Citation
Laminations, October, 1978

Material Information

Title:
Laminations, October, 1978
Series Title:
Laminations
Creator:
University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Mailing address: Laminations, c/o College of Environmental Design, 1100 14th Street,
Denver,
Colorado 80202
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The newspaper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building.
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space.
thanks
speakers
Are you interested in informal brown bag lunches with stimulating people, the opportunity to share ideas and questions, a weekly lecture series developing a particular topic, variety and inspiration, "big name" lecturers, faculty presentations of work or ideas? Or even multidisciplined lectures covering a wide variety of topics related to environmental design (sociology, psychology, construction)? Or tapping the resources and expertise of the local people.
These were a few of the ideas discussed at a meeting of the Speakers Club to plan, the speakers program for the year. Funds are limited ($1000 for the year) but other sources are being investigated. Possible speakers are being contacted to determine fee and availability.
Who would you like to hear speak? Share your ideas with the Speakers Club Committee: Sheila Metcalf (third floor),
Sallee Kunkel (fourth floor), or Bob Utzinger, or with the Student Reps in your design studio. Please help us to find interesting, knowledgeable people to share their experience.
granted
Dave Brown Robert Busch Jan Caniglia Mark Dorian Diane Gayer Geoff Kampe Susan Kandelin Sallee Kunkel Katy Liske Rob Murphy Dana Reingold Jim Smotherman Wayne Stryker John Villa Doug Ward Jim Wright
Dr. David Hill has received a Ford Fundation Grant. The first phase of the project will involve synthesizing and improving the methods by which the state analyzes its required Energy Impact Statements.
Dr. Daniel J. Schler has received a Kellogg Foundation Grant to be awarded over the next three years. He will do prototype studies of energy impacted communities on the Western Slope, RUDAT-style.


But the elevator in Bromley has only four buttons you say. That's right, and with a price tag of approximately $200,000 that fifth button to the penthouse is at least a couple of years away according to Gary Long and John Prosser, Directors of Architecture and Urban Design.
In 1975 Prosser designed the remodel for the Bromley Library to accomodate its new tenant, the UCD's College of Environmental Design. In addition to revamping all the spaces in the basement and the existing four upper floors his plan included 3000 square feet of new construction on the roof of this one time warehouse and light manufacturing structure. Surrounded by decks offering a breathtaking; view of the mountains and cityscape this penthouse would enclose sorely, needed multipurpose meeting rooms, seminar spaces and a lounge. The interior space would allow for guest lectures, classroom space and presentations, while the deck areas could be used for a landscape lab, an applied solar energy lab, wind testing and other controlled climatological field work.
Engineering studies at that time indicated that, while the exterior masonry bearing walls are maximally loaded, the difference between the original warehouse live load requirements and those of the new office and classroom space allows for the additional loading on the existing interior columns. Based on these studies the Auraria Board approved the plan, but no funds were appropriated for roof top construction.
With the library carving out most of Bromley's existing seminar space little doubt remains that the sky is the limit on additional space. Where will funding come from? Gary Long sees at least three possibilities. Making the tenuous assumption that this project will be high priority on the school's budget request for 1980 (it's too late for 979) it would be two years from June before the legislature would part with the money, A second possibility would
be the school's solicitation of private funds either by direct solicitation or through the creation of a development organization such as a foundation.
The planning and implementation of such an approach would involve years of hard work by faculty and administration before bearing green fruit. A grass roots answer is the third possibility. Since a code approved hand railing along the west edge of the roof is the only requirement for its use a temporary structure (of student design perhaps) could be erected to open the roof up to immediate, albeit limited use. No funds now exist for this possible endeavor, but the beauty of that roof could be a strong incentive. With a little imagination and some work on their own, students could be using that roof next fall instead of two years from then.


1| NATIONAL AIA AWARDS
application or recommendation req. award amount - undetermined dollars university quota
2) COLO MASONRY INSTITUTE SCHOLARSHIP
application or recomendation req. pward amount - $600
3) C. GORDON SWEET SCHOLARSHIP
application or recommendation req. award amount - $750
k) ARTHUR A* & FLORENCE FISHER TRAVELING SCHOLARSHIPS application or recommendation req. award amount - (2) $1800 ea.
5) FACULTY AWARDS (2)
applications not accepted award amount - $50
6) ALPHA RHO CHI
application or recommendation req. award amount - none
7) AIA SCHOOL MEDAL AND MENTION
application not accepted one medal, one mention
8) AIA DESIGN CERTIFICATES
application not accepted
Each spring, somtime after April the behavior of the students of the architectural program are assessed in ballot form by the faculty. Later, before the semester grinds to an end, a fine feast known as an awards banquet is held.
Students, faculty, and professionals gather, eat, and drink in anticipation of the announcement ceremony where we find out who got what;
In the past, applications for these awards have been far toofew. It is an accepted fact that many of these awards are honoraria bestowed upon the students at the discretion of the faculty. However, there appears to be competition for some of these awards, therefore, publicity originating from the administration concerning the details of application will hopefully be forthcoming
An architect is said to be a man who knows a very little about a great deal and keeps knowing less and less about more and more until he knows practically nothing about everything, whereas on the other hand, an engineer is a man who knows a great deal about very little and who goes along knowing more and more about less and less until finally he knows practically everything about nothing. A contractor starts out knowing practically everything about everything, but ends up by knowing nothing about anything, due to his association with architects and engineers.
mini course
A five week course in "Grants-manship and Grant Proposal Writing” will be taught under auspices of the Planning Division.
The one-credit course will be given by Diane Duca, a management consultant.
committees
All interested architectural students are urged to get involved.
If enough interest is indicated, new committees will be formed.
General meetings will be on Mondays (times posted) with individual committee meetings to be arranged. Talk to your Architectural Student Rep.
LIBRARY LIAISON: Bake Baker;
Dave Evans; Shannon Morris
EXHIBITS: Bill Munyan; Chris Williams
SPEAKERS: Sallee Kunke1;
Shirley Metcalf AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS:
CURRICULUM: Mike Hall; Wayne
Stryker; Mike V/inters; Ted Kaiser; Jim Smotherman;
Linda Stansen
THESIS: Mike Hall, Sue West;
Linda Stansen
STUDENT STANDING: Linda Stansen;
Rina Waaf1
FACULTY STANDING:
SCHOLASTIC REVIEW:
FACULTY MEETINGS: Bill Munyan;
Mike Hall


