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Laminations, April, 1980

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Title:
Laminations, April, 1980
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
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This will be the lest issue of LAMINATIONS for this semester, which, completes the third year of publication. The staff wishes to thank those people and organizations that have made this publication possiblec
Mailing address: Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space.
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The newspaper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building.
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SPONSORED UNIVERSITV
THE SCHOOL COLORADO
OF ENVIRONMENTAL
DESIGN
DENVER
SEE PAGES 6 AND 7
THE GERMANS ARE HERE!
The college is being visited by a group of students with Prof. Kovach from the school of architecture in Munich, Germany. The students are here for four weeks to study and to soak Up a little American culture.
COVER: THE DENVER ART MUSEUM, MICHAEL FULLER
FUNDING: Deezine Club
The College of Environmental Design AIA
STAFF: Elizabeth Bravo Jeanne Cabral Michael Fuller, editor Paul Miles Fran Mishier John 0' Dowd Bob Perkins Dave Powers Marce Teas
also...
Robert Austin-Murphy Kathryn McGinnis Paula Schulte Linda Stansen
CONTRIBUTORS: Bake Baker
Ted Bujalski John Fuller Bill Green Crandon Gustafson Jeff Markwith Randy McMillan John Schler Barney Swett John Villa Jeff Wright
LAMINATIONS exists as a vehicle for the ideas and talents of the students of the College of Environmental Design, as a fulcrum for positive change, and as a focal point for dialogue within the College. That LAMINATIONS may continue to exist, may the interest in ideas and communication not subside. Ed-


JOHNS
©HH SEPEMS <36P
John O’Dowd
The most publicized building tale in Denver besides the formerly wanton fate of the D & F Tower has got to be the public announcement of One United Bank Center by Philip Johnson. One might think that all an architect need do to achieve fame and a certain notoriety would be to make the top of a skyscraoer anything but horizontal. Seemingly trite to some, the avant-garde in building form,(specifically in the form of the top of the building), has proven to be effective in drawing attention from architects and the general public alike.- Pennzoil Place,
AT&T (both by Johnson-Burgee), & Citicorp Center (by Hugh Stubbins), are a few examples of buildings that exhibit unusual profiles on their skylines. The skyscraper presents the architect with a myriad of decisions to be made concerning form. Some architects (like Guirgola) treat each floor and each building elevation distinctly.
Other architects (like Johnson) have strong ties to the international style and treat the tower as a continuously patterned shaft. They make their strongest design statements at the base and at the cap. The skyscraper cap has potential significance for every architect because of its power within the field of view; from close up, and from afar. For Johnson, the building cap has special design significance. His treatment is symbolic of his break from the international style. Treating the cap in a box-like manner was Miesian influenced - pure expression on the exterior of the structural framework sheathed on the interior. Today, economics more so than Miesian philosophy, encourages repetition of building elements and sameness of large building facades.
Critics of Johnson’s latest work for United Bank point out that the glass vault proposed to go over the present outdoor plaza is out of scale and is not sympathetic to I. M. Pei’