "overd ose death ... rathe r that this has b eco m e a s y n o n y m f o r " Cause o f Death Unknown". H e c ites six separate instances where research b y D r. M i c hael M. B aden, Depu ty Chief Medica l Examin e r, New Y ork City, p resents evidence which overt urn s the ' H eroi . n O ve r dose Theo ry": (I) Wh e n t h e pa c kets of he roin fou n d near t h e bo d ies o f d e ad addicts a r e exami n e d , t h ey do not d iffe r fr o m ordi n ary p ackets . N o q u a l itativ e o r q u antitat i ve d if fer e n ces are f oun d . This r u l e s o ut the possib i l i t y t h at some inc r ed i b l y stupi d pr ocesso r m ay h ave filled a bag wit h pure h e roin i nstead of the u s u a l adulterated m ix; (2) w h en the sy ringes used b y a ddi c t s imm e di ate dl y b e f o r e dyin g a r e exa m i n e d , t h e mixture f o und in th e m d oes n o t cont ain m o r e h e r oin than u s u a!, (3) Wh e n th e urin e of a ddi c t s allegedl y dead o f ove rd ose i s a n a l yze d , th e r e i s n o ev id e n ce o f ove rd ose; ( 4 ) Th e tiss ues s urr o und ing th e s ite o f th e f a tal inj ec ti o n s h ow n o s i g n s o f hi g h h e r oin con ce ntr atio n ; (5) N eo ph ytes un acc u s t o m e d t o h e r o in r a th e r th a n a ddi c t s t o l e r ant t o o pi a tes would b e ex p ec t e d t o b e s u sce p t ibl e t o death fr o m ove rd ose. Alm os t all o f th ose d ying o f alleged "overdose" are l o n g tim e us e rs; (6) Addi c t s o ft e n ''shoot " in a g r o up , all u sing th e sam e h e r o in s uppl y and rare l y d oes m o r e th a n on e addi c t di e at su c lr a tim e. Mr. Br ec h e r p o ints o ut th a t the a b ove r e futati o n s o f th e o verdose th eo r y s h o uld have l e d t o warnin g addi c t s that s om ething other than "overdose" i s causing hundreds 9f addi c t s d eaths annuall y and an int e n sive search f o r th e true cause o f these d eaths s hould hav e been initi a ted . S i n ce n e ith e r of these s t e ps has been taken , the media g o rig ht o n t a lking about "hero in o v e rd o s e d eaths". Mr . Br echer suggests that eve n in c ases wh e r e an addict takes an exce ssiv e d ose, death usuall y can b e prevente d . During th e minut e s or hour s f ollo wing the injection of a p o t e ntiall y fatal overdose, death can b e for estalled b y administering a n e ff ec tive antidote: a narco tic antagonist known as nalorphine (Nallin e). Nalorphine brings the vic tim of opiate overdose out of his stupo r or coma within a few minut e s . Sinc e there is plenty of time and since nalorphine i s s t oc k e d in ph armac ies and h o spital e m e rgen cy r ooms throughout th e country, th e d eath of an yo n e due t o h e r o in o v erdose is rarely e x c u s abl e . If the r eade r finds himself in vo l ve d in a situat i o n wh e r e h e mu s t r e nd e r e m erge ncy servi ce t o so m eo n e suffe ring fr o m " overdose o f h e roin " the r e are som e t ec h niques whi c h may help: ( 1) B y placing i ce on the addict's groin o r fillin g a bath tub w ith i ce water and subme rgin g th e a ddict in it ; (2) B y w alkin g th e addic t a t a constant pace, talkin g him down , etc.; ( 3 ) B y keep ing the addict a w ake , keepin g a clo s e wa t c h that h i s e yes d o n o t start to r oll bac k ; ( 4) The mo s t import ant is to get the addic t t o a h os pit a l for m e dical attentio n . R eade rs wh o are interested i n furth e r informatio n or ass istan c e in d e alin g w ith drug-related problems s h o uld c all the Auraria Community C ente r Drug Free Educational Prog r a m . (534-7 614 ) and ask for Min e rv a Antuna o r Dav e Orti z. Dear S anta, I have been a goo d girl. I wan t a b ig w heel f o r Christmas. l o v e you , Deser e e ( Bu ettne r . 