This month's center section is devoted to the architecture student at his leisure# Here at the beginning of the semester, before it all hits the fan, the students' fancy turns to thoughts only tangential to "well###, building"• Heavy questions arise* What to wear to class (see Khaki Impact, next page), what's in the stars for me (see your horoscope) or who is burning up the architecture scene at UCD (see this month's "Didit Profile")#
Later, around December 10, when you decide it's time to get busy, we suggest the following activities to help you keep that leisure-time feeling even in the depths of an all-nighter#
Play the Minute Waltz, double time Chew Juicyfruit Feed the dog
Water what's left of the plants
Make bumwad dolls
Sharpen your Pentel
Call Time and Temperature
Think of your mother
Argue
Do a crossword (one)
Take out the trash (concepts 1-53)
Q-tip yourself
Reverse your contacts
Peel the drafting tape off your feet
Wash the graphite off
Masturbate
Take a toke
Sing "Her Majesty's a Pretty Nice Girl" Fill your tank.
didit profile
(pronounced did-it)
NAME: M# Hieronymus Hedjuk
BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENT: Winner of September Draw This Dog Contest
OCCUPATION: Special student, UCD CED BURP program
HOBBIES: Breathing out and breathing in
LAST BOOK READ: Sweet's, French edition
FAVORITE QUOTE: "Less is less, more or less
DRINK: Didit Sangria


6
ctioin
Lawyers have their three piece suits and legalese, doctors have their white lab coats and Latin vocabulary of diseases, and architects have their rumpled, three-dollars-a-pair khakis and "zoobie". You may consider this a bum wrap, but that is the profession, like it or not. Consequently it is imperative that one master the "khaki look" if he or she is to present the proper image to the architectural community, and to the world beyond#
Many of you no doubt are saying to yourselves, "I*ve got the look", but alas, there are damn few at CU who have "the look" down# Therefore being a good sort, I am going to let you in on the subtleties so you can truly advance in the profession.
Foremost to the image is the khakis—no khakis, no image# However, just any pair of khakis will not do.
Care in selection is in order for this naturally subtle look. They must not look neat—please, no permanent press, and certainly no creases. Crumpled is
you have fallen asleep at your drawing board or simply crashed without botherij to climb out of your khakis. Shirt selection allows more latitude. You may wear a 100% cotton oxford cloth button-down which is either white (the preferred), light blue, yellow, or if your designs are sufficiently avant garde, soft pink. Of course these should be rumpled appropriately (more on this later). Some architects, nevertheless, do appear in starched and neatly pressed shirts straight from the laundry and though this is considered ok in some circles, they do run the risk of being considered a dilletante. Rugby shirts have gained acceptance in recent years and they can also be worn with your khakis, if they are crumpled neatly.
Shoes are equally important. Select a top grade leather oxford of rugged construction with durable rubber heels•
L. L. Bean's is the logical outlet for the easterners? Eddie Bauer for the westerners. Clogs, surprisingly enough, are also permissable and should be worn to Mike Doyle's graphics class if you are serious about getting an A, or an award from Progressive Architecture.
. So now you think you have got it— rumpied khakis, oxford cloth shirt in the most subtle pastel shades (rumpled), and sensible, leather walking shoes (weathersealed)—but let it be known here that accessories make or destroy the image. For example, never, but never carry a Samsonite-type attache case or you will surely be confused for a public accountant, or worse. Packs are acceptable, preferable with a leather bottom, or as an inexpensive alternative just roll all your gear into a ball and act as though you have an ingenious


