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Laminations, October, 1979

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Title:
Laminations, October, 1979
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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LAMINATIONS
university
OF COLORAOO AT DENVER
This issue marks the beginning of LAMINATIONS third year of publication. We would like to thank the DEEZINE Club, the AIA, and UCD for their continued support and encouragment, for it is their interest and assistance that make this publication possible.
Special thanks for this issue to:
Bake Baker Daryl Booker Michael Fuller Crandon Gustafson Bruce Levek Kathryn McGinnis Randy McMillan Rob Murphy Paula Schulte Linda Stansen Jeff Wright Jim Wright
ARTICLES, GRAPHICS, PHOTOS
LAMINATIONS NEEDS INPUT FROM STUDENTS, FACULTY, PROFESSIONALS INTERESTED? CONTACT OUR OFFICE 3RD FLOOR BROMLEY OR
LAMINATIONS 1100 14TH. ST.
DENVER, CO. 80202
Cover: David Brown photosf Michael Fuller


report’
3
Linda Stansen
Last March the Architecture program here underwent an accreditation review. The Visiting Team was comprised of the following members:
Edith A Cherry, Assistant Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of New Mexico representing ACSA
David L. Perkins, FAIA
Perkins, Guidry, Young, Architects, Inc. representing AIA as NAAB Board Member
William J. Geddis, FAIA, Team Chairman
William Geddis Associates
representing NCARB, as NAAB Past President
administration of the two Canpuses and to create this without a teaching load being assigned to this person.
Physical Resources: improvements are necessary. The Boulder Library should be maintained according to the Team and the Library in Denver needs improvement.
Creativity and Aesthetics: the Problem Solving/ Design process in the Boulder program should be reviewed to assure that students are developing "creative sensitivities" through the curriculum offerings during the undergraduate sequence.
Students: students in Boulder are enthusiastic,
in Denver they appear to be disgruntled and disorganized. To the Team it is important to improve student counseling with respect to course and career opportunities. Students should be involved in committee work. Funds should be provided for visiting critics and lecturers who should be selected by the students.
Facilities and Equipment: the Boulder facilities should be maintained. In Denver, appearance, Library, exhibit spaces, a shop, the dark room should be improved "considerably". Additional space is needed and should be acquired.
For three days this Team visited both the Denver and Boulder campuses, meeting with faculties and students. The Boulder program was reviewed as part of the College of Environmental Design program even though it does not require accreditation as an entity since it does not issue a first professional degree. Both campuses still, needed review and some useful criticisms were received. Only the preliminary report has been made available. The final is expected in October or November and will be in the Library for everyone's use.
Generally the Team found that the College has an "unrealized potential" for interdisciplinary functions on the Denver campus. The other general comment made was that there needs to be expanded relationships between Denver and Boulder. Careful scheduling of communting professors' time and additional faculty to alleviate the problem of instructors not being able to be available every day of the week was recommended. But it was felt that the relationship between Denver and Boulder was a necessary one that should be continued through the use of the same professors on both campuses.
A summary of the report touches on several key issues which the Team sees as positive criticisms for the College to use as a starting point for continued improvements. Addressing each issue more specifically:
Administration and Leadership: the Team recommended that the school look at hiring an assistant Dean to assist in the coordination and
Research: Programs in the area of energy and other regional concerns should be initiated immediately and a position of leadership established.
Professional Relationship: A better relationship should develop, advice be sought, counsel and support for the College and its students gained. Political help in obtaining funds for programs and faculty and financial aid (scholarships), books, etc., should be acquired.
Faculty: there should be improvement in the faculty by adding "new and talented people in needed areas and challenging older tenured faculty by exampls and leadership to improve their skills and again, to become a vital part of the process".
Program: careful consideration should be given to length and content of the three-year program as well as the architectural preparation faught in the ENVD undergraduate preparation for the two-year program.
In concluding the Team stated that their report was a positive one recognizing the strengths of the College and hopes the report is useful in taking remedial action to strengthen the program.
The report should be used as intended, as a starting point for the newly formed ASC committees. The preliminary report is adequate for this as the final report is not expected to change greatly.


4
o
A casual glance at the rapidly changing Denver skyline is all that is needed to remind us that we are in the midst of a building boom. The city appears to have been invaded by a flock of crane-birds that are now busily involved in nest-building. This is but one aspect, however, of the growth occuring in Colorado. Another side of the story is the Western Slope where energy development, ski resort development and recreation/tourism are having a profound impact upon rural communities. Helping two of these communities with their growth related problems was the task of two interdisciplinary teams of students from the College of Environmental Design.
This summer, students in planning, landscape architecture and architecture worked under a grant from the Kellogg Foundation’s Western Colorado Rural Communities Program to assist the
towns of Basalt and Pagosa Springs. Although rapid growth was at the root of the problems in both towns the situations faced by the teams were unique.
Jan Caniglia landscape architecture
Alan Ford architecture
Bruce Levek planning/community development
The design study was concerned with the issues of downtown revitalization and parks and recreation development for Pagosa Springs.
These two issues were selected because ot the current trend toward highway strip development and the deficiency of parks and organized recreational activities within Pagosa Springs.
Also, the tow issues complement each other.
The downtown area of Pagosa Springs is centrally located with available retail space and potential for future expansion. The San Juan River flows through the town center and an existing park is located here and there giving potential for the creation of a greenway system.
The planning and design process was conducted under the assumption that there was a certain problem. This problem was expressed in a number of ways. First, the problem was identified by community residents in the form of citizens questionnaire and documented in the comprehensive plan. Next, a series of community and task force meetings were organized to seek community input. Also the Design Team spoke with various groups, organizations, and residents who helped outline objectives of the community needs which were then defined and analyzed. Following this, specific hypotheses were formulated and these were finally synthesized into the designs which offer possible community solutions.
The results in both cases show how successful a cooperative effort of different disciplines can be in addressing the needs of growth impacted communities. It also provides students from different disciplines with an opportunity to learn from each other, an opportunity that could and should be included in the curriculum as well. Although scheduling conflicts exist, it could be possible to establish a formal interdisciplinary studio, as was done with the "Capitol Project" where a joint studio involved architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. It need not be the only way, however. Given the right project any studio would potentially be of interest to another discipline. A suggestion has been made to allow studios to be taken as independent study if it is "out of field" with the amount of credit received and the work load negotiated by student-teacher. Another alternative is to operate a joint studio for only a part of the semester, for a specific project/problem analysis and then use separate studios to solve various aspects of that problem.
Currently the faculty is investigating these and other alternatives for the Spring semester. If you are interested in participating in such a project or have suggestions, relay it to the administration.
Michael Fuller
The downtown revitalization designs were associated with the concept of a pedestrian mall. This mall would include the present downtown area and an area which is currently being used for storage and parking, or not used at all.
The mall would serve as the central focus of the town and provide a cluster of community facil--ities, year-round activities, retail businesses and public services. Specific features of the mall design are an outdoor theater, cafes, a day care center, playground, plazas and a geo-thermally heated greenhouse.
The parks and recreation designs features year-round activities focusing primarily on the natural environment of the San Juan River, A trail system would connect the town center with the eastern and southern areas of town, as well as specific destinations throughout Pagosa Springs. Other features of this system include playgrounds, picnic areas, playfields, ice skating rink, swimming pool and tennis courts.
The reinforcing link between the downtown mall and the parks and recreation system is a scenic overlook. This would be located in an area of Pagosa Springs which is presently used for parking. It is in the town center between the downtown and river area. The scenic overlook would offer townspeople a panorama of river, valley, forest, meadow and mountains, and provide easy access from the downtown mall to the park system and vice versa.


