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The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, February, 1976

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Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News, February, 1976
Series Title:
The Santa Fe Trail - Westside News
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Santa Fe Trail
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Denver, CO
Publisher:
Santa Fe Trail
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Language:
English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Santa Fe Trail
U1A702 QSaTflfll
FEBRUARY 1976 • ISSUE #20
Register To Vote Now
Monte Pascoe, Chairman of the Colorado Democratic Party, urged all independent and non-registered voters in Colorado to affiliate with a political party and register to vote before February 3rd. February 3rd is the cut-off date for participation in the precinct caucus,, which begins the process of selecting delegates to the national Presidential conventions and designating candidates for the primary election.
“It is important,'* said Pascoe, “that people realize that one must be affiliated with a political party for at least 90 days prior to the caucus day, May 3rd. This makes Tuesday, February 3rd, the deadline for affiliation to participate in the precinct caucus.
: “In both 1974 and 1975 over 25,000 Democrats in Colorado participated in a precinct caucus, more
New Welfare Program a Dud
This February, the Denver Welfare Department is starting a new program which will affect approximately 100 families on the West-side who are now on Aid for Dependent Children. This program is officially called the Denver Monthly Reporting Experiment but is commonly known as the Mathe-matica Program.
The main features of this program are:
1. Families will receive - their checks on the 15th of the month instead of the 1st of the month.
2. Families must fill out a monthly eligibility form. This must be done each month or the family will not receive the next month’s check.
It is stated that families who do not fill out the forms will be cut off from the program and if they need help, caseworkers can not be of assistance as they have been specifically told not to help. Individuals or families are to be referred to the new Mathematics technicians.
It appears that many problems will arise since the checks will come on the 15th of each month. Families will not have enough money to pay for rent, food stamps and other bills that are due the first of each month. Also in February, food stamps will cost more, and in many
Hope in New State Legislation
by State Representative Richard Castro
The short session of the 50th General Assembly was officially launched on Wednesday, January 7th by Governor Richard Lamm. The Governor presented a 42-point agenda which included several controversial issues such as a severance tax on minerals, collective bargaining for teachers, and a package of conservation bills.
Several issues affecting West-side which State Rep. Castro intends to push for are:
BANKING
Disclosure legislation which would require financial institutions to report commercial and residen-
tial lending by geographic area, disclose loan terms, and reveal sources of deposits. Such disclosure would provide information valuable in combating redlining, the practice of withholding loans from certain areas considered undesirable. A recent study done by two graduate students at D.U. indicated that such socially questionable lending practices are occuring predominantly in Capitol Hill, West Denver and lower East Denver neighborhoods.
Other banking items that should be debated at length include: limitations on holding companies, branch banking and electronic funds transfer.
Continued on page eight
****************************** Money Available for Your Home-Does Your Home Qualify?
people than ever before in the history of Colorado politics. 1976 promises an even better turnout!’*
Colorado will send 35 delegates and 28 alternates to the Democratic National Convention in New York City beginning July 12. The Colorado plan for selection of these delegates has been adopted and approved by the State Party and the National Party.
Pascoe stated that anyone who wants to change or declare his or her affiliation to a political party or register to vote can do so at their County Clerk’s office or at the Election Commission, but this should be done by February 3rd.
“This is a very good opportunity,” concluded Pascoe, “for people to be more involved in the political process on a grassroots level.**
Let’s all get Involved!
situations families will have to be buying them twice on the same pay check.
The program’s purpose is “to cut down the incidence of overpayment*' to ADC families, but the families were selected at random and not by any specific procedure. One of the workers in the new program believes that the new program will result in a 100% turnover within the one year experiment period. The purpose then seems to be to eliminate poor families from the program.
This program is called the Denver Monthly Reporting Experiment and the experiment is taking place hdre in the Westside and all over town. It is difficult to see how anyone who has gone through the frustrating and insulting process of qualifying for ADC will benefit from the program. Only Welfare bureaucrats or conservative persons who oppose the welfare system will get any reward as poor families who struggle to survive and treat their children rightly lose out on this “experiment.”
There is a form that must be filled out for each federal government grant for an experiment or program called “Human Subjects” questionnaire. This editorial board and staff wonder whether this had been filled out for this “experiment.”
Councilman’s Committee Active For Westside
Councilman Sal Carpio has recently formed a District 9 Community Development Committee, made up of residents from the various parts of District 9: West-side, North Denver, Globeville, Elyria and Swansea.
Although the first order of business for this new Committee has been to work to get needed community projects through the Community Development Act, this Committee will also be working on such matters as zoning issues, housing, and other items for community betterment.
Westside residents sitting on the District 9 Community Development Committee are: Ruben Leal, Andrew Lovato, Betty Koehler, Betty Sanchez, Adolph Gomez. Victor DeLeon, Wilma Dabrowsfi, Bob Federico, Paul Martinez and Lowell Langendorfer.
The chairman of the District 9 Community Development Committee is Manny Martinez of West Denver who also serves as Councilman Carpio’s appointee to the Mayor’s Advisory Council on the Community Development Act, representing all of District 9. Mr. Martinez was also elected Vice-Chairman of the Mayor’s Advisory Council. - *
Mr. Martinez and Councilman Carpio conducted numerous meetings throughout District 9 last November and December in getting projects ready to submit for funding through the Community Development Act and in preparing for the Housing Remodeling Assistance Program which will begin in District 9 in February.
Other Community Development projects which will begin soon in the Westside are building expansion of the La Alma Center at Lincoln Park and the construction of a recreation center south of 6th Avenue.
For any additional information, contact Councilman Carpio at City Council 297-3012, or at home 458-1711.
A housing remodeling program that will help home-owners make needed repairs on their homes will begin in City Council District 9 in February. For Westside homeowners, Uving in District 9, applications for this bousing assistance program will be taken at St. Joseph’s Church hall. West 6th and Gaiapago, on February' 12, 13 and 16, from 12 noon to 8 p.m. each day.
This program will concentrate on helping home-owners make needed plumbing, heating, electrical and roofing repairs to their homes. Eligible home-owners may receive tax free grants up to $5,000 depending upon the income of the family, the size of the family, and the age of the home-owners. Grants are not repaid. Low interest loans, ranging from 3 to 6 percent, can also be available for interested and eligible home-owners. Low interest loans can be available for up to $7,500 and can be repaid over a period up to ten years.
Eligiblity requirements include:
• home must be owner-occupied and a single family residence (or making payments on the home — not rent)
• home-owner must have lived in that home for at least 6 months
• home-owner must not have over $3,000 in liquid assets (cash, savings account, stocks and bonds — does not include furniture, cars or clothing or other personal property)
Many Westside streets are now crowded as a result of the Anraria Higher Education Complex north of Colfax. If you would like to know more or become involved in ending this and other effects, call Muriel Ashmore at 534-1280 or Betty Koehler at 534-5141.
homes already remodeled through a Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) program will not be eligible
This is the first year of a three year program that is being funded through the Community Development Act of 1974. District 9 has been allotted $1,225,000 for the first year which will provide assistance for at least 175 homes throughout District 9. District 9 has also been allocated enough funds to provide assistance for another 175 homes in the second year and at least 200 homes for the third year. The second year of this program will begin later on during this year. Home-owners, who are eligible, and are not assisted during the first year’s program will be eligible to receive assistance in the second or third year of the program. Since applications will be considered on a first-come, first-serve basis, it is important that interested home-owners apply early during the dates listed above.
This program will be administered through the Denver Urban Renewal Authority.
Persons wanting more information should call any of the following persons:
Councilman Sal Carpio — Office 297-3012; Home 458-1711
Manny Martinez, District 9 Chairman — Office 573-5107; Home 534-1078
Barbara Talarico, Commission on Community Relations — Office 297-3171
**************** 8c. ******
* * * *
Lowell Langendorfer presents a plaque to Leonard Chadwick, honoring him for 23 years of service with Denver Housing Authority.
CHADWICK HONORED
More than 100 residents and staff of the Denver Housing Authority attended a reception to honor former Executive Director, Leonard G. Chadwick, on Saturday evening, Jan. 10.
Sponsored by the Central Resident Council (CRC) of the Housing Authority the event was held at Hirschfeld Towers. A plaque was presented to Mr. Chadwick honoring him for his more than twenty years with the Housing Authority by CRC chairman, Lowell Langendorfer.
Chadwick had resigned from the position of Executive Director , effective Aug. 1, but prior to that time he underwent unexpected heart surgery and the receptions u honoring him were delayed until . his recovery.
Chadwick had been on the staff at the Housing Authority for 23 years working his way from painter, resident counselor to executive
director. He always has been active in civic and church affairs, serving on the Denver Opportunity board for many years. He is a well-known jazz musician playing the trumpet with his own group for social, civic and political events.
Entertainment for the reception included the Hirschfeld Singers with Alice Notary; Ballet Folklorico El Netzahuallaoyotl with Enrique Montoya, director; the Kersena Joyce Models;- Valeric Conict, dancer; Minnie Conict, poetry reading, and Jim Benway, guitar. Jean Jackson was the narratof.
Other residents assisting include refreshments — Jean Jackson, Minnie Conict, Lily Roberson, Amanda Walker, Thelma White-side, Lowell Langendorfer, Erma Turner and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Sayers, and the plaque committee — Lonnie Frierson, Laura Ham-mergren, Minnie Conict and Jean Jackson. • V*
Santa Fe Trail
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Page 2 -SANTA FE TRAIL
Community School a Reality
Community School at Del Pueblo Elementary School will become a reality this year and an advisory council or steering committee has become active. This is a new adventure for the Westside and also for Denver Public Schools since the only community school now in existence within Denver Public Schools presently is Kunsmiller Junior High.-"
Fred DeHerrera, who has worked in this neighborhood and also in the Sun Valley - Las Casitas area for a number of years, has been hired as the community school coordinator. He will be working under the direction of Mr. Gil Crater at DPS Administration but also under the steering committee of community residents and agency personnel. He was hired on January 5th.
Community School is a new term but does not necessarily mean “school” for adults, teens, and children. A community school opens the school to use by the neighborhood residents and other residents of Denver throughout the school day (where it does not interfere with the education of the children) and in the late afternoons and evenings.
Not only can reading. GED instruction, belly-dancing, special classes, a community chorus? guitar or piano lessons, Spanish, or exercise classes be taught under the direction of the community school specialist and the advisory board, but special events can now take place at Del Pueblo or any other of the four community schools now being planned or opened.
All activities must be approved by the steering committee of the community school and by the community school specialist. The principal, neighborhood residents, staff members from agencies and/or churches, and teachers are members of this committee.
The Del Pueblo committee is off to a good start and this paper salutes both Fred and the committee. A survey will soon be in the Del Pueblo district asking residents what types of activities they would like to see at the school: dancing, income tax, recreation, arts and crafts, auto mechanics, or other needs of the residents.
Although all classes will be open to all persons in the Westside and in the city and county of Denver, the activities will be planned for the Del Pueblo school area. This is not something exclusive, but it is planned for us, here in the Westside.
If you are interested in working on the steering committee or have ideas about classes and activities you would like to see at Del Pueblo community school, call Fred DeHerrera at 629-1473. Your input is important and necessary.
This is our school; neighborhood residents worked hard to make it a community school. Now we have to work to make it something we can all use for our own education or our benefit and the benefit of our children and parents. This program is for everyone: baby to older persons.
It is ours! Let’s make it go!
WHS Youth Show Respect
Sunken Gardens is a problem for West High staff and youth, community parents and leaders, and anyone who is opposed to youth becoming involved in drugs or drinking. It is a meeting place and a place to buy pot or other stuff and a place to get drunk during the day.
But in spite of this our youth who frequent the park are certainly not all bad for many reasons and in many ways. One such incident happened last month and should be reported to the community.
Grandma Mary Nelson works at Raggedy Ann Headstart each morning with the three-year-old children. She is a foster grandmother. She left at noon to catch the #5 bus at 9th and Elati.
Dear Editor:
1 would like to take this opportunity to thank Project Concern for the help it has given me.
On three occasions Project Concern helped me obtain food for families whose children attend the school where I teach. On the -first occasion I was put in contact with the Westside Action Center where I obtained food and money for a family in dire need. On the second occasion, when I was unable to obtain food elsewhere because of low supplies, Project Concern provided it for another family. On the, third occasion, I was given a box with rice, flour, beans, milk, salt, sugar, macaroni and other staples so that I could give it to a family who had no money and whose daughter was ill.
These families could not 'have turned elsewhere for help as none of them qualified for welfare or other social services.
1 firmly believe that Project Concern is a worthwhile endeavor and one that is needed by families who seek temporary help.
Sincerely, Katherine- Acosta Teacher, Denver Public Schools 4331 Wyandot Denver, Colorado 80211
One of our West High youth saw her and asked if she was indeed Grandma Mary who was nice to- all the Headstart children. When she replied that she was, he stopped all the snowballs (which were hard and frozen) from being thrown in that direction. No snowballs were thrown then nor as the bus left its stop.
Some of our youth do know how to respect others and how to be good leaders and responsible citizens. Although we need to find ways of stopping the high amount of use of drugs and alcohol in the park during school hours, we also need to find ways of honoring our youth who are responsible, mature, and respectful. He who respects others deserves respect himself.
Dear Editor,
We would like to thank Mr. Anthony Lopez for coming to Del Pueblo and teaching us about “la charreada” and bringing his beautiful horse. The children enjoyed seeing the film about charros de Denver, and they learned about many of the Spanish words which are still used by cowboys of the United States.
Anita De Herrera Elias Robles Aztec students Del Pueblo
Del Pueblo students were fortunate to have Mr. Anthony Lopez of the Charro Association de Denver present a movie with some background information about the history and activities of the Charro Association. The movie showed some of the calf roping, bull riding, and rope tricks that are a part of a Mexican Charreada. The children have been studying about the stock show, cowboys, and the charreada, and they have learned many of the Spanish words that are still used in the cattle industry.
Mr. Lopez brought his Arabian horse and explained the steps involved in saddling and riding a horse.
The children were very excited and wished they could all have horses to ride.
EDITORIAL BOARD
Chuck Garda, president; Becky Garcia, vice president; Sr. Rene Weeks, treasurer; Brice Balmer, editor; Flora Gasser, Russ Brito, Judy Bauer.
Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume no liability for any advertising which is not publish,ed for any cause.
The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents. It is also understood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree ,to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail''' against all expense, loss or damage sustained by reason of printing such copy.
All correspondence can be sent to:
SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 892-1039
COMPAMENTO and ANTONIA BRICO are two films which will be shown at Auraria Community Center on Friday, February 6th, at 7:00 p.m. The showings are sponsored by the Citizens Coalition.
Donations are Welcomed to support the Coalition’s work for Citizen participation in Denver city government. There will be free refreshments.
COMPAMENTO shows the struggle of people in Chile while ANTONIA BRICO is a film by Judy Collins about Ms. Brico who is a woman orchestra conductor here in Denver. Both films have received good reviews in numerous papers and magazines.
Westside Agencies Funded
The Mile High United Way for 1976 is allocating a record $7,968,823 to its affiliated agencies for agency purposes and for direct community service.
Robert Priester, president of the United Way Board of Trustees made the announcement after the organization’s December meeting. The total represents an increase of $578,417 new dollars over last year’s allocation, according to Priester.
Priester said the remainder of the $8,611,659 raised in the fall fund drive will be allocated as follows: United Way administration, $220,501; Agency Operations and Budgeting Department, $55,-658 and Campaign Department, $336,677.
“Service on budgeting committees is a great responsibility, demanding of one’s time and effort,” according to Andy Van Nostrand, chairman of the Admissions and Allocations Committee. This year over 100 men and women spent three months and some two thousand hours meeting with the agencies discussing their budget needs for the upcoming year.
The following Westside services and agencies received grants: Auraria Community Center $84,000
Boys’ Club of Denver, Inc. $140,000
Community Homemaker Service, Inc.
$127,330
Latin American Research & Service Agency $66,500
Legal Aid Society $111,300
Lutheran Service Society $70,500
Mile High Child Care Association $248,000
Because the United Way did not reach its goal this year, the Special Needs grants will not be given. A number of Westside programs have benefitted from this program during the past several years.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
BUS PASSES AVAILABLE
A new program of monthly bus passes for commuters to become effective on March 1, was approved Thursday by the board of directors of the Regional Transportation District (RTD).
The existing $10 monthly pass' for students and $5 monthly pass for elderly and handicapped citizens will remain in effect without change.
“It is felt' that a monthly pass is not only more convenient to the riders of the system, but also can be an incentive for additional ridership,” Mrs. Houston said. “The daily commuter undoubtedly has certain frustrations in making certain that he or she has the exact change for his ride to work.”
Under The- new program, there will be two types of commuter passes: • Monthly Express Pass costing $19.76. This can be used at any time without payment of additional cash on all express and local
buses. For service where the fare is more than 50 cents, the pass is worth 50 cents toward the applicable fare.
• Monthly Local Pass costing $15. This can be used at any time without payment of additional cash only on local bus service, including TownRider, DART service, Boulder Ride and handy Ride.
Passes will be available at the RTD Information Center, 1524 California St., and the Alameda Division office, 350 S. Santa Fe Dr. In addition, RTD plans to implement a system to permit purchase of passes by mail.
A Saturday Shoppers Pass was also approved by the RTD board. Effective March 1, the Shoppers Pass can be purchased on any Saturday from RTD bus drivers for 50 cents. Customers purchasing the pass will be entitled to unlimited use of the bus system on that day at no additional cost.
New Mural at West by Student
a
During November and December, Lupe Carlos was busy with a mural at West High School, entitled Conquest of Mexico. He previously designed the mural for a contest at the school and won the right to paint the mural.
This reporter was excited and well rewarded as he talked with the sophomore painter about the mean-ing and the origins of the design.. Lupe spent about ten days researching the symbols at West High and Denver Public Library.
The center symbol is a temple with a spear in it. The temple is on fire. From the triangles on out is the Serpent of Fire. The head of the serpent is at the bottom of the round mural. Also in the concentric circles are a row of gods from central Mexico civilization. Symbols in the design are from the cultures of the Mayans, Toltecs, and Aztecs.