design rushing through your head and simply have no time for the prosaic. Important too are eye glasses? all of you student architects with contact lenses are squandering your money and not least of all your claim on "the look".
Horned rimmed glasses are the word and Liberty 25*s the choice (for the uninitiated these glasses have perfectly round lenses--ask Anthony where he got his). Some daring types have lately been seen sporting translucent lucite frames in various colors, but again they run the risk of clashing with their oxford cloths or even worse, when standing in bright sunlight, of casting multi-colored shadows on their khakis. Belts offer slightly more flexibility. Striped are quite acceptable, as are coach leather, especially if they do not look too new or too expensive.
However no belt at all is probably the way to go as it distinguishes you as an ascetic; remember Mless is more".
Ties should not be worn for general, everyday use • Though they are required for meetings with clients who are building a house to save their marriage as well as at crits to impress your professors. Regimental ties are acceptable for as we all know diagonal lines have more inherent energy, but small and discreet bow ties affect the proper Gropius look or the Chippendale look of Philip Johnson. And lastly, one should always carry a tape measure in the left pocket so that when you are with people from the other professions and they ceremoniously turn to you, the architect in the group, and intone,
"How big (they mean tall) is that tower?", you can generously offer them the use of your trusty tape.
There are but two additional aspects we must consider—the arch-lingo and expensive German cars. As for the buzz words and buzz phrases, remember these are the mortar to the stone of the initial "khaki impact"; together thev sing out, loud and clear, "I am Architect" (to the tune of Helen Reddy's "I am Woman"), For example, always begin conversations on interior spaces by saying, "I see white", pure "architectural white" (courtesy of Marvin Hatami). And always refer to buildings as piles except when conversing with members of the medical profession.
Other expressions like "but do the people flow", "does it work", "it's too busy", "transportation interface" (parking lot), "random rubble" and "people scoops" are very good and should be thrown into conversations to confuse and mislead the laymen, or at least the doctors and lawyers in the group who are barraging you with their own brand of esoterica. As for German cars, whenever possible be seen getting into, getting out of, closing the door of, opening the door of, or better yet* leaning rakishly against a Porsche.
This association is absolutely crucial.
If, however, you are a student and a true ascetic, or just poor, you occasion-
ally can get away with driving a classic Volkswagen bug. This should nevertheless always be parked next to a Porsche, BMW, or Mercedes. (Geoff Drake is the person to ask about this technique as he pioneered it at a classy Cherry Hills wedding this past summer).
So there you have it, my personal insights on how to cut the proper architectural image. But remember to give yourself time until you have gotten it down. When you finally do feel comfortable waltz right over to SOM and let them know that you have arrived. And should they have the audacity to ask, Tell them straight out, "I don't do toilet details".


center section
£ u 0 £ o 2 Msfc ! 3 at 3 0 ti I £ 0 m > i i * i O a 8 K
Khakis
Pastel Oxford Shirt
Rugby Shirt
Leather Oxfords w/ Rubber Heals
Clogs
Samsonite Case
Backpack w/Leather Bottom
Horned Rim Glasses
Lucite Frames in Multi-color
Stiped Belt
Coach Leather Belt
Ties
Tape Measure
Arch-Lingo
Expensive German Car
Bug
Funding is available for the activities of the environmental design school. Under the umbrella of an organization to be known as "The Design Club”, monies can be acquired to provide for the publication of Laminations, darkroom facilities; lectures/speakers, films, displays, field trips, entertainment, and reproduction facilities.
In order to acquire this funding, it is necessary to approach the UCD Student Government as an organized entity. Our student fees provide the Student Government with resources to allow them to provide basic services to the general UCD population, and funding for specific groups activities.
To become onr of these specific groups, we umst follow various proceedures of their bylaws.
The greater the numbers of our membership and the services we provide, the greater will be the support received from the UCD Student Government.
To assure this support and diversity, and continuity in the future, it is necessary that students from all levels of each program take part.
Keep your eyes peeled for notices of organizational meetings.
©
©
©
©
©
©
THE ASTRBPORT
AQUARIUS; Be careful who you call an SOM.
PISCES; Beware of Falling Waters, when the salmon run.
ARIES: Khakis are tacky. Wear wool,
TAURUS; Turn Bulls loose at Sea Ranch - watch your step.
GEMINI; Keep presentations simple avoid xerox machines.
CANCER: Plant your garden now for organic design.
©
©
©
©
LEO: Distribute your intimate moments within your own portals.
VIRGO: Maintain purity of .thought, form and deed - read Mies.
LIBRA: Keep your perspectives in scale - station points may change.
SCORPIO: Beware of critsy critters at Jurys - they will get you.
SAGITTARIUS: Great fortunes in cookies, Peiday imminent.
CAPRICORN: If Louis Kahn, so can you.


