Citation
Laminations, November, 1978

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Title:
Laminations, November, 1978
Series Title:
Laminations
Creator:
University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION NOVEMBER 1978


LAMINATIONS
Mailing address: Laminations, c/o College of Environmental Design, 1100 14-th Street,
Denver,
Colorado 80202
Opinions expressed are not necessarily* those of anyone other than the writer. The newspaper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building.
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space.
thanks
Bob Busch
Mark Dorian
Diane Gayer
Geoff Kampe (Photos)
Katy Liske (Calendar)
Dana Reincold (Cover Photo) Do us* Ward Jim Wriaht
MteSEy Tspiite is.
Plans for the establishment of an Environmental Design Library look better than ever. Some problems will still have to be dealt with, but current developments point to a library on the second floor of Bromley by January, 1979* In September Chris Guleff was appointed the librarian of the new facility. Chris is a member of the Auraria library staff. He holds a Masters degree in Library Science and has done graduate study in urban affairs.
A library committee, chaired by Guleff, submitted a list of recommended title block transfers last week to the library administ?* ration. It included all nNA" (architecture),
’’SB” (landscape architecture), and MHK"
(interior design) catalog headings, as well as a number of selected titles from other headings. This list has been approved and now requires a combined faculty committee review by UCD, MSC and CCD. A periodicals list is also being compiled that includes all the environmental design magazined currently at the main library plus related journals in areas of building technology, social/ psychological research, land-use and preservation. The initial move will involve only 3,000 volumes. It will be a small, weak collection, well below the national average of over 13,000 volumes for accredited architectural branch libraries, as Guleff admirably pointed out in his listed recommendations. However, it is a start, and a rather large book acquisition fund for this fiscal year should begin to fill out the collection.
Because the library will also be available to the professional community of the state it is hoped that their interest^ and financial support will further encourage the development of our fledgling library.
Problems with funding, the faculty review of recommended subject block transfers, and general lethargy could still block or delay the move. However, recent progress is most encouraging, and with student/facuity interest and help our library could be a reality by January.


Wednesday October 11th through Sunday October 15th the Santa Fe Chapter of the AIA hosted the Western Mountain Regional Conference.
Eleven partially.funded UCD Environmental Design students had the good fortune of attending this conference, courtesy of our own CSA (thanks again).
The five day fiesta ...(program) provided guest lectures, from as far away as New York and Berkeley, California, talks from local architects on indigenous forms past and present, many short seminars on just about anything you"have ever wanted to know about architecture, and cocktailing at 11«30 AM every day.
From pueblos to parties the Santa Feans accomodated their guets in good form. A few disappointing guest speakers slowed things down, yet, on the whole the Conference was a rewarding and "bon vivant" affair.
The Santa Fe Art Festival ran concurrently with the"Arch, Fest." which provided a total cultural experience. The event was framed in the picturesque downtown square, amid ancient adobe government buildings, shops, and quite excellent haciendas— well suited for the casual course of events.
As is the case of most conferences the scheduled activities set the foreground of events, yet the true tale of any conference is read in the background, "Hob-nobbing" of course plays an important part in any conference, espescially for students. And there were plenty of occasions that afforded this, from hotel room parties to producer's council cocktails. Throw in some expensive dinners, dancing, and the night life to cap things off— and voila! you have one nice k day conference.
The following are some varied and personal accounts from the design student conferees.
M. Dorian
The Santa Fe Opera House is an unu sual.example of the ways in which adobe is being adapted to the structure and even more so to the out-buildings surrounding it• Glu-lams support the Opera House in a combination of gracious sweeping curve s, which provide the only shelter for seating in this outdoor theater.
The Opera House is used only during the summer months for evening performances. Shows range from The Merry Widow to Madame Butterfly. They are able. to open out the back of tbe stage to use the lights of the town beyond for certain effects. Trap doors cover about 90$ of stage right and stage left walls and about 30$ of the floor. Three levels, starting at stage level and going down, contain rooms for costume
After enjoying a writer's books, one often goes with high expectations to hear the author speak only to be disappointed when the speaker does not fulfill the promise of the writer. This was certainly not the case with Vincent Scully's presentation, "empathy, Sign and the Vernacular in Modem Architecture,” given October 13 in Santa Fe.
The content of his talk and his enthusiastic delivery made Scully one of the highlights of the Western Mountain Region Conference. He gestured with and at his slides immoderately, almost danced with them. He obviously felt the architecture, and through word and gesture was able to convey this sense of empathy to the audience•
Scully's style of architectural criticism is unusually creative. By often establishing relationships between seemingly unrelated elements, he helps us understand each thing more fully. Critics have found his connections, at times, too tenuous, perhaps even imaginary. Creativity, they say is not necessarily appropriate for architectural criticism and Scully's view is not necessarily the way things really are. Yet his influence remains strong? perhaps too strong. For example, Louis Kahn's reputation was more or less made by the book Scully wrote about him in 1962,
The intriguing thing is that Scully is actually shaping our architectural reality.
In the most positive sense we should see this as a challenge to talk more, write mor and exchange ideas more—to do our share of architectural "reali’ y formation." At the same time we should feel fortunate that one of the people doing the most in this area attacks the job with so much enthusiasm, vigor and creativity, -C. Gustafson
\UVU^>
design, production, laundry and storage; orchestra rehearsal and dressing; make-up rooms; prop production and storage; choral rooms; scenery design, production and storage; and dance warm-up and rehearsal space.
It is a very exciting design with good acoustics, sight lines, form, yet still conforming to the strict design code of Santa Fe demanding low profile adobe buildings which blend with the antural landscape, L stansen