5
At the Community Design Team’s final presentation, fifty Pagosa Springs residents voted unanimously to accept the design concepts and proceed to the next stage of the development process. Since that time, a combination town/ county parks and recreation advisory board has been established which will help continue to plan for facilities and programs. Also the town has submitted an application to the Farmers Home Administration for funding in the downtown revitalization program.
Bruce Levek
Tom Donnelly Michael Fuller Bill Hoffman Mary Roberts Steve Walker
planning architecture landscape architecture planning
landscape architecture
Basalt is a small town (pop. 850) located at tht confluence of the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan Rivers, 20 miles downstream from Aspen. The valley is for many, an attractive place to live and is experiencing rapid growth fueled by energy development and by the ski/recreation/ tourist industry. Keeping the valley an attractive place to live in the face of mounting pressures to accomodate more and more people is a problem common to many areas on the Western Slope. Basalt, however, is is a unique position in that it is located on the border of two counties with substantially different viewpoints;
cont. p.8


6
Editor's note: This year's Design Conference at Aspen (June 16-22) was attended by eight students from the College of Environmental Design through the generous contributions of DEEZINE Club, AIA and UCD. The following article was compiled by a team of roving correspondents.
INTRODUCTION
For the.first time in its history the International Design Conference at Aspen focused its attention on the design (architecture, film, graphic arts and other media) of a single nation with the theme "Japan in Aspen".
The efforts to reconcile the old and the new in Japanese culture, to accomodate both tradition and the change wrought by cultural upheaval, have made the Japanese a nation of self-evalu-ators and self-explainers. The conference at Aspen bore this out, as in the case of one Japanese speaker who, after announcing that his people are not very verbal, went on to talk for two hours on the subject. There are contradictions in Japanese society, but there are also continuities. The subtitle of this year's conference was "A Synthesis of Contradictions". One did gain an understanding, by the end of the week, how the same cultural influences that created the traditional Japanese garden could also spawn the plug-in, "metabolist" architecture of' Kisho Kurokawa.
CULTURAL CONCEPTS
The design, conference in Aspen organized itself around various Japanese concepts of design and living. The first concept we were exposed to is "EN" which translated means relationship.
This concept has its roots in the Buddhist philosophy representing a bond between man and the continuity between past and present. In architecture this concept is found in the word "Engawa" or veranda. A second link between nature and building is "KE" which means atmosphere in design. The concept is more abstract than others but the understanding comes from
EN KE
the realization that various forces when applied in harmony produce an ambience which can only be reached through the interaction of various parts. No architectural element of this sort exists, however, I think we all have experienced it some time as the mood or spirit of a space. An example of this concept is best told in a traditional courtship between a man and woman. If a man wishes to express a feeling or love for a woman he will show it through a special place that he may take her, or a space he may prepare for her which will produce this special atmosphere.
"SHINKANSEN" is the concept of time. A sense of time is very important to the Japanese way of life. Climate and religious traditions have made the Japanese aware of the limitations of time. An example of this can be seen in the transit system known as the bullet train which is an organizing force among cities, technology and space.
SHINKANSEN
"KATA", or principle of form, is the process between image and design in the Japanese culture. The object is not the "thing"-"KATA" and essences are the living forces in architecture, craft and design.
KATA
A sense of scale was long established by the use of the Tatami mat for measuring space. The concept of "TATAMI" however was never meant as a universal modular system. "TATAMI" has a strong relationship to "KATA". The interplay of each produce that common expression in music "variation on a theme".
The last concept and probably the best known to Western culture is "BONSAI" which is control of nature. Japanese gardens are a symbolic manifestation of "KATA", "SHINKANSEN", "KE" and "TATAMI".
As designers we should learn from these concepts especially as we are forced to do more with less as well as integrate present and past with future.