it’s always something
Ever wonder what the hell all those people in those big studios and those little offices on the second floor are doing so busily? Well, this is a new department created to tell you. Emphasis will be on projects being undertaken by students and faculty, individually and in groups. It is our hope that the image of a school with separate programs with different directives can be supplanted by one of people with special interests learning and sharing skills.
So far, we have found that UCD is living up to some of its potential as a community service resource. At the request of State Representative Hugh Fowler six students are undertaking a study of the grounds around the Civic Center. Bob Busch (Arch), Katv Liske (UD), Kent Gonzales (UD), Jane Palmer (LA), Nancy McCurdy (LA) and Don Clausen (LA) are looking into land planning in the government complex and will make recommendations for landscaping, alternate parking plans, etc. Assisting them are instructors Gary Crowell and Dan Young. John Prosser and Duane Nuzum are coordinating and administering the CCDD funded study. So long, Sodomy Circle.
MURP movements include a study of neighborhood commercial activity in the area of Downing and 34th. Under CCDD’s Mike Smith and Professor Jonni Jones, students will make recommendations about the future of the area.
Mike Pharo of Harmon, 0*Donnell, Henninger, a landscape architecture planning consulting firm, is heading a land use study on anticipated traffic pressures at County Line Road near Mission Viejo and future Colorado 470. Director Herb Smith is working on a report to the Task Porce of the Denver Urban Observatory. HiSsrecommendations will go to the City Counoil in an attempt to encourage private investment in residential development in the city’s core. Dr. Dave Hill has received'a Ford Foundation Grant to help synthesize and improve the methods by which the state analyzes its required Energy Impact Statements
In the Landscape Architect ture Department a master plan for the city of Erie, Colorado is under consideration by Dan^ Young’s students Jeff Pecka, Jim Zelensky and Terry Teague. The second year students are looking at the reservoir in Kiowa County, Colorado with an eye toward its suitability as a recreation center and wildlife habitat.
interiors
This is not a movie review. UCD finally has an Interior Design program. Director Attila Lawrence and many others have worked long and hard to bring this about. Some of the. students have waited years for the program to begin. Mr. Lawrence feels that he has the moral as well as the financial support of the professionals of the city and is looking forward to establishing a very "professional program".
The curriculum sounds rigorous enough. In addition to the usual structures and materials courses that make up a three year program, the students will take such courses as "Social Factors in Interior and Architectural Design" and "Environmental Factors in Human Development". During the first semester emphasis is placed on human development, well-being and evolution. Later coverage includes residential, transportation facilities, commercial and
institutional design and thesis. Future faculty will include specialists in these areas. The search is currently on for a second faculty member’to join the program next fall.
landscape
x-tra
The American Society of Landscape Architects now recognizes a student chapter of same at UCD. This has been a long time in the works. Jeff Pecka is the proud president. Hooray for LA.


Uisisons ie daughters
ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS: These people are your link to the nebulous College of Environmental Design. Got a problem with bureaucracy, administration, the pop machiner Contact them.
FIRST YEAR - TWO YEAR PROGRAM David Evans Sue West Mike Winters Bill Munyan
SECOND YEAR - TWO YEAR PROGRAM Mike Hall Linda Stansen Steve Patton
FIRST YEAR - THREE YEAR PROGRAM Ted Kaiser Chris Williams Jim Smotherman
SECOND YEAR - THREE YEAR PROGRAM Bake Baker Monnie Gore Jay Moore Carlos Lopez
THIRD YEAR - THREE YEAR PROGRAM Wayne Stryker Margaret Smith Geoff Drake
At the first organizational meeting of the Architectural Student Reps, plans were announced to sponsor elections for school representatives to AIA sponsored boards. The positions available are one National Representative to the ASC-AIA, one Regional Representative to the ASC-AIA, and one Local Representative to the ASC-AIA who would, also serve as a student representative to the Colorado Society of Architects/AIA. The positions are open to all interested architectural students.
The National and Regional Representatives will become involved in policy making and other political duties. In this capacity, they will be expected to attend several meetings in "Washington,D.C. with expenses partially paid. The National Representative is a voting delegate to the AIA. The Local Representative will serve as an information link oh design competitions, study grants, and travel opportunities. As a full voting member of the CSA, he/she will be the link between the student body and the professional architectural community.
The deadline for nominations to these positions is noon Monday, Oct. 16. Submit nominations to your Student Rep. Elections will be held later that week.
See Linda Stansen (third floor Bromley) for more details.
In addition, students are urged to apply for appointments to ASC-AIA committees as listed in nASC News 9". Application deadline is November 10. Write ASC-AIA for Jury descriptions and applications.