4
noguchi s
If you are interested in fantastic new ways to win over your jury this year-visit Noguchi's Imaginary Landscapes Exhibit at the Denver Art Museum.
Whether sensual, geometric or abstract Isamu Noguchi's bronze models show the most olavful narks imaginable. Thru tunnels and tiers he creates level changes regardless of the initial grade. Benches become part of the whole landscape (not just something to sit on.) And the playground pieces themselves are colorful and creative sculptures. The minute details cast in the bronze and the patina they have taken on with time are something our matt board models are definitly lacking. There is a wonderful model series showing various stages of development plus enlarged details for Riverside Park in New York, unfortunatly the proposal was defeated. He did however get a commission to design a park in Atlanta (Piedmont Park 1976) and now near completion is the 13-acre downtown Civic Center in Detroit which has as focal point a tremendous spaceship fountain.
Other than the bronze models, there are several examples of sculpture gardens to enhance a building's environment with.
The very basic is his inverted red cube in front of the Marine Midland Building in New York or the huge granite donut (Black Sun) on a ledge overlooking the city at the Seattle Art Museum.
Somewhat more esoteric are his japanese type gardens that are not meant to be intruded upon, the sand is pure and the rocks create life and form on their own. Even his pieces of sculpture that are simple objets d'art without context show his mastery over materials, as in his bronze and aluminium one called '‘Stone of Spiritual Understanding".
Noguchi's expert and creative handling of materials and spaces could make you question and change much of the architectural images that have become embedded in your mind.
The Exhibit will be there until Dec. 3# 1978 and costs $ .50 for students.
alley life Murphy
Even though I have lived for over a year noW in an aborted architectural masterpiece of an apartment building in Capitol Hill, it was only last week that I had a real av/akening. All this time I believed that the reason why I enjoyed the view from my whitewashed kitchen on the third floor was because I looked dov/n onto, .several Denver squares as they back the alley, and in the non-presumptuousness of their back facades I am reminded of the austere brick rowhouses that the British Railway rushes past as it approaches London.
I was convinced, until quite recently that it was this strong personal association and the resultant flood of memories of my holidays in England which endeared me so to this backstage view.
However, the other day this all changed.
It was early evening when the sun is low in the western sky and its light washes the alley with a brilliant orangish cast. I was driving down the alley towards the garage in my battered Volkswagen, which is not yet a classic, when there to the right side before me was a remarkable sight - two trash cans sitting in a masonry alcove! And though I had passed this way hundreds of times in my comings and goings, on this particular evening these receptacles were no less important than the ordinary red wheelbarrow in the William Carlos Williams poem ...
so much depends upon
a red wheel barrow
glazed with rain water
beside the white chickens.
... these trash cans had superior importance. They were two objects set within the protective embrace of the whitewashed alcove, tinted with orange light; and to the right the wall of brick cut in once again to accomodate several steps and a picket gate which ambiguously invited and discouraged admission to the worn path which runs to the back door; and next to this
(Continued on page 7*)


Darlene Anderson 1280 Humboldt Avenue Denver, CO 80218
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-------J . w . -
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424-2156
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1709 Spruce Swanson, Randy
Boulder, Colo. 80302 yjg Cherokee St. 449-9680 Denver, Colo. 80223
u ^ n 778-0998
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3680 S.- Monaco Parkway Swibas, Ed
Denver, Colo. 80237 759-1789
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Kaehny, Karen 5100 Montview Blvd. Denver, Colo. 80207 321-3791
Korbobo, Tad
1620 Glen Ayr Drive Lakewood, Colo. 80215 237-8317
Swift, Kathleen 3923 West 32nd Ave. Denver, Colo. 80212 433-1995
Taylor, Courtney 1800 S. Sherman #3 Denver, Colo. 80210 733-2336
Teague, Terry 1020 Portland Place Boulder, Colo. 80302 449-4808
605 Dillon Way Apt. Aurora, Colo. 80011 366-7309
Lee, Gina
625 South Elm St. #26 Denver, Colo. 80222 399-6743
McCurdy, Nancy 800 South Ogden Denver, Colo. 80209 722-7019
Tupa, Michael 12487 E. Amherst Cir. Aurora, Colo. 80014 755-6315
Wade, Clay
403 South Sherman
Denver, Colo. 80209
733-7339
Walker, Steven
295 Skylark Circle
Lafayette, Colo. 80026
Zelensky, Jim 345 Cook Street Denver, Colo. 80206


5
To the Auraria Library for its inhumane To the Riverside Baptist Church
response to the environment. for obvious reasons.
THE BARRIER FREE SIGNAGE AWARD
To the D.C.P.A. for its concern for handicapped access through its clear use of signage.
|||gggM|§ Hi
OLdii Wdf
â– iflf
tpi Mezzanine &
SI Ring Sections
1 68 g "*4 Dress Orcie 2 â– â– 
Parquet
mSeating ;,l;
Restrooms
Telephones
& ill ' SBW® - HBHHHi' SB
THE M.DOYLE GRAPHICS AWARD llo 6ne Denver Place for the uniqueness of its sign.
THE LOST THEATER GOER AWARD
To the D.C.P.A. parkins garage and all the patrons who are still looking for the way out.


o contemporarytthe (0)1 Q)j QG) o death of a word ss.
1978 marks the tenth anniversary of the death of a useful element of the English language. Alas, ignorant acts of neologism have nearly precluded the articulate writer’s use of the word contemporary—a once proud word of respectable lineage (from Latin1 cum - tempus).
The cause of death is now easily understood to be the coinage of a Contemporary Style and the resulting confusion between the actual and stylistic uses of the word.
Consider as an example the ambiguity of the phrase "a Victorian house furnished in the contemporary style". Proper usage would indicate that the house is furnished in Vic*?-torian style, but the current popular usage would imply that it is done in new furnishings of the nebulous Contemporary Style. The difficulties arose initially from misinterpretation and later from misuse. When IBM exhibited its collection of contemporary art at the Golden Gate International Exposition in 1939 and at the New York World’s Fair in 1939*?^0 the intent was to exhibit new, current works, but the interpretation was that of a new style. Today the decorating profession uses "Contemporary" to differentiate plastic furniture that simulates carved wood from plastic furniture which looks like plastic intentionally•
A survey of book titles shows that "contemporary" was rarely used in the nineteenth century, and very little until the 1920’s. Its use was first in the arts— poetry in the 1920’s, German and French drama of the late 1920’s, art of the 1930’s, and music of the 19^0's. In all of these areas the word had two appealing characteristics: 1) it differentiated current works from earlier "moderns" (the Armory Show of 1913* Schoenberg, Stravinsky, et al.), and 2) beinsr a temporal adjective, it avoided the necessity of making judgments as to quality, style, or essence, but had an avant-garde sound for credibility.
After World War II economics, education, political science, psychology, and philosophy seized the term to describe new developments or ideas, usually concurrently with "concepts", "issues", or "dimensions". By the early 1960's social and economic conditions had left virtually every field of study in turmoil, grasping for new methods (remember being a Guinea pig for new math?), and in dire need of new definitive works. The years 1963-7 produced great quantities of "contemporary" books, but 1968 was the bumper crop that choked and foundered the "contemporary" epidemic. The formula for success that year was a neat, paper-bound book on virtually any subject matter with a minimalist abstract design on the cover and in slick, sans serif typeface the title Contemporary Issues in (subject). The last ten ydars have seen a steady but greatly diminished number of "contemporary" books.
The Contemporary Style in architecture and interior design springs from these same origins in "contemporary" consciousness.
Throughout the 1950's House Beautiful published a collection of Contemporary American Homes: it begins with a survey of notable Frank Lloyd Wright houses and a summary of the important ideas which, in the view of the editors, liberated our thinking toward domestic architecture and spawned the Contemporary Style. It boldly claims that "we have at last, a new architecture for the new world, thanks largely to a man whose more than sixty years of passionate and principled effort liberated architectural thinking and prepared three generations of builders." Contemporary houses were seen to be those that "open to light, sky, and nature without losing a sense of shelter", and the collection included many lavish California and Florida houses characterized by expanses of glass, open, multi-level plans, semi-enclosed terraces, and "informal but elegant" furnishings.
The Contemporary Style today is a complex first, second, and third generation trickle-down blend of many twentieth-century periods and ideas. The architecture of world's fairs and expositions in the 1960's and accompanying media and graphic presentations certainly had a great influence on the style as did cubism, dadaism, minimalism, and op and pop.
A good house of High Contemporary Style would, of course, be one by Meier, Gwathmey, Eisenmann, Neski, Barnes, Jacobsen, or an architect competent enough to capture the proper degree of coolness. The interior would include Corbu, Mies, br Breuer originals (the right reproductions are still considered original) in chrome, glass, leather, or natural fibers, with white walls, track lighting, art works by (ironically) early modern masters and perhaps one carefully placed ficus. (Some of the more restrained Italian designs will do if the classics are out of reach.)
An example of Decorator Contemporary would be a newer apartment o;f house with some "interesting use of space" and lots of plants, new modular furniture, lots of plants, narrow slat blinds, lots of plants, a Parsons table and lots of plants.
Contemporary Sophistifunk is an older house with a new skylight, some old furniture, some new furniture, some baskets and a few macrame plant hangers. This is the most liberal and eclectic of the recognized orders•
Although the book boom of 1968 and the "dynamizing" of EXPO 67 took their toll, life must proceed! Our verbal salvation lies in our ability to compensate for the loss of -our esteemed friend. The following suggestion may comfort you in your time of need: Develop a file of suitable synonyms on 3 X 5 cards, with each word correctly used in a sentence. Then when you feel the "contemporary" urge, you may flick through the file and pick out a suitable word with hardly more anguish than a small lump in the throat.