CONFERENCE STRUCTURE
The format and structure of the conference revolved around the exploration and analysis of these concepts. Each was introduced and defined in large lecture settings and then utilized to expand and direct discussion of specific aspects of Japanese culture in seminars. The presentations covered a broad range of topics, from Japanese cinema to business relationships, from calligraphy to architecture, and from fashion to kite flying. The seminars reflected the curious relationship between modern and traditional forms and philosophies in Japanese culture.
The subject of "self and society" underlay much of the discussion. The struggle to understand one's relationship with a society changing so rapidly necessarily produces uncertainty and apprehension. Tradition, as real or perceived cultural concepts manifested in modern forms and relationships, provides a soothing, comprehensible link between the old and the new. The concept of "EN", or relationship, perhaps best characterizes this search for continuity, between man and ideas, man and things, and between the past and present.
The direction traditional concepts have given the Japanese arts was obvious at the conference. "KATA", and "TATAMI" were apparent in the Tokyo Designers' display and the small architectural exhibit. The film series explored modern passions and social disorder using historical settings and characters. The examination of Japanese business relationships was based on several medieval social concepts-"RINGI" (concensus decision-making), "KAISHA" (the relationship between the individual and society) and "AKINAI" (entrepreneurship). Many aspects of applied design, including T.V. commercial production and tool design mirrored the old conceptual tenets.
The conference, like modern Japanese culture, searched for continuity. The scope and diversity inherent in such a subject often produced a fragmented sense of having sampled, without fully comprehending the components.
The lack of visuals in many presentations left a visually oriented group of designers, architects, graphic artists and planners dependent on the spoken word. The language barrier hindered understanding further. Although noble translators tried desperately to relay statements and questions between English- and Japanese-speaking participants, the communication was incomplete and fragmented. Translated lectures lost meaning and continuity as they came over our radio headsets. At times these problems were compounded by an inability of the speakers to fully grasp, or at least transmit, an understanding of the interrelationships of the concepts being discussed.
In spite of the crowded seminar rooms, the dead batteries in the radio translators, and the lack of graphic presentations it was an exciting stimulating conference. If it was at times fragmented, the fragments were jewels. To listen to a lecture by Kisho Kurokawa, or sit in on an impromptu seminar of Noguchi's, or have an opportunity to hear Moshe Safdie address the subject of scale in architectural design made it all a very valuable experience.
SOCIAL SCENE
Of course no trip to Aspen would be complete without a review of the social experience. Arriving fashionably late, we registered in the main tent. Each of us was given a photo I.D. to prove to all the yokles back home that we were actually there.
Most evening programs included Japanese movies (In the Realm of the Senses, Yohimbo, etc.). However, after registration the main event for the four of us was the sake reception in the undersized garden of the Hotel Jerome. If Japan is indeed the most densely populated nation on earth then this truely was "Japan in Aspen". Sake was served in wooden boxes, hand-dipped from wooden kegs. Everyone drank heartily amid toasts and laughter. (A word of caution to the uninitiated - the sake though delicious, is potent and potentially vengeful).
Whereas by day one could sample the profferings of Kurokawa, Chermayeff, Safdie, George Nelson and Noguchi (occasionally in competition, as three to six events often ran simultaneously), by night the town became the primary attraction: restaurants, bars, discos, movies, parties. Given our limited budgets, a surprise attraction proved to be the best entertainment buy - women's softball league spectating and a six-pack.
Aspen is a living contradiction in many ways: a lifestyle popularized by ski bums is now only affordable to the wealthy. (Indeed we came to appreciate that after meeting a bona-fide munitions heir, a chic media-bum and a near-famous cinematographer from Mykonos.) This same contradiction manifests itself in many ways. Workers, for instance, cannot afford housing or mainstream entertainment.
The final social event of the conference was the "flying" of the huge hand-painted Japanese kites. No one seemed to mind that without a sustaining wind, the coloful kites never got off the gound. Although it had snowed the first day, we were in Aspen, today the sky was blue; the sun beaming; the mood festive.
m


8
Eagle and Pitkin. Truely, Pitkin County has opinions different from other counties on most things, and on the question of growth they are true to form. Pitkin attempts to limit growth to 3.5% annually while Eagle is generally more flexible and does not use a growth quota. Problems in Basalt have arisen not just from the impact of growth, but in dealing with a variety of governmental policies as well. Our approach therefore, has two major aspects; 1) documentation - maps, graphics, reference materials and recommendations; 2) community development -to overcome apathy and open up lines of communication/ cooperation among all parties.
The initial request for help came from the Basalt Planning and Zoning Commission which wanted help in rewriting its outdated zoning ordinance. It was apparent that it was short-sited to look only at the town and ignore the surrounding areas, for the problems of Basalt extended well beyond its borders. Convincing the town of Basalt that they needed to take a broader View was a major step.
Typically the call for help came after a major decision had been made: to annex an 80 acre planned urban development (PUD) to the town. The PUD would double the commrcial space, which would severly challenge the existing commercial in the Old Town, and would triple the population.
The problems of the residents of the area were expressed through a 16 page survey distributed to each household at the begining of the summer and through town meetings.
The most important issues to residents of the area were: housing (lack of), recreational facilities (too few), shopping (not enough), and the preservation of open space. Implicit in most of these concernes is an underlying concern for the quality of life in the valley.
In addition the potential problems of circulation caused by the construction of the PUD needed to be addressed.
No organized body of information existed on the area. Therefore we began by collecting a data base of information to be used during the summer and by the town of Basalt in the future. Our analysis included researching and mapping natural hazards (wild fire, flood plain, geologic, severe slopes, avalanch), service/utilities, circulation, land ownership, land use, zoning, housing types, income levels, population projections, and more.
Through the use of design guidelines and development criteria, lands suitable for development, conservation and preservation were identified.
Recommendations were made to the Town dealing with an integrated park/pedestrian system which
would link the old Town with the new PUD. The issue of providing housing was also addressed by identifing areas suitable for development and recommending densities.
Regular meetings with the citizens of the area kept them informed of our progress and allowed us to solicit their input. Through these meetings the Mid-Valley Concerned Citizen’s Committee (MVCC) was formed. The MVCC now meets regularly and addresses issues which affect the Basalt area or cut across county boundaries.


survival kit
BLUE PRINTS: our machine (own paper required), 4th floor Bromley; CHB, Capitol Hill Blueprint, across from Union Station; Colorado Copy, 14th and Arapahoe; T-Square, Broadway and 18th (hard to find but worth it!), Dodge Instant Printing, Dravo Building,
(just opened - xerox for 2^c/copy
BUS INFO: Denver Bus Station, 19th and Champa, Includes Trailways 534-2291, Greyhound 623-6111, RTD regional service 778-6000
CAMERAS: to check out cameras and other
photographic or use the darkroom, see John Fuller, 4th floor Bromley, east end
CHILD CARE: Child Care Center, 9th at W. Colfax 629-3188; Woman’s Center, E.C. room 205 629-2815
COLORADO AND DENVER VISITORS BUREAU: 892-1505, Colfax and Court St., info and brochures on places to visit in Colorado and Denver
FILM DEVELOPED: Britone, 16th and Arapahoe
893-8591; Waxman, 15th and Curtis 623-1155, Pallas Photo, 6th and Kalamath (3 hr. professional service) 893-0101; Ataraxia, 1st and Pennsylvania (3 hr. service) 733-5252
GREEN SPACE IN CITY: Skyline Park, Arapahoe
and 15th; 9th Street Park, 9th and Curtis, Auraria; Confluence Park, S. Platte River and 15th; Larimer Square at 15th Street
GROCERIES: The Market at Larimer Square,
gourmet foods, cheese and breads, etc.
Pacific Mercantile, 1925 Lawrence fresh vegetables, oriental foods
Ethnic market (of some sorts) next to Waxman’s on 15th Street
KEY TO STUDIO: get key request card from
Dolores Hasseman on 2nd floor Bromley, fill out and return to her; about two weeks later it should be available for a $3 deposit at the physical plant, 7th and Lawrence, 629-3260
LIBRARIES: Auraria Media Center, 10th and
Lawrence; Environmental Design, 2nd floor Bromley; Denver Public including Conservation and Western Libraries, 573-5152; USGS, Federal Center, W. 6th and Kipling, 234-4133
MODEL SHOP: see John Fuller, 4th floor, Bromley east end; supplies: Auraria Bookstore, Student Center; CHB; Caboose Hobbies 534-3377; M.L. Foss 534-5151 (for metals); Meininger's 571-5775; Plasticrafts, Inc. 433-8801; Art Hardware and Hapco, Boulder
REC CENTER: free swimming every day (locker 25 SOCIETIES TO JOIN: Denver Art Museum 575-2793; Denver Botanic Gardens 575-2547; Colorado Native Plant Society via Botanic Gardens; Student Chapters AIA, ASLA, APA
SUPPLIES: CHB 892-9593; Meininger's 14th and Tremont; Auraria Bookstore Student Center; Art Hardware and Hapco in Boulder
XEROX: 2nd floor Bromley, 5th floor E.C. building, Dodge Instant Printing, Dravo Building
ARAPAHOE GRILL
Touch of suburbia downtown
(Especially appealing for the dart-at-heart) BRATSKELLER
Sauerkraut and naugahyde In a Bavarian bunker
CAFE NEPENTHES
Sixties deja-vu
Indian bedspreads, sprouts and you!
THE ESPRESSO BAR AT THE MARKET
Has the best coffee Elegant atmosphere
THE LIBRARY AT BASIN STREET
Larimar Square Lovely to look at Beautiful and old If you should eat there Consider yourself bold
MERCANTILE
9th Street Park, Auraria Campus Auraria run and not bad
MCDONALDS
17th Street decor -
But, amacisamacisamacisamac. . .
MILTON'S DELLI
Homogenized Jewish
MY BROTHER'S BAR
Burgers, Beer and Bach
THE OLD SPAGETTI FACTORY
1215 18th Street Turn-of-the-Century Junk Museum Ditto on the Italian food
SOAPY SMITH'S EAGLE BAR
Meet the Friday afternoon crowd Drink with abandon!
STUDENT CENTER CAFETERIA
They went to Woolworth's for this one WAZEE
20's funk
Black and white tile floor and Bentwood under the 15th Street viaduct
WHIMS
Good food and decor Pricey
Good when parents are in town