The actual painting of the mural
took 19 days and Lupe Carlos was helped by Dave Rivera, who is also a sophomore at West and a West-side resident. Both young men also worked on the murals and designs op the second floor of the Westside Action Center in the Neighbors ACT offices.
Before he started painting the West High mural, Lupe was frustrated because someone at the school stole his original design. The present mural was drawn and painted from memory of the original that won the contest.
The motivation for working so hard on the mural was two-fold. Lupe wanted to see a Chicano mural at the school because he is a Chicano and many of his classmates are also. He also likes art and someday hopes to go to the University of Denver and would like to have a scholarship to go there. All of these murals and works will help show his talents to judges who decide who gets the grants and/or scholarships.
Presently Lupe is working on a school crest for West High. No decision had been made at the time of this writing whether he won that contest. Others at the school are designing school flags in another contest. • -< .r si,. »
The mural is done in acrylics, but Lupe and Dave are frustrated because there are already scratches on the painting. The painting is on the north side of the lunchroom in the hallway. It is not in an obvious place or showy place so interested people will have to look a bit to find it.
Lupe Carlos works hard on his homework to keep up his grades in school and also plays on West High’s football team. He is the son of Lupe and Pat Carlos. The family lives on West Cedar, here in the Westside.
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Resident of the Month:
HELEN
“I bless Yahweh, who is my counselor,
and in the night my inmost seif instructs me;
I keep Yahweh before me always, for with him at my right hand nothing can shake me.”
These words from the Psalms stick with Helen Lucero who read last month’s issue of Santa Fe Trail and said she would be willing to tell her story of her bout with alcohol.
Her faith, her respect for her self, her new goals, and her ability to live each day new keep her from the old self-pity and misery that - were her lot before she got rid of her habits.
About two and one-half years ago, many things started coming to a climax for Helen. The doctor warned her about her health and said she must give up drinking if she wanted to be healthy. She was charged with her third and fourth DUI charges and her attorney was about to refuse to assist her. The fear of jail and embarrassment along with the attorney and doctor led her to see a psychiatrist and to l begin anabuse monitoring.
Even though she began all this, she was hostile toward the world and toward others, but she had begun on the first step: seeking some help. But even here, she needed help and other people and Helen is thankful for her family, doctor, friends and other people which she had behind her. She wishes only that other alcoholics also had such a good foundation from youth and also so many friends that will help.
The psychiatrist asked her, “How do you feel about Helen? What feelings do you have for yourself?” At that point, she didn’t have good feelings. She didn’t like herself; she felt resentful toward others; and she didn’t have respect for herself. Many of her hang-ups that she needed to work through were from her childhood, but her psychiatrist found another problem i also: She needed spiritual help through A A or the church. Helen j refused to go to AA and has not yet I been to A A. (It just wasn’t for her.)
El Libro Que Responde A La Necesidad , Fundamental De La Humanidad
Cual es? Si bien es cierto que la gente doquier anhela sentir que se le ama, todos los grandes profetas y maestros de la Biblia nos dicen que la necesidad mas grande es amar a Dios —
! con todo el corazon y con toda el alma y con toda la mente. Cuando sentimos este amor por Dios, empe-zamos a percibir que El nos i ama y nos cuida, eterna y compasivamente.
El Heraldo de la Ciencia Cristiana ayuda a discernir como amar a Dios total y completamente. Amamos a Dios mas al comprenderlo mejor. Los articulos en el Heraldo ayudan a explicar la curacion por la oracion a Dios. Pueden cambiar su punto de vista hacia la vida.
Usted puede obtener un I ejemplar libre en espanol.
! ENVIE ESTE CUPON SIN COMPROMISO A
Fourth Church of j Christ, Scientist 3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colo. 80211
|
Por favor mandeme mi ejemplar 5 libre del Heraldo de la Ciencia Cristiana.
Nombre
Direccion
Ciudad
Estado 2lP
LUCERO
In June of 1974, she went to a wedding in New Mexico and found that some cousins and other relatives and friends had changed as a result of the charismatic movement in the Catholic Church. It surprised her but “if they could change, why not Helen?” She brought home a Bible and a book on Catholic Pentecostal movement.
Since she was off anabuse on her return, she headed for the 10th Avenue Bar because she could control herself, but she couldn’t. She finally got control of herself after two weeks, went back on anabuse on her own (not because of probation) and began reading the Bible. She also began going to church each Sunday.
During the past two years, she has read many books and the Bible which have been instrumental in her “spiritual healing” from alcohol. She didn’t have some quick, fantastic experience that healed her, but through the process of reading,, prayer, and putting into practice what she read, she was healed from alcohol. She can’t stand the smell of it anymore.
For the first time in many years, Helen Lucero feels that she has a “clear mind” and she is happy and grateful. Her family which has been with her through the struggle is also much happier. Ms. Lucero is beginning to work toward her B.A. at Loretto Heights College in the University Without Walls program. She is sewing more and saving some money on clothes. She is
Polly Baca Barragan Appointed To ‘Carrascolendas’
State Representative Polly Baca Barragan, D-Thornton, has been appointed to the national advisory board of “Carrascolendas,” a bilingual television program transmitted nationally by the Public Broadcasting Service.
“Carrascolendas” is designed to cultivate three qualities in children — respect for self, respect for others, and respect for the world around them. It is the only bilingual program on television that has as its focus the feelings, attitudes, values, and human relationship of children in a multicultural society.
The program is aimed at a 6 through 10-year-old audience and uses a musical-comedy format in both Spanish and English to demonstrate concepts such as cooperation, decision-making, respect for diversity, and problemsolving. “Carrascolendas” can be seen Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.ni. on KRMA, Channel 6.
Representative Barragan has served as a White House Public Information Officer, a Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and as a member of the Democratic National Committee. Boards on which she serves include Project CANBEE, Mile High United Way, Colorado Housing, Inc., and she is Vice Chairperson of the National Congress of Hispanic American Citizens. Rep. Barragan has received several International Labor Press Achievement Awards. In 1969 she received the Outstanding Young Woman of America Award and in 1973-74 and 1975-76 she was included in Who’s Who in American Politics.
reading and enjoying books. Each Sunday she attegds Mass and every Friday she meets ‘with a small group which reads the Bible, has discussions, and prays spontaneously together at the convent on 6th and Galapago.
Helen has some feelings about what she is doing and what others can do to make life meaningful and to get off of alcohol:
1. She not only reads the Bible and other books but she attempts to practice Christianity and live as Christ lived.
2. She is dealing with her emotions and feelings and learning how to handle them. She also has a personal relationship with Christ and talks over her problems and fears in prayer.
3. She realizes that in the Christian faith there is forgiveness. The past is forgiven and she can live in the present and future.
She doesn’t carry the hurt and anger from the past and can learn to forgive those who bring up the past or make her out to be what she was before.
4. She has learned to love and respect herself as Helen Lucero. She hopes that others learn to accept themselves and feel .good and become able to act as individuals.
Helen has always been actively involved in many Westside activities and organizations and she still is but less than before because sometimes the activities she was involved in were to get her away from herself. She is presently working at the Justice Information Center where she has contact with many people who have been arrested or must appear before the courts in Denver.
She can assist people there, but she can also meet some other people who are burdened down with alcoholism and refer them to agencies which can help them. She can be reached at the center at 825 West 11th Avenue (893-2347).
She hopes that „ other., people won’t go so long before realizing that alcohol is a problem for them. Now is the time to take care of the problem, so that the person can set new goals for himself and have a clear mind.
The Santa Fe Trail staff thanks Helen Lucero for being bold enough and concerned enough about others to share her story. We hope that her recovery (day-by-day) will be an inspiration to others' in our communityHo start* * getting help and helping themselves.
The Latin American Development Society (LADS) have organized to achieve the following goals:
• Unification in our attempt to set good examples for those in this organization and for all others
• Furthering communications, education and human relations for a better way of life
• Overcoming inferiority complexes in our selves and in others of Mexican-American nationality
• Developing potentialities lying dormant within us
• Utilizing our skills to help ourselves and our people lead more prosperous, useful and satisfying lives.
As you are no doubt aware, there have been major problems we have had and are having. The self help programs were discontinued and we haven’t really been able to function as we should. Because we have been lax, we. have lost contact with friends and supporters.
We now have the opportunity to start the self help groups again, such as Drama Workshop, Crime Prevention Teen Program, LADS, etc. Friends and supporters who are interested in helping us help ourselves should please contact LADS secretary, Box 1010, Canon City, Colorado 81212.
Thank you very much,
Alberto Martinez #42433 Secretary, Latin American Development Society
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 requires employers to provide workplaces free from safety and health hazards and to comply with safety and health standards.
Not Only Meals, But also Activities
PASCO! One may think it is a new United States program, but, NO! It is a local Westside organization which stands for Pan American Senior Citizens Organization. PASCO, sponsored by Volunteers of America, serves lunches Monday through Friday at 1:00 p.m. to all Senior Citizens sixty years of age or older in this area. The nutritious lunch is served at St. Joseph’s Church on 6th and Galapago and aids Senior Citizens in having a balanced diet.
After lunch older people have an opportunity to communicate with fellow Senior Citizens; to enjoy entertaining experiences; and to learn about services available to them.
PASCO has some events which regularly appear on the activity calendar. Here are a few of the Senior Citizens’ at PASCO favorite activities:
Dave Fager is a very special person among the older people. He attends PASCO and entertains the group by playing the piano and singing the favorite “good old” songs. Dave can really make a piano come alive. Listening to Dave play and sing is a very enjoyable way to spend time after the noon meal.
Music seems to give the most satisfaction to the Senior Citizens. Carlos Chavez’s and Gaspar Eames’ dance music is appreciated by the people who attend PASCO. Chavez and Eames can keep the interest of the older people with their skilled fingers on the guitar.
Arts and crafts are usually led by Connie and John Ruybal. Connie’s and John’s creative ideas keep the Senior Citizens’ hands busy with
A Cub Scout Troop is beginning in North Lincoln in the very near future. Boys between 8 and 11 are invited to join the troop. Adults are also needed to help with the troop activities. For more information contact Juan Pena: 455-5522. or Elsie Padilla: 222-0691.
A rummage sale will be held at 1438 Navajo on February 9th from 1:30 to 4:00 with all proceeds for the benefit of the North Lincoln Cub Scouts. Donations of rummage are being accepted at the Housing Office until February 8th. You are all invited to patronize the sale.
very beautiful rewards. These crafts are often used by the older people to decorate their homes during the different holidays throughout the year.
Once a month there is a Blood Pressure Clinic conducted at PASCO. The older people have their blood pressure checked and are weighed. The nurses often suggest ways to improve one's health and body condition. High blood pressure is one of the great killers in the United States today. It is important to have your blood pressure checked regularly.
Judy Fowler gives the program on Nutrition. Judy has ideas and suggestions on how to improve the food the Senior Citizens eat. Her programs are interesting and informative and maybe Judy can help you with a problem you have.
There are many other activities going on at PASCO. PASCO is a place an older person can go to have a meal, meet old and make new friends, and get involved in a variety of activities. If you are sixty years of age or older, why don't you come see if PASCO can help you?
“Addicts Are Walking Death”
By Dave Ortiz
According to the reference book Licit & Illicit Drugs, by Edward M. Brecher and the Editors of Consumer Reports, to be a confirmed drug addict is to be one of the walking dead. The teeth have rotted out, the appetite is lost, and the stomach and intestines don’t function properly. The gall bladder becomes inflamed, eyes and skin turn a bilious yellow, in some cases membranes of the nose turn a flaming red, the partition separating the nostrils is eaten away, breathing is difficult. Oxygen in the blood decreases, bronchitis and tuberculosis develop. Good traits of character disappear and bad ones emerge. Sex organs become affected, veins collapse and the livid purplish scars remain. Boils and abcesses plague the skin, growing pain racks the body. Nerves snap, vicious twitching develops. Imaginary and fantastic fears blight the mind and sometimes complete insanity results. Oftentimes too, death comes much too early in life. Such is the torment of being a drug addict, such is the plague of being one of the walking dead.
This quotation was brought in popular view of the effects of narcotics on addicts was eloquently expressed in a 1962 decision of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Effect on sexual potency and libido in a 1970 study revealed that many Philadelphia addicts thought their sexual fonctioning was adversely affected while they were on heroin. The study did not differentiate, however, between the effects of the heroin itself and other
depressing aspects of the street addict’s way of life. Perhaps the best evidence for a depressant effect of heroin on both potency and libido is the fact that addicts who complain of reduced libido and impaired sexual performance while on heroin report prompt improvement when they “Kick the Habit”. In a group of 13 ex-dddicts intensively studied at St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City, for example: all “claimed their sexual problems disappeared during detoxification whether in hospitals, in detention, jail, etc.” There are even reports of spontaneous orgasm that heroin temporarily depresses rather than permanently damages sexual function.
Consequently, in the Rocky Mountain News, on Tuesday, January 13, 1976, Dr. Tomas Martinez related these effects on women with a heroin addiction. So it is important that during a certain amount of time both male and female addicts should be kept in separate treatment programs for a period of time. Which in my opinion is true, not only for the addict to get emotionally stable but to prevent the possibility of children being born with an addiction to heroin, since science has already proved by factual reports that heroin addiction is hereditary. If any person who is having difficulty with the problems of drug abuse and wants information on drug addiction, please contact the Au-raria Community Center, Drug Free Educational Project; contact Minerva Antuna, or Dave Ortiz at 534-7614. ,
(To be continued)


SCHOOL NEWS Greenlee News
GREENLEE GYM NEWS
We are in the midst of our winter activities program at Greenlee. In gym we are playing volleyball games in addition to ropes and mats. Also we are having our annual wrestling tournament with the finals scheduled for January 29th. This is the third year for our wrestling tournament and those involved seem to really enjoy the wrestling.
Our after school recreation program is centered around basketball in the winter. We have a fifth grade boys team and also a sixth grade boys team. In addition we have a girls team for the second year. We have twenty girls competing this year on a regular basis, with practices being held two times a week. The girls have played two games so far against Fairmont and Rosedale and have won them both. The boys sixth grade team lost to Lincoln Elementary while the fifth grade boys defeated Fairmont. In the next two weeks we plan on having two faculty-student games. The girls will play the lady faculty members while the boys will play the men faculty members. These games should be a lot of fun.
The members of the teams are: FIFTH GRADE — FIREBIRDS Captain — Tommy Solano Mark Dixon John Tenorio Jerry Smith Carlos Martinez Mike Rodriguez Robert Medina Juan Williams Eston Archuleta Anthony Pacheco Gilbert Castello
SIXTH GRADE — LAKERS Captain — Leroy Martinez Jose Martinez Dino Reyes Joey Bermudez Mike Barela Orlando Archuleta Oscar Colmenero Willie Bell
GIRLS TEAM —
Captain — Mary Beard Michelle Reese Darlene Vigil Tamara Chambers Yvonne Mota Anna Reyes Christine Costello Debbie Martinez Susan Duvall Bernice DeLeon Debbie Romero Jessica Ruiz Jackie Torres Kathy Torres Sherry Pacheco Mary Madrid Rachel Vasquez Pauline Vasquez Suzy Gonzales Arlene DeLeon Rosalinda Cabazos
SIXTH GRADERS REPORT ROOM 101
The Wrestling Tournament We have a wrestling tournament in our school each year and many boys are in it. The finals will be soon and the winners in each division will receive a trophy. For second prize they will get a certificate. It is a lot of fun so why don’t you come to Greenlee School, 1150 Lipan Street, on January 29th.
Joey Bermudez
First Aid
At Greenlee Elementary we are practicing First Aid. We are talking about how to save lives. The nurse is Mrs. Byars. She comes in every Tuesday and Thursday. We are also talking about how to treat people in shock. We are learning interesting things. I hope other schools gdt the great opportunity of learning-First Aid too.
Leslie Eden
Our Science Class In science we are doing many experiments with magnets and batteries. So far we have made an electro-magnet. We’ve studied currents and have also made light switches. We use materials such as batteries, insulated wire, magnets, nails, compasses, and lightbulbs. So far we have done about 5 big experiments and all of them have been a complete success. We’re hoping that our future experiments will also go as well as these did.
Jeannine Geist
High Intensity Reading Lab At Greenlee Elementary School we have a Reading Lab. Our teacher for that class is Mrs. Fin-nerty. It is a lovely Reading Lab with lots of things to read, to hear, and to do. Some people work very hard in there. Rosita Padilla
Art Museum
Some of us at Greenlee went to the Art Museum and saw the American Art Heritage. It was very interesting. All of the paintings were by the original artists. We saw a picture of George Washington which is the one that is on the dollar bill. There were still life, portraits, and landscapes, too. In Mrs. Ryan’s class we’ve tried to draw portraits and found that they are very hard to draw.
Lisa Scott
Student of
the Month:
Joe Montoya
a
FAIRMONT NEWS -
Greenlee School is very proud of its student of the month, Joe Montoya. Joe is a fourth grader and has attended Greenlee since he started to school. He is an excellent student in all subjects. His favorites are reading and math where he performs two or three years beyond his grade level. Joe has taken tests that have qualified him for a scholarship at Graland School. These scholarships are valued at approximately $2000 a year.
Joe is well-known by all teachers and students at Greenlee. He is a leader, well-liked and respected by everyone. He often serves as Master of Ceremonies in our programs and enjoys helping others, especially new students at Greenlee. He is active in gym where he enjoys dodge ball, mats, ropes, and is looking forward to the wrestling tournament.
Joe says he would like to become a writer when he finishes school, and he already has a good beginning. His class is writing limericks in Language now and he shared one of his with us:
I once khew a bey named Max He always played with an ax He chopped down trees Which made him sneeze That crazy boy named Max.
Joe is proud of his family who live at 1050 Kalamath Street. His parents are Junior and Orlinda Montoya. He has two brothers, James and Leonard, and three sisters, Clara, Connie and Susan. A sixteen month old nephew, John, and a fifteen month old niece, Audrey, are also important people in Joe’s life.
Joe is very active in the Lincoln Park Boys Club of Denver and was recently awarded the Boy of the Month by the Club. Congratulations, Joey, we’re very proud of you.