diction returns
Remember you read it here first. The results of last Friday's elections are pregnant with significance•
The 1978-79 ASC/AIA Student Contact is Linda Stanson, Mike Darner is the 1978-79 CSA Student Representative. On the question of the student co-op, 85# of the students indicated they would welcome a system to reduce their supply expenses.
The curious question of whether student apathy exists was met with even mors curious response by the voters. In fact more people responded to this question than any of the others. Does it exist?* 60# -YES* 14#- NOj 17#-INDIFFERENT. It appears there is a break in the camp of the apathetic between the actively and the passively apathetic. It remains to be seen whether this faction can mend the split an present a united front.
The implications are immeasurable!
update
For those of you who are wondering how the College of Environmental Design stacks up in a national perspective, you will have to wait until next spring.
Following a submittal of supporting evidence and exhibits in July, the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB for you acronym freaks) was scheduled to have a review team on compus about now. Some bureaucratic problems on both ends of the line have postponed the review until early in the Spring Semester.
According to Architectural Chairmen Gary Long, the administration and faculty is ready for the review now but the extra time will now allow for some grace notes to be thrown in. One of these refinements is the ubiquitous "FUTURE" Design Library, now scheduled for installation over Christmas break.
women in arch.
Learn how architects can use the Media! The next meeting will feature Fran Nichols, Associate Editor for the Daily Journal and Irene Clurman, writer for the Rocky Mountain News. Bothe women are actively involved in the art and architecture scene here in Denver. Fran has been a part of the WIA from the organ zation's beginning. The meeting will be at Fran's home and the graduate students will provide a pot luck dinner.
DATE: Monday November 27, 1978
TIME: 6:00 pm
Address: 15000 Foothill Road Golden
RSVP (Fran) work: 458-6501 home * 279-7440
‘uuc.d.d.c.
Hey deezine club fans! The voting this past Oct. 23rd A 24th was a smashing 100# success «— we have 100 members and more on the way — this represents the beginning of our identity as a legitimate entity.
Keen looking for annoucementsi we will keep looking for money!
was the garage with doors closed to view but open to the chiaroscuro play of light on the individual panels.
It was then that I realized that the remembrance of. an English past was but a partial explanation, more important to the explication was the realization that my kitchen v/indow frames a view of life, not unlike that stolen from the window of a train.
The alley abounds with life. The life which must not transpire on the costly street-side lawns because pretensions must be preserved unfolds ceremoniously on the alley side. Not just the hanging of laundry on rope lines, or the lugging of groceries from auto to house, it is also where the "architectural life" is most potent. An architecture without architects thrives unabated here with diversity and beauty. There are endless individual and creative solutions to accomodating the automobile ? to drawing a separation between public and private spaces, to storing and protecting the lowly trash can, to planting and landscaping, and to making that small but psychologically essential backyard one's very own. -The*individual hand of present and past ovine re is everywhere evident and that is v/hat I saw that evening through the orange light - a direct and beautifully simple solution to the mundane problem of fitting in two trash cans.
Walk the alleys and discover all the imaginative solutions to many of the common design problems of our daily lives. And be sure not to pass up a walk down the alleys when that late and unexpected Spring snow, heavy with moisture, weighs down the blossoming lilacs - the alleys are in their Ultimate appeal as human spaces.




Full Text

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r , AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION NOVEMBER _1978 }

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I a LAMINA110NS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER Mailing address: Laminations, c/o Colleg e of Environmental Design, 1100 j4th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The news paper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building. Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to . . group editing for reasons of clarity and space. thanks Bob Busch Mark Dorian Diane Gayer Geoff (Photos) Katy Liske (Calendar) Oana (Cover Photo) Doue: Ward Jim Wri2'ht Plans for the establishment of an Environmental Desig n Library look better than ever. Sene problem s w i l l still hav e to be dealt with, but current de velopnents point to a library on the second floor of Bromley by January, 1979. In September Chris Gulef.:' was appointed the librarian of the ne\.' facility. Chris is a nember of the Auraria library staff. He holds a Masters de cree in Library Science and has done c;raduate study in uro ar. a .ffairs. A library committee, chaired by Guleff, submitted a list of title block transfers last \ •leek to the library ration. It included all "NA" (architecture), "SB" (landscape architecture), and "NI{" (interior design) catalog headings, as well as a number of selected titles f rom other headings. This list has been a pproved and now requires a combined faculty committee reviel, , , by UCD, HSC and CCD. A !)eriodica1s list is also being com pilee. that includes all the environmental desic n currently at the main library plus related journals in areas of buildinc technolOf."3r, social/ psycholocical research, land-use preser vation. The initial mov e will involv e only 3,000 volumes. It will b e a small, weak coilection, \ Jell belo\'i the national a-\rera c e of over 13,000 volumes for accredited architectural branch libraries, as Guleff admirably pointed out in his listed recommendations. HO\'Iever, it is a start, and a rather large book acquisition fund for this fiscal year should besin to fill out the Because the library will also be available to the professional conmtt ! 'ti t :'" of the state it is hoped that their interest and financial support 'dill further encourag e the de-.;.:eloument of our f"' edr.l; 0" 1 b "" 0 -nu 1 rarJ• Problems \:i th fundin.z , the faculty re"Tliew of subject block transfers, and ceneral letharcy could still block or delay the move. Hov1ever, recent progress is most encouraginc;, and t.-rith student/faculty interest and help our library could be a reality by January. .