girls
The WIA group provides learning as well as social experiences. It is comprised of women in architecture and related fields (interiors, landscape, construction and engineering) and students. Master of Architecture students Dana Reingold and Kaki Zeeb are organizing a Women in Architecture exhibit and symposium as an independent studies course. The event is slated for February 1979* If anyone is interested in helping contact Kaki or Dana on the third floor of Bromley or leave a message in the Laminations office.
The October meeting will be Thursday October 19 at Nancy Sturgill's home and studio, 2555 W. 5^-th Ave. at 6:00 P.M. fall come now.
Two initial organizational meetings have been held this spring and summer by women in landscape architecture.
On August 20, twelve women formulated the following statement of purpose:
"To further the interests of women in the Colorado Chapter, American Society of Landscape Architecture, (CC/ASLA) by providing for professional growth, examining professional relationships, furthering ASLA visibility and providing a social meeting ground."
Regular meetings will be held bimonthly to provide an informal forum and organized programs. The group is seen as a focus for a continuing series of meetings open to all area LA's.
It will be a point of contact for professional newcomers and as a clearinghouse for jobs for women in the area. There was great interest in continuation of associate membership in the Colorado Chapter for women in related professions.
The CC/ASLA Executive Board, noting that national ASLA has recognized women's groups within the profession, has officially approved the CC/ASLA Women's Group as a legitimate entity for the purposes defined above.
The next meeting is tentatively scheduled at the home of Audry Blum in mid-October. Women LA students are heartily welcomed. Call J. S. L. Green-tree, ^9^-1804 or Diana Webb, 758-1*H1 if you wish to contribute program or discussion ideas, and watch*the bulletin board in mid-October for a meeting announcement.
guys
At a recent gathering of male students, the need was uncovered for the organization of what may well come to be known as "Men in Architecture". Watch for a coming announcement?
gays
Join the latest wave in organizations, the professional sub-sub-cultural group. Architects Together is a group for gays studying and/or practicing in architecture and related fields.
This is very informal, no dues, just people with whom you may have a lot in common. If you are interested in how your sexuality might affect your professional future or just idly curious, call the Gay Community Center of Colorado for further information.
A Solar Technology Series has been scheduled for alternate Fridays from 10:50 a.m. to 12 noon. Mark your calendar for:
FRIDAY 6 OCT: Ski Milburn
FRIDAY 20 OCT: Phil Henshaw
Passive Energy Case Study
FRIDAY 5 NOV: TBA FRIDAY I? NOV: TBA FRIDAY 1 DEC: TBA




Full Text

PAGE 1

II , • --, ht AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION OCTOBER 1978

PAGE 2

2 UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER Mailing address: Laminations, c/o College of Environmental Design, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 Opinions are nqt necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The news paper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building. Articles and letters must be signed and acc.ompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space. thanks Dave Brown Robert Busch Jan Caniglia Mark Dorian Diane Gayer Geoff Kampe Susan Kandelin Sallee .Kunkel Katy Liske Rob Murphy Dana Reingold Jim Smotherman Wayne Stryker John Villa Doug Ward Jim Wright speakers Are you interested in brown bag.lunches with . stimulating people, the to 1deas a weekly lecture series develop1ng a part1cular top1c, and inspiration, "big name" presentat1oz;s of work or ideas? Or even multldlsc1pl1ned lectures cover1ng a wide variety of topics related to environmental desig n (sociology, psychology, construction)? Or tapping the resources and expertise of the local people. These were a few of the ideas discussed at a meeting of the Speakers Club to plan, the speakers program for the year. Funds are limited ($1000 for the but other sources are being investigated. Possible speakers are being contacted to determine fee and availability. you like to hear speak? Share your ideas with the Speakers Club Committee: Sheila Metcalf (third floor), Sallee Kunkel (fourth floor), or Bob Utzinger, or with the Student Reps in your design studio. Please us to.find interesting, kno\-Jled geable people to share the1r exper1ence. granted. Dr. David Hill has received a Ford Fundation Grant. The first phase of the project will involve synthesizing and improving the methods _by l ,vhich the state analyzes its required Energy Impact Statements. Dr. Daniel J. Schler has received a Kellogg Foundation Grant to be awarded over the next three years. He will do proto type studies o! energy impacted communities on the Western Slope, RUDAT-style.

PAGE 3

But the elevator in Bromley has only four buttons you say. That's right, and with a price tag of approximately $200,000 that fifth button to the penthouse is at least a couple of years away according to Gary Long and John Prosser, Directors of Architecture and Urban Design. In 1975 Prosser designed the remodel for the Bromley Library to accomodate its new tenant, the UCD's College of Environmental Design. In addition to revamping all thespaces in the basement and the existing four upper floors his plan included 3000 square feet of new construction on the roof of this one time warehouse and light manufactur ing structure. Surrounded by decks offering a breathtaking view of the mountains and cityscape this penthouse would enclose sorely _ _ needed purpose meeting rooms, seminar spaces and a lounge. The interior space would allow for lectures, classroom space and presentations, while the deck areas could be used for a landscape lab, an applied solar energy lab, wind test ing and other controlled climatological field work. Engineering studies at that time indicated that, while the exterior masonry bearing walls are maximally loaded, the difference between the original warehouse live load requirements and those of the new office and classroom space allows for the additional loading on the existing interior columns. Based on these studies-the Auraria Board approved the plan, but no funds were appropriated for roof top construction. With the library carving out most of Bromley's existing seminar space little doubt remains that the sky is the limit on additional space. Where will funding come from? Gary Long sees at least three possibilities. Making the tenuous assumption that this project will be high priority on the school's budget request for 1980 {it's too late for '79) it would be two years from June before legislature would part with the money. A second possibility would be the school's solicitation of private funds either by direct sblicitation or through the creation of a development organization such as a foundation. The planning and implementation of such an approach would involve years of hard work by faculty and administration before bearing green fruit. A grass roots answer is the third possibility. Since a code approved hand railing along the west edge of the roof is the only requirement for its use a temporary structure (of student design perhaps) could be erected to open the roof up to immediate, albeit limited use. No funds now exist for this possible endeavor, but the beauty of that roof could be a strong incentive. With a little imagination and some work on their own, students could be using that roof next fall instead of two years from then. 3