WHS Team Wins
The West High School rifle team has had an outstanding year during 1975-76. Chris Von Male is the team captain. Others on the team are Bret Holman, Gary Doud, Jesus Quinonas, and David Martinez.
They placed second in the city in varsity matches and third in the North High School Invitational in December. In the North High match, they beat all of the Denver teams, but lost to Boulder and Canon City High School teams. The group then entered the Martin Luther King, Jr., match in January and came back with five first place, one second place and two third place trophies.
On Saturday, January 27th, the team will compete in Cheyenne in their sectional. They will also be competing on February 12th and 13th in the National Rifle Match and on February 28th they will be in Pueb'lo for the sectional contest at the University of Southern Colorado.
West High School will have a Disco-Valentine’s Dance on Friday, February 13th, from 8:00 - 11:00 p.m. The sophomore class under the sponsorship of Mr. Richard Hewitt will host the all-school dance in the old Girls’ Gym.
The price is 75 cents per person or $1.00 per couple. West High School students and dates only are invited to this school function.
* * *
The Westside Players will present, as their second production of the season, BAREFOOT IN THE PARK, a Neil Simon comedy. The play will be at West High School.
The New Year brought the boys and girls back to Fairmont School ready to “hit the books” once again as well as to take part in many special activities.
Martin Luther King and all Black Americans were honored during January as the main theme of our bilingual-bicultural teacher, Mrs. Cathy Acosta. Classroom teachers also presented units of study to help their students to better understand and appreciate Black culture and its contributions to our history. The showcase in the main hall contained various articles from Africa and was a hit with the children. On King’s birthday, January 15th, the school lunchroom staff prepared a special “soul food” lunch for all children complete with black-eyed peas and sweetpotato pie.
Fifth and sixth graders from Samuels School recently visited Fairmont. They presented a gymnastic exhibition to all children in the school. We hope that soon our Fairmont gymnastic group will be able to go to Samuels School to give a demonstration of their gymnastic skills.
A Denver Symphony Orchestra Concert was enjoyed by 20 Fairmont fifth graders on January 19th. Mr. Ron English and Mr. Rich Moody accompanied the group to the Auditorium Theatre.
The Fairmont auditorium was alive with the “now” musical sounds of the Denver Police Squad IV Rock Band on January 27th. Enjoyment was evident by the nonstop clapping and cheers from the fourth, fifth, and sixth graders who
attended the concert. Our thanks to Detective Ernie Apodaca who made the arrangements for this group to come to Fairmont.
On January 29th the first semester ended and report cards of pupil progress have gone home. Parents who have any questions about grades or pupil progress are urged to stop by or call the school, 893-1957, to make an appointment for a conference with your child’s teacher. Be an interested parent and visit your school often!
As we start the new semester we also begin a new pairing cycle. A new group of boys and girls from Fairmont have been selected to1 attend Lincoln School at 950 South Pearl Street on a half day basis for the rest of this school year. First, second, and third graders go in the afternoons while fourth, fifth, and sixth graders go in the mornings. Parents of children who will attend Lincoln have been notified by mail and should note down bus times and stops which were given in the letter. We are sure that the second pairing cycle will be as successful as the first and we wish to thank all parents for their cooperation. If you have any questions about paired busing, please call the school.
Second graders were also busy in January studying a unit on animals and their care. As a part of this unit all second graders attended the National Western Stock Show with their teachers, Miss Adolphson, Miss Sellinghausen, and Miss Trujillo. From all that we heard, the exhibits were better than ever this year and this field trip was very worthwhile.
BAKER NEWS -
Greenlee students in Mr. Hackethal’s 4th grade class prepare envelopes containing tickets for a Laradon Hall benefit.
WHS Student Activities Announced
On Thursday and Friday evenings (February 19th and 29th), the performances will begin at 8:00 p.m.
Seen in the role of Corie will be JoAnn Sainz. Opposite her in the male lead will be Bob Carrillo. Others in the cast are David Van Cleave, Teresa Martinez, Mark Lindeman, and Billie Rendon.
Tickets are Si.00 for adults and 50 cents for children and students. Drama students at West High School will be selling the tickets and tickets may be purchased at the door on the nights of the performance.
January 16 was Spirit Day at Baker. Students were encouraged to wear orange and white and an ! assembly was held featuring cheerleaders, Student Council, Jazz Band and the Baker’s Dozen. Cheerleaders are Mary Arellano, Tracy Collins, Sharon Gardner, Pat, Lopez, Sandy Martinez, Tina Ortega, Tina Suazo, Christina Valdez, Tammy Velarde. Student Council members participating were Renee Romero, Head Girl, and Moses Norman, Head Boy. The Jazz Band consisted of: Gus Lindemann, Robin Garcia, Lima Tagovailoa, Janet Draper, Jeff DeWispelaere, Brad Kampmann, Paul Tafoya, Ed Cooper, Paul Humphryes, Jackie Arnold, Karen Rogers, Daran Schwartz, Ivan Sahabuddin, Carlos Gutierrez. Baker’s Dozen members are: Kip Craft, Paul Humphryes, Brad Kampmann, Moses Norman, Dennis Peters, Dave Powell, Daran Schwartz, Louis Serrat, Steve Shelton, Janet Draper, Terry Draper, Vickie French, Gina Gray, Kevin Kimmel, Kelly McCarthy, Renee Romero, Kelly Walters, Debra Bird. Stephanie Webb was Mistress of Ceremonies and Mr. Salazar, Principal, opened the assembly.
The Bilingual-Bicultural Program in Denver Public Schools has launched a community involvement program. We want you to help us! Even if you don’t have children directly involved, you can be of service. If you have a particular skill or hobby that the children might be interested in, please contact Martha Urioste (program coordinator) at Greenlee Elementary School, or Teresa Harper at Baker Jr. High.
Make-up color pictures and black and white pictures were taken January 21. Color pictures should be back after the first week of February.
January 30 marked the end of first semester in Denver Public
Schools. Grades received on the report cards during the week of February 2 will go on permanent records.
At 7:30 p.m. on January 29, the Instrumental Music Department held a Winter Band Concert, which involved the Intermediate, Advanced and Jazz Bands. The bands were conducted by Mr. Don Novy, instrumental teacher.
The pace has not slowed down for Baker’s choirs since the holiday season. On January 15, the Concert Choir and Baker’s Dozen participated in a memorial program for the late Dr. Martin Luther King-at Lowry Air Force Base. The Choir sang, “The Stars Are With The Voyager” and “Ainta That Good News”. The Dozen performed a special Bicentennial number entitled, “Mother Country”.
Baker’s Dozen performed at Spirit Day on January 16 and both ninth grade choirs entertained the Retired Personnel on January 19th at Baker.
Baker’s four choirs, under the direction of Susan Kates and Ken Hailpern, are busy preparing music for a number of presentations this spring, including a Bicentennial program and a special spring concert.
WHS Chili Contest
Winners of the 2nd Annual Chili Contest, held recently at West High School, 951 Elati St., have been announced.
First place winner is Paul Garcia, 15.
Second place winners were a tie between the team of Donna Zapata, 15, and Lisa Pettid, 16, and Ralph Trujillo, 15.
Elaine DeLeon, 15, and Valerie Vigil, 16, took third place.
The contest was co-sponsored by the Home Economics department and the Bilingual Bicultural Program.
Older Persons Can Direct Deposit Social Security Checks at
UNION BANK & TRUST
1 st & Broadway
744-3221


CHURCH
ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
6th and Galapago Denver, Colorado 80204 Fr. Andrew Meiners, Pastor Fr. Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl Schwarz Fr. Leroy Burke Fr. Thomas Ryan MASSES
12:10 and 6:00 p.m. Sat.
7:00, 8:30, 10:00 (Spanish, up stairs)
10:00 (English, hall)
12:00 noon
NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER (BAPTIST)
325 W. Irvington Place
Don Davis, Pastor
Jerry McCormick, Assoc. Pastor
SERVICES
Worship, 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening Meeting,
6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting, Thursday,
7:30 p.m.
CLUB PROGRAM Boy’s Club,
Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.
Girl’s Club,
Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
ST. ELIZABETH’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
1060 Uth Street Denver, Colorado 80204
MASSES
Weekday: 8:00, 12:15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9:00, 11:00, 12:15 Saturday: 12:00, 5:00
CONFESSIONS
Daily — before 12:15 Mass
Saturday — 4:00 to 5:00
PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA (del Sur)
910 Kalamath - Phone 825-7497 Rev. Job Maldonado, Pastor
Sundays:
10:00 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship Service 6:00 p.m. Church Training 7:00 p.m. Evening Service
ST. CAJETaN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
Stuart & Alameda Denver, Colorado 80219 James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor
MASSES
Saturday evening, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish) 10:30 12:00 (Spanish), 7:00 p.m. Weekdays, 8:00 a.m. (Spanish)
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN
120 West First Ave.
777-5325
Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. A. J. Blomquist, Pastor Rev. Moicelio Cruz, Asst. Pastor
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship, 11 '00 a.m.
WEST HIGH
REGISTRATION TIME
The nine Denver Public High Schools will conduct second semester registration January 26 to February 2 on the following schedule:
West High School, 951 Elati St., will provide buses on Thursday, January 29, with one run for seniors to register 7:00 to 10:30 a.m., another for juniors to register 9:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m., and a third run for sophomores to register 12:30 to 2:15 p.m. There will be two return trips with one for seniors at 10:30 a.m., and a second for juniors and sophomores about 2:15 p.m-On Friday, January 30, there will be a bus to pick up the remaining sophomores and anyone late to register from 7:00 to 10:40 a.m., with return at 10:55 a.m.
NEWS
LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER
215 West 5th Avenue Denver, Colorado John Hushman, Youth Minister Bruce Klitzky,
Older Persons Ministry
SERVICES
Sunday: Worship service and Sunday School from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m.
CHURCH OF ST. PETER (EPISCOPAL)
126 West 2nd Avenue Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. George Castono, Pastor
SERVICES Sunday —
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion 10:30 a.m. Morning Prayers and Sermon
Wednesday —
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion
SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH
1230 Decatur - 825-0121 Lou Roossien, Pastor John Algera, Intern Pastor (1039 Bryant - 893-5753)
Lupe Rodriguez, Social Worker
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m. Worship, 11:00 a.m.
Monday, Cadets at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday —
Adult Bible Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up), 7:30 Friday — Teen Lounge, 8:30 p.m.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH
430 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister
Morning Worship, 9:00 a.m. Church School, 10:00 a.m.
Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038
WESLEY tJNITED METHODIST CHURCH
West 5th and Galapago Jim Harris, Minister Jack Calderon, Associate
Sunday School — 10:00 a.m. Worship Service — 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service (Spanish) —
7:00 p.m.
FOURTH CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colorado
Worship Services —
Sunday (English) 11:00 a.m. Sunday (Spanish) 4:00 p.m.
Services weekly in English Sunday 11:00 a.m.
Servicios en Espanol Domingo
primer y tercer — 4:00 p.m. Escuela dominical a la misma hora
ACTIVITIES
PARENTS ORGANIZATION The first meeting of the West High Parents Organization was held Wednesday evening, January 21st, in the school social room. Mrs. Emily Montoya was elected President.
One of West’s needs is an active, enthusiastic organization of parents to help with many activities at West High. Parents contribute much to the education of their sons and daughters and can contribute to the spirit and progress being made at West High this year.
Parents are urged to join and become involved. The next meeting will ,be Wednesday evening, February 4th from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the West High social room. If you need more information, call Mrs. Stevenson at West High, 222-3545.
Justice Hearing Announced
In accordance with the National Conference of Catholic Bishops Bi-Centennial program, the Archdiocese of Denver will sponsor a series of eight regional hearings. The purpose of the hearings is to assist Church leaders in determining the Catholic Church’s social justice policies for the next five years.
There will be a panel at each hearing with a Bishop and several persons in decision making positions listening to the social concerns of the people who come before them to speak.
The hearing for West Metro Denver will be on Saturday, March 13th, from 9:30-4:00 at All Saints Parish Hall, 2559 S. Federal. Bishop George Evans will be a member of the listening panel on that day.
Anyone who would like to speak on any social justice issue is urged to contact
Mr. Steve Robach Religious Education Office Our Lady of Fatima Church 10530 W. 20th Ave.
Lakewood, Colorado 80215 or phone 233-1283 and state your name and the topic you would like to speak on so you can be placed on the schedule.
H Escuche el Programa §| ■"Palabras de Esperanza" n | KFSC- 1220 AM i ■DOMINGOS - 8:30 a.m. H ■ Iglesia Adventista I 1 del Septimo Dia I
New Approach To Student Gov’t At West High
West High School began a new Student Leadership Program last September as pact of the curriculum. The Leadership Program replaces the Student Council at West and involves around 150 students. The new program, developed by Rick Reynolds, Director of Student Activities, and Dick Hewitt, a class sponsor, is designed to involve many more students than the old student council.
Mr. Hewitt commented, “In the past we were only involving 36 students and they were being asked to perform the duties of student council representatives and class Officers. Now, we have opened up the system and allow any student to volunteer, then set up separate class organizations and a school-wide group of leaders.” Any student at West may sign up for a class in Student Leadership and receive academic credit for it. The sophomores are assigned to Mr. Hewitt’s Sophomore Class Council. Juniors enroll in Mr. Bemie Lopez’s Junior Class Council. Seniors are assigned to Mr. Joe Sandoval’s Senior Class Council. All three groups meet daily with their sponsor and conduct class business, learn, about leadership roles, learn meeting skills, group dynamics, program evaluation, financial management, and per-, sonal responsibility. They elect their own officers and six Senators.
The eighteen Senators and the six All-School Officers meet with Mr. Reynolds two or three times a week and take care of the duties of the former student council. The Student Senate has been involved with the Homecoming activities, the Bicentennial, a contest to design a flag and crest for the school, and other related activities.
Mr. Reynolds said, “In the past, the Student Council was an exclusive dub that was very difficult to break into. Students were required to make speeches in front of the student body and get elected. Many students who were uncomfortable in front of large groups could not get involved. Now they merely sign up and we seem to have attracted a very good group of students. Where we used to involve 36 students, we now have about 150 students learning by doing.”
Open House at St. Joe's School
As second semester approaches, I St. Joe’s is involved in many projects. The teachers and students are working on projects that nil! be displayed at the Education Night in February. This will be an excellent opportunity for people to come and see what the students have been doing. Class work, art works, and other school projects will be displayed. Also, the Physical Education class will demonstrate some rope jumping techniques.
This is basketball season and the school is actively participating in the Parochial League. There is a midget team for boys in grades 4, 5, and 6, and there is a varsity team for boys in grades 7 and 8. For the first time there is also a girls’ basketball team. The team is made up of girls in grades 5, 6, 7, and 8. All the teams are given a great deal of support by the cheerleaders, pep club, parents, and friends. The games generally are played Saturday mornings at St. Joe’s gym.
Each week a different class works on developing the liturgy for Tuesday’s mass. This year the mass has taken on a special meaning for the students because they plan the mass. Last week at mass each eighth grader presented a younger sister or brother with a gift at the exchange of peace. This was in keeping with their theme of the importance of families.
Because this is the Bicentennial year, there will be a special day, February 10th, when the students will dress as someone in the past. A special Bicentennial lunch will also be featured that day. There are more special events being planned to celebrate this year.
Del Pueblo
The Aztec Family at Del Pueblo is concerned about the food waste in their lunchroom. In November, a committee of 5th and 6th graders was formed to discuss the problems of waste during their lunch period. These children were concerned with the reasons that so much food was thrown out each day.
The group believed that portions were too large for the young children at the school. They also felt that certain foods should be served in smaller amounts. Some of these foods are beets.and cabbage salad. However, after two months of careful study on the subject, the committee found that there are many rules and guidelines that must be met by the lunchroom crew. For example, certain foods must be served because of their nutritional value. This rule helped the Aztecs understand why some “unpopular” foods must be served.
The Aztecs also have some suggestions to improve school lunches.
1) Before throwing your food away, see if a friend near you might want something that you don’t.
2) Try each type of food. You may surprise yourself and like something new.
3) For a real change, ask your teacher if you could eat “family style” in your classroom. We found that to help food waste, for sure.
Auraria Committee Announced
The newly elected Policy Committee consists of parents: Juliette Bailey, Patsy Boots, Rita Nielsen (secretary), Helaine Sigle (Vice Chairperson), and Barbara Gallegos. The at large members are Irene Zuniga (Chairperson) and Valerie Archuleta.
This school year has returned many staff members to college courses. They include: Child Development Associate Degree (Colorado State University) - Debbie Lopez, Jennie Bustos, and Leonor Nieto; Bilingual Child Development Associate Degree (Metro State College) - Patricia Carlos, Loyola Arellano, and Betty Quintana; Master’s Degree in Learning Disabilities (University of Northern Colorado) - Sam-Abeyta.
The Ortega home on Kalmath was recently remodeled by Brothers Redevelopment, Inc. (BRI). BRI has been remodeling Weatslde homes and agencies for four years as of Janaary 1976.
New Medical Center
Rocky Mountain Hospital (an Oesteopathic Institution) has launched its "Operation Outreach” program with the opening of a new Outpatient Unit at 875 Kalamath Street on December 1st, 1975. The facility has been named The Rocky Mountain Family Practice Center (Leland E. Warren Division) in honor of the late Leland E. Warren, D.O., a long-time Osteopathic Physician who practiced at that location and was a member of the Medical Staff of Rocky Mountain Hospital.
The Outpatient Unit will be staffed by Osteopathic Physicians on a 7-day per week basis, with hours from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon and from 1:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. Full 24-hour service will be provided to patients through a referral system to the Emergency and Outpatient Department at Rocky Mountain Hospital, 4701 East 9th Avenue after Clinic hours. A full range of primary medical care will be offered with specialty referrals available. The facility is open to all citizens, whether they be Medicaid, Medicare, other Insurance or private pay patients.
The Denver Areawide Comprehensive Health Planning Agency has determined that a Certificate of Public Necessity is not required for the Family Practice Center, and has also stated that there is a definite shortage of primary care physicians for the area in which the facility is located. The Unit is approved and licensed by the Colorado State Health Department as an extension of Rocky Mountain Hospital. '
In keeping with the basic philosophy of the Osteopathic profession, to deliver primary health care to the nation’s citizens, some 86% of the graduates of the nine Osteopathic Colleges in the United States become General or Family Practitioners.