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Wednesday October 11th through Sunday October 15th the Santa Fe Chapter of the AIA hosted the Western Mountain Regional Conference. Eleven partially.fundedUCD Environmental Design students had the good fortune of attending this conference, courtesy of our own CSA (thanks again). The five day fiesta ••• ('program) provided guest lectures, from as faraway as New York -and Berkeley, California, talks from local architects on indigenous forms past and present, many short seminars on just about anything ever wanted to know about architecture, and cocktailing at lla30 AM every day. From pueblos to parties the Santa Feans accomodated their guets in good form. A few disappointing guest speakers slowed things down, yet, on the whole the Conference was a rewarding and "bon vivant" affair. The Santa Fe Art Festival ran concurrently with the"Arch. Fest." which provided a total cultural experience. The event was framed in the picturesque downtown square, amid ancient adobe government buildings, shops, and quite excellent haciendas--well suited for the casual course of events. As is the case of most conferences the scheduled activities set the foregroundof events, vet the true tale of any conference is read in the background. "Hob-nobbing" of course plays an important part in any conference, espescially for students. And there were plenty of occasions that afforded this, from hotel room parties to producer's council cocktails. Throw in some expensive dinners, dancing, and the night life to cap things off--and voila: you have one nice 4 day conference. The following are some varied and personal accounts from the design student conferees. The Santa Fe Opera House is an unu sual examule of the ways which adobe is being adapted to the structure and more so to the out-buildings it. Glulams support the Opera House in a combination N. Dorian 3 After enjoying a writer's books, one often goes with high expectations to hear the author speak only to be .r:-., when the speaker the promise of the wr 1ter. was certainly not the case Vi!lcent Scully's presentation, and. the Ve:::-nacular Arch1 tecture, r i ven October 1 3 in Santa Fe. . The content of his talk and h1s enthusiastic delivery made Scully one of the highlights of the Western Conference. He w1th and at.h1S slides immoderately, almost dance? w1th them. He obviously felt the arch1tecture, and through word and gesture was able to convey this sense of empathy to the audience. . . i Scully's style of arch1tectural cr t1-cism is unusually creative. By oft:n esta relationships between seem1ngly unrelated elements, he helps us understand each thing more fully. Critics have found his connections,at times, too perhaps e .ren ty, they say is not necessar1ly appropr1ate for. architectural criticism and Scully's V1eW is not necessarily the way things really are. Yet his influence remains strong; perhaps too strong • . For example, Louis Kahn's reputation was more or less made by the book Scully wrote about him in 1962. . The intriguing thing is that Scully 1s actually shaping our architectural real1ty. In the most positive sense we should see this as a challenge to talk more, write mor and exchange ideas more--to do our share o architectural "reali y formation." At the same time we should feel fortunate one of the people doing the most in th1s area attacks the job with. so much enthusiasm, and creativity. -c. Gustafson of gracious sweeping ____ curves, wnich provide the only shelter for seating in this outdoor theater. The Opera House is used only during the summer moriths for evening performances. Shows range from The Merry \'lidow to Madame Butterfly. They able.to open out the back of the stage to use the lights o! the beyond !or certain effects. Trap doors cover about 9Q; of stage right and stage lett walls and about ot the floor. Three levels, starting at stage level and going down, contain rooms for costume design, production, laundry and storage; orchestra rehearsal and dressing; make-up rooms; prop production and storage; choral rooms; scenery design, production and storage; and dance \'larm-up and rehearsal space. It is a very exciting design with good acoustics, sight lines, form, yet still conforming to the strict code of Santa Fe demanding low profile adobe buildings which blend with the antural landscape. L. Stansen

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4 noguchi If you are interested in fantastic new ways to win over your jury this yearvisit NoP.:uchi 's Imae-inarv Landscapes Exhibit at the Denver Art Museum. Whether sensual, or abstract Isamu bronze models show the most nlavful narks Thru tunnels and tiers he creates level changes regardless ot the grade. Benches become Part of the whole landscape (not just something to sit on.) And the playground pieces themselves are colorful and creative sculptures. The minute details cast in the bronze and the patina they have taken on with time are something our matt board models are definitly lacking. There is a wonderful model series showing various stages of development plus enlarged details for Riverside Park in New York, unfortunatly the proposal was defeated. He did however get a commission to a park in Atlanta (Piedmont Park 1976) and now near completion is the 13-acre downtown Civic Center in Detroit which has as focal point a tremendous spaceship fountain. Other than the bronze models, there are several examples of sculpture gardens to enhance a. buildinds environment with. The very basic is his inverted red cube in front of the Marine Midland Building in New York or the huge donut (Black Sun) on a ledge overlooking the city at the Seattle Art Museum. Somewhat more esoteric are his japanese type gardens that are not meant to be intruded upon, the sand is pure and the rocks create life and form on their own. n1s pieces ot sculpture that are simple objets without context show his mastery over materials, as in his bronze and aluminium one called "Stone of SPiritual Understanding•. Noguchi's exPert and creative handling of materials and spaces could make you questionand change much of the architec tural images that have become embedded in your mind. The Exhibit will be there until Dec. 3, 19?8 and costs $ .50 for students. alley life Even though I have lived for over a year now in an aborted architectural masterpiece of an apartment building in Capitol Hill, it was only last week that I had a real a\'Jakening. All this time I believed that the reason v..rhy I enjoyed the view from my \Thite\vashed kitchen on the third floor was because I looked dov1n onto several Denver squares as they back the alley, and in the non-presumptuousness of their back facades I am of the austere brick rowhouses that the British Railway rushes past as it approaches London. I was convinced, until quite recently that it was this stronc personal association and the resultant flood of memories of my holidays in Enr;land v1hich endeared me so to this vie\T. However, the other day this all chansed. It was early evening when the sun is low in the western sky and its light washes the alley with a brilliant orangish cast. I was driving down t h e alley towards the in my battered Volkswacen, which is not yet a classic, when there to the right side before me was a renarkable -two trash cans s itting in a masonry alcove! And thoug h I had passed this \-ray of times in my comings and goings, on th1s part1cular eveninc these receptacles were no less important than the ordinary red wheelbarrow in the William Carlos Williams poem ••• so much depends upon a red wheel barrow glazed with ra1n \vater beside the white chickens. ••• these trash cans had superior importance. They were two objects set within the protective embrace of the whitewashed alcove, tinted with orans e lic;ht; and to the ric:ht the \ •Jall of brick cut in once acain to accomodate several steps and a picket cate which ambicuously invited and discouraced admission to the worn path \ Jhich runs to the back door; and next to this (Continued on page 7.)