5 ) D ear S anta, I have been a go o d girl. I w ant a Barbie d oll with cloth e s , and some shoes for m y Barbie doll , and some clothes and records for myself. Deedra (Tru jillo, 6) Tenants Have Rights M t f u are ncemed a ut the .1diti n f th e buildin w e nd the nditi n of th e ro und u . Th re nrc tw o departme nt f the i t y a.nd unt y f D en\'e r th. t arc n erm: d with th e e re : H ealth H pital {whi h deal " ' ith upied build J u an Lnfant e leads th e T aeK w on-Do classes In A urarla ' gym. F o ; more lnform ati ou caU 5347 614. ing ). nd the Buildin D epart m e nt ('hi h deal with un upied buildin ) . Thi month' ani le will deal with H e alth a n d H o pital . Karate at Auraria The H ou in tion f H eal th and H o pital i re po n ibl e r ad m ini tr ati n and en f rce m en t o f D e n e r ' H ou ing de. TI1e h u The Auraria Communi ty Cent e r. 1212 Mariposa Stree t , has opened a new r ec r e ation program to young people on the Westside. l n addi t ion to its wide range of activities. A u ra ria n ow offers TaeKwon D o (the Korean for m o f t h e martial arts) . Classes a r e free to all yo uth. and are inst r ucted by J u an Infante. (F i rst D a n ) B lack B elt. who is affi l iated w i th K im ' s TaeK wonD o I nstitut e. Two months ago. Juan offered to tea c h . fre e of c ha rge, a class at the Cent e r . The p rog r a m becam e so po pu lar t h a t h e n ow teac hes two classes each T uesd ay a nd Thu rs d ay . Mr. Inf ante says Tae-Kwon D o teaches discipline and self confid e n ce. a ddin g th a t h e ' s g l a d t o b e doin g so methin g f o r t h e youn g p eo pl e. Jua n began tra inin g five yea r s ago, rece i ving his Blac k AMIGO If yo u think th a t yo ur manne r of drinkin g i s ca u s in g yo u incon ve ni e n ce, if yo u have r eac h e d th e p o int th a t it's b o th e ring yo u , may b e yo u w o uld b e int e rest e d in kn o win g m o r e details co n ce rnin g ''A leo h olies An o n y m o us" and it s p ro g r a m s o f r eco v e r y; v i s it u s . M o nd ay nites, 7 : 30 p . m ., W est s id e N eighbo rh oo d H e alth Clini c, lOth and F e d e ral , Rm. 214. B e gin ' n e r s Meeting: It ' s Bilingual Spanish English. Call Ernie Martinez at 255-8574 . Do You Qualify? Suppl e m e ntal Se c urity Income i s a F e d eral program that pay s m o nthl y ch ec k s to peopl e in financi:tl need who are age 65 o r older and t o needy p eo pl e at any age wh o are blind . or di sabled. Th e aim of the program i s to provid e monthl y chec ks s o that a n yo n e wh o is 65 or old e r or blind or disabl e d c an have a bas ic cash incom e. Th e amount i s $157 . 70 monthl y for o ne person or $236 . 60 for a m arried couple:-Thi s d oe s not mean that e v e r y e ligibl e p e rson gets thi s amount in hi s Suppl e m e ntal S ecuri t y In c om e ( SSI) c h ec k ever y m onth. S o m e peopl e get Jess because they alread y have other in co m e . S o m e p eo pl e g e t m o r e than these a m ounts b ec ause th ey live in a state th a t adds m o n ey t o th e F e d e ral p ay m e n t. In m os t states, a p e r so n wh o i s elig ibl e f o r SSI als o qualifie s f o r M e di ca id a nd othe r s ocial s e rvi ce s prov id e d b y the state. In C o lorad o, p eo pl e wh o are on SSI u s uall y receive a s mall supplemental chec k fr o m t h e county they live in , and a l so are e n t itl e d to M e di caid. P eo pl e w h ose m o nthl y in co m e is unde r $180 and w h o hav e savings o f less than $1, 500 may qua1ify for SSI . d e p ending on whethe r oth e r r equire m ents are m e t. Eli g ibilit y based on blindness or di s abilit y depends on the s everity o f th e a ppli cant's condition . T o b e co n s id e r e d disabl e d , a p erson must b e un a bl e to d o substantial gainful wo rk b ecause o f an 'impairment w h ic h i s ex pected t o la s t at least 12 m o n t h s o r result in death. Blindness is d e fined as 20 / 200 o r less in t h e b e tter eye w ith a corre c ti ve l e n s. o r v i s u a l fie ld restric ti o n (tunne l v i s i o n ) o f 20 degrees o r less. People w h o think they may qualify f o r SSI pay m ents c an appl y o r get more informati o n b y c on tacting a n y So c ial S ecurity offi ce. Th e number in Den ver f o r informa tion is 232 3650. Se habla Espanol. B elt earhe r this ye ar. Hi o n . Little John. al o r eceived hi Black B elt thi yea r . and h e lps with th e cia s. as Juan's wife and