The osteopathic profession believes all patients should have the right to select the kind of health care they prefer, and that the profession’s continuing educational emphasis on general practice rather than medical specialization best serves the true health-care needs of the American public.
‘LUCIA’ TO BE SCREENED
The National Lawyers Guild and the End Police Abuse Fund announce a showing of the film “Lucia,” on Friday, January 30, at 7:00 p.m. at the Denver Indian Center, 1580 Gaylord. Admission is $1.50. There will be a bake sale and refreshments.
+ RELIGIOUS ARTICLES
John P. Daleiden Co. 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver 80204 j 534-8233
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Page S- SANTA FE TRAIL
NEIGHBORHOOD
NEWS
Agapita Salazar returned to her home in Lincoln Park this month after spending several weeks with a daughter recovering from ah illness. Welcome home, Agapita, and we’re glad you’re feeling better.
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Hazel Krieg spent several days in Denver General Hospital after a fall on New Years Day left her with a broken hip.
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Audrey Guzman of 409 Inca celebrated her first birthday on New Year’s Day. Her parents Gloria and Rigoberto Guzman had a party in her honor and a pinata was broken. Her brother Steve was in charge of all the games and prizes.
Attending were her godparents, Mr. and Mrs. Phil Josue; her grandmother, Sarah Santistevan; Mr. and Mrs. Jake Lucero and cousins; Traci and Brian Josue, . Karen and Jason Casias, Craig Lucero, Gina and Kevin Marquez, Brenda and Kathy Ortega. Her birthday cake was made by her, aunt, Rose Casias.
A group of happy Seniors left Auraria Center for the VO A on 18th and Larimer to bag cookies. They had lunch and listened to music. Two of our Seniors sat at the birthday tables. They were Pete Bonsell and Arthur Serumgard. Those who took part were Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bonsell, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Rund, Mr. and Mrs. Henery Torres, Mrs. Carmen Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Serumgard and Martha Lowe and our driver Maria Elena McKissick. We returned a tired but happy group saying, “We didn’t want to see another cookie, but maybe next year!”
Alice Media took 6 ladies and their instructor, Loyola Salazar, of Wednesday’s ceramic class to the Cinderella City Shopping Center where we did shopping and had lunch. Even if some of us didn’t buy anything, everyone had a good time. Those that went were Pat Fresquez, Bonnie Busbage, Mrs. Ruth Adams, Vita Carluces, Loyola Salazar, Martha Lowe and Mrs. Brown. Thank you Alice!II Lincoln Park Senior Citizens held their pot luck and Christmas party at 1438 Navajo. Music was furnished by James Stinnett, one of our seniors, and a friend, Mr. L.O. Beard; Mrs. Hazel Tracey was a guest. Gifts were also exchanged. Laura Gregory decorated the tables. Thank you all for coming and taking part in a beautiful afternoon with me. Your President, Martha Lowe.
A van 6t seniors lett Auraria for West High School to see the singing Christmas tree. Those attending were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Serumgard, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bonsell, Mr. and Mrs. Henery Torres, Daisy Stethman, Louie Martinez, Pablita Roybal and their driver Maria Elena and her beautiful mother, Mrs. Aragon from Colorado Springs.
Martha Lowe returned Monday, January 5th from New Mexico where she visited her daughter and family and all of her friends from Toho Senior Citizen’s Gub.
Mr. Ray Garrett fell and broke his leg. Hurry up and get going
OBITUARIES
again
Mrs. Lela Kirkwood, former1 resident of Lincoln Park Homes, died on January 4th at Colonial Manor Nursing Home in Westminster. She was buried on January 6th at Crown Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Kirkwood was the sister of another fondly-remembered West-sider, Obie Rich, who is also deceased.
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Martinez, Manuel P. - 614 West 4th Ave. Mass of Christian Burial. December 5. St. Joseph’s Church. To Fort Logan.
LUND —
Gustav G. Lund, 835 Kalamath St. Service Thursday 1 p.m. Moore’s Little Stone Chapel. To Crown Hill
BURT —
Grady Foster Burt, 9 S. Bannock St. Entrusted to the care of Howard’s Park Ave. Chapel. Private interment, Ft. Logan
HOLMAN —
Ethel Rebecca Holman, 333 West Ellsworth Ave. Services Thursday 3 p.m. Howard’s Park Ave. Chapel. Private interment, Ft. Logan
OLIVAS —
Felix Olivas, 1323 Lipan St. Son of Reyes Olivas, Sr., Bernalillo, NM.; Eloy and Reyes Baca, both of Denver; Amanda Salazar, Albuquerque, and Gilber Olivas, South Gate, Calif. Mass of Christian Burial. Dec. 31. St. Joseph’s Church. To Ft. Logan
PASSARELLI —
Mike Passarelli, Sr., 1338 Lipan St. Husband of Marry Passarelli; father of,Shirley M., Terry L., and Mike R. Passarelli, Jr., Tose M. Emerling, Carol J. Maes, all of Denver; Frank L. Passarelli, Pocatello, Idaho. Mass of Christian Burial, Dec. 22 St. Elizabeth’s Church. To Mt. Olivet
POLEDNA —
Mrs. Dora, 1055 Bannock St. Wife of John E. Poledna; mother of Adelia (Dolly) Mares, Talph (Butch) Martinez, Jr., both of Denver; Sally Lee, Hawaii. Mass of Christian Burial. Dec. 30 St. Joseph’s Redemptorist Church. To Ft. Logan
TRUJILLO —
Julio Trujillo, 1212 West 11th Ave. Mass of Christian Burial. Dec. 29, Stevens Chapel, Crist Mortuaries. To Mt. Olivet
If you have neighborhood News from your friends, relatives and neighbors, mail them to SANTA FE TRAIL before the 20th of the month. Your news is the news we want and need!
NORTH LINCOLN HEAD START
The Parents of North Lincoln held a Burrito Sale for their children’s Christmas Party. The children each received wonderful gifts. Thet Eta Ch., of E.S.A., Sorority gave the children a party and each child received a hat, mittens, and cookies.
The Parents of Platte Valley Head Start and North Lincoln Head Start planned their own Christmas Party at Curtis Park Community Center. The Head Start staff Jean Jackson, Maxine Brown and Cris Fleming appreciate the cooperation of Bob Moon of KDKO for coming down and entertaining all of us.
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WEDNESDAYS AT THE YW
The YWCA is offering a nine week brown bag luncheon series entitled “Wednesdays at the YW”. All sessions will stmt at noon and will be offered at the YWCA Building, 1545 Tremont Place.
The series will begin on February 4 with the topic “Working Parents with Children”. Guest speaker will be Marilyn Anderson, a psychologist with Northwest Counseling Center.
Other topics will include Basic Tax Information, the Equal Rights Amendment, the Divorce Statute, Banking Investments (two sessions), Creative Ways to Relate to Your Children, Juvenile Law, and a session on Epilepsy.
This series is free to members. Non-members will be asked to pay a fee of 75 cents per session. For information call the YWCA at 825-7141.
Legislative Report
Continued from page one
AMENDMENTS TO COLORADO EMPLOYMENT SECURITY ACT The present Colorado employment law has been termed “one of the worst in the nation,” with seven out of every ten applicants disqualified or forced to wait long periods.
The bill is still in the drafting stage; indications are that the bill will be aimed at revamping eligibility requirements for unemployment compensation.
AID TO CORE CITIES Last session Governor Lamm appointed me to a select Core City Task Force made up of legislators, city councilmen and school board members, to explore problems of Denver’s Core City. This year Denver has established a City Council Liaison Committee to seek state aid f®r Denver. Some items that are expected to be included in the core city package may include reimbursement for the costs of providing cultural facility services to non-Denver residents, aid for welfare costs,>*aid for juvenile diversion programs and a proposal for a state-collected, locally shared income tax. A healthy Denver is essential for a healthy Colorado, and a rational Denver proposal should receive a fair hearing.
Older Persons’ Activities
REMEMBER WHEN?
Remember when you used to dance away the hours? Why not revive old memories and dance up a storm once again? Join us for a pleasant evening of ballroom dancing to live music every Wednesday from 7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., at Hirschfeld Community Center, 333 W. Ellsworth Ave. (6 blocks north of Alameda and 3 blocks west of Broadway). The cost is 75 cents per person; light refreshments are served during intermission.
All senior citizens are welcome! It provides an excellent opportunity to make new friends. Many people come without a partner so if you are alone don’t let that keep you from making another happy memory. Join us at our Wednesday Night Dance.
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VALENTINE PARTY
The Senior Outing Program of the Denver Department of Social Services and Hirschfeld Community Center invite all senior citizens to attend a Valentine’s Day Party at . Hirschfeld Community Center, 333 W. Ellsworth Ave. You may dance to live music with the valentine of your choice on Friday, February 13, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Admission is free.
♦ * *
NEW SCRIBE MAGAZINE Literary contributions are requested from senior citizens for the new Scribe Magazine. The magazine is sponsored by Metropolitan State College; the first publication will be released in February. Copies will be available in the recreation office at Hirschfeld Community Center. Please call Dorothy Oblock at 297-2201 for information.
SUBCRIPTI0N COUPON
Atencion: Todos Los QueReciben Securo Social
Las cuentas medicas de octubre, noviembre, y diciembre podran contar en algunos casos para el deducible anual de $60 del seguro medico de Medicare para el 1975 y 1976 mediante la disposicion de “traspaso” del seguro medico de Medicare, segun Sifredo Martinez -R, gerente del Seguro Social del distrito del suroeste de Denver.
El seguro medico de Medicare no paga por los primeros $60 de gastos medicos cubiertos en un ano natural. “Pero las personas que no hayan tenido $60 de gastos medicos cubiertos antes de octubre deberan enviar todas las cuentas por servicios cubiertos recibidos en octubre, noviembre, o diciembre,” dijo Sr. Martinez.
“Cualquipr gasto que tenga durante los uttimos 3 meses del ano que puedan contar para el deducible de ese ano podra contar tambien para el deducible del siguiente ano,” dijo el.
La regia de traspaso ayuda a las personas que de otro modo ten-drian que pagar el deducible de $60 dos veces en un periodo corto de tiempo — al fin de un ano y al comienzo del ano' siguiente, explico Martinez.
Las cuentas por sepvicios medicos cubiertos deberan ser adjun-tadas a la forma de Solicitnd de Pagos de Medicare y enviadas a Colorado Medical Service, Inc. Las formas pueden obtenerse en cual-quier oficina de seguro social y en muchas oficinas de medicos.
El seguro medico de Medicare ayuda a pagar cuentas de doctores y muchos otros gastos medicos de personas de 65 anos y mas, de personas incapacitadas menores de 65 anos con derecho a beneficios de seguro social por incapacidad por 24 meses consecutivos como mi-nimo y de muchas personas con fallo permanente del rinon.
El seguro medico es la parte voluntaria del Medicare, financiada por premios individuates y por impuestos Federates generales. El Medicare esta administrado por la Administracion del Seguro Social, una agenda del. Departmento de Salud, Educacion, y Bienestar de los Estados Unidos.
La oficina de seguro social de Suroeste Denver esta ubicada en 2525 W. Alameda. El telefono es 232-3650.
Residents Tube
On Tuesday, December 30th, 10 people from the Lincoln Park area went tubing. It was on this trip that we named ourselves the Ditch Diggers because we got stuck in a ditch near Evergreen. The Ditch Diggers are Debbie Medina, Kathy and Robert Martinez, Jelly Tenor-io, Debbie, Rick and Josie Garcia, Eli Aragon, Ralph Gomez and Sister Fran. We found out that there are some pretty nice people in this world. Two cars stopped to help us. When we got the van out of the ditch we went down the road and helped get another car out of the ditch. One gringa said, “See what Chicano power and white people can do when we work together!”
Sunday, January 4th, a play about los Tres Reyes was presented at Auraria. The three Kings who saw the light were played by Ralph Gomez, Rick and Josie Garcia. La Virgen was Kathy Martinez and San Jose Eli Aragon. This play was put together under the direction of Sister Fran with Sister Rene providing the musical accompaniment. The baby Jesus was portrayed by Veronica Aguilera, infant daughter of Josi and Raquel Agiulera.
MUSICIANS NEEDED A senior citizen instrumental group is presently being formed at Hirschfeld Community Center, 333 W. Ellsworth Ave. All seniors are welcome to audition. Contact Dorothy Oblock at 297-2201 for further information.
* * *
Happy
Valentina’s
Day
• Classified Ads •
Neat 1 VS story brick. Fireplace in livingroom, 2 bedrooms down with room for 2 bedrooms up. New roof. Fenced yard, with brick garage. VA Appraised $17,950. Dave Sweetman, Crown Realty. 832-3453 or 399-2121.
DEADLINES FOR SANTA FE TRAIL Articles and classified advertising must be into the office by Friday, February 20th. Advertisements must be in on Tuesday, February 24th. The paper will be laid out on February 25th and will be distributed from February 27th — 29th.
The newspaper staff is proud of the fact that there have been 18 issues of the SANTA FE TRAIL which were published and distributed before the first of the month. We have been in operation fra over one and one half years.
SANTA FE TRAIL will continue to have a special column for classified ads. Please call 892-1039 weekdays between 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon or write to:
Santa Fe Trail
430 West 9th Ave.
Denver, Colo. 80204 All classified ads are 50 cents per line and must be submitted by die 20th of any month.________
COMEDY FILM FESTIVAL On February 23, at 7:00 p.m., Hirschfeld Community Center will show the first of three great comedic films. The first , film scheduled consists of seven great W.C. Fields film shorts. The second film, scheduled for 7:00 p.m., March 22, will star Laurel & Hardy and the third, April 26 at 7:00 p.m., will feature the Fabulous Marx Brothers. Cost is $1.00. Refreshments will be provided.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Project No. 1898/2064
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the State Buildings Division, Room 626 State Services Building, 1S25 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado 80203 until 2:00 p.m. (MST) on the 17th day of February, 1976 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in £oom 710, same building.
Project: No. 2064 - Child Care Center, *No. 1898 - Child Development Center — Bid Package 90-21, Auraria Higher Education Center
1. The entire project shall be accomplished on or before August 30, 1976, including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warranties. the submittal of sales and use tax payment forms, the calling” for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the work as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Completion and Liquidated Damages, in accordance with Article 47 of The Ge.neral Conditions of the Contract.
2. The right is reserved to waive informalities and to reject any Proposal.
3. Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: CH1LDRESS/PAULIN, 1865 SOUTH PEARL STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80210
4. A Deposit of $25.00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (1) Actual bidders who return the documents before the termination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out. Additional copies of any documents, drawings or specifications will be supplied at the actual cost of reproduction.
5. Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not less than 5% of the total Proposal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (1) a cashier’s check or (2) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC-6.14. Cashier’s or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado. The Proposal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project.
6. The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Award, he will, within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certificates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages.
7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufactured in Colorado, as provided by law.
8. The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall be in accordance with the laws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project, if such rates have been established. Dated at Denver, Colorado, this 20th day of January, 1976.