10
Landscape Architecture students had the opportunity to meet informally with Garrett Eckbo, Internationally known Landscape Architect, Friday, September 14, in the Landscape Architecture studio.
Eckbo said this is an exciting time to be entering the rapidly evolving Landscape Architecture profession, but he cautioned students not to become too involved in the expanding technical aspects of practice and forget the primary function of Landscape Architecture - Design.
Eckbo, who said generally he finds residential design the most satisfying and challenging, wa.« in Denver enroute to the annual meeting of the Colorado Chapter of ASLA in Keystone where he was a keynote speaker.
The Landscape Architecture students and faculty met at the YMCA of the Rockies outside Estes Park, August 29,30,31 for the Second Annual fall retreat; this year a three day intensive seminar on montane and subalpine ecology. Why the retreat? To learn and become more aware of the specifics of how and why to manage montane and subalpine spaces for people, including factors imperative to consider and resources necessary to designers. Particular attention was paid to ecology as it pertains to design, combining field classes with lectures and slide shows.
Food for thought from the guest lecturers: Karl Norbeck, Thorne Ecological Institute, Boulder -an ecosystem is similar to our circulation system. All is OK till you cut your finger and bleed. Why choose a landscape architect for involvement with the environment? Because of the landscape architect's background and analytical skills for sensitive involvement with ecosystems. Raymond Korbobo, professor at Rutgers University and cooperative extension service specialist in landscape design - get down and get your nose into what you're studying; keep your eye on your goal. And if you have a hard time being humble, take up the game of golf.
Phil Flores and Duane Blossom, Flores and Blossom Associates - key into site and ecology. Always summarize for the client and graphically communicate. Gail Gunter, UCD - the concept of carrying capacity perhaps is a fallacy. We only work with the ecosystem surplus. Adrienne Anderson, archaeologist at the National Park Service - cultural resources are truely nonrenewable. Strive for compatible, non-destructive design. Eugene Decker, wildlife biologist at CSU - a wild life biologist wants healthy animals in a healthy habitat. Wildlife conservation is only the luxury of an affluent, literate society.
known practitioners within the Western Region attended the 1979 Annual Meeting of the Colorado Chapter of the American Society of Lane-scape Architects in Keystone, Colorado, September 14-15.
The Conference program was entitled, "The World of Landscape Architecture", and included presentations on such topics as "New Towns in the Soviet Union", by Robert M. O'Donnell, President of HOH Associated, Denver; "Landscapes in China", by Garrett Eckbo of San Francisco; "National Park Planning in Saudi Arabia", by Paul D. Kalkwarf of the National Park Service in Denver and"Planting in Mexico and the Middle East", by Warren Jones, Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona in Tuscon.
The schedule of events began with cocktails Friday evening and concluded with a business meeting Saturday afternoon to plan for the National Conference of the American Society of Landscape Architects to be held at the Fairmont Hotel in Denver in 1980.
The DEEZINE Club would like to gratefully acknowledge and thank the Denver businesses who have contributed gifts to the raffle being held to raise money for the new lounge and seminar room. We thank:
H.R. Meininger Co. $35 gift certificate
$15 gift certificate Auraria Book Center $10 gift certificate
$10 gift certificate $ 5 gift certificate Spivak Art Supply $15 gift certificate
We also thank all who have bought tickets.
Your participation has obviously been needed and appreciated._______________________________


Gail Gunter, from Driggs, Idaho
...B.A. Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, Utah State
...M.L.A. University of Michigan
...Co-produced the professional graphics package for ASLA
...1973 co-winner "Outstanding Teacher Award", College of Architecture,
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
...1978 winner "Outstanding Teacher Award" College of Architecture, Ohio State University
...LA faculty member teaching Engineering I and 3rd year design
..."Make a commitment and get involved!
You can afford to learn leadership in school. Students must provide outside enrichment - faculty will provide the core!"
Max Steele, from Boulder, Colorado
...B.A. Architecture, University of Illinois, 1966
...M. ARCH., University of Washington, 1967
...Teaching assistant at University of Washington, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, 1967
...Assistant professor at University of Colorado, College of Environmental Design, 1970
...Registered architect, State of Colorado, 1972
...Tenured professor, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1975
...Sabbatical leave, travel and study in China, Indonesia, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, France and Spain, 1979


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Full Text

PAGE 1

AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION OCTOBER 1979

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2 LAMIPMilONS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT OENVER This issue marks the beginning of LAMINATIONS third year of publication. We would like to thank the DEEZINE Club, the AlA, and UCD for their continued support and encouragment, for it is their interest and assistance that make this publication possible. Special thanks for this issue to: Bake B aker Daryl Booker Michael Fuller Crandon Gustafson Bruce Levek Kathryn McGinnis Randy McMillan Rob Murphy Paula Schulte Linda Stansen Jeff Wright Jim Wright ARTICLES, GRAPHICS, PHOTOS LAMINATIONS NEEDS INPUT FROM STUDENTS, FACULTY, PROFESSIONALS INTERESTED? CONTACT OUR OFFICE 3RD FLOOR BROMLEY OR LAMINATIONS 1100 14TH. ST. DENVER, CO. 80202 Cover: David Brown .. photos: Michael Fuller : : :-_ f-: _ f _ _ _ _ _ _ -:" Tr=--.: . :::=i_::::l;::'r _ _ _:;::" I h '. __ •' _:_;_ . • • . . . i . . . J • - • 1----..... (. : : 11: . l l ::.---=j l== ....... ,j l . .l.,._.: _ I I I I I l _ .... I i j i