PAGE 4

4 I 1} NATIONAL AIA AWARDS application or recommendation req. award amount -undetermined dollars university quota 2) COLO MASONRY INSTITUTE SCHOLARSHIP application or recomendation req. amount $600 3) C.GORDON SWEET SCHOLARSHIP application or recommendation req. award amount $750 4) ARTHUR A. & FLORENCE FISHER TRAVELING SCHOLARSHIPS application or recommendation req. award amount -(2) $1800 ea. 5) FACULTY AWARDS (2) applications not accepted award amount $50 6) ALPHA RHO CHI application or recommendation req. award amount none 7) AIA SCHOOL MEDAL AND MENTION application not accepted one medal, one mention 8) AIA DESIGN CERTIFICATES application not accepted Each spring, somtime after April the behavior of the students of the architectural prog ram are assessed in ballot form by the faculty. Later, the semester grinds to an end, a flne feast known as an awards banquet is held •. Students, faculty, and professlonals rr'a.ther eat, a:nd drink in anticipat::.on of 0 ' f" d the annou.ncemerit ceremony where we 1.n out \vho got ,,vhat • In tl1e past, applications for these awards have been far toofew. It is an accepted fact that many of these awards are honoraria bestowed upon_ the students at the discretion of the faculty. How ever, there to be competition for some of these .awards, from adml.n istration the detalls of ap-piication hopefully be fbrthcbming An architect is said to be a man who knows a very little about a great deal arid keeps knowing less and less about more and more until he knows practically nothing about everything, whereas on the other hand, an engineer is a man who knows a great deal about very little and who goes along knowing more and more about less and less until finally he knows practically everything about nothing. A contractor starts . out knowing practically everything-about everything, but ends up by knowing no• thing about anything, due to his association with architects and engineers. • • m1n1 course A five week course in "Grants manship and Grant Proposal Writing" will be taught under auspices of the Planning Division. The one-credit course will be given by Diane Duca, a management consultant. committees All interested architectural students are urged to get involved. If enough interest is indicated, new committees will be formed. General meetings will be on Mondays (times posted) with individual committee meetings to be arranged. Talk to your Architectural Student Rep. LIBRARY LIAISON: Bake Baker; Dave Evans; Shannon Harris EXHIBITS: Bill Hunyan; Chris \'Jilliams SPZAKERS: Sallee Kunkel; Shirley Metcalf AND SCHOLARSHIPS: f-1ike Hall; \•layne Stryker; Mike Winters; Ted Kaiser; Jim Smotherman; Linda Stansen THESIS: Mike Hall, Sue West; Linda Stansen STUDENT STANDING: Linda Stansen; Sue West FACULTY STANDING: SCHOLASTIC REVIEW: FACULTY MEETINGS: Bill Munyan; Mike Hall

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This month's center section is devoted to the architecture student at his leisure. Here at the beginning of the semester, before it all hits the fan, the students' fancy turns to thoughts only tangential to "well ••• , building". Heavy questions arisea What to wear to class (see Khaki Impact, next page), what's in the stars for me (see your horoscope) or who is burning up the architecture scene at UCD (see this month's "Didit Profile"). Later, around December 10, when you decide it's time to get busy, we suggest the following activities to help you keep that leisure-time feeling even in the depths of an all-nighter. • Play the Minute Waltz, double time • Chew Juicyfruit • Feed the dog • Water what's left of the plants • Make bumwad dolls • Sharpen your Pentel • Call Time and Temperature • Think of your mother Argue Do a crossword (one) • Take out the trash (concepts 1-53) • Q-tip yourself • Reverse your contacts • Peel the drafting tape off your feet • Wash the graphite off • Masturbate • Take a toke • Sing "Her Majesty's a Pretty Nice Girl" • Fill your tank. 5 did it profile (pronounced it) NAME: BIGGEST ACCOMPLI Sin-lENT: OCCUPATION: HOBBIES: LAST BOOK READ: FAVORITE QUOTE: DRINK: M. Hedjuk 'dinner of September Dxaw This Dos Contest Special student, UCD CED BURP program out and breathinrr: in '-' Sweet's, French edition "Less is less, more or less Didit Sangria