OFFICE OF STATE PLANNING AND BUDGETING STATE BUILDINGS DIVISION John L. Mason - 1/20/76 Acting Director Media of Publication:
Santa Fe Trail Publication Dates:
First: January 22, 1976 Second: January 29, 1976


Full Text

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1 1111111 n llle U18702 0239881 ****************************** Money Available for Your Home Does Your Home Qualify? A h o u ing remodeling pro g ram • h me lr dy remodel d 7 Santa Fe Trail that will help home-owners m e D n ve r rb n n ee ded r epairs on thei r h m e will Auth ?r: t y ( D R l pro ram wtll n t b egi n in C'rry Council D istrict in b e , _ le F ebruary . For We t side home-nu I the fir 1 _ ye r _ fa three OWD.ei"S li\ •ing in District9, applica-year program that I b Lng fund e d FEBRUARY 1976 • ISSUE 1120 Register To Vote Now Monte Pascoe, Chairman of the Colorado Democratic Party, urged all independent and non-registered voters in Colorado to affiliate with a political party and register to vote before February 3rd. February 3rd is the cut off date for participation in the precinct caucus,. which begins the process of selecting delegates to the national Presiden tial conventions and designating candidates for the primary election . "It is important , " said Pascoe, "that people realize that one must be affiliated with a political party for at least 90 days prior to the caucus day, May 3rd. This makes February 3rd, the dead line for affiliation to participate in the precinct caucus . "In both 1974 and 1975 over 25, 000 Democrats in Colorado par ticipated in a precinct caucus, more people than ever before in the history of Colorado politics . 1976 promises an even better turnout!" Colorado will send 35 delegates and 28 alternates to the Democratic National Convention in New York City beginning July 12. The Colo rado plan for selection of ttiese delegates has been adopted and approved by the State Party and the National Party. Pascoe stated that anyone who wants to change or declare his or her affiliation to a political party or register to vote can do so at their County Clerk's office or at the Election Commission, but this should be done by February 3rd. "This is a very good opportunity," concluded Pascoe, "for people to be more involved in the political process on a grassroots level." Let's aU get involved! New Welfare Program a Dud T his February, the Denver Wel fare Department is starting a new program which will affect approxi mately 100 families on the West side who are now on Aid for Dependent Children. This program is officially called the Denver Monthly Reporting Experiment but is commonly known as the Mathe matica Program. The main features of this pro g'ram are: I. Families will receive their checks on the 15th of the month instead of the 1st of the month. 2. Families must fill out a monthly eligibility form. This must be done each month or the family will not receive the next month's check. It is stated that families who do not fill out the forms will be cut off from the program and if they need help, caseworkers can not be of assistance as they have been specifically told not to help. Indi viduals or families are to be referred to the new Mathematica technicians. It appears that many problems will arise since the checks will come on the 15th of each month. Families will not have enough money to pay for rent, food stamps and other bills that are due the first of each month. Also in February, food stamps will cost more, and in many s ituation s f amilies will ha>v.: t v b e buying them twice on the same pay check. The program's purpose is "to cut down the incidence of overpayment" to ADC families, but the families were selected at random and not by any specific procedure. One of the workers in the new program believes that the new pro gram will result in a 100 % turnover within the one year experiment period . The purpose then seems to be to eliminate poor families from the program. This program is called the Denver Monthly Reporting Experi ment and the experiment is taking place h ere in the Westside and all over town. It is difficult to see how anyone who has gone through the frustrating and insulting process of qualifying for ADC will benefit from the program. Only Welfare bureaucrats or conservative per sons who oppose the welfare will get any reward as poor famihes who struggle to survive and treat their children rightly lose out on this "experiment." There is a form that must be filled out for each federal govern ment grant for an experiment or program called "Human Subjects" questionnaire. This editorial board and staff wonder whether this had been filled out for this "experi-ment." Hope in New State legislation by State Representative tial lendind by geographic area, Richard Castro disclose loan terms, and reveal The short session of the 50th "General Assembly was officially launched on Wednesday, January 7th by Governor Richard Lamm . The Governor presented a 42-point agenda which included several controversial issues such as a severance tax on minerals, coUec tive bargaining for and a package of conservation bills. Several issues affecting West side which State Rep. Castro intends to push for are: BANKING Disclo,sure legislation which would require financial institutions to report c.omme)'cial and residen-sources of deposits. Such dis closure would provide information valuable in combating redlining, the practice of withholding loans from certain areas considered un desirable. A recent study done by two graduate students at D.U . indicated that such socially ques tionable lending practices are occuring predominantly in Capitol Hill, West Denver and lower East Denver neighborhoods. Other banking items that should be debated at length include: limitations on holding companies, branch banking and electronic fund_ s transfer. , _ Continued on page eight Councilman's Committee Active For Westside C o uncilman Sal Carpio has re ce ntl y f ormed a District 9 Commu nity Development Committee, made up of residents from the various parts of District 9: West side, North Denver, Globeville, Elyria and Swansea. Although the first order of business for this new Committe e has been to work to g e t needed community pro j ects thro ugh the Community De ve lopm e nt A c t , thi s Committ e e will also b e w o rkin g on such matte r s a s zoning issu e s , 'housing. and o th e r items for. communit y b e tt e rm e nt. West s id e r esidents sitting on the District 9 Community Development Committ ee are: Ruben Leal , An dre w Lov ato. B e tty Koehler , Betty S a n c h ez . Adolph Gomez Victor D e L eo n. Wilma Iv.tbrows , Bob F e d erico. Paul Martinez and Lowell Langendorfer . Th e chairman o f th e Distri c t 9 Communit y D eve l o pm e nt Commit tee i s M a nn y M a r tinez o f Wes t Denver wh<) also serve. as Coun cil man Carpio's appo intee t o th e Ma yo r ' s Adv isor y C o unci . l on the C ommunity D e v e lopm e nt A c t , r e p resentin g all ofDistric t 9 . Mr . Mar tin ez was a l s o e l e ct e d ViceChair m a n o f the Mayor's A d v isor y C o un c il. .. , Mr. M a rtin ez and C o un c ilm a n C a rpi o co n d u cte d nume r o u s meet ings thro u g h o u t Dis trict 9 la s t N ove mb e r a nd D ece mb e r in get tin g pr o j ec t s read y to submit for fundin g thro u g h th e Community D eve l o pm e nt A c t a nd in preparing f o r th e H o u sing R e m o d e ling As s i s t a n ce Pr ogram whic h will b e gin in Distri c t 9 in F ebrua r y. Oth e r C ommunity D eve lopm ent proj ec t s whi c h will begin soo n in. th e Westside a r e buildin g e xp a n s i o n of th e La Alm a C ente r at Linc oln Park and th e constructio n of a re c r e ati o n c ente r so uth o f 6th Ave nu e. For an y additional informati o n , co nt a ct C o un c ilman C a rpi o at Cit y Council 297-3012 , o r at home 4581 711. tions for this bousing assl t.ance throu h the C mmunity Develop-program wiU be ta.ken at St. m en t Act f I 4 . Di tTict 9 h Joseph's Church hall West6tb and been H oned S\.225.000 r the Galapag() , on 12, 13 and _ year whi h will pr id 16 fro . m 12 noon to 8 p.m. each tst nee for at le t I h m through ut D i tri t . D ' tri t h This prog r am will con centrate on al ? n ted en u h fun d t he l pi n g h ome-<>wners m ake needed provtde . a 1 t an c f r n th r 1 7 5 plum b i n g . heatin g . e l ectrical and h m m the n d and a t roofin g r e p airs t o th ei r ho m e . lea t 200 homes f\ r t h th1r d ar. Eli g ibl e h o m e-o wn e rs m ay r ece i ve The econd yea r of th1 prog r a m t ax free grants up t o SS.OOO will b egi n l a t e r on durin g thi . . ear. d e p e ndin g upon the in co m e o f the H o m e-o wn e r . . h o ru:e e h gtb l e . f a mil y . the siz e of the famil y, a nd and not assl t ? dunng. fir t the age of the home-owners. ear. s be e h 1ble to Grants are not rep.Ud . Low int erest asSIS tan ce m the secon? o r loans , ranging from 3 to 6 percent , of the S m ce can als o be available for int e r este d apphd!t10 n s w11l be con 1dered on a and eligible home-own e r s . Low fir t -serve basis . it i interest loans can be availabl e f o r I mpo rt a n t th at mterested home up to S7,500 and can b e r e p.Ud ove r ow n e r s _ apply earl y during t h e a period up to ten years. da t es _ It t e d abo ve : . . Eligiblity requireme nts includ e : Th1s p rog r a m w 11l be adm tnl ter • home must be own e r -occ upi e d e d thro u g h D en er U rb an R e-and a single famil y r e sid e n ce (or n ewa l A uth onty : . making pay m e nts o n th e h o m e P e rson s wantmg m o r mform anot rent) tio n s h o uld call a n y of th e f o llo wi n g • home-owner must have l ive d p e r sons: in that h o me for at l east 6 m on th s Coun c ilman Sal C arpio Offi ce • hom e-o wn e r must not have 297-3 012; Hom e 4 5 8 1 711 over S3.000 in liquid assets ( cash, Manny Martinez, Di stric t 9 saving s account, stoc ks and bonds Chairman Office 5 73 5 10 7; does not include furniture , cars Hom e 534 -107 8 o r clothing or other personal Barbara Talar i co, Co mmissi on property) on Community R e l a tion s Offi ce 297-317 1 LoweD Langendoifer presents a plaque to Leonard Chadwick, honoring him for 23 years of service with Denver Housing Authority . CHADWICK HONORED Mor e th a n 100 r esi d e nt s a nd staff of the D enve r H o u s in g Authorit y attende d a recepti o n t o hon o r former E xec uti ve Dir ecto r . L e on ard G. Chadw i c k , o n S aturday e v e ning , Jan. 10. Sponsored by the C entra l Resi d ent Council (CRC) of th e H o u sing Authority the ev ent was h e ld at Hirs c hfeld Towers. A pl a qu e was presented to Mr. Chadwi c k honor ing him for his more th a n tw e nt y years with the Housing Auth o rity b y CRC chairman, Lowell Lang e n d orfe r . Chadwick had resigne d from the position of Executive Director effective Aug. I , but prior to that time he underwent unexpected heart surgery and the r eceptions d i recto r . H e a l ways h a been acti v e in c i v i c a nd churc h affa i rs . ser v in g o n t h e D e n ve r Oppo r t uni ty board f o r m a n y year s . H e is a well-know n j azz mu s i c i a n pl aying th e trumpe t w ith hi s ow n g r oup f o r soc ial. c ivi c a nd p o liti ca l eve nt s . Ent ertainme nt f o r th e r ece pti o n inc lud e d the Hirschfe ld Singer s with Ali ce Notar y; Ball e t F o lkl o ri c o El N e t zahuaitpyotl w ith Enrique M o nt oy a. dire ct o r ; th e K e rsena Joyce Val e ri e Conict, dancer ; Minnie C o n ic t , poetry r eading, and Jim B e nw ay, guitar. -Jean Jackson w.as th e narrator. -honoring him were d e la ye d until • his recovery. Other resident'S assi sting include r efreshments J ean Jackson, Minnie Conict. Lil y Roberson, Amanda Walke r . Th e lma White side, Low ell L-angendorfe r, Erma Turner and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Sayers, and the plaque committee Lonni e Fri e r s on , Laura Ham m ergren, Minn,i e Coni c t and J e an Chadwic k had been on th e staff a t ""'lli .iifll the Housing Authority for 23 years Ill working his way from painte r , resident counselor to executive Delivlt to: ,; ' I ' I I ' • ' I ' I J ,; ' ' ' Jackson. '-\ , . --''' Many W estslde streets are now crowded as a result of the A1ll'BI'ia Higher Education Complex nortli of Colfax. If you . would like to know more or become Involved in ending this and other effects, call Muriel Ashmore at 534-1280 or Betty Koehler at 534-5141. I Goot and Berg 514 East 13lth Denver, Co ora o '''. '

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Page 2S'AN"tA. FE TRAIL Editori-al:. Community School a Reality Community School at Del Pueblo Elementary School will become a reality this year and an advisory council or steering committee has become active. This is a new adventure for the Westside and also for Denver Public Schools since the only community school now in existence within Denver Public Schools presently is Kunsmiller Junior High.--.. Fred DeHerrera, who has worked in this neighborhood and also in the Sun ValleyLas Casitas area for a number of years, has been hfred as the community school coordinator. He will be working under the direction of Mr. Gil Cruter at DPS Administration but also under the steering committee of community and agency personnel. He was hired on January Sth. Community School is a new term but does not necessarily mean "school" for adults, teens, and children. A community school opens the school to use by the neighborhood residents and other residents of Denver throughout school day (where it does not interfere with the education of the children) and in the late afternoons and evenings. Not only _ can reading GED instruction, belly-dancing, special classes, a communjty choru , guitar or piano lessons, Spanish, or exercise classes be taught under the direction of the community school specialist and the advisory board, . b _ ut special events can now take place at Del Pueblo or any other of the four community schools now being planned or opened. All activities must be approved by the steering committee of the community school and by the community school specialist. The principal, neighborhood residents, staff members from agencies and/or churches, and teachers are members of this committee. The Del ' Pueblo committee is off to a good start and this paper salutes both Fred and the committee. A survey will soon be in the Del Pueblo district asking residents what types of activities they would like to see at the school: dancing, income tax, recreation, arts and crafts, auto mechanics, or other needs of the residents. Although all classes will be open to all persons in the Westside and in the city and county of Denver, the activities will be planned for the Del Pueblo school area. This is not something exclusive, but it is planned for us, here in the Westside. If you are interested in working on the steering committee or have ideas about classes and activities you would like to see at Del Pueblo community school, call Fred DeHerrera at 629-1473. Your input is important and necessary. This is our school; neighborhood residents worked hard to make it a community school. Now we have to work to make it we can all use for our own edj.lcation or our benefit and the benefit of our children and parents. This program is for everyone: baby to older persons. It is ours! Let's make it go! .WHS Youth Show . Respect Sunken Gardens is a problem for West High staff and youth, com munity parents and leaders; and anyone who is opposed to . youth becoming involved in drugs or drinking. It is a meeting place and a place to buy pot or other stuff and . a place to get drunk during the day. ,. But in spite of this our youth who frequent the park are certainly not all bad for many reasons and in many ways. One such incident happened last month and should be reported to the community. Grandma Mary Nelson works at Raggedy Ann Headstart each morning with the three-year-old children. She is a foster grand mother. She left at noon to catch the #S bus at 9th and Elati. One of our West High youth saw her and asked if she was indeed Grandma Mary who was riice toall the Headstarl children. When she replied that she was, he stopped all the snowballs (which were hard . and frozen) from being thrown in that' direction. No snowballs were thrown then nor as the bus left its stop. . Some of our youth do . know how to respect others and how to be good leaders and responsible citi zens. Although we need to find ways of stopping the high amount of use of drugs and alcohol in the park during school hours, we also need to find ways of honoring our youth who are responsible, mature, and respectful. He who respects others deserves respect himself. LE -TTERS TO THE EDITOR Dear Editor: I would lik e to take this opportu nity to thank Project Concern for th e help it has given me . On th.ree occasions Project Con cern he1ped me o btain food for famili es whose children attend the sc hool where I t eac h. On th e first occas i o n I was put in contact with the W estsi d e Action Center where I obtained food and mon ey for a family in dir e n ee d. On th e second occasion, when I was unable to obtain food because of low s uppli es, Project Concern pro vided it for another family. On the third occasion, I was given a box with rice, flour , bean'S, milk, salt, s ugar., ma ca r oni a nd other so that I could give it to a famil y who had no m o n ey and whose daughter was ill. These families could not ' hav e tl'!rned e ls ew h e r e for h elp as non e 0t them qualified for welfare o r ot h e r social services. I firml y b elieve th at Pr ojec t Concern is a worthwhile e nd eavo r and o n e that i s need e d by families who seek temporary help. Sincerel y, Katherine Acosta Teacher, Denver Public Schools 4331 Wyandot Denver, Colorado 80211 , Dear Editor, We would like to thank Mr. Anthony Lopez for coming to Del Pueblo and teaching us about ''Ia charreada'' and bringing his beau tiful horse. The children enjoyed seeing the film about charros de Denver, and they learned about many of the Spanish words which are still used by cowboys of the United States. Anita De Herrera Elias Robles Aztec students Del Pueblo Del Pueblo students were for. tunate to have Mr. Anthony Lopez of the Charro Association de Denver present a movie with some background information about the history and activities of the Charro Association. The movie showed some of the calf roping, bull riding , and rope tricks that are a part of a Mexican Charreada. The children have been studying about the stock show, cowboys, and the charreada , and they have learned many of the Spanish words that are still used in th e cattle industry. Mr. Lopez brought his Arabian hors e and explained the steps involved in saddling and riding a h orse. The c hildr en were very excited and wished they coul d all have horses to ride . EDITORIAL BOARD Cbuck Garcia, president; Becky Garcia, vice president; Sr. Rene Weeks, treasurer; Brice Balmer, editor; Flora Gasser, Russ Brito, Judy Bauer . Liability for any newspaper error in an advertisement shall not exceed the cost of space occupied by error. The publishers assume flO liability for any advertising whit;.h is not published for any cause. The publishers assume absolutely no obligation or responsability for subject matter contained in copy placed by its advertisers or their agents . It is also unde(stood that the advertiser and the agency placing such advertising jointly and severally agree _to indemnify "The Santa Fe Trail' • ' against all expense or damage sustained by reason of pnntmg such copy. All correspondence can be sent to: SANTA FE TRAIL 430 W. 9th Avenue Denver, Colonido 80204 892-1039 COMPAMENTO and ANTONIA BRICO are. two films which will be shown at Auraria Community Cen ter on Friday, February 6th, at 7:00 p.m. The showings are sponsored by the Citizens Coalition. Donations are welcomed to sup port the Coalition's work for Citizen participation in Denver city govern ment. There will be free refresh