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Linda Stansen Last March the Architecture program here underwent an accreditation review. The Visiting Team was comprised of the following members: Edith A Cherry, Assistant Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of New Mexico representing ACSA David L. Perkins, FAIA Perkjns, Guidry, Young, Architects, Inc. representing AlA as NAAB Board Member William J. Geddis, FAIA, Team Chairman William Geddis Associates representing NCARB, as NAAB Past President For three days this Team visited both the Denver and Boulder campuses, meeting with faculties and students. The Boulder program was reviewed as part of the College of Environmental Design program even though it does not require accreditation as an entity since it does not issue a first professional degree. Both campuses still, needed review and some useful criticisms were received. Only the preliminary report has been made available. The final is expected in Octo ber or November and will be in the Library for everyone's use. Generally the Team found that the College has an "unrealized potential" for interdisciplinary functions on the Denver campus. The other general comment made was that there needs to be expanded relationships between Denver and Boulder. Careful scheduling of communting professors' time and additional faculty to alleviate the problem of instructors not being able to be available every day of the week was recommended. But it was felt that the relationship between Denver and Boulder was a necessary one that should be continued through the use of the same professors on both campuses. A summary of the report touches on several key issues which the Team sees as positive criticisms for the College to use as a starting point for continued improvements. Addressing each issue more specifically: Administration and Leadership: the Team recommended that the school look at hiring an assistant Dean to assist in the coordination and 0 administration of the two Canpuses and to create this without a teaching load being assigned to this person. Physical Resources: The Boulder Library ing to the Team and improvement. improvements are necessary. should be maintained accordthe Library in Denver needs Creativity and Aesthetics: the Problem Solving/ Design process in the Boulder program should be reviewed to assure that students are developing "creative sensitivities" through the curriculum offerings during the undergraduate sequence. Students: students in Boulder are enthusiastic, in Denver they appear to be disgruntled and disorganized. To the Team it is important to improve student counseling with respect to course and career opportunities. Students should be involved in committee work. Funds should be provided for visiting critics and lecturers who should be selected by the students. Facilities and Equipment: the Boulder facilities should be maintained. In Denver, appearance, Library, exhibit spaces, a shop, the dark room should be improved "considerably". Addi tional space is needed and should be acquired. Research: Programs in the area of energy and other regional concerns should be initiated immediately and a position of leadership established. Professional Relationship: A better relationship should develop, advice be sought, counsel and support for the College and its students gained. Political help in obtaining funds for programs and faculty and financial aid (scholarships), books, etc., should be acquired. Faculty: there should be improvement in the faculty by adding "new and talented people in needed areas and challenging older tenured faculty by exampls and leadership to improve their skills and again, to become a vital part of the process". Program: careful consideration should be given to length and content of the three-year program as well as the architectural preparation taught in the ENVD undergraduate preparation for the two-year program. In concluding the Team stated that their report was a positive one recognizing the strengths of the College and hopes the report is useful in taking remedial action to strengthen the program. The report should be used as intended, as a starting point for the newly formed ASC committees. The preliminary report is adequate for this as the final report is not expected to change greatly. 3

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A casual glance at the rapidly changing Denver skyline is all that is needed to remind us that we are in the midst of a building boom. The city appears to have been invaded by a flock of crane-birds that are now busily involved in nest-building. This is but one aspect, however, of the growth occuring in Colorado. Another side of the story is the Western Slope where energy development, ski resort development and recreation/tourism are having a profound impact upon rural communities. Helping two of these communities with their growth related problems was the task of two interdisciplinary teams of students from the College of Environmental Design. This summer, students in planning, landscape architecture and architecture worked under a grant from the Kellogg Foundation's Western Colorado Rural Communities Program to assist the towns of Basalt and Pagosa Springs. Although rapid growth was at the root of the problems in both towns the situations faced by the teams were unique. The results in both cases show how successful a cooperative effort of different disciplines can be in addressing the needs of growth impacted communities. It also provides students from different disciplines with an opportunity to learn from each other, an opportunity that could and should be included in the curriculum as well. Although scheduling conflicts exist, it could be possible to establish a formal interdisciplinary studio, as was done with the "Capitol Project" where a joint studio involved architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. It need not be the only way, however. Given the right project any studio would potentially be of interest to another discipline. A suggestion has been made to allow studios to be taken as independent study if it is "out of field" with the amount of credit received and . the work load negotiated by student-teacher. Another alternative is to operate a joint studio for only a part of the semester, for a specific project/problem analysis and then use separate studios to solve various aspects of that problem. Currently the faculty is .investigating these and other alternatives for the Spring semester. If you are interested in participating in such a project or have suggestions, relay it to the administration. Michael Fuller Jan Caniglia Alan Ford Bruce Levek landscape architecture architecture planning/community development The design study was concerned with the issues of downtown revitalization and parks and recreation development for Pagosa Springs. These two issues were selected because ot the current trend toward highway strip development and the deficiency of parks and organized recreational activities within Pagosa Springs. Also, the tow issues complement each other. The downtown area of Pagosa Springs is centrally located with available retail space and potential for future expansion. The San Juan River flows through the town center and an existing park is located here and there giving potential for the creation of a greenway system. The planning and design process was conducted under the assumption that there was a certain problem. This problem was expressed in a number of ways. First, the problem was identified by community residents in the form of citizens questionnaire and documented in the comprehensive plan. Next, a series of community and task force meetings were organized to seek community input, Also the Design Team spoke with various groups, organizations, and residents who helped outline objectives of the community needs which were then defined and analyzed. Following this, specific hypotheses were formulated and these were finally synthesized into the designs which offer possible community solutions. The downtown revitalization designs were associated with the concept of a pedestrian mall. This mall would include the present downtown area and an area which is currently being used for storage and parking, or not used at all. The mall would serve as the central focus of the town and provide a cluster of community facilities, year-round activities, retail businesses and public services. Specific features of the mall design are an outdoor theater, cafes, a day care center, playground, plazas and a gee thermally heated greenhouse. The parks and recreation designs features yearround activities focusing primarily on the natural environment of the San Juan River. A trail system would connect the town center with the eastern and southern areas of town, as well as specific destinations throughout Pagosa Springs. Other features of this system include playgrounds, picnic areas, playfields, ice skating rink, swimming pool and tennis courts. The reinforcing link between the downtown mall and the parks and recreation system is a scenic overlook. This would be located in an area of Pagosa Springs which is presently used for parking. It is in the town center between the down town and river area. The scenic overlook would offer townspeople a panorama of river, valley, forest, meadow and mountains, and provide easy access from the downtown mall to the park system and vice versa.