two daughte r s . Under t h e direction o f Bert M arti n ez, A sistant D ir ec tor of the C enter. TaeK won -Do has gone from a temporar y program to p e r manent c lasses for c hildr e n 6 to II yea r s of age each Tuesday and Thu r sday from 5:30 t o 6:30 p . m .. and an advanced c las e on th e }lime two day . f ollowing the c h ildren s classes. Plans are n ow being mad e for th e fir st p art of the ye ar. to begin d e m o nstrati o n s i n fighting forms, breakin g tech niques, and Tae Kwon-D o pattern s . Anyo n e interested i n t h e Ce n ter's Tae-Kwon-D o Progr a m is i n v ited t o co m e watc h a work o u t . Dear a n ta, ave een a goo oy. I wa n t a raci n g car. I want a o l o r i n g b oo k , a nd a h a t for Ch rist as a n d that's a ll. I l ove you . a n ta. Michael ( Maestas, 5) Dear S anta, I've been goo d . I a nt Evil Kn e i ve l a nd I g uess I ant a r ac in g ca r , a nd a fir e t ru c k ith a ladd e r. Love, J a mi e (E m a iurc h , 4 ) Dear Santa, I' ve been a goo d oy. I w a n t a Evil Kn e i vel, a nd a tar Tr ek, a nd a trainin g w h eel ike, and a Pl a net o f t h e Apes. BOYS CLUB Karate: Tues. & Thur. n ights, 6 : 30 9 : 00 p.m. Ar c h e ry : Wed. nights, 6:30 9 :00p. m . Wre stlin g ( t e am): M o n . & W e d . , 3 : 00 5 : 00 p . m . Boxin g (team) : Tues. & Thur., 3 : 00 5 : 00 p.m. Swimming : Mon . & Fri ., 6 :3 0 9 :00p. m . . Basketball (team) : Starts i n January. The above programs are for bo ys between the ages of 7 and 18 years of age. For further info rmation con cerning these classes contact Ronnie Maynes at 936 7342 or drop in at the Bo y s ' Oub at 721 W est 8th Ave. ing d e a r n crned with h o ' peopl e li ve and e t mtntmum tandard f r a f e and h ea lthful h o u ing . Thi in lud e utilities. a nitar y fac ilities. in ect and roden t control. maint e n a n ce and a cide nt preventi n . p ecifically. th e h o u ing co d e r e quir e that y ur r e i den e ha e a k.itc h n ink . a toil e t. wash b asin. bathtub or s h owe r , h t and co ld water. window and e ntilati n. and h ea t . all o f which mu t work pro perl y . landlo rd are al o r e p o n ibl e for co mm n area like hall s and s tair . I f a tenant think th e r e a r e h o u ing co d e vio l a tion in th e ir unit . they ca n call 893-6 144 to ask an i n p ec tor to come a n d in s p ec t th e unit. Heal th and H ospital will cite th e landlord for an y v i o l at i o n of th e housing co d e. It has been our experien ce that H ealth and Hospi tal responds v e r y qui c k l y when called t o in pec t a u n it. and in iss u ing citations for vio l at ions. H ow eve r . sometimes it may take seve ral mon t h to get violat ions of the h o u sing code repair e d . T h e reaso n f o r t h is i that Heal t h a nd H o pita! g i ves t h e l a ndl o rd a certa in a m o unt oftime to repair t hings, a nd t h e l a ndl o rd has t h e rig ht t o a ppeal. T hu s, t h e case co uld drag o n a nd o n . Also , if yo u a r e a ten a n t w h o i s t hi n k i n g of reporting yo ur l a ndlord f o r h o u s in g co d e v i o lati o n s, t here is o n e ve r y important t h ing t o r e m e m b e r. C o l o r a d o J aw s tates t hat a ten a n t may b e ev i c t e d for n o reason a t all , a s lon g as t h e landl ord does it pro p erly. Thi s mean s t hat i f yo u r e p ort h o u si n g cod e v i o l a ti o n s, a nd your l a ndlord doesn't lik e i t, you ma y b e ev icted a t t h e e nd o f the m o nth , o r a t the e nd of your lease. Thi s may sound ve r y dis couraging , but that's th e w a y it i s i n Co lorado . Th e o nl y w a y t o change that i s to change the laws. If yo u a r e int e rested i n supporting changes in t h e la w. pl e ase Jet u s kno w. Ca11 Betty Koehl e r o r W e ndi S chne id e r at 5 3 4 5141. Next m onth. w e will e xplain the fun c tions of the Building D epart m e nt . YWCA Has Preschool Programs In Fit b y Five, childre n age d four R egistratio n f o r t w o m othe r t o s i x enj oy a weekl y morning or. c hild prog r ams o f th e YWCA of aft ernoo n of g ymnas ti c s instruction Metr o p o lit a n D e nv e r will