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Darlene Anderson 1280 Humboldt Avenue Denver, CO 80218 Stiletto, Armano Arapahoe Grill no phone Serge Arrestouilh 2985 E. College Boulder, CO 442-3457 Carlos M. Lopez Brooks Towers Apt 1020 15th St. 13B Terry Carpenter-Goular Denver, co 2261 East 66th Ave. 825-4291 Bake Baker 1065 Gaylord Denver, CO 322-9577 St., E Denver, Colo. 80229 Mark McCormick 287-3868 2330 E. 12th Ave. Mannie L. Gore Denver, CO 80206 Lee Baker 9600 E. Girard Denver, Colo. 80231 755-3921 Robert W. Barton 1040 W. 14th Avenue Denver, CO 80204 825-2655 Peter Becker 982 South York Denver, Colo. 722-6918 3403 E. Lake Dr. Littleton, CO 722-5568 Regina M. Grady 985 16th Street Boulder, Colo. 80302 449-1154 Stephen Gregory 952 So. Pearl #5 Denver, Colo. 777-1464 Crandon Gustafson Richard Bernstein 1365Corona # 7 1200 So. Oneida, 10-204 Denver, CO Denver, Colo. Abbas Hadjihabib 759-8958 16900 E. Evans #213 Vija Berzins Denver, CO Kathryn McGinnis 1587 Ivanhoe Denver, CO 399-4966 Paul Miles 2690 S. High Denver, CO 733-1796 Jeffrey Miller 1775 Monaco Parkway Denver, Colo. 80220 355-3035 Jay Moore 6165 E. Iliff #406D Denver, CO 756-5057 Shannon Morris #17 6030 East First Avenue 759-1127 Denver, CO 80220 333-7168 Hall, Michael 340-2865 1415 Detroit St. Apt. Denver, Colo. 80206 388-7744 Darryl Booker 2727 Quitman St. Denver, CO 433-7990 Dwane Hansen 12884 E. 30th Ave. Aurora, CO 80011 365-0849 Duane Boyle Cherie Hartley 4940 Thunderbird Circle 1190 Grape St. Boulder, Colorado 499-0109 . Alan Brown 2985 E. College Boulder, CO 449-4051 R. Brian Brazee 1331 Franklin St. Denver, CO 831-8476 Karen Buettner 1475 Folsom #2028 Denver, CO 399-6852 Beth Hennessey 2345 Cherry Denver, CO 377-6158 Greg Hepp 3065 S. Sherman tnglewood, Colo. 781-8715 Williams. Hoffman 1638 Ogden 3rd Floor .c __ .. :L,.Bruce R. Mosteller 2962 Raleigh Qenver, CO 477-6142 Henry W. Mueller 806 Spruce #l Boulder, Colo. 443-4046 Rob Murphy 1415 Steele St. # 6 Denver, CO 377-5885 Bill Nardin 2849 Utica St. Denver, Colo. 477-5068 Les Nelken 982 s. York Denver, CO 6c,_ s George Schusler 7480 Windwood Way Parker, Colo. 841-2521 Bob Schnautz 3526 Quivas Denver, CO 477-8356 Margaret Alice Smith 924 Hawthorn Ave. Boulder, CO 80302 449-2844 Jim Smotherman 1407 East lOth Ave. Denver, Colo. 80218 861-9326 John Spitzer 1936 Bluff Boulder, Colo. 443-5931 Linda Stansen 900 S. Hudson Denver, Colo. 80222 388-1142 01 aug Strand 1245 S. Bellaire #312 Denver, Colo. 80222 758-1160 wayne Stryker 1134 lOth Street Boulder, Colo. 80302 2 443-9742 Wen-Chun Sun 9080 8th Ave. Apt. 201 Denver, Colo. 80211 366-3395 Brainard Swett 1105 S. Cherry St. #4-l Denver, Colo. 80222 753-9128 Kunle Taiwo Jon Talgo 1060 Logan St. Apt. 8 Denver, Colo. 831-7590 Alima Theno 1931 Mapleton Boulder, Colo. 449-8568 Dave Thomas 366 Milwaukee Barry, Gail 1027 Pontiac St. Denver, Colo. 80220 355-8486 Bloss, Francine 100 South Cherry Denver, Colo. 80222 377-3173 Brandes, Don Post Office Box 1309 Windsor, Colo. 80550 1-693-8065 McKinnon, Elsie 922 Spruce Street Boulder, Colo. 80302 444-2381 Miles, Gary 7708 Lamar Arvada, Colo. 80003 422-0034 Mitchell, Cathy 1840 Race Denver, Colo. 80206 355-0434 Morrison, Larry Bruce, Colleen 4590 Grove Street Denver, Colo. 80211 433-4020 130 Field Street Lakewood, Colo. 80226 238-5728 (home), 234-4767 Burton, Jan 4156 Stuart Street Denver, Colo. 80212 477-1504 Caniglia, Jan 2299 E. Floyd Place Englewood, Colo. 80110 781-4626 Mussett, Gerry 748 St Paul Denver, Colo. 80206 322-1681 Palmer, Jane Salina Star Route Boulder, Colo. 80302 449-1565 Claussen, Donald 245 S. Pennsylvania Denver, Colo. 80209 744-9748 # 4 Pee ka, Jeff 1700 17th St. Apt. Boulder, Colo. 80302 Clark, Shirley 449-2469 1550 W. Bri a rwood Ave. . . Littleton, Colo. 80120 R1ce, E1lzabeth 795-5759 16-2 FAMC Denver, Colo. 80240 . Drewes, Debi 341-8569 B-9