ments. (:OMPAMENTO shows the struggle of people in Chile while ANTONIA BRil;O is a film by Judy Collins about Ms. Brico who is a woman orchestra conductor here in Denver. Both films have received good reviews in numerous papers and magazines. Westside Agencies Funded The . . JI-igh United Way for : 1976 is allocating a record: $7, to its affiliated agencies for agency purposes and for direct community service. -. Robert Priester, president of the United Way Board of Trustees made the announcement after the organization's December meeting . The total represents• an increase of $S78,417 new dollars over last year's allocation, according to Priester. Priester said the remainder of the $8,611,6S9 raised in the fall fund drive will be allocated as follows: United Way administra tion, $220,S01; Agency Operations and Budgeting Department, $SS,-6S8 and Campaign Department, $336,677 . : service on budgeting committees is a great responsibility, demanding of one's time and effort," according to Andy Van Nostrand, chairman of the Admis sions and Allocations Committee. This year over 100 men and women spent three months and some two thousand hours meeting with the agencies discus.sing their budget needs for the upcoming year. The following Westside services and agencies received grants: Auraria Community Center $84,000 Boys ' Club of Denver, Inc. $140 , 000 Community Homemaker Service, Inc. $127 , 330 Latin American Research & Service Agency $66,SOO Legal Aid Society $111,300 Lutheran Service Society $70,SOO . Mile lligh Child Care Association $248,000 B eca us e the United Wa y did not reach its goal this year, the Special N ee ds grants will not be given. A number of Westside programs have b enefitted from this program during &he past yea r s . BUS PASSES AVAI:LABLE A new program of monthly bus passes for commuters to become effective on March J, was approved Thursday by the board of directors of the Regional Transportation District (RTD). . The existing $10 monthly pass' for students and $S monthly pass for elderly and handicapped citi zens will remain in effect without change. _ "It is felf that a monthly pass is not only more convenient to the riders of the system, but also cart be an i .ncentive for additional ridership," Mrs. Houston said. ''The daily commuter undoubtedly has certain frustrations in making certain fhat he or she has the exact change for his ride to work ... Under th e new program, there will be two types of commuter passes: • Monthly Express Pass costing $19.76. This can be used at any time' without payment of addi tional _ cash on all express and local buses. For servicewhere the fare is more than SO cents, the pass is worth SO cents toward the applicable fare. . • Monthly Local Pass costing $1S. This can be used at any time without payment of additional cash only on local bus service, including TownRider, DART service, Ride and handyRide. . Passes will be available at the RTD Information Center, 1S24 California St., and the Alameda Division office, 3SO S. Santa Fe Dr. In addition, RTD plans to implement a system to permit purchase of passes by mail. A Saturday Shoppers Pass was also approved by the RTD board. Effective March 1, the Shoppers Pass can be purchased on any Saturday from RTD bus drivers for SO cents. Customers purchasing the pass will be entitled to un limited use of the bus system on that day at no additional cost. New Mural at West by Student took 19 days and Lupe Carlos was helped by Dave Rivera, who is also . , a sophomore at West and a West -, side resident. Both young men also ' worked on the murals and designs . on the second floor of the Westside ' Center in the Neighbors ACT offices. Before he started painting the West High mural, Lupe was ' frustrated because someone at the school stole his original design. The present mural was drawn and painted from memory of the original that won the contest. The-motivation for working so hard on the mural was two-fold. Lupe wanted to _ see a Chicano . mural at the schoorbecaus' e he is ' a Chicano and many of his . classmates are also. He also likes art and someday hopes to go to the University of Denver and would like to have a to go . . _-, _ . .there. All of these murals and Durtng November and • Decem, . k .. • . 11. h 1 h . h " t ' 1.-ts t 1 b ith a wor s wt e p s ow ts a en o ber. Lupe Car os usy w judges who decide who gets the mural at West Htgh School, en. i d C t f M • He pre-grants and/or scholarshtps. e 0 enco. Presently Lupe is working on a vtously destgned the mural 10r a h 1 t W t H' h N h h 1 d the sc oo cres 10r es tg . o at e sc o_o an won decision had been made at the time rtght to pamt the mural. of this writing whether he won that This reporter was excited well contest. Others at the school are . rewarded as he talked wtth the designing school flags in another sophomore painter. about the, meaneontest, , ... , . . . .. ing and the origins of the design. The muralis i n " bu t Lupe spent about ten days re-Lupe and Dave ate frustrated the West because there are already scratches Htgh and Denver Ltbrary. on the painting. The painting is on The center symbol ts a temple the north side of the .lunchroom in with a spear in it .. The temple is the hallway. It is not in an obvious fire. From the on out ts place or showy place so interested the Serpent of Ftre. The head of the people will have to look a bit to find serpent is at the. bottom of it. r?und mural. Also tn the concentrtc Lupe Carlos works hard on his ctrcles are from homework to keep up his grades in fyiextco _ctvthzatton. Symschool and also plays on West bois m the destgn are from the High's football team. He is the son cultures of the Mayans, Toltecs, of Lupe and Pat Carlos. The family and A-ztecs. lives on West Cedar here in the The actual painting of the mural Westside. ' ; RESTAURANT AND BAR * 753 SANTA FE DRIVE '* * '* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * The meal that's sure to filt" * * Come and enjoy our: * FAST LUNCHES * From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Our place is always * AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS AND BANQUETS DANCING FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS AND * HOLIDAYS FROM 8:00 p.m. UNTIL 2:00a.m. * * SUNDAYS FROM 7:00 p.m. UNTIL 12:00 p.m. : PHONE 534-9579 * '*

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i i I I \ I I. Resident of the Month: HELEN LUCERO " I bless Yahweh, wbo is m y collJlSe lor , and in the night m y inmost self ins truc ts me; I keep Yahweh b e for e me alway for with hJm at m y ri ght hand ' nothJng can shake me." These words fro m the Psalms stic k with H e l e n Luce r o who read l ast m onth's issu e o f S .anta Fe Trail and said s h e would be w illing t o tell h e r story of h e r b o ut with alc o hol. H e r faith , h e r r espect f o r her self , h e r n e w goals. and h e r ability t o live each da y n ew keep h e r fr o m the old self pit y and misery that we r e h e r lot befor e s h e got rid of h e r habit s . Ab o ut two and o n e-half years ago, man y things started coming to a climax f o r H e l en. The d oc t o r warned her about her h ea.lt h and said s h e must give up drinking if s h e wanted t o b e health y. She was charge d with h e r third and f o urth DUI c harges and h e r attorney was abo u t to r efuse to assist her. Th e f e ar of jail and embarrassment alo n g wit h th e attorney and doctor l e d h e r to see a p syc h ia trist and to b egi n a n abuse m o nitoring . Eve n though she began all this, s h e was hostile t owa rd the world a nd t owa rd others, but she had begun o n th e fir s t step: seeking some h e lp. But even here, she needed h e lp and other pe o ple and H e l e n is thankful for her family , d octo r , friend s and o th e r people wh1c h s h e had b e hind h e r . She wishes only that o th e r alcoholics a l so h a d s uch a goo d foundation fr o m yo uth and a ls o so many frie nd s that will h e lp . The psychiatrist asked h e r " H ow d o you fee l about Helen? Wh at feelings d o you hav e for your se lf?" At that point , s h e didn ' t hav e goo d feeling s. She didn "t like h e rself ; she f e lt rese ntful towarrl o th e r s; and she didn ' t hav e re s p ec t f o r herself. Many o f her hang-ups th at s h e need e d to work through were from h e r c hildho o d , but h e r p syc hi at ri s t found another problem a l so: She needed spiritual help through AA or the c hurch . Hel e n refused t o go t o AA and has n o t ye t been t o AA. (It just wasn't f o r her. ) El Libro Que Responde A La Necesidad Fundamental De La Humanidad . Cual es? Si bien es c 1erto que Ia gente doquier al)hela sentir que se le ama todos los grandes profetas y maestro s de Ia Biblia nos d1ce n qu e Ia necesidad mas grande es amar a Oios _ co n todo el corazon y con toda el alma y con toda Ia m ente. Cuando sentimos este amor por Oios , empe za mo s a percibir que El nos ama Y nos cuida, eterna y compas1vamente . _Heraldo de Ia Ciencia Cnshana ayuda a .discernir como amar a Oios total y completamente. Amamos a Dios mas al comprenderlo me1or . Los articulos en el Heraldo ayudan a explicar Ia_ curaCJon por Ia oracion a D1os. Pueden cambiar su punto de vista haci a Ia vida . Usted puede obtener un ejemplar libre en espanol. ENVIE ESTE CUP ON SIN COMPROMISO A '-------------Fourth Chu rc h of Christ, Scientist 3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colo. 80211 Por favor mandeme m i ejemplar hbre del Heraldo d e Ia c . Cristiana . Jenc1a Nombre ' Direccion C i udad Estado ln June o f 1974, she we nt to a wedding in N ew M ex i co and f o und that some co u si ns and other r e l a tives and fri e nd s had changed as a result o f the charismatic mov e m e nt in the Cath olic Church . It surprised her but " if th ey could change, wh y not Helen?'' She brought home a B1ble and a book on Catholic Pentecos tal movement. Since she was off anabuse on her return, she headed for the lOth Avenu e Bar because she could control herself, but she couldn't. She finall y got control of herself after tw o weeks, went back on ana buse on her own (not because of and began reading the Btble. She also began going t o c hurch each Sunday. During th e past t wo yea rs, s h e has read many books and the Bibl e which hav e bee n instrumental in h e r "spiritual healing" from alco hol. She didn ' t . have some quick fantastic experience that healed h e r, . but through the process of read1!lg • . pr!lyer, .and putting into prac tic e wh a t she read, she was heal e d from alcohol. She can't stand th e s mell of it anymore. For th e first time in many years, Hel e n Luce r o feels that she has a "clear mind" and she is happy and grateful. H e r family which has ?een with her through th e struggle ts also much happier. Ms. Lucero is begin!ling to work toward her B .A. at Lor e tto Heights Colleg e in the Walls program. She I S sewm g m o re and saving so m e m o n ey on clothes. She is . Polly Baca Barragan Appointed To 'Carrascolendas' Sta t e R e present ative P olly B aca Barragan. D Th o rnt o n. h as been appo inted t o th e n ational advi s o r y board o f carr asco l e ndas." a bi lin g ual t e l e vis i o n program tra n s mitt e d nati o n ally b y th e Public Br o adcastin g S e r v i ce . .. _ Ca rra sco l endas"" is designed t o c ulu va t e three qua lities in c hildren respect f o r self , respect for ot h e r . and respect for the wo rld a r o und them. It is the only bllm g u a l progr a m o n t e le v i s i o n th a t ha s as its f oc u s th e feelings. att itudes. va lues, and huma n r e l a tionship o f c hildr e n in a multi c ultur a l soc i e t y. The program is aimed at a 6 thro u g h 10-yea r-old audience and uses a mu s ical -co m e d y f ormat in b o th Sp a ni s h and Engli s h t o demonstrate co ncepts such as co o p e r atio n , decisi on-making, r e s p ec t f o r di ve rsit y , and pro bl e m so l v mg. "Carrascolendas" can b e seen Tuesday and Thursday a t 6 p.m. o n KRMA, Channe l 6. R epresent a tiv e Barragan h as ser ved as a White H o use Public Inf o rm a ti o n Offi ce r . a Special Asststant to the Chairman o f th e D e m oc r atic N a ti o nal Committee, a nd as a m ember o f th e D e m oc r atic N at i o n a l Committee. Boards on which s h e s e rves includ e Pro j e ct CAN BE E. Mil e Hi g h Unit e d Wa y. Colorado Housin g. Inc ., and s h e is Vice C h a irp e r so n of th e National C01_ 1gress o f Hispanic Am e ri ca n R e p . Ba r ragan has r e ceive d sever a l International Lab o r Press Achie e m e nt Awards. In 1 969 s h e received th e Outstandin g Young W o m a n of Am e ri ca Award a nd in I 9 7 3-74 and I 975-76 s h e wa s includ e d in Who's Who in Amer ican Politics. reading and enjoying boo . Each Sunda y she anegds Mass and every Frida y she meets with a maJI group whjch reads the B ible. has discu ion . and pra y spon taneou ly together at the conven t on 6th and Galapago. H elen has some feeling about w h at he i doing and what other can d o t o make life meaningfuJ and t o get off of alcohol : I. he n o t only reads th e B ible and o th e r bookS but she a ttempt t o pra c ti ce Chri tianit y and li" e a Chri t liv e d . 2. Sh e is dealing with h e r emo t ion and f eel ings and learnin g h ow t o handl e them. She also h a a p e r son al r e lation hip with Christ a nd talk ove r her problem and fears in praye r. 3. She realiz e s that in the Christ ian faith th e r e is forgiveness . Th e past i s f o rgiv e n a . nd she c an J ive in th e present an d future. She doesn ' t carry the hurt and anger fro m the past and ca n team t o f o r g i ve those who bring up the past o r mak e her o ut t o b e what sh e was b e f o r e . 4 . Sh e ha s learn e d to Jove and re spect h e rself as H e len Lucero . She h o pes that others learn to accept themse lves and feel .good and be come able to act as individuals. . Helen always been actively mvolved m many Westside activi ties and organizations and she still is but less than b e for e because so m e times th e a ct ivities she was invol ved in were to get h e r away from herself. Sh e is presentl y work Ing at the Justice Informatio n Center w h e r e she has co n ' act with many peopl e who have been arrested o r mu s t appear b e f o r e th e cou r t s in D e n ve r. She ca n assist people there, but s h e ca n a l so meet some oth e r p eople who a r e burdened d ow n w ith a l co h olis m a nd r e fer th e m to agen c ies which ca n h e lp them. She ca n b e r e a c h e d at the center at 825 . West lith Avenue (89,32347). hopes other p eople wo n t go so l o n g b e f o r e realizing th at al co h o l i s a proble m f o r th e m. N ow i s the time t o take care o f the p roblem, so th a t th e p e rson can set n ew goal s for himself and hav e a clear mind, Th e Santa Fe Trai staff than s H e l e n Lucer o f o r b eing bold e n o ugh and concerne d e n o u g h a b o ut o th e r s t o share h e r s t ory . W e h o p e that h e r r ecove r y (day-by day) will be a n inspirati o n t o o thers m o ur community-to start gettin g h e lp a nd h e lping th e mselves. The Latin American ment Society (LADS) ganized to achiev e the goals: Develop have or following • Unification in our attempt to set good examples for those in this organization and for all others • Furthering communications, edu cation and human relations for a better way of life • o _vercoming inferiority complex. es m our selves and in others of Mexican-American nationality • Developing potentialities lying dormant within us • Utilizing our skills to help our selves and our people lead more useful and satisfying hves. As you are no doubt aware, there have been major problems we have had and are having. The self help programs were discontinued and we haven't really been able to function as we should. Because we have been lax , we. have lost contact with friends and supporters. We now have the opportunity to start the self help groups again, such as Drama Workshop, Crime Prevention Teen Program, LADS, etc. Friends and supporters who are interested in helping us help ourselves should please contact secretary, Box 1010, Canon Ctty , Colorado 81212. Thank y ou very much, Alberto Martinez #42433 Secretary, Latin American Development Society The Occupational Safety and lfealth Act of 1970 requires emplo_rers to provide workplaces free from safety and health hazards and to comply with safety and health standards. Not Only Meals, But also Activities P S 0 ! One mav thin it i new nited t t e p ram. but. 0 . It i a I \! estside r ani zarion which stand for Pan Ame ri n enio r Ciriz.en Or aniz.a t i n . PA CO. pan red bv Volunteers o f America. e rve ton da y through F riday at I : 00 p . m . t all S enio r Citi ze n ixty vear f age o r older in thi ' ar . The nutTitiou Jun h i e rved at t. J o e ph Chu rc h o n 6th and Gala p ago and aid S enio r Citi ze n i n having a bala . n ce d di e t . Aft e r lun c h older p eo ple hav e an ............... . opportunity t o communicate ' ith f ellow S enio r Citi ze ns : to enjoy ver y beautiful rew rd . The e e nt e rtainin g experience ; a . nd t o crafts are often u ed by the older Jearn about services availabl e to p pie to d eco rat e their h m e th e m . during the diffe r nt holidays PAS C O has some eve nt which throughout the ear . regularl y appear on the activi t y Once a month th r e i a Blood ca l endar. Here are a f ew of the Pressure C l i nic conducted at PAS S enio r Citizens' at PAS C O f avo rit e CO. The o lder p eople hav their activities : blood pressure c hecked and are Dave Fager is a ve r y specia l weighed. The nurses often ugge t p e rson among the o lder people. H e ways to impro e one' health and attends PASCO and e ntertains the bod y con di tion . High blood pre -group by pla ying the p iano and sure I S one o f the great killers in th e singing the favorite "good o ld " United States t oday. It is important songs. Dave can reall y mak e a t o have your blood pre sure piano co m e alive . Listening to Da ve c h ecke d regularl y . play and sing i s a very enjoyable Judy F?wl e r gives the program wa y to spend tim e after the n oo n on Nutnt10n . Judy has ideas and m eal. suggestio n s on h ow to improve the Music seems to g i ve the m os t food the S e nior Citizens eat. H e r satisfaction t o th e S e nior Citizens . programs are interesting and in Carlos Chavez's and Gaspar formativ e and may b e Judy can h e lp Eames' dance mu s i c is appreciated. yo u with a probl e m you have . b y th e peo pl e who attend PASCO . Th e r e are many other activities Chavez and Eames can keep the going on at PASCO . PASCO is a int e rest of th e older people with place an older p e r so n can go to their skilled fingers on the guitar. have a meal, meet old and make Art s and crafts are usuall y l e d b y new fri ends, and get involved in a Connie and John Ru ybal. Connie' s variety of acti vities. If yo u are sixty and John's creative ideas keep the years of age or older, why d o n ' t yo u Senior Citizens' hands busy with co m e see if PASCO h e lp you ? "Addicts Are Walking Death" By Dave Ortiz According to th e reference b oo k Licit & Ulicit Drugs, b y Edward M. Br ec h e r and the Editors of Con sumer Reports, to be a confirmed drug addi<;_t is to be one of the walking dead. The teeth have rott e d out, th e appetite i s lost, and th e stomach and intestines don ' t function pro p e rl y . Th e gall bl adde r becomes inflam ed, eyes and ski n turn a bili ous yellow, in some cases m embra nes o f the nos e turn a fla min g r e d, the partition sep aratm g the nostril s is eaten away , breathing is difficult . O xyge n in the blood decreases, bro n c hiti s a nd tube r cu losis develop. Good traits of c h a racter disappear and bad o nes e m e rge. S ex o rgans b eco m e af f ected, ve in s collapse and the liv id purplish r e m ai n . B oils a nd abcesses pla gue the skin, g r owing pam rack s the bod y . N e rves s nap, vicious twit c hin g develops. !mag m a r y and f&ntastic fears bli ght t h e mind a nd sometimes co mplete in sanit y results . Ofte ntimes too, death co mes much too e arly in lif e . is the to _rme nt of being a drug addtct, such t s the plag u e of b e ing one of the walkin g dead . Thi s quotati o n was brought in popular view o f the e ffect s of n a r co tics on addicts was e loqu e ntl y expresse d in a 1962 decision of the Supreme Court of the United States. Effect on sexual potency and libido in a 1970 study revealed that ma?y Philadelphia addicts thought thetr sexual functioning was ad affected while they w ere on herom. The study did not differ entiate, however, between the e ffects of the heroin itself and other depressing aspect s of th e street a ddi ct's way o f lif e. P erhaps t h e best ev idence for a depressant effect _ o n both potency and hb1do t s t h e fact that addicts who complain of r educed libido and impaired sexual p erformance while o n h e r oi n r e p ort prompt improve m ent wh e n they " Ki c k the Habit". In a group of 1 3 ex-l!.d dicts inten sive l y studie d at St. Luke's H os pital in N e w York City, f o r exam pie: all "claime d their sexual pro_ blem_s disappeared during de t oxtficatJOn w heth e r in hospitals, in detenti o n , jail , etc." Th e r e a r e even r e ports of s p ontaneo u s o r gasm that h e r o in temporarily d e presses rather than perm a n e ntl y damages sexu al function. Consequently, in t h e Rocky Mountain News, o n Tuesday , Jan u a r y 13, 1976, Dr . Tomas Martinez r e lated these effects on women w ith a h e r oin addiction . So it i s important th a t during a certain amount of time both mal e and female addicts s h o uld b e k ept in separate treatment programs for a pe_ri?d ?f time. Which in m y opm10n ts true, not only for the addict to get e motionall y stable but t o prevent the possibilit y o f child r e n b eing b o rn with an addiction to h e roin , since science has already proved by factual reports that heroin addiction is hereditary . If person w ho is having difficulty wtth the problems of drug abuse and wants information on drug addiction, please contact the Au raria Community Center, Drug Educational Project; contact Mmerva Antuna, or Dave Ortiz at 534-7614. ' (T o be continued) Entire Celebra_tion