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t:::J D .tJ t:J op 0 fi Et s [t ,__ __ _) p Cl 8 0 "" VL rr=JI t!;.-D IJ I [ 11 g I C1 D D O tl I D D. n n G' At the , Community Design Team's final presentation, fifty Pagosa Springs residents voted unanimously to accept the design concepts and proceed to the next stage of the development process. Since that time. a combination town/ county parks and recreation advisory board has been established which will help continue to plan for facilities and programs. Also the town has submitted an application to the Farmers Home Administration for funding in the downtown revitalization program. 0 0 Bruce Levek Tom Donnelly Michael Fuller Bill Hoffman Mary Roberts Stevf Walker planning architecture landscape architecture planning landscape architecture • RA.G.O.SA A 'WJitUC.."*'-Y CDHHI5CTI>: RET"A&. P\.eUC ...,_._ ,...,..., .............. t'\.M-, •• __._. e Ovf.RL.OOI< 1D MAI.,.L. N-fE> f'MIC.• \MofT'-= l-t'1f. M.JHTAIH, • 'W.AU<<> .lltfP ,.,... concept= . town Center Basalt is a small town (pop. 850) located at tht confluence of the Roaring Fork and Frying Pan Rivers, 20 miles downstream from Aspen. The valley is for many, an attractive place to live and is experiencing rapid growth fueled by energy development and by the ski/recreation/ tourist industry. Keeping the valley an attractive place to live in the face of mounting pressures to accomodate more and more people is a problem common to many areas on the Western Slope. Basalt, however, is is a unique position in that it is located on the border of two counties with substantially different viewpoints; cont. p.8 5

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Editor's note: This year's Design Conference at Aspen (June 16-22) was attended by eight students from the College of Environmental Design through the generous contributions of DEEZINE Club, AlA and UCD. The following article was compiled by a team of roving correspondents. INTRODUCTION For the.first time in its history the International Design Conference at Aspen focused its attention on the design (architecture, film, graphic arts and other media) of a single nation with the theme "Japan in Aspen". , The efforts to reconcile the old and the new in Japanese culture, to accomodate both tradition and the change wrought by cultural upheaval, have made the Japanese a nation of self-evaluators and self-explainers. The conference at Aspen hore this out, as in the case of one Japanese speaker who, after announcing that his people are not very verbal, went on to talk for two hours on the subject. There are contradictions in Japanese society, but there are also continuities. The subtitle of this year's conference was "A Synthesis of Contradictions". One did gain an understanding, by the end of the week, how the same cultural influences that created the traditional Japanese garden could also spawn the plug-in, "metabolist" architecture of Kisho Kurokawa. CULTURAL CONCEPTS The design. conference in Aspen organized itself around various Japanese concepts of design and living. The first concept we were exposed to is "EN'1 which translated means relationship. This concept has its roots in the Buddhist philosophy representing a bond between man and the continuity between past and present. In architecture this concept is found in the word "Engawa" or veranda. A second link between nature and building is "KE" which means atmosphere in design. The concept is more abstract than others but the understanding comes from EN KE the realization that various forces when applied in harmony produce an ambience which can only be reached through the interaction of various parts. No architectural element of this sort exists, however, I think we all have experienced it some time as the mood or spirit of a space. An example of this concept is best told in a traditional courtship between a man and woman. If a man wishes to express a feeling or love for a woman he will show it through a special place that he may take her, or a space he may prepare for her which will produce this special atmosphere. "SHINKANSEN" is the concept of time. A sense of time is very important to the Japanese way of life. Climate and religious traditions have made the Japanese aware of the limitations of time. An example of this can be seen in the transit system known as the bullet train which is an organizing force among cities, technology and space. SHINKAN.SEN "KATA", or principle of form, is the process between image and design in the Japanese culture. The object is not the "thing"-"KATA" and essences are the living forces in architecture, craft and design. I I I I I I KATA TATNAI A sense of scale was long established by the use of the Tatami mat for measuring space. The concept of "TATAMI" however was never meant as a universal modular system. "TATAMI" has a strong relationship to "KATA". The interplay of each produce that common expression in music "vari ation on a theme". The last concept and probably the best known to Western culture is "BONSAI" which is control of nature. Japanese gardens are a symbolic manifestation of "KATA", "SHINKANSEN", "KE" and "TATAMI". As designers we should learn from these concepts especially as we are forced to do more with less as well as integrate present and past with future.