b e ac and cre a tive dramatic s . While their cepte d thro u g h January 7. c hildr e n are in the s e activities , In Mommi e and Me, m others m others participate in a program of and th e ir childre n who are at l e a s t s p eakers, disc u s sions , and crafts. two y ears of age share tog ethe r a M o th e r s must attend with their weekly m orning of a ct i v iti e s . Th e children. fir s t part of the morning is spent i n Mothers and the ir children may m otherchild phy s ic al ac tivit i e s in enro11 for 8 s essions on Friday the g y m or pool. mornings fr o m 9 : 30 to 11: 30 or In the second part of the Friday afternoons from 12:30 to morning, m othe rs liste n t o spe ak 2 : 30 p . m ., beginning January 9. e rs and discuss topics o f interest to The YWCA play s c hool is avail them, while children participate in able for younger childre n . The cost c r e ative a c ti vities in the YWCA of the program is $16 . 00 for one pla y s c h o ol. mother and child , with a charge of Participants may enroll in M o m$5.00 for e ach additional child in mi e and Me for 8 Wednesday s . the program, the playschool, or the starting January 7 from 9 : 30 to nursery. YWCA membership is II : 45 a . m . or for 8 Thursday s , required. starting January 8 from 9:15 to For further information , call the 11: 30 a . m . YWCA, 825-7141. A Unit e d Way TT;:,:T 3190 West Alameda (Thrift Store) 922-0837 Clothing, household items, and other tun things. HOURS: 9 am-5 pm Mon.Sat. PARKING IN THE REAR

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Page 8 • SANTA FE TRAIL NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ihle had a display of their tin cutting work miniature chairs, tables, dressers, settees, foot stools and a complete doll house assembled completely with doll. This is a craft of delicacy and skill worthy of publicity, which is a part of "Pins and Needles"a lot of talent and work by the elderly generation. 60th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Mr. and Mrs. Celestino LaFore of 825 Mariposa Street their 60th wedding anniversary on October 5th. They renewed their vows at Mercy Hospital due to the illness of Mr. La Fore. Fr. Campbell from St. Joseph's Church was there for the renewal of vows. They were married October 5th, 1915, at Walsenburg, Colorado. They lived there a few years; then moved to Longmont where Mr. La Fore farmed for many years. He quit farming and went to work for the Burlington Railroad from which he retired and moved to Denver. In 1970 Mr. Ihle was in a period of depression, following a pro longed healing of a broken leg. He was shown a book on tin craft and was asked to make some vigil candles. He became interested in the work and made many things for . the Washington Park Community Center. He is affiliated with the St. Francis deSales Catholic Church and very active in the work of the • 'Legion of Mary''. He also belongs to the Holy Name Society. Their home here in Hirschfeld is so compact that it looks like a small factory with tin cans everywhere. You would not recognize the coffee table it's his work bench. Joseph Ihle made the doll house and most of the furniture. He takes small orange juice cans and other small cans and makes chairs, tables, sofas, and beds. A good Westside craftsman. Mrs. LaFore suffered a stroke in 1965 and has not been well since. They have three daughters: Mrs. Evelyn Padilla of Lakewood, Mrs. Vivian Cook and Mrs. Geneviene Perez of Denver. They have four sons: Benjamin of Longmont; Rob ert, George and Tom of Denver. Tom is in business for himself and owns Mr. T' s Beauty Shop located at 2495 Youngfield Street in Qolden, Colorado. They have 18 grandchildren and 12 great grand children. Immigration Brochure Readied If you have neighborhood News from your friends, relatives and neighbors, mail them to SANTA FE TRAIL before the 20th of the month. Your news is the news we want and need! Publicacion espanol: El nuevo foieto del westside action center de immigracion esta listo para su uso. La informacion P.sta fundamental, para que cum pies y registrar con el servido