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SCHOOL . NEWS / StuJent .of the Month: Greenlee News GREENLEE GYM NEWS .We are in the midst of our winter activities program at Greenlee. In gym we are playing volleyball games in addition to ropes and mats. Also we are having our annual wrestling tournament with the finals scheduled for January 29th. This is the third year for our wrestling tournament and those involved seem to really enjoy the wrestling. Our after school recreation pro gram is centered around basketball in the winter. We have a fifth grade boys team and also a sixth grade boys team. In addition we have a girls team for the second year. We have twenty girls competing this year on a regular basis, with practices being held two times a week. The girls have played two games so far against Fairmont and Rosedale and have won them both. The boys sixth grade team lost to Lincoln Elementary while the fifth grade boys defeated Fairmont. In the next two weeks we plan on having . two faculty-student games. The girls will play the lady faculty members while the boys will play the men faculty members. These games should be a lot of fun. The members of the teams are: FIFTH GRADE-FIREBIRDS Captain Tommy Solano Mark Dixon John Tenorio Jerry Smith Carlos Martinez Mike Rodriguez Robert Medina Juan Williams Eston Archuleta Anthony Pacheco Gilbert Castello SIXTH GRADE LAKERS Captain Leroy Martinez Jose Martinez Dino Reyes Joey Bermudez Mike Barela Orlando Archuleta Oscar Colmenero Willie Bell GIRLS TEAM Captain Mary Beard Michelle Reese Darlene Vigil Tamara Chambers Yvonne Mota Anna Reyes christine Costello Debbie Martinez Susan Duvall Bernice DeLeon Debbie Romero Jessica Ruiz Jackie Torres Kathy Torre s Sherr y Pacheco Mary Madrid Rachel Vasquez Pauline Vasquez Suzy Gon za les Arl e ne DeLeon Rosalinda Cabazos WHS Team Wins The West High School rifle team has had an outstanding year dijring 1975-76. Chris Von Male is the team captain. Others on the team are Bret Holman, Gary Doud, Jesus Quinonas , and David Mar tine z. They plac e d second in the city in varsity matches and third in the North Hig h Sch oo l Invitational in December. In the North High match , they beat all of the Denver teams, but lost to Boulder a nd Canon City Hig h S c hool teams. The group th e n e nt e r e d the Martin Luther Kin g , Jr., match in January a nd came bac k with five first place, one seco nd plac e and two third pla ce tr ophies. On Saturday. January 27th, the t e am will compete in Chey e nn e in th e ir sectional. Th ey will a l so b e comp e ting on February 12th and 13th in th e National Rifle Match a nd on Febru ary 28th th ey will be in Pu e blo for the sectiona l contest a t th e Univ e rsity of Southern Colo rado. SIXTH GRADERS REPORT ROOM 101 The Wrestling Tournament We have a wrestling tournament in our school each year and many boys are in it . The finals will be soon and the winners in each division will receive a trophy. For second prize they will get a certifi cate. It is a lot of fun so why don't you come to Greenlee School, 1150 Lipan Street, on January 29th. Joey Bermudez First Aid At Greenlee Elementary we are practicing First Aid. We are talking about how to save lives. The nurse is Mrs. Byars. She comes in every Tuesday and Thursday. We are also talking about how to treat people in shock. We are learning interesting things. r hope other schools the great opportunity of learning .First Aid too. Leslie Eden Our Science Class In science we are doing many experiments with magnets and batteries. So far we have made an electro-magnet. We've studied cur rents and have also made light switches. We use materials such as batteries, insulated wire, magnets, nails, compasses, and lightbulbs. So far we have done about 5 big experiments and all of them have been a complete success. We're hoping that our future experiments Will also go as well as these did. Jeannine Geist High Intensity Reading Lab At Greenlee Elementary School we have a Reading Lab . Our teacher for that class is Mr s . Fin nerty. It is a lovely Reading Lab with lots of things to read, to hear, and to do. Some people work very hard in there. Rosita PadiUa Art Museum Some of us at Greenlee went to the Art Museum and saw the American Art Heritage. It was very interesting. All of the paintings were by the original artists. We saw a picture of George Washing ton which is the one that is on the dollar bill . There were still life, portraits, and landscapes, too. In M.rs. Ryan ' s class we've tried to draw portraits and found that they are very hard to draw. Lisa Scott Joe Montoya . Greenlee School is very proud of 1ts student of the month, Joe Mon toya. Joe is a fourth grader and has attended Greenlee since he started to school. He is an excellent student in all subjects. His favor ites are reading and math where he performs two or three years beyond his grade level. Joe has taken tests that have qualified him for a scholarship at Graland School. These scholarships are valued at approximately $2000 a year. Joe is well-known by all teachers and students at Greenlee . He is a leader, well-liked and respected by everyone. He often serves as Master of Ceremonies in our pro and enjoys helping others, especially new students at Green lee. He is active in gym where he ball, mats, ropes, and 1s lookmg forward to the wrestling tournament. Joe says he would like to become a writer when he finishes school he has a good H1s class is writing limericks m Language now and he shared one of his with us: I once kbew a bey named Max He always played with an ax He chopped down trees Which made him sneeze That crazy boy named Max. . Joe is prou d of his family who IIYe at 1050 Kalamath Street. His parents are Junior and Orlinda Montoya. He has two brothers, James and Leonard, and three sisters, Clara, Connie and Susan. A sixteen month old nephew, John, and a fifteen mo11th old niece, / Audrey, are also important people in Jo's life. Joe is very active in the Lincoln Park Boys Club of Denver and was recently awarded the Boy of the Month by the Club. Congratula tions , Joey, we're very proud of you. Greenlee students in Mr. Hackethal's 4th grade class prepare envelopes containing tickets for a Laradon Hall benefit. WHS Student Activities Announced West High School will have a Dis co -Val entine's D a nc e on Friday , F e bruary 13th , from 8 : 00 11:00 p . m . Th e so phomore class unde r th e s p onso rship of Mr . Richard H ew itt will host the all-school dan ce in the o ld Girls' Gym. The price is 7 5 ce nts per p e r so n or $1.00 per co upl e. W est High School st udents and dates on l y are invited to this schoo l function. * * * The Westside Players will pre sent, as their second production of the season, BAREFOOT IN THE PARK , a Neil Simon comedy. The pla y will be at High School. On Thursday and Friday eve nings (February 19th and 29th), the performances wiiJ begin at 8:00 p.m. Seen in the role of Corie will be JoAnn Sainz. Opposite her in the male lead will be Bob CarriiJo. Others in the cast are David Van Cleave , Teresa Martinez, Mark Lindeman, and Billie Rendon. Tickets are $1.00 for adults and SO cents for children and students. Drama students at West High School will be seUing the tickets and tickets may be purchased at the door on the nights of the per formance . FAIRMONT NEWS -The New Year brought the boys attended the concert. Our thanks to and girls back to Fairmont School Detective Ernie Apodaca who made ready to "hit the books" once the arrangements for this group to again as well as . to take part in come to Fairmont. many special activities. On January 29th the first semesMartin Luther King and all Black ter ended and report cards of pupil Americans were honored during progress have gone home . Parents January as the main theme of our who have any questions about bilingual-bicultural teacher, Mrs. grades or pupil progress are urged Cathy Acosta . Classroom teachers to stop by or call the school, 893also presented units of study to 1957, to make an appointment for a :help their students to better under-conference with your child's teach stand and appreciate Black culture er. Be an interested parent and and its contributions to our history. visit your school often! The showcase in the main hall As we start the new semester we contained various articles ffom also begin a new pairing cycle. A Africa and was a hit with the new group of boys and girls from . children. On King's birthday, Fairmont have been selected to January 15th, the school lunchroom attend 'Lincoln School at 950 South staff prepared a special "soul Pearl Street on a half day basis for food" lunch for all children com-the of this school year. First, plete with black-eyed peas and second, and third graders go in the sweetpotato pie. while fourth, fifth, and Fifth and sixth graders from Sixth graders_ go in the mornings. Samuels School recently visited P _arents of children who will attend Fairmont. They presented a gymLmcoln have been notified by mail nastic exhibition to all children , in and should note down bus times school. We that soon our and stops which were given in the Fairmont gymnastic group will be letter. We are sure that the second able to go to Samuels School to give pairing cycle will be as successful a demonstration of their gymnastic as the first and we wish to thank all skills . parents for their cooperation. If you A Denver SyJ?phony Orchestra any questions about paired Concert was enJoyed by 20 Fair -busmg, please call the school. mont fifth graders on January 19th. Second graders were also busy in Mr. Ron English ' and Mr. Rich January studying a unit on animals Moody accompanied the group to and their care. As a part of this unit the Auditorium Theatre. all second graders attended the The Fairmont auditorium was National Western Stock Show with alive with the "now" musical tea_chers, Miss Adolphson, sounds of the Denver Police Squad M1ss Selhnghausen, and Miss TruIV Rock Band on January 27th. jillo. From all that we heard the Enjoyment was evident by the nonexhibits were better than eve; this stop clapping and cheers from the year and this field trip was very fourth, fifth, and sixth graders who worthwhile . BAKER NEWS -January 16 was Spirit Day at Baker. Students were encouraged to wear orange and white and an ! assembly was held featuring cheer leaders, Student Council, Jazz Band and the Baker's Dozen. Cheerleaders are Mary Arellano, Tracy Collins, Sharon Oardner,. Pat, Lopez, Sandy Martinez, Tina Or tega, Tina Suazo, Cbristina Valdez Tammy Velarde. Student Councii members participating were Renee Romero, Head Girl, and Moses Norman, Head Boy . The Jazz Band consisted of: Gus Lindemann, Ropin Garcia, Lima Tagovailoa, Janet Draper, Jeff DeWispelaere, Brad Kampmann, Paul Tafoya, Ed Cooper, Paul Humphryes, Jackie Arnold, Karen Rogers, Daran Schwartz , Ivan Sahabuddin, Carlos Gutierrez. Baker's Dozen members are: Kip Craft, Paul Humphryes, Brad Kampmann, Moses Norman, Dennis Peters, Dave Powell, Daran Schwartz, Louis Serrat, Steve Shel _Janet Draper, Terry Draper, V1ckie French, Gina Gray , Kevin Kimmel, Kelly McCarthy, Renee Romero, Kelly Walters, Debra Bird. Stephanie Webb was Mis tress of Ceremonies and Mr. Sala zar, Principal, opened the assem blv. The Bilingual-Bicultural Pro gram in Denver Public Schools has launched a community involvement program. We 'want you to help us! Even if you don't have children directly involved, you can be of _ service. H you have a particnlar skiiJ or hobby that the children might be in, please contact Martha Urioste (program coordinator) at Greenlee Elemen tary School, or Teresa Harper at Baker Jr. High. Make-up color pictures and black and white pictures were taken January 21. Color pictures should be back after the first week of February. January 30 marked the end of first semester in Denver Public Schools . Grades received on the report cards during the week of February 2 will go on permanent records. . At 7:30 p.m. on January 29, the Instrumental Music Department ?eld a Winter Band Concert, which Involved the Intermediate, Ad vanced and Jazz Bands. The bands conducted by Mr. Don Novy, mstrumental teacher. The pace has not slowed down for Baker's choirs since the holiday season. On January 15, the Concert Choir and Baker's Dozen partici pated in a memorial program for the late Dr. Martin Luther Kingat Lowry Air Force Base. The Choir sang, "The Stars Are With The Voyager" and "Ainta That Good News". The Dozen performed a special Bicentennial number en titled, "Mother Country". Baker's Dozen performed at Spirit Day on January 16 and both ninth grade choirs entertained th e Retired Personnel on January 19th at Baker. Baker's four choirs, under th e direction of Susan Kates and Ken Hailpern , are busy preparing music for a number of presentations thi s spring, including a Bicentennial program and a special spring concert. WHS Chili Contest Winners of the 2nd Annual Chili Contest, held recently at West High School, 951 Elati St., have been announced. First place winner is Paul Garcia , 15. Second place winners were a tie between the team of Donna Zapata, 15, and Lisa Pettid, 16, and Ralph Trujillo, 15. Elaine DeLeon , 15, and Valerie Vigil , 16, took third place. The contest was co-sponsored by the Home Economics d e part ment and the Bilingual Bicultural Program. Older Persons Can Direct Deposit Social Security Checks at UNION BANK & TRUST 1st & Broadway 744-3221

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CHURCH NEWS ST. JOSEPH'S CAmOIJ(: CHURCH 6th and Galapago Denver. Colorado 80204 Fr. Andrew Meiners, Pastor Fr . Joseph Campbell Fr. Carl S c hwan: Fr . Leroy Bu rke Fr. Thomas R ya n MASSES 1 2 :10 and 6:00p.m . Sat. 7:00, 8 :3 0, 10 : 00 (Spanish, up s tairs) 10:00 ( English , hall) 1 2:00 noon NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE MASTER ( BAPTIST ) 325 W . Irvington Place D o n Davis, Pas tor Jerry McCormick, Assoc . Pastor SERVICES Worship , 8 :30 and 11 : 00 a . m . Sunday School , 9 :45a.m. Sunday Evening Meeting, 6 :00p.m. Prayer Meeting, Thursday, 7:30p. m. CLUB PROGRAM Boy's Club, Wednesday, 6 :30 p . m. Girl's Club, Saturday. 9:30a.m. ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOUC CHURCH 1060 lith Street Denver, Colorado 80204 MASSES Weekday: 8:00, 12: 15, 5:15 Sunday: 8:00, 9 : 00, ll :00, 12:15 Saturday: 12 : 00, 5:00 CONFESSIONS Daily -before 12 : 15 Mass Saturday 4:00 to 5:00 PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA ' ' 910 Kalamath -Phone 825-7497 Rev . Job Maldonado, Pastor 10: 00 a . m. Sunday School 11: 00 a.m. Worship Service 6 : 00 p . m. Church Training 7 : 00 p . m. Evening Service ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHUKCH Stuart & Alameda Denver, Colorado 80219 James Prohens, Pastor Thomas Fraile, Assistant Pastor MASSES Saturday evening, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, 8 : 00 a . m. (Spanish) 10 : 30 12: 00 (Spanish), 7:00p.m. Weekdays, 8:00a.m. ,spanish) FIRST A VENUE PRESBYTERIAN 120 West First Ave . 