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CONFERENCE STRUCTURE The format and structure of the conference revolved around the exploration and analysis of these concepts. Each was introduced and defined in large lecture settings and then utilized to expand and direct discussion of specific aspects of Japanese culture in seminars. The presentations covered a broad range of topics, from Japanese cinema to business relationships, from calligraphy to architecture, and from fashion to kite flying. The seminars reflected the curious relationship between modern and traditional forms and philosophies in Japanese culture. The subject of "self and society" underlay much of the discussion. The struggle to understand one's relationship with a society changing so rapidly necessarily produces uncertainty and apprehension. Tradition, as real or perceived cultural concepts manifested in modern forms and relationships, provides a soothing, comprehensible link between the old and the new. The concept of "EN", or relationship, perhaps best characterizes this search for continuity, between man and ideas, man and things, and between the past and present. The direction traditional concepts have given the Japanese arts was obvious at the conference. "KATA", and "TATAMI" were apparent in the Tokyo Designers' display and the small architectural exhibit. The film series explored modern passions and social disorder using historical settings and characters. The examination of Japanese business relationships was based on several medieval social concepts-"RINGI" (concensus decision-making), "KAISHA" (the relationship between the individual and society) and "AKINAI" (entrepreneurship). Many aspects of applied design, including T.V. commercial production and tool design mirrored the old conceptual tenets. The conference, like modern Japanese culture, searched for continuity. The scope and diversity inherent in such a subject often produced a fragmented sense of having sampled, without fully comprehending the components. The lack of visuals in many presentations left a visually oriented group of designers, architects, graphic artists and planners dependent on the spoken word. The language barrier hindered understanding further. Although noble translators tried desperately to relay statements and questions between English-and Japanese-speaking participants, the communication was incomplete and fragmented. Translated lectures lost meaning and continuity as they came over our radio headsets. At times these problems were compounded by an inability of the speakers to fully grasp, or at least transmit, an understanding of the interrelationships of the concepts being discussed. In spite of the crowded seminar rooms, the dead batteries in the radio translators, and the lack of graphic presentations it was an exciting stimulating conference. If it was at times fragmented, the fragments were jewels. To listen to a lecture by Kisho Kurokawa, or sit in on an impromptu seminar of Noguchi's, or have an opportunity to hear Moshe Safdie address the subject of scale in design made it all a very valuable experience. SOCIAL SCENE Of course no trip to Aspen would be complete without a review of the social experience. Arriving fashionably late, we registered in the main tent. Each of us was given a photo I.D. to prove to all the yokles back horne that we were actually there. Most evening programs included Japanese movies (In the Realm of the Senses, Yohirnbo, etc.). However, after registration the main event for the four of us was the sake reception in the undersized garden of the Hotel Jerome. If Japan is indeed the most densely populated nation on earth then this truely was "Japan in Aspen". Sake was served in wooden boxes, handdipped from wooden kegs. Everyone drank heart-ily amid toasts and laughter. (A word of caution to the uninitiated -the sake though delicious, is potent and potentially vengeful). Whereas by day one sample the profferings of Kurokawa, Chermayeff, Safdie, George Nelson and Noguchi (occasionally in competition, as three to six events often ran simultaneously), by night the town became the primary attraction: restaurants, bars, discos, movies, parties. Given our limited budgets, a surprise attraction proved to be the best entertainment buy -women's softball league spectating and a six-pack. Aspen is a living contradiction in many ways: a lifestyle popularized by ski burns is now only affordable to the wealthy. (Indeed we carne to appreciate that after meeting a bona-fide munitions heir, a chic media-bum and a nearfamous cinematographer from Mykonos.) This same contradiction manifests itself in many ways. Workers, for instance, cannot afford housing or mainstream entertainment. The final social event of the conference was the "flying" of the huge hand-painted Japanese kites. No one seemed to mind that without a sustaining wind, the coloful kites never got off the gound. Although it had snowed the first day, we were in Aspen, today the sky was blue; the sun beaming; the mood festive. '

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Eagle and Pitkin. Truely, Pitkin County has opinions different from other counties on most things, and on the question of growth they are true to form. Pitkin attempts to limit growth to 3.5% annually while Eagle is generally more flexible and does not use a growth quota. Prob lems in Basalt have arisen not just from the impact of growth, but in dealing with a variety of governmental policies as well. Our approach therefore, has two major aspects; 1) documentation -maps, graphics, reference materials and recommendations; 2) community development -to overcome apathy and open up lines of communication/cooperation among all parties. The initial request for help carne from the Basalt Planning and Zoning Commission which wanted help in rewriting its outdated zoning ordinance. It was apparent that it was short-sited to look only at the town and ignore the surrounding areas, for the problems of Basalt extended well beyond its borders. Convincing the town of Basalt that they needed to take a brbader was a major step. Typically thecall for help carne after a major decision had been made: to annex an 80 acre planned urban development (PUD) to the town. The PUD would double the cornrnrcial space, which would severly challenge the existing commercial in the Old Town, and would triple the population. The problems of the residents of the area were expressed through a 16 page survey distributed to each household at the begining of the summer and through town meetings. The most .important issues to residents of the area were: housing (lack of), recreational facilities (too few), shopping (not enough), and the preservation of open space. Implicit in most of these concernes is an underlying concern for the quality of life in the valley. In addition the potential problems of circulation caused by the construction of the PUD needed to be addressed. No organized body of information existed on the area. Therefore we began by collecting a data base of information to be used during the summer and by the town of Basalt in the future. Our analysis included researching and mapping natural hazards (wild fire, flood plain, geologic, severe slopes, avalanch), service/utilities, circulation, land owner• ship, land use, zoning, housing types, income levels, population projections, and more. Through the use of design guidelines and development criteria, lands suitable for development, conservation and preservation were identified. Recommendations were made to the Town dealing with an integrated park/pedestrian system which would link the old Town with the new PUD. The issue of providing housing was also addressed by identifing areas suitable for development and recommending densities. Regular meetings with the citizens of the area kept them informed of our progress and allowed us to solicit their input. Through these meetings the Mid-Valley Concerned Citizen's Committee (MVCC) was formed. The MVCC now meets regularly and addresses issues which affect the Basalt area or cut across county boundaries.

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survival kit BLUE PRINTS: our machine (own paper required), 4th floor Bromley; CHB, Capitol Hill Blueprint, across from Union Station; Colorado Copy, 14th and Arapahoe; T-Square, Broadway and 18th (hard to find but worth it!), Dodge Instant Printing, Dravo Building, (just opened -xerox for BUS INFO: Denver Bus Station, 19th and Champa, Includes Trailways 534-2291, Greyhound 623-6111, RTD regional service 778-6000 CAMERAS: to check out cameras and other photographic or use the darkroom, see John Fuller, 4th floor Bromley, east end CHILD CARE: Child Care Center, 9th at W. Colfax 629-3188; Woman's Center, E.C. room 205 629-2815 COLORADO AND DENVER VISITORS BUREAU: 892-1505, Colfax and Court St., info and brochures on places to visit in Colorado and Denver FILM DEVELOPED: Britone, 16th and Arapahoe 893-8591; Waxman, 15th and Curtis 623-1155, Pallas Photo, 6th and Kalamath (3 hr. professional service) 893-0101; Ataraxia, 1st and Pennsylvania (3 hr. service) 733-5252 GREEN SPACE IN CITY: Skyline Park, Arapahoe and 15th; 9th Street Park, 9th and Curtis, Auraria; Confluence S. Platte River and 15th; Larimer Square at 15th Street GROCERIES: The Market at Larimer Square, gourmet. foods, cheese and breads, etc. Pacific Mercantile, 1925 Lawrence fresh vegetables, oriental foods Ethnic market (of some sorts) next to Waxman's on 15th Street KEY TO STUDIO: get key request card trom Dolores Hasseman on 2nd floor Bromley, fill out and return to her; about two weeks later it should be available for a $3 deposit at the physical plant, 7th and Lawrence, 629-3260 LIBRARIES: Auraria Media Center, lOth and Lawrence; Environmental Design, 2nd floor Bromley; Denver Public including Conservation and Western Libraries, 573-5152; USGS, Federal Center, W. 6th and Kipling, 214-4133 MODEL SHOP: see John Fuller, 4th floor, Bromley east end; supplies: Auraria Bookstore, Student Center; CHB; Caboose Hobbies 534-3377; M.L. Foss 534-5151 (for metals); Meininger's 571-5775; Plasticrafts, Inc. 433-8801; Art Hardware and Hapco, Boulder REC CENTER: free swimming every day (locker 25); get schedule at intramural office; call for info on tennis, raquetball, intramurals, etc. 629-3210 SOCIETIES TO JOIN: Denver Art Museum 575-2793; Denver Botanic Gardens 575-2547; Colorado Native Plant Society via Botanic Gardens; Student Chapters AIA, ASLA, APA SUPPLIES: CHB 892-9593; Meininger's 14th and Tremont; Auraria Bookstore Student Center; Art Hardware and Hapco in Boulder XEROX: 2nd floor Bromley, 5th floor E.C. building, Dodge Instant Printing, Dravo Building ARAPAHOE GRILL Touch of suburbia downtown (Especially appealing for the dart-at-heart) BRATSKELLER Sauerkraut and naugahyde In a Bavarian bunker CAFE NEPENTHES Sixties deja-vu Indian bedspreads, sprouts and you! THE ESPRESSO BAR AT THE MARKET Has the best coffee Elegant atmosphere THE LIBRARY AT BASIN STREET Larimar Square Lovely to look at Beautiful and old If you should eat there Consider yourself bold MERCANTILE 9th Street Park, Auraria Campus Auraria run and not bad MCDONALDS 17th Street decor -But, amacisamacisamacisamac. MILTON'S DELLI Homogenized Jewish MY BROTHER' S BAR Burgers, Beer and Bach THE OLD SPAGETTI FACTORY 1215 18th Street Turn-of-the-Century Junk Museum Ditto on the Italian food SOAPY SMITH'S EAGLE BAR Meet the Friday afternoon crowd Drink with abandon! STUDENT CENTER CAFETERIA They went to Woolworth's for this one WAZEE 20's funk Black and white tile floor and Bentwood under the 15th Street viaduct WHIMS Good food and decor Pricey Good when parents are in town 9