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6 ction Lawyers have their three piece suits and legalese, doctors have their white lab coats and Latin vocabulary of diseases, and architects have their three-dollars-a-pair khakis and "zoobie". You may consider this a bum wrap, but that is the profession, like it or not. Consequently it is imperative that one master the "khaki look" if he or she is to present the proper .image to the architectural community, and to the world beyond, Many of you no doubt are saying to your-selves, "I've got the look", but alas, there are damn few at CU who have "the look" down. Therefore being a good sort, I -am going to let you in on the subtleties so you can truly advance in the profession. Foremost to the image is the khakis--no khakis, no image. However, just any pair of khakis will not do, Care in selection is in order for this naturally subtle look. They must not look neat--please, no permanent press, and certainly no creases. Crumpled is / ---____ ....,_--_..._ __ ---II' .. -----7---/ you have fallen asleep at your drawing board or simply crashed without bothering to climb out of your khakis. Shirt selection allows more latitude. You may wear a cotton oxford cloth buttondown which is either white (the preferred), light blue, yellow, or if your designs are sufficiently avant garde, soft pink. Of course these should be rumpled appropriately (more on this later). Some architects, nevertheless, do appear in starched and neatly pressed shirts straight from the laundry and though this is considered ok in some circles, they do run the risk of being considered a dilletante. Rugby shirts have gained acceptance in recent years and they can also be worn with your khakis, if they are crumpled neatly. Shoes are equally importanto Select a top grade leather oxford of rugged construction with durable rubber heels. L, L. Bean's is the logical outlet for the easterners; Eddie Bauer for the westerners. Clogs, surprisingly enough, are also permissable and should be worn to Mi'ke Doyle's graphics class if you are serious about getting an A, or an award from Progressive Architecture. . So now you think you have got it-rumpled khakis, oxford cloth shirt in the most subtle pastel shades (rumpled), and sensible, leather walking shoes (weathersealed)--but let it be known here that accessories make or destroy the image. For example, never, but never carry a Samsonite-type attache case or you will surely be confused for a public accountant, or worse. Packs are acceptable, preferable with a leather bottom, or as an inexpensive alternative just roll all your gear into a ball and act as though you have an ingenious / v / ..... .., .. _. .. ---/ / /

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design rushing through your head and simply have no time for the prosaic. Important too are eye glasses, all of you student architects with contact lenses are squandering your money and not least of all your claim on "the look". Horned rimmed glasses are the word and Liberty 25's the choice (for the uninitiated these glasses have perfectly round lenses--ask Anthony where he got his}. Some daring types have lately been seen sporting translucent lu?ite frames in various colors, but aga1n they run the risk of clashing with their oxford cloths or even worse, when standing in bright sunlight, of casting multi-colored shadows on their khakis. Belts offer slightly more flexibility. Striped are quiie acceptable, as are coach leather, especially if they do not look too new or too expensive. However no belt at all is probably the way to go as it distinguishes you as an ascetic; remember "less is more". Ties should not be worn for general, everyday use-. -Though they are required for meetings with clients who are building a -house to save their marriage as well-as at crits to impress your professors. Regimental ties are acceptable for as we all know diagonal lines have more inherent energy, but small and discreet bow ties affect the proper Gropius look or the Chippendale look of Philip Johnson. And lastly, one should always carry a tape measure in the left pocket so that when you are with people from the other professions and they ceremoniously turn you, the architect in the group, and 1ntone, "How big (they mean tall) is that tower?", you can generously offer them the use of your trusty tape. There are but two additional aspects we must consider--the arch-lingo and expensive German cars. As for the buzz words and buzz phrases, remember these are the mortar stone of the initial "khaki_impact": they " sing out, loud_ and clear, "I am Arch1tect (to-the tune of Helen Reddy's "I am Woman") • For example, always begin conversations on interior spaces by saying, "I see white", pure tectural white" (courtesy of Marv1n Hatami}. And always refer to buildings as piles except when conversing with members of the medical profession. Other expressions like "but do the " "t k" ""t' people flow", does 1 . , 1 s " too busy"; "transportatlon 1nterface (parking lot}, "random rubble" and "people -scoops" are very good and should be thrown into conversations to confuse and mislead the laymen, or at least the doctors and lawyers in the group who are barraging you with their own brand of esoterica. As for German cars whenever possible be seen getting into: getting out of, closing the door of, opening the door of, or better leaning rakishly against a Porsche •. This association is .absolutely cruc1al. If, however, you are a student and a . true ascetic, or just poor, you occas1on-ally can get away with driving a classic Volkswagen bug. This should nevertheless always be parked next to a Porsche, BMW, or Mercedes. (Geoff Drake is the person to ask about this technique as he pioneered it at a classy Cherry Hills wedding this past summer). So there you have it, my personal insights on how to cut the proper architectural image. But remember to give yourself time until you have gotten it down. When you finally do feel comfortable waltz right over to SOM and let them know that you have arrived. And should they have the audacity to ask, Tell them straight out, "I don't do toilet details".

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J1 JWWliDJill .. , % Khakis Pastel Oxford Shirt Rugby Shirt Leather Oxfords w/ Rubber Heals Clogs Samsonite Case Backpack w/Leather Bottom Horned Rim Glasses Lucite Frames in Multi-color Stiped Belt Coach Leather Belt Ties Tape Heasure Arch-Lingo Expensive German Car ., td > ; .J 2 L II 5 • te. L C[ i 0 0 i Fundir..g is available for the activities of the environmental design school. Under the umbrella of an organization to be known as "The Design Club''', -monies can be acquired to for the publication of Lart1iflations, darkroom facilities; lectures/speakers, films, displays, field' trips, entertainment, and reproduction facilities. In order to acquire this funding, it is neeessar;r. to approach the UCD Student Government as an organized entity. Our student fees provide the Student Government with resources to allow them to provide basic servicesto the general UCD population, and funding for specific groups activities. To become onr of these specific groups, we umst follow various proceedures of their byla\ls. The the numbers of our membership and the ser"'.rice s provide, the greater \J.rill be the support received from the UCD Student Government. To assure this support and diversity, and continuity in'tbe future, it is necessary that students from all levels of each program take part. Keep your eyes. peeled for notices of meetings. THll ASTllBPOBT • 0 0 • • e AQUARIUS: Be careful who you call an SOM. PISCES: Beware or Falling Waters. , when the salmon run. ARIES: Khakis are tacky. Wear wool. TAURUS: Turn Bulls loose at Sea Ranch watch your step. GEMINI: Keep PJ:'esentations simple -avoid xerox machines. CANCER: Plant your. garden now for organic design. • LEO: Distribute your intimate moments within your own portals. G e • • • VIRGO: Maintain purity of_thought, !orm and deed -read Mies. LIBRA: Keep your perspectives in. scale -station points may change. SCORPIO: Beware of critsy critters at Jurys they will get you • SAGITTARIUS: Great fortunes in cookies, Peiday imminent • CAPRICORN: It Louis Kahn, so can you.