777-5325 Denver, Colorado 80223 Rev. A . J . Blomquist, Pastor R ev. Moicdio Cruz, Asst. Pastor Sunday S c h oo l , 9 : 45 a . m . Morning Wors hip , 111)() a .n.t. LUTHERAN COMMUNITY CENTER 215 West 5t.b Avenue D e n ver, C olorado John Hushman, Youth Minist e r Bru ce Klitz..ky, Older Persons Ministr y SERVICES Sunday: W orship servi ce and Sunday S c h ool fr o m 10: 00 to 11:30 a.m. CHURCH OF ST. PETER ( EPISCOPAL ) 126 West 2nd Avenue D e nv e r, Colorado 80223 R ev. George Castano, Pastor SERVICES Sunday 8 . : 00 a . m . Holy Communion 10 :30 a . m . Morning Prayers and Sermon Wednesday10: 00 a.m. Holy Communion SUN VALLEY COMMUNITY CHURCH 1230 Decatur 825-0121 Lou R ooss i e n , Pastor John Algera, Intern Pastor (1039 Bryant 893 '-5753) Lupe Rodriguez , Social Worker Sunday School ; 10:00 a.m. Worship, II : 00 a.m. Monday, Cadets at 7 :15p. m. Wednesday • Adult Bible Study, 7:30 Teen Time (13 and up) , 7:30 Friday -Teen Lounge, 8:30 p.m. FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 436 West 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80204 Westley Jantz, Pastor Brice Balmer, Urban Minister Morning Worship, 9:00 a .m. Church School, 10:00 a.m. Various adult groups meet weekly. For more information call 892-1038 WESLEY 'uNITED METHODIST CHURCH West 5th and Galapago Jim Harris, Minister Jack Calderon , Associate Sunday School10: 00 a.m. Worship Service11: 00 a . m. Evening Servic e (Spanish) 7:00p.m. FOURTH <;HURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST -3101 West 31st Avenue Denver, Colorado Worship Services-Sunday (English) 11: 00 a .m. Sunday (Spanish) 4:00p.m. Services weekly in English Sunday 11: 00 a.m. Servicios en Espanol Domingo primer y tercer-4:00p. m . Escuela dominical a Ia misma hora WEST HIGH ACTIVITIES REGISTRATION TIME Th e nin e Den ve r Publi c High Schools will conduct secontl semes t e r registrati o n J anuary 26 to February 2 o n the following sc hedul e: West Hi g h School, 951 Elati St., will prov id e buses o n Thursday, J anuary 29, with one run for seniors to regist e r 7:00 t o 10:30 a. m ., anothe r for juniors to register 9:30a. m . to 2:15p.m., and a third run for sophomores to registe r 1 2:3 0 to 2 :15p.m. There will be two return trips with one for seniors at 10 :30 a. m . , and a second for juniors and sophomores about 2:15 p . , m . On Friday, January 30, th ere will b e a bus to pick up the remaining sophomores and anyone late to register from 7 :00 to 10:40 a.m., with return at'l0:55 a.m. PARENTS ORGANIZATION The first meeting o f th e West Hi g h P a r e nts Organi zation was held W ednesday evening, January 2 1 st, in the s c h oo l social r oo m . Mrs . Emily M o ntoya was elected Presid ent. One of West's needs i s an ac;;tive, enthusiastic organizati on of parents to help w ith many activities at West High. Parents contribute muc h to the education o f their sons and daughters and can contribute to the spirit and progress b e in g made at West Hi g h t his year. Parents are urge d to join and become involved. Th e next meetin g will . b e Wednesday evening, Feb ruary 4th from 7: 00 to 9:00p. m. in the Wes t High social room. If yo u need more information, call Mrs. Stevenson at West High, 222-3545. Justice Hearing Announced In accordance with the ationaJ Conference of Catholi c B ishop Bi Centennial program. the Arch dioce e of Denv e r will ponsor a eries of eight regional hearing . The purpo e of the hearing is to assist Church leaders in determin ing the Catholic Church social ju tice polil"ies f o r th e n ext five yea rs. There will b e a panel at each hearing with a B ishop and several p e r so n s it:1 d ecisio n making posi t i o n s list e ning to the social con ce rns of the p eople who come befor e them to speak. Th e hearin g for West M et r o Denver will b e o n S aturday. M arch 13th. fro m 9 :3 0-4 : 00 at All Saints P a rish Hall. 2559 S. Feder a l. Bis h op George Evans will be a m embe r o f the list e nin g panel o n that d ay. _ Anyone w h o would like t o s peak o n a n y social ju s ti ce issu e i s urge d t o co nt act Mr. St eve R o b ac h R elig i o us Educati o n Offi ce Our Lad y of Fatima Church 10530 W. 20th A ve. L akewoo d. Col orado 802 1 5 o r phon e 233 -1283 and stat e yo ur name and th e topic yo u would lik e to s peak o n so yo u ca n b e placed o n the sc h e dule. Escuche el Programa "Palabras de Esperanza" KFSC -1220 AM DOMINGOS8:30a.m. lglesia,Adventista del Septimo Dia .4359 Pecos • New Approach To StudenfGov't At West High West High S c hool began a new Student Leadership Program last _ September as pant of the curricu lum. The Leadership Program replaces the Student Council at West and involves around ISO students. The new program, de veloped by Rick Reynolds, Director of Student Activities, and Dick Hewitt, a clas s sponsor, is d e signed to invo lv e many m o r e students than the old student council. Mr. Hewitt commented, "In the past we were only involving 36 students and they were being asked to perform the duties o f student co uncil representatives and class officers. Now, we have opened up the system and allow any student to volunteer, then set up separate class organizations and a school -wide group of lead ers." Any student at West may sign up for a class in Student Lead e r ship and receive academic credit for it. Th e sophomores are assigned to Mr. Hewitt's S ophomore Class Council. Junio r s enroll in Mr. B ernie Lopez's Junio r Class Coun c il. Seniors are assigned to Mr. Joe Sandoval ' s Senior Class Council. All three groups meet dail y w ith their sponsor and conduct class business, learn_ about lead e r ship r o les, learn meeting s kills, group d ynamics, program evaluatio n , financial manage m ent, and per-. son a I responsibility . They e lect their own officers and six S e n a t o rs. Th e S enators and the s i x AII, School Officer s meet with Mr. Re y n olds two or three times a week and take care o f the duties of the f ormer student council. The Student Senate has bee n involved wi th the Homecoming activities, the Bicentennial, a contest to design a flag and crest for the school , and other related activities. Mr. Reynolds said, " In the past, the Student Council was an ex clusive club that was ve r y difficult to break into. Students were r equired to make speeches in front of the student body and get e lected . Many students who were uncomfortable in front of large g r oups could not get invol ve d . Now they merel y sign up and we seem to have attracted a ver y good group of stud. ents. Where we use d to involve 36 students, we now have about 150 students learning by doing.'' Open House at St. Joe's School As nd em er appro ch St. Joe' i involved in many projCC1 • The teacher and tudent are working on proj t that \\;u be di played at the Edu ti n February. Thi will be an e opponun'ity for people to me and ee what the tudent have been doin . Clas work . art w rk . and other chool projects will be displayed . AI o. the Ph y icaJ Edu cation clas will demon trat e orne rope j umping techniques. Thi is basketball eason and th e school is actively pani ipating in th e P arochial League. There i a midget team for boy in grade 4 . 5 . and 6. a nd there i a va r ity team for boys in grade 7 and 8. For the first time th e re i also a girl ' basketball team . The team i mad e up o f gi rl s in g rade 5. 6. 7, and . All the teams are given a g reat dea.l of s uppon by th e cl-]eer leaders , pep club, p a r ents, a nd fr iend . The gan 1es generally a r e pla ye d Satur d ay m o rnings a t St. Joe's gym. Eac h week a diffe r e nt class , wo rks o n devel oping the liturgy for Tuesday's mass. Thi year the mass has taken o n a special m e anin g f o r th e stude nts because th ey plan t h e mass. Last week at mass each e i ghth grade r presented a yo unger s ister o r brot h e r wit h a gift at the exchange o f peace. This was in keepin g with th e ir theme of th e importance o f f a milies. Because thi s i s th e B icente nni a l year , t h e r e will b e a s pecial day, F ebruary lOt h , wh e n the students will dress a s so meon e in th e past. A special Bic e nt e nni a l lun c h will a l so b e f eatured that d ay . T h e r e are more special events being planne d to celebrate this year. Del Pueblo Th e Azte c F a mil y at D e l Pu e bl o is co ncern e d abo ut t h e fo o d waste in th e ir lun chroom. In Nov embe r , a committee of 5th and 6t h grade r s was formed to disc uss the probl e m s of during their lunch p e riod . These children were co ncern e d with the reason s that so mu c h food was thrown out each d ay. Th e group believed that portions were too large for the young c hildr e n at t h e sc h ool. They also felt that certain foo d s s h o uld b e served in smaller amounts. Some of t hese foods a r e beets .and cabbage salad. However , after t wo m onths of car e ful study o n th e s ubj ec t , t h e committee f ound that there are many rules and g uid e lines that must b e m e t b y th e lun chroo m c r e w . For example, ce rtain f oo d s mus t be ser ve d because o f th ei r nuttiti o nal v alue. Thi s rul e h e lp e d the Aztecs unde rstand wh y some "unpopular" foods mus t b e ser ve d . ' The Aztecs a lso have som e s uggesti o n s to improve school lun c hes. 1) Befo r e throwir g you r food away, see if a friend near yo u mi ght want something that yo u don't. 2) Try e ach type of f oo d . You may surprise yourself and like so methin g new. 3) For a real change, ask your teacher if yo u could eat " famil y style " in your classroom. We found that to h e lp f oo d waste, for sure. Auraria Committee Announced Th e newl y e lected P olicy Com mittee consists of parents: Juliette Bailey, Patsy Boots. Rita Nielsen (secretary), H e laine Sigl e (Vic e Chairperso n) , and B arbara G a lle gos. Th e at large m embers are Ire n e Zuniga (Chairperson) and Valerie Archuleta. Thi s sc hool year has returned many staff members to college courses. They include: Child Devel opment Associate Degree (Colo rado State University) Debbie Lopez, J ennie Bustos, and Leonor Nieto; Bilin g ual Child Dev e lop m ent Associate Degree (Metro State C ollege) Patricia Carlos, Loyola Arellano, and Betty Quin t ana; Maste r's Deg ree in Learning Disabilities (University of Northern Colorado) The Ortega home on Kalmath was recently remodeled b y Brothers Red e , • elopment, Inc. (BRn. BRI ha. s been remod eling West.slde homes and agencies for four years as or January 1976. New Medical Center R ocky M o unt ain H o pital (an O e teopathic I n titution) has l a un c h e d its "Operatio n Outreach " program with t h e opening of a new Outpatien t Unit at 875 K a lamath Street on Decembe r 1st, 19 75. The facility has been name d The Ro cky M ountain Famil y Practice Center (Leland E . Warr e n Di vision) in h o nor of the late Leland E . Warre n , D . O., a long-tim e Osteopathic Ph ys i c ian who practice d at t h a t l ocatio n and was a m ember of the M e dical Staff of R oc k y Mountain Ho s pital. . The Outpati e nt Unit wiJJ be staffed b y Osteopathi c Physicians o n a 7-day p e r week basis , with h ours fr o m 10 : 00 a. m. until 12: 00 n oo n and from 1 : 00 p.m. until 6 : 00 p.m. Full 24 h our ser v i ce will b e provided to patients through a referral system to t h e E m ergency and Outpatient D e partment at Roc k y M o un tai n Hospital , 4 701 East 9th Avenue after Clinic hours. A full range of primary m edical care will be offered with specialty referrals available. The facility is open to all citi zens, whether they b e M e di ca id, M e dicare, other In surance or private pay patie nts. Th e D enver Areawide Compte h e n sive Health Planning Agency has determine d that a Certificate of Publi c Necessity i s not required for the Family Practice Center, and has also stated that there is a d e finit e shortage of primary care physi cians for the area in which the facility is locat e d . The Unit is approved and license d b y the Colo rado State Health D epartment as a n extension of Rocky Mountain Ho s pital . ln keeping with the basic philos ophy of the Osteopathic profession, to deliver primary health care to the nation's citizens, some 86"7o of the graduates of the nine Osteo pathi c Colleges in the United States b eco m e G eneral or Family Prac titioners. The osteopathic profession be lieves all patients should have the right to select the kind of health care they prefer, and that the pro fession's c ontinuing educational emphasis on general practice rather than medical specialization best serves the true health-care needs of the American public. 'LUCIA' TO BE SCREENED The National Lawyers Guild and the. End Polic e Abuse Fund an n ounce a showing of the film "Lucia, " on Friday, January 30, at 7 : 00 p.m. at the Denver lndian Center, 1580 Gaylord. Admission is $1.50. There will be a bake sale and refreshments. t RELIGIOUS ARTICLES john P. Daleiden Co. 1175 Santa Fe Drive Denver 80204 534-8233 FREE PARKING

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I ' 'I I I I I r f ( • r, I Agapita Salazar returned to her home in Lincoln Park this month after spending several weeks with a daughter recovering from an ill ness. Welcome home, Agapita, and 'we're glad you're feeling better. * * * Hazel Krieg spent several days in Denver General Hospital after a fall on New Years Day left her with a broken hip. * * * Audrey Guzman of 409 Inca celebrated her first birthday on New Year's Day. Her parents Gloria and Rigoberto Guzman had a party in her honor and a pinata was broken. Her brother Steve was in charge of all the games and prizes. Attending were her godparents, Mr. and Mrs. Phil Josue; her grandmother, Sarah Santistevan; Mr . and Mrs. Jake Lucero and cousins; Traci and Brian Josue,; Karen and Jason Casias, Craig Lucero, Gina and Kevin Marquez, Brenda and Kathy Ortega. Her birthday. cake was made by her, aunt, Rose Casil:ls. A group of happy Seniors left Auraria Center for the VOA on 18th and Larimer to bag cookies. They had lunch and listened to music. Two of our Seniors sat at the birth day tables. They were Pete Bonsell and Arthur Serumgard. Those who took part were Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bonsell, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Rund, Mr. and Mrs. Henery Torres, Mrs. Carmen Hodges, Mr. and Mrs. Serumgard and Martha Lowe and our driver Maria Elena McKissick. We returned a tired but happy group saying, "We didn't want to see another cookie, but maybe next year!" Alice Media took 6 ladies and their instructor, Loyola Salazar, of Wednesday's ceramic class to the Mrs. Lela Kirkwood, former: resident of Lincoln Park Homes, died on January 4th at Colonial Manor Nursing Home in West minster. She was buried on Janu ary 6th at Crown Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Kirkwood was the sister of another fondly-remembered West sider, Obie Rich, who is also deceased. * * * Martinez, Manuel P. 614 West 4th Ave. Mass of Christian Burial. December 5. St. Joseph's Church. To Fort Logan. LUND-Gustav G. Lund, 835 Kalamath St. Service Thursday 1 p . m . Moore's Little Stone Chapel. To Crown Hill BURTGrady Foster Burt, 9 S. Bannock St. Entrusted to the care of Howard's Park Ave. Chapel. Pri vate interment, Ft. Logan HOLMAN-. Ethel Rebecca Holman, 333 West Ellsworth Ave. Services Thursday 3 p.m. Howard's Park Ave . Chapel. _Private interment, Ft. Logan OIJVASFelix Olivas, 1323 Lipan St. Son of .Reyes Olivas, Sr., Bernalillo, )'I.M.; Eloy and Reyes Baca, both of Denver; Amanda Salazar, Albuquer que, and Gilber Olivas, South Gate, Calif . Mass of Christian Burial. Dec . 31. St. Joseph's Church. To Ft. Logan PASSARELU-Mike Passarelli, Sr., 1338 Lipan St. Husband of Marry Passarelli; father o(Shirley M . , Terry L., and Mike R. Passarelli, Jr., Tose M . Emerling, Carol J . Maes, all of Denver; Frank L. Passarelli, Poca tello, Idaho. Mass of Christian Burial, Dec. 22 St. Church. To Mt. Olivet Cinderella City Shopping Center POLEDNA -where we did shopping and had Mrs. Dora, lOSS Bannock St. Wife lunch. Even if some of us didn't of John E. Poledna; mother of buy anything, everyone had a good Adelia (Doll_y) Mares, Talph time. Those that went were Pat Martmez, Jr.' . . both of Fresquez, Bonnie Busbage, Mrs. Sally Hawan. Mass of Ruth Adams, Vita Carluces, Loyola Chrtsttan Burtal. Dec. 30 St. Salazar, Martha Lowe and Mrs. Joseph's Redemptorist Church. To Brown. Thank you Alice!!! Ft. Logan Lincoln Park Senior Citizens held their pot luck and Christmas party at 1438 Navajo. Music was furnish ed by James Stinnett, one of our seniors, _ and a friend, Mr. L.O . Beard; Mrs. Hazel Tracey was a guest. Gifts were also exchanged. Laura Gregory decorated the tables. Thank you all for coming and taking part in a beautiful _after noon with me. Your Prestdent, Martha Lowe. A van ot semors lett Auraria tor West High School to see the TRUJILLOJulio Trujillo, 1212 West 11th Ave. Mass of Christian Burial. Dec. 29, Stevens Chapel, Crist Mortuaries. To Mt. Olivet If you have neighborhood News from your friends, relatives and neighbors, mail them to SANTA FE TRAIL before the 20th of the month. Your news is the news we want and need! singing Christmas tree. Those NORTH LINCOLN HEAD START attending were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Serumgard, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Bonsell, Mr . and Mrs. Henery Torres Daisv Steth man, Louie Pab-lita Roybal and their driver Maria Elena and her beauti ful mother, Mrs. Aragol} from Colorado Springs. , The Parents of North Lincoln held a Burrito Sale for their children's Christmas Party. The children each received wonderful gifts. Thet Eta Ch., of E.S.A., Sorority gave the children a party and each child received a hat, mittens, and cookies. r r r i 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 r ' . WEDN' ESDAYS AT THE YW The YWCA is offering a nine week brown bag luncheon series entitled ''Wednesdays at the YW". All sessions will start at noon and will be offered at the YWCA Build ing, 1545 Tremont Place. The series will begin on Febrn ary' 4 with the topic "Working Parents with Children". Guest speaker will be Marilyn Anderson, a psychologist with Northwest Counseling Center. Other topics will include Basic Tax Information, the Equal Rights Amendment, the Divorce Statute, Banking Investments (two ses sions), Creative Ways to Relate to Your Children, Juvenile Law, and a session on Epilepsy. This series is free to members. Non-members will be asked to pay a fee of 75 cents per session. For information call the YWCA at 8257141. Legislative Report Continued from page one AMENDMENTS TO COLORADO EMPLOYMENTSECVRnYACT The present Colorado employ ment law has been termed "one of the worst in the nation,". with seven out of every ten applicants disqualified or forced to wait long periods. The bill is still in the drafting stage; indications are that the bill will be aimed at revamping eligi bility requirements for unemploy ment compensation. AID TO CORE CITIES Last session Governor Lamm appointed me to a select Core City Task Force made up of legislators, city councilmen and school board members, to explore probl,ems of Denver's Core City. This year Denver has established a City Council Liaison Committee to seek' state aid ftJr Denv.c.. Refreshments_ will be provided. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Project No. 1898/2064 SEALED PROPOSALS will be received from qualified contractors by the State Bujld ings Division, Room 626 State Services Building, 1525 Sherman Street, n cnver, Colorado 80203 until 2 : 00 p.m . (MST) on the 17th day of February, 1976 and then and there publicly opened and read aloud in 710, same building . . Project: No. 2064 Chi)d Care. Center,INo. 1898 Child Development Center Bid Package 90-21, Auraria Higher Education Center L The entire project shall be accomplished on or before August 30, 1976, including the delivery of any or all guaranties and warraoties, . the submittal of sales and use tax --payment ' forms, the calling " for the final inspection and the completion of the final punch list. Failure to complete the wo_ rk as prescribed shall be considered as a breach of the Contract and subject to Time of Com pletion and Liquidated Damages, in ac cordance with Article 47 of The Ge,neral Conditions of the Contract . 2 . The right is reserved to waive informali ties and to reject any Proposal. 3 . Bidders may procure Bidding Documents from: CHILDRESS/ PAULIN, 1865 SOUTH PEARL STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80210 4. A Deposit of $25 . 00 will be required for each complete set of Contract Documents. This deposit shall be a . guaranty that the documents will be returned in good condition. Such deposits will be returned to (I) Actual bidders who relurn the documents before the tennination of five working days after the opening of the Proposals, (2) Other interested parties who return the documents within five working days after checking them out . _ Additional copies of any documents, draw ings or specifications will be supplied at the . actual cost of reproduction. 5 . Each Proposal shall be submitted on the required Proposal Form and must be accompanied by a Proposal Guaranty in an amount not Jess than S"!o of the Prop<>sal. The Proposal Guaranty may be (I) a cashier's check or (;l) a certified check or (3) a Bid Bond on State Form SC6 . 14. Cashier's or certified check shall be made payable to the Treasurer of the State of Colorado . The Pro posal Guaranty is submitted as a guaranty that the Proposal will be maintained in full force and effect for a period of thirty (30) days after the opening of Proposals for the project. 6 . The Bidder promises, in submitting his Proposal, that if issued a Notice of Awa . rd, he will. within the prescribed time, execute the required Agreement, furnish the required Performance Bond, Labor and Material Payment Bond, Insurance Policy and Certifi cates of Insurance, or forfeit his Proposal Guaranty as Liquidated Damages. 7. Preference shall be given for Colorado labor and materials produced or manufac tured in Colorado, as provided by Jaw. 8 . The rate of wages to be paid for all laborers and mechanics shall 'be in ac cordance with the Jaws of Colorado and the applicable Davis-Bacon rates of wages for the project if such rates have been established. Dated Denver, Colorado, this 20th day of January, 1976. OFFICE OF STATE PLANNING AND BUDGETING STATE BUILDINGS DIVISION John L. Mason -1/20/76 Acting Director Media of Publication : Santa Fe Trail Publication Dates : First: January 22; 1976 Second : January 29 , 1976