de lmmigradon. Tambien tiene 10 que necesitas para entrar legalmente. El foieto tambien habla del pro ceso de deportacion y que encuen tras con el servicio de immigracion y naturalizacion y sus derechos. El foieto se puede aprovechar, en Ia calle once y Santa Fe. Si tiene ust e d preg•mtas hable al 534-5141. Fear and Insecurity Found in Survey About half of all Denver resi d ents are afraid to walk in their own neighborhood at night, a s urvey commissioned by Neighbors Against Crime Together (Neigh bors-ACT) revealed recently . Dave Martin, executive director o f Neighbors-ACT , a major Denver p rogram aimed at reducing crime t hrough citi ze n a c tion and educa tio n, release . d the results of the s urvey. "The survey shows that Denver people realize crime is a problem that police alone cannot solve and that they are ready and wiliing to pitch in to help themselves and their neighbors," Martin said. R. F. Falk Associates of Denver conducted the survey. It is part of the Neighbors-ACT campaign to acquaint people with the nature of the crime problem and involve them in a variety of ways to help each other avoid becoming victims of crime. Neighbors-Act, a $1.1 million federally funded program sponsored by the Denver Anti Crime Council and endorsed by Denver Mayor Bill McNichols, was launched in October and will con tinue through next October. The study consisted of 1,083 interviews throughout the city. Of those interviewed, 67 percent were household heads, 57 percent were homeowners and 61 percent weve e mployed . The ethnic breakdown was 57 percent Anglo, 25 percent Spanish-surnamed and 16 percent black. The survey also studied attitudes about crime and crime prevention and gathere d information about public views of the criminal justice s ystem, including attitudes toward . SUBSCRIBE NOW!!! Start loving your Neighborhood . Yearly Rate $ 3.00 the police and the courts. The study shows that crime is among the top three concerns of Denverites, ranking with inflation and unemployment. In terms of what bothers citizens about their own neighborhood, crime ranks with the environment and "pbb lems with fellow neighbors" as the top concerns. Other trends and feelings re vealed , Martin said , are these: • three out of five people feel their home is vulnerable to burg lary. • seven out of ten people "have not" cut back or changed activities during the past year because of crime, indicating possibly that changes happened before a year ago and that fear of crime has become a way of life for city residents. • half of those interviewed felt that nothing can be done to prevent an assault on themselves, but 68 percent felt they could protect their home from burglars. • 71 percent believe that Denver citizens must help the police pre vent crimes. At the same time, the survey showed , "Denver residents appear very willing to become involved in activities which may prevent crime,'' and they have, on balance , a favorable attitude toward the Denver Police Department. The survey also found that, although people see police "in a positive light," more citizens were "reluctant to answer questions about the police than any other set of questions." Make checks payable to Santa Fe Trail, 430 w. 9th Colorado, 80204 Avenue, Denver Name Address ---------City State Zip SUBCRIPTION COUPON . . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I The new West Side Action Center Immigration brochure is available for your use. The informa tion in it is useful to have you fill out and register with the Immigra tion Naturalization Service. It also contains what is required for your legal entry. The brochure also speaks about Deportation hearings and what goes on throughout your encounter with the Immigration Naturaliza tion Service and your rights. The brochure is available at 1100 Santa Fe Drive. If you have an y questions, feel free to call 5345141. Ask for the Immigration counselor. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Project No. 1898 SEALED PROPOSALS will be r eceive d from qualified contra c tor s b y the Dir e ctor , Stat e Building s Div i s ion. Room 626 State S e rvices Building , 1525 Sherman Street , Denver. Color a do 80203 until 2 :00p.m. MST o n th e 1 5 th day of January , 1976and th e n and there publicl y o p e ned and r ead aloud in Room 710. s am e building. PROJ E CT: AURARIA HIGHER EDUCA TION CENTER . BID PKGS. 40 -4. 5, & 6: Mechani cal, Electrical and Enclosure of S c i e nc e Buildin g , D e nver , Colorado 80204. I. Th e w o rk shall be accomplished as sc hedul e d including th e delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties, the submittal of sal e s and tax paym e nt forms, the calling . for th e final mspectton and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The General Conditions of the Contract. The work is scheduled to start on or about January 21, 1976 . 2. The right is reserved. to waive informali ties and to reject any Proposal. 3. Bidders may procure Bidding Docu ments from: CHARLES S. SINK & ASSOCI ATES. 3003 East Third Avenue , Suite 103, Denver. Colorado 80206. 4. A Deposit of $100.00 will be required for e ach complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the docum e nts will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (I) Actual bidd e rs who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the openmg of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Addi tional CO(Jie s of any documents, drawings or spectficatoons wtll be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction . S. Each Pr(}posal shall be submitted on the r e quir e d Propo s al Form and must be accom panied by a Prop o sal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5 % of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may b e (I) a cashier's c heck or (2) a c e rtified ch eck or (3) a Bid Bond o n State Form SC-6 .14. Cashier ' ' s or certified c heck shall be mad e pay able to the Trea surer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full forc e and e ffe c t for a period of thirty ( 3 0) days after the op e ning or Propo s als for the project. 6 . The Bidde r promi s es , in submitting his Proposal , that of ossue d a Notice of Award , h e will. within th e presc rib e d time , ex e cute the r e quired Agreement , furnish th e requir e d P erformance Bond. Labor and Mate rial Pa y m e nt B o nd. Insurance Policy and Certifi c at es of Insuran ce . or forfeit hi s Pr o posal Guara nt y as Liquidat e d Damages. 7. Prefer e n c e shall b e given for Colorado l a bor and mat eria l s produ ce d or manufac tur e d in Colo rad o. a s provided b y law . 8. The rat e o f wag e s to b e paid for all l a b o r e r s and m ec hani cs shall b e in ac cord a n ce with th e l a w s of Colorado and th e a ppli c abl e Dav is-Bacon rates o f wages for th e proJec t. tf su c h rates h a v e been e s tablished. D a t e d at D enve r . Colorado . this 22nd d a y of D ece mb er. 1 975. OFFI C E OF STATE PLANNING AND BUDGETING S TAT E BUILDING S DIVISION B y J o h L. Ma so n 1 212 2 17 5 A c tin g Dir ec t o r M edia o f Publi catio n : D aily J o urnal . Den ve r : D e n ve r W e ekl y N e w s ; Santa F e Trail Publi catio n Dates: Fir s t : De ce mb e r 24. 197 5 S e c o nd : D ecember 3 I . 197 5 OBITUARIES -Edith Gomez of 102 West 4th Avenue died on 15th, 1975. She was born in Taos, New Mexico, in 1921. She was a widow. The service and burial were at Mt. Olivet Cemetery on November 20th. * * * Manuel Padilla of 614 West 4th Avenue died on December 1st, 1975. He was born in 1916 in Colo rado. He never married. Mass was celebrated at St. Joseph's Church and burial was at Ft. Logan Cemetery on Decem ber 5th. His brothers and sisters were Jose A. Mattias (Pueblo), Eugenio Padilla (Pueblo), Rose Anaya (Den ver), and Frances Gallegos (Den ver). * * * Nicomedez J. Vigil of 916 West 9th Avenue died on December 7th, 1975 in Ocate, New Mexico, where he was born in 1900. He was the husband of Adelina Vigil. Mass was at St. Joseph's Cath olic Church on December lOth, and burial was at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. * * * Rudolph (Rudy) Delgado of 710 Elati Street died on December 15th at home. He was