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it's always something Ever wonder what the hell all those in those big studios and those little offices on the second floor are doing so busily? Well, this is a new department created to tell you. Emphasis will be on projects being under taken by students and individually and in groups. It is our hope that the image of a school with separate programs with different directives can be by one of people with special interests learning and So far, we have found that UCD is up to some er its potential as a community service resource. At the request of State Representative Hugh Fowler six students are undertaking a study of the grounds around the Civic Center. Bob Busch (Arch), Katy Liske (UD), Kent Gonzales (UD), Jane Palmer (LA), Nancy McCurdy (LA) and Don Clausen (LA) are looking into land planning in the government . complex and will make recommendations for landscaping, alternate parking plans, etc. Assisting them are instructors Gary Crowell and Dan Young. John Prosser and Duane Nuzum are coordinating and administering the CCDD.funded study. So long, Sodomy Oircle. MURP movements include a study o . ! neighborhood commer
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10 • daughters ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS: These people are yeur link to the nebu lous College of Environmental Design. Got a problem with bureaueracy1 administration, the pop machine1 Contact them. FIRST YEAR T"v'IO YEAR PROGRAM David Evans Sue West Mike \'linters Bill Munyan SECOND YEAR Tt,vO YEAR PROGRAM Nike Hall Linda Stansen Steve Patton FIRST YEAR THREE YEAR PROGRAM Ted Kaiser Chris Williams Jim Smotherman SECOND YEAR THREE YEAR PROGRAM . Bake Baker Monnie Gore Jay Moore Carlos Lopez THIRD IE.AR -THREE YEAR PROGRAM Wayne Stryker Margaret Smith Geoff Drake At the first organizational meeting of the Architectural Student Reps, plans were announced to sponsor elections for school representatives to AIA sponsored boards. The positions available are one National Representative to ASC AIA, one Regional Representative to the ASO-AIA, and one Local Representative to the ASC-AIA who would aleo serve as a student representative to the Colorado Society o!.Architects/AIA. The positions are open to all interested architectural students. The National and Regional Representatives will become involved in policy making and other political In this capacity, they will be expected to attend several meetings in 'Washington,D.C. witn expenses partially paid. The National Representative is a voting delegate to the AIA. The Local Representative will serve as an information link on deeign eompetitions, study grants, and travel opportunities. As a full voting member of the CSA, he/she will be the link between the student body and the professional architectural community. The deadline for nominations to these positions is noon Monday, Oct. 16. Submit nominations to your Student Rep • Elections will be held later that week. See Linda Stansen (third floor Bromley) for more In addition, students are urged to apply for appointments to ASC-AIA committees as listed in "ABC Ne\'IS 9". Application:deadline is November 10. Write ASC-AIA for Jury descriptions and applications.

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girls The WIA group provides learning as well as social experiences. It is comprised o! women in architecture and related fields (interiors, landscape, construction and engineering) and students. Master o! Architecture students Dana Reingold and Kaki Zeeb are organizing a Women in Architecture exhibit and symposium as an independent studies course. The event is slated for February 1979. If anyone is inter ested in helping contact Kaki or Dana on the third floor or Bromley or leave a message in the Laminations office. The October meeting will be Thursday October 19 at Nancy Sturgill's home and studio' 2555 W. 34th Ave. at 6:00 P.M. Y'all come now. Two initial organizational meetings have been held this spring and summer by women in landscape architecture. On August 20, twelve women formulated the following statement of purposea "To further the interests of women in the Colorado Chapter, American Society of Landscape Architecture, (CC/ASLA) by providing for professional growth, examining professional relationships, furthering ASLA visibility and providing a social meeting ground." -Regular meetings will be held bi monthly to provide an informal forum and organized programs. The group is seen as a focus for a continuing series of meetings open to all area LA's. It will be a point of contact for professional newcomers and as a clearinghouse for jobs for women in the area. rhere was great interest in continuation of associate membership in the Colorado Chapter for women in related professions. The CC/ASLA Executive Board, noting that national ASLA has recognized women's groups within the profession, has officially approved the CC/ASLA Women's Group as a legitimate entity for the purposes defined above. The next meeting is tentatively S
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