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10 Landscape Architecture students had the opportunity to meet informally with Garrett Eckbo Internationally known Landscape Architect, F;i day, September 14, in the Landscape Architecture studio. Eckbo said this is an exciting time to be entering the rapidly evolving Landscape Architecture profession, but he cautioned students not to become too involved in the expanding technical aspects of practice and forget the primary function of Landscape Architecture -Design. Eckbo, who said generally he finds residential design the most satisfying and challenging, in Denver enroute to the annual meeting of the Colorado Chapter of ASLA in Keystone where he was a keynote speaker. ll\NDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE U.C.D.enver The Landscape Architecture students and faculty met at the YMCA of the Rockies outside Estes Park, August 29,30,31 for the Second Annual fall retreat; this year a three day intensive seminar on montane and subalpine ecology. Why the retreat? To learn-and become more aware of the specifics of how and why to manage montane and subalpine spaces for people, including factors imperative to consider and resources necessary to designers. Particular attention was paid to ecology as it pertains to design, combining {ield classes with lectures and slide shows. Food for thought from the guest lecturers: Karl Norbeck, Thorne Ecological Institute, Boulder -an ecosystem is similar to our circulation system. All is OK till you cut your finger and bleed. Why choose a landscape architect for involvement with the environment? Because of the landscape architect's background and analytical skills for sensitive involvement with ecosystems. Raymond Korbobo, professor at Rutgers University and cooperative extension service specialist in landscape design -get down and get your nose into what you're studying; keep your eye on your goal. And if you have a hard time being humble, take up the game of golf. Phil Flores and Duane Blossom, Flores and Blossom Associates -key into site and ecology. Always summarize for the client and graphically communicate. Gail Gunter, UCD -the concept of carrying capacity perhaps is a fallacy. We only work with the ecosystem surplus. Adrienne Anderson, archaeologist at the National Park Service -cultural resources are truely nonrenewable. Strive for compatible, non-destructive design. Eugene Decker, wildlife biologist at CSU -a wild life biologist wants healthy animals in a .healthy habitat. Wildlife conservation is only the luxury of an affluent, literate society. . . known practitioners within the Western Region attended the 1979 Annual Meeting of the Colo rado Chapter of the American Society of Lanescape Architects in Keystone, Colorado, September 14-15. The Conference program was entitled, "The World of Landscape Architecture", and included presentations on such topics as "New Towns in the Soviet Union", by Robert M. O'Donnell, President of HOH Associated, Denver; "Landscapes in China11, by Garrett Eckbo of San Francisco; "National Park Planning in Saudi Arabia", by Paul D. Kalkwarf of the National Park Service in Denver and"Planting in Mexico and the Middle East", by Warren Jones, Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona in Tuscan. The schedule of events began with cocktails Friday evening and concluded with a business meeting Saturday afternoon to plan for the National Conference of the American Society of Landscape Architects to be held at the Fairmont Hotel in Denver in 1980. The DEEZINE Club would like to gratefully acknowledge and thank the Denver businesses who have contributed gifts to the raffle being held to raise money for the new lounge and seminar room. We thank: H.R. Meininger Co. $35 gift certificate $15 gift certificate Auraria Book Center $10 gift certificate $10 gift certificate $ 5 gift certificate Spivak Art Supply $15 gift certificate We also thank all who have bought tickets. Your participation has obviously been needed and appreciated.

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Gail Gunter, from Driggs, Idaho ... B.A. Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, Utah State ... M.L.A. University of Michigan ... Co-produced the professional graphics package for ASLA ... 1973 co-winner "Outstanding Teacher Award", College of Architecture, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio ... 1978 winner "Outstanding Teacher Award" College of Architecture, Ohio State University ... LA faculty member teaching Engineering I and 3rd year design .. a commitment and get involved! You can afford to learn leadership in school. Students must provide outside enrichment -faculty will provide the core!" Max Steele, from Boulder, Colorado ... B.A. Architecture, University of Illinois, 1966 ... M. ARCH., University of Washington, 1967 ... Teaching assistant at University of Washington, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, 1967 ... Assistant professor at University of Colorado, College of Environmental Design, 1970 ... Registered architect, State of Colorado, 1972 ... Tenured professor, University of Colo rado, Boulder, 1975 ... Sabbatical leave, travel and study in China, Indonesia, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania; Yugoslavia, Hungary, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, France and Spain, 1979 / Congratulations to Andy Rovelstad for winning Second Prize in the Paul Rudolph Modular Housing Competition 11 . I . , t. •

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11 ece .---...) 0 ) AA t>Q>A CA'6 WNQ\ 0 ..,_.._..,.. L...--o...... "------+ I ] ... -c ) C) 0 11 I 1,.0 I MSC FilM <;CRI I r 12.:ls t Z;l6 7 > 9 7S4 s-t. JSNEi$'( I NOON