the husband of Cathy Delgado and was only 34 years old at the time of death. He was born in Pueblo. Mass was at St. Joseph's Church with burial at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. * * * Louis Pinedo, 88 years old, 1254 Kalamath Street, died September 5th in Mercy Hospital of heart failure. He had been in failing health since his wife Matilda was also ill. Matilda Pinedo, 74 years old , di e d October 4th, in St. Luke's Hospital of cancer. Mr. Pinedo was born in Mexico in 1887 and came to the United States when he was fourteen years old. He was a Westside resident for 74 years. Mrs. Pinedo was born in Trinidad , Colorado, in 1901 and mov e d to Denver when she married Louis Pinedo on September 3, 1917. They are survived by three children : Faustino Pinedo, Lillian Tafoya, and Jenny Hernandez, all of Denv e r. They had nineteen grandchildren and t 'wenty-four great gran etch ildren. Both funerals were at St. Eliza beth ' s Catholic Church and burials . were at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. * * * Manuelita Castro of 1014 West 9th Avenue died on November 6th, 1975. She was 93 years old and was born in Mexico . She was a widow and was survived by her children: Antony R. Castro and Louise Duran, both of Denver. She had 5 grandchildren, 11 great grand children and 6 great-great-grandchildren. Burial was at Mt. Olivet Ceme tery. * * * • classified Ads • NEW PINTO BEANS, double clean 100 pound sack is $32.50. Cal! 733-2958, day or night. Will deliver. . SANTA FE TRAIL will continue to have a special column for classified ads. Please call 892-1039 weekdays between 9:00 and 12:00 a.m. or write to Classified Ads, SANTA FE TRAIL, 430 West 9th Avenue, Denver, Colorado 80204. All classi fied ads are 50 cents per line and must be submitted by December 22nd at noon. Rights Under Are there any rights to which all general-assistance recipients are entitled? General-assistance recipients have no uniform substantive rights -that is, rights to specific items or ajllounts of money but wherever they live they are entitled to equal treatment and fair procedures. The states are not required to run any kind of general-assistance program at all but once they do establish such a program it must follow these rules: 1. No one may be refused general-assistance because he has not been in the state or county for some specified period of time as long as he is there now and intends to stay. 2. No one may be refused general-assistance because of his race or because he is not an Amer ican citizen. 3. Everyone must be told the rules that govern general-assis tance, be allowed to apply for general-assistance, be given a decision within reasonable time. and be given a chance to appeal and a fair hearing. Onc e a person starts receiving general-assistance, his benefits may not be cut off until he pas been given a notice of the reason for the proposed termina tion and the opportunity for a fair hearing. Vickie Herrera West Side Action Center Sewing Classes Need to use a sewing machine in the mornings to mend or make something? Would you like to learn to sew? Do you need to make clothes and other things economically? Sewing sessions at First Men nonite Church community center are open to people from the West side community. Several women and nine sewing machines are _ available for your project. Each Tuesday the machines and help is available from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. or 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Every thing is geared to your needs and the needs of others there that Tuesday. ; RESTAURANT AND BAR * -753 SANTA FE DRIVE * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * The meal that's sure to fiJ( * * Come and enjoy our: * ; FAST LUNCHES ; * From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Our place is always * * * * . AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS AND BANQUETS * OANCING FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS AND * HOLIDAYS FROM 8:00 p.m. UNTIL 2:00a.m. * * SUNDAYS FROM 7:00 p.m. UNTIL 12:00 p.m. . PHONE 534-9579 * * * *