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Anderson, William Scott 2304 East St. Golden 80401 279-5846 .f!.rthur, Debra A. 639 Doilning r 80219 S32-1686 . ' 2arbeau, Mari lyfl ti. S Spruce Denver 80220 322-5889 Barnhart, Terrv Rober: 1004 E. lOth Denver 80218 832-3660 Barnes, Kim Michael Sox 291 Frisco 80443 468-5350 Beland, Michele Ann 4144 Greenbriar Blvd. Boulder 80303 0 Conley, Richard Patrick 71 Roberts St. Portlcnd 77/_?<'"'
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757-7030 ')50 11 -#3901 69Q03 0 Craig .D. lan Hoffman .. Ph1'111'p l..J t-1 more;:; R0239 Bliss, Rhoda E. Corbett 7085 W. Colorado Dr. Lakewood 80226 988-2505 rnno D '-i \o\o.40iif-', 1\.4 I """ 2091 H. 9th Ave. Lakewood 80215 23 7-6322 Roge r s Boyd, Dennis 2300 Arapahoe #114 Boulder 80302 443-9330 Bruso, Kathleen 5065 Perry Apt. 2 Denver 80212 455-6135 Bump, Linda Light 875 Cascade Ave. Boulder 80302 443-6342 Burstein, Stephen Joseph P.O. Box 262 81433 Busby, James 33 Pearl Denver 80203 722-0760 Carden, Elizabeth Ann 8398.E. Costilla Ave. Englewood 80110 770-9040 Chrisco, Donna Beasley 460 S. Marion Denver 80209 744-8659 Ciesielski, Michael 915 9 th St. Golden 80401 279-0665 Clark, Kristen Holmberg 2871 W. Amherst Denver 80236 761-0859 Cochrane, Steven 9313 Everett Ct. Broomfield 80220 420-2866 George ac,,, 1 s L Avo Denver 80206 333-2378 Denver . . .-u/ ... • -L • - • 262 S. Newark Cir. 373_17 04 Trimm, William Geoffrey C 3 0 5 Aurora 80010 617 Eross St • 11 ' / Patricia LonBlTlont 80501 ,.,--4 s Dd Rubinstein, Gordon 1 l nore f\ • 772-4917 E nglert, Michael Jerry 284 0 St. Senv2r Erickso:1, Jeanne 1364 Ash Denver 80220 333-8803 Fehsenfeld, Betsy 905 Juniper Ave. L.J i..A I C I U '--449-1219 Fern2ndez, John Manuel Cenver 80219 Fessenden, P . l i ve 1401 t. Girard #267 Engle\•Jood 80110 FeTiu, Richard 505 Harvard Lane Boulder 80303 Figi, Randall 8423 Middle Fork Boulder 80302 442-2207 Fitzpatrick, James 1033 Downing #304 Denver 30218 Foster, Carl Edward 2425 University Boulder 80302 Fulton, Greg Dean 304 Adams Denver 80206 Garcia, Michael John 6 9 71 Saul s b tny Arvada 423-8678 Gibson, -10646 h. Ave. La ke\'JOo: ;215 -""""' . -.:..vHo land, Richard Fort Co1l ins 80521 9993 E. 1st Ave. . 10025 E • . Girard 493_0279 Aurora 80010 Denver 80231 364-3700 Holland, Shawn 5 Malvern Terrace Medford,MD 02155 (617) 391-6234 Hoopes, Thomas 1265 S. Mariposa Denver 80223 (312) 337-1356 Horn, Robert Dean 9313 Everett Ct. Broomfield 80020 Horner, Randall 3655 S. Penn ... Englewood 80110 781-5662 Humphrey, William 1407 S. Yank Lakewood 80228 986-8571 Jackson, Karol Eve 1035 Colorado Blvd. Denver 80206 Jereb, Edward P. 1621 Elm St. Denver 80220 355-7239 Kap 1 an, Ho\'/a rd S. 141 Dahlia Denver 80220 355-0424 Larscheidt, Dorothy 1497 S. Zephyr Ct. Lakewood 80226 Larson, Prudence 845 15th St. Boulder 80302 Laubner, William 1551 S. Parfet Ct. Lake\'JOOd 80226 989-1708 Minkler, Charles 6800 S. Clarkson Littleton 80122 . 794-4647 Leonard 229 Francis Longmont 80501 i •1ue 11 er, ti c hae 1 1150 Syracuse #7 l08 Denver 80220 355-8423 Murphy, Patricia Box 122 I d . H '11 n nLJ.;:: • n 1an 1 .s bv __ . ...,. • • ' h ' !.1 .; _, "" . ' n ... ;:: ..urp y, h''" , __ , 1541 Adar.'1S Denver 30206 . 399-2011 Needham, Linda 3514 St. Denver 80212 477.:.1151 t:ichols, Kevin 391 Eastern Dr. Brighton 80601 O'Dell, Laurie 4602 E. Arkans2s Denver 80222 "'L h,. ,.l. ...., oug .1n, .• ,c,.c:-:. 9270 W. 45th Avs. \'h • "d '; .ea L r1 ge ou ,:;.) 0\Jens , i io l a 2518 Kearney Denver 80207 Parker, Ann Leslie 4675 E. Denver 80222 Parker, Hilliar 1306 Elizabeth =5 Denver 80206 Ryan, Douglas Lee 1562 S. Owens #265 Lakewood 80226 986-1971 Saiz, Raymond 205 El Pueblo N.W. Albuquerque NM 87114 (505) 898-4121 Sandler, Marideth Joy 900 S. Williams #3 Denver 80209 733-7318 Sangster, Ellen Babette 1565 Tamarac St. Denver 80220 355-6950 Schock, Thomas Allen 6896 Greenleaf Ave. Cleveland OH 44130 (216) 843-7357 Shin, Sharon Sumi 6031 Olive Commerce City 80022 288-9673 Velma Sarah 1708 Short.Place Longmont 80501 772-2524 Slaughter, Mary 2343 South Vaughn Way Denver 80232 #216 750-3575 Smith, Lynn E. 120 S. Pennsylvania #206 Denver 8020.9 733-9971 Smith, Timothy Charles 1724 S. Logan Denver 80210 722-9987 Waesche, Kathleen Collins Rt.l, Perry Pines Sedalia 80135 6RR09443 Watkins, Anna Whitfield 1407 St. Paul Denver 80206 Welsch, John Michael 881 Comobabi Tucson AZ 85704 ( 602 . ) 2972614 White, Christopher R. 1576 S. Pennsylvania St. Denver 80210 733-3240 Wilson, Mary Patricia 4230 E. 6th Ave. Denve . r 80220 322-8435 Wyman, Lynn Jeanette 5250 Cherry Creek Dr. s. # 17-H Denver 80222 756-2778 Louise Mornroe 5116 Williams Fork Trail #114 Boulder 80301 447-2499 Yu, Susan Chua 1756 Clarkson St. 5 Denver 80218 A31-A328 Zimmerman, Judith Kay 454 s. Jay Lakewood 80226 935-7883

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... ... • ...... ......."""J ........ " -Denver, CO Dirk Buttjes 1310 Corona #3 Denver, Colo. 80218 832-3586 -Mi chae 1 Co 11 ins 1710 Moore St. Lakewood, CO 80215 233-3735 Denver, CO 80207 320-4540 Elizabeth Houck 3225 W. 23rd Ave. Denver, CO 433-3978 Tia Jenkins 1105 S. Cherry #1-204 Denver, Colo. 80222 757-8686 Bernie Decosse Ted Kaiser 1240 Colorado Boulevard 1646 s. Downing Denver, CO 80206 Denver, Colo. 355-2687 744-7479 St. Don Dethlefs 1045 Sherman Denver, Colo. 861-7718 80203 Donahoe, Mary-Kay 1415 E. 9th #5 Denver 837-0724 Mark Dorian 1065 Pennsylvania #207 Denver, Colo. 80218 831-8531 Geoff Drake 1000 E 9th Denver, Colo. 832-5637 Linda Eddy 80218 14195 W. 21st Pl. Golden, CO 80401 279-2254 Gregory Fisher 3023 4th Street CO 80302 449-8218 Dan Ferraro 985 Corona #104 Denver, Colo. 80218 832-3787 Ben Fulgenzi 5250 Cherry Creek S. Denver, CO 759-1206 Diane Gayer 807 E. lOth Denver, Colo. 80218 831-4462 Geoff Kampe 807 E. lOth Denver, Colo. 80218 Susan Ka nd e 1 i n 982 South York Street Denver, CO 80209 722-6918 Doug Kehr 1532 Spruce Denver, CO 377-3230 chae 1 Kitner 50 N. Clarkson Denver, CO 80218 777-6259 Sa 11 ee Ku nke 1 660 Detroit St. Denver, CO 377-3031 Dave Lay 825 S. Quebec St. #110 Denver, Colo. 80231 320-0063 Livnat, Miry 5424 E. Asbury, De: -758-5806 Timothy Leong 1985 S. Cherry #206 Denver, CO 759-9325 Michael Lesoing 1247 Clarkson Denver, CO 832-5499 Susan Long 740 E. Jefferson Ave. Englewood, Colo 761-3019 831-9678 Steve Patton 1033 Downing St. #105 Denver, CO 80218 837-0593 J. Dave Powers 799 Dahlia Apt. 102 Denver, Colo. Prindle 801 S. Vine St. Denver, CO 80209 744-7852 Daniel B. Rawson 1139 Downing Denver, Colo. 80218 837-9761 Kim Rea Reingold, Dana 1094 Ogden #3 Denver 80218 832-8387 Brett Richards 944 South Logan Denver, Colo. 80209 777-2219 Linda Richissin 2055 Birch St. Denver, CO 399-7621 Lila Rieth 1827 South Franklin Denver, CO 80210 744-.0007 Laura Ruocco 3236 Wyandot Denver, CO 433-9845 Dave Ruterbories 362 s. Lincoln St. Denver, CO 778-0676 Will Salerno 3236 Wyandot Denver, Colo. 433-9845 80211 Edward B. Samuel 5548 Billings St. Denver, CO 80239 373-5840 299 Arapahoe #105 Boulder, CO John M. Villa 1109 Marion, #12 Denver, CO 80218 832-8863 John Walker 999 Pearl #103 Denver, CO 832-8436 Steve Wallick 1035 East 11th Ave. Denver, Colo. 80203 832-8035 Doug Ward 789 Clarkson #901 Denver, Colo. 80218 832-3774 Bob West 1475 Folsom #1027 Boulder, Colo. Christopher F. Williams 1073 Steele Street rDenver, CO 80206 399-4543 Randy Williamson 1300 30th St. #82-26 Boulder, CO 80303 442-0632 Kurt Wi 1 son 1640 East 13th Ave. Denver, Colo. 80218 377-5485 Paul Worrell 12155 W. 58th Pl. #304 Arvada, Colo. 424-2156 Jeffry Stewart ght 134 Pennsylvania Crenver, CO 744-9935 Jim Wright 982 S. York Denver, Colo. 722-6918 Kaki Zeeb 6300 Charrington Dr. Englewood, Colo. 80110 771-0503 Fleck, t
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THE CLIMATIC CALAr1ITY AWARD THE LAST GASP OF To the Auraria Library for its inhumane response to the environment. To the Riverside Baptist Church for obvious reasons. THE BARRIER FREE SIGNAGE AWARD To the D.C.P.A. for its concern !or handicapped access through its clear use of signage. $eatin g Geoff THE M.DOYLE GRAPHICS AWARD To One Denver Place for the uniqueness of its sign. THE LOST THEATER GOER AWARD To the D.C.P.A. garage and all the patrons who are still looking for the way out.

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I 0 contemparJ:tbe o death of a w-ord John Villa 1978 marks the tenth anniversary of the death of a useful element of the English Alas, ignorant acts of neologism have nearly precluded the articulate writer's use of the word contemporary--a once proud word of respectable lineage (from Latina cum -tempus). The cause of death is now easily understood to be the coinage of a Contemporary Style and the resulting confusion between the actual and stylistic uses of the word. Consider as an example the ambiguity of the phrase "a Victorian house furnished in the contemporary style". Proper usage would indicate that the house is furnished in torian style, but the current popular usage would imply that it is done in new furnishings of the nebulous Contemporary Style. The difficulties arose initially from misinterpretation and later from misuse. When IBM exhibited its collection of contemporary art at the Golden Gate International Exposition in 193q and at the New York World0s Fair in the intent was to exhibit new, current works, but the interpretation was that of a new style. Today the decorating profession uses "Contemporary" to differentiate plastic furniture that simulates carved wood from plastic furniture which looks like plastic intentionally, A survey of book titles shows that "contemporary" was rarely used in the nineteenth century, and very little until the 1920s, Its use was first in the arts-poetry in the 1920's, German and French drama of the late 1920's, art of the 1930's, and music of the 1940's, In all of these areas the word had two appealing characteristics: 1) it differentiated current works from earlier "moderns" (the Armory Show of 1913, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, et al.), and 2) a temporal adjective, it avoidedthe necessity of judgments as to quality, style, or essence, but had an avant-garde sound for credibility, After World War II economics, education, political science, psychology, and philosophy seized the term to describe new developments or ideas, usually concurrently with "concepts", "issues", or "dimensions". By the early 1960's social and economic conditions had left virtually every field of study in turmoil, grasping for new methods (rememb9r being a Guinea pig for new math?), and in dire need of new definitive works. The years 1963-7 produced great quantities of "contemporary" books, but 1968 was the bumper crop that choked and foundered the "contemporary" epidemic. The formula for success th.at year was a neat', paper-bound book on virtually any subject matter with a minimalist abstract design on the cover and in slick, sans serif typeface the title Contemporary Issues in (subject). The last ten have seen a steady but greatly diminished number of "contemporary" books. The Contemporary Style in architecture and interior design springs from these same in "contemporary" consciousness. Throughout the 1950's House Beautiful published a collection of Contemporary American Homesr it begins with a survey of notable Frank Lloyd Wright houses and a summary of the important ideas which, in the view of the editors, liberated our thinking toward domestic architecture and spawned the Con temporary Style. It boldly claims that "we have at last, a new architecture for the new world, thanks largely to a man whose . more than sixty years of passionate and principled effort liberated thinking and prepared three generat1ons of Contemporary houses were seen to be those that "open to light, sky, and nature without losing a sense of shelter", and the collection included many lavish California and Florida houses characterized by expanses of glass, open, multi-level plans, semi -enclosed terraces, and "informal but elegant" furnishings. The Contemporary Style today is a complex first, second, and third generation trickle-down blend of many twentieth-century periods and ideas. The architecture of world's fairs and expositions in the 1960's and accompanying media and graphic presenta tions certainly had a great influence on the style as did cubism, dadaism, minimalism, and op and pop. A good house of High Contemporary Style would, of course, be one by Meier, Gwathmey, Eisenmann, Neski, Barnes, Jacobsen, or an architect competent enough to capture the proper degree of coolness. The interior would include Corbu, Mies, br Breuer originals (the are still considered original) in chrome, glass, leather, or natural fibers, with white walls, track lighting, art works by (ironically) early modern masters and perhaps one carefully placed ficus, (Some of the more restrained Italian designs will do if the classics are out of reach,) An example of Decorator Contemporary would be a newer apartment of house with some "interesting use of space" and lots of plants, new modular furniture, lots of plants, narrow slat blinds, lots of plants, a Parsons table and lots of plants, Contemporary Sophistifunk is an older house with a new skylight, some old furnitur-e, some new furniture, some baskets and a few macrame plant hangers. This is the most liberal and eclectic of the recognized orders, Although the book boom of 1968 and the "dynamizin,g" of EXPO 67 took their toll, life must proceed! Our verbal salvation lies. in our ability to compensate for the loss of.our esteemed friend. The following suggestion may comfort you in your time of needa Develop a file of suitable synonyms on 3 X 5 cards, with each word correctly used in a sentence. Then when you feel the "contemporary" urge, you may flick through the file and pick out a suitable word with hardly more anguish than a small lump in the throat.

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Remember YQU read it here first. The results of last Friday's elections are with • . -. ' The 1978-79 ASC/AIA Student Contact is Linda Stanson. Mike Darner is the 1978-79 CSA St.udent Representative. On the question of the student co-op, of the students indicated they would welcome a system to reduce their supply expenses. The curious question of whether student apathy exists was met with even more curious response by the voters. In fact more people responded to this question than any of the others. Does it exist?a -YESJ 14?'-NOJ It appears there is a break in the camp of the apathetic between the actively and the passively apathetic. It remains to be seen whether this faction can mend the split an present a united front. The implications are immeasurable! womcm iD arcll. Learn how architects can use the Medial The next meeting will feature Fran Nichols, Associate Editor for the Daily Journal and Irene Clurman, writer for the Rocky Mountain News. Bothe women are actively involved in the art and architecture scene here in Denver. Fran has been a part of the WIA from the organ zation's beginning. The meeting will be at Fran's home and the graduate students will provide a pot luck dinner. DATE: Monday November 27, 1978 TIME: 6:00 pm Address: 15000 Foothill Road Golden RSVP (Fran) work: 438-6301 home: 2?9-7440 u..c.a.a..o. Hey deezine club fans: The this past oct. 2Jrd & 24th was a success --we have 100 members and more on the way --this represents the of our identity as a legitimate entity ••• Keen for annoucements1 we wi11 keen for money: .• .,.., . 7 " update . For those of you who are wondering ho\v the of Environmental Design stacks up in a perspective, you will have to ' .Alai t . until next spring. . Following a submittal of ev1dence and exhibits in July the National Arch1tectural Accreditation Board for you acronym freaks) was scheduled to have a review team on compus about now. Some bureaucratic problems on both ends of the line postponed the review until early in the Spring Semester. According to Architectural Chairmen Gary Long. the administration and faculty is ready tor the review now but the extra time will now allow for some grace notes to be thrown in. One o! these refinements is the ubiquitous "FUTURE" Design Library, now scheduled !or installation over Christmas break. was the garage with doors ciosed to yiew but open to the chiaroscuro play or light on the individual panels. It was then that I realized that the remembrance of. an English past \lias but a partial explanation, more important to the explication was the realization that my kitchen vrindo\•T frames a view of life, not unlike that stolen from the window of a train. The alley abounds. with life. The life 1vhich must not transpire on the costly streetside lawns because pretensions must be preserved unfolds ceremoniously on the alley side. Not just hanging of laundry on rope lines, or the lugging of groceries from auto to house., it is also \vhere the "architectural life" is most potent. An architecture vlithout architects thrives unabated here with diversity and beauty. There are endless individual and creative solutions to accomodating the automobile 1 to dra\oJing a separation between public and pr1vate spaces, to storing and protecting the lo\Ily can, to planting and landscaping, and to that small but psychologically essential backyard one • s very own • . . The individual hand of present and past O\•Znere is everywhere evident and is vthat I sa\-r that e .vening tlU-ough the orange light -a di.rect and beautifully simple solution to the mundane problem of fitting in two trash cans. Walk the alleys and discover all. 'the' imaginative solutions to many of the common design problems of our daily lives. And be sure not to pass up a \oJalk do\m t}le alleys \vhen that late and unexpected Spring ano\'1, heavy with moisture, weighs the blossoming lilacs -the alleys are in their tiltimate appeal as human spaces. ..., , -;.. ,•

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0 c J c ) 0 ...... '16: '"V. AlA Mae.nNeJ .. WN VAi.t.af. IDAHo .. -•..•• ••• ... . ......... ;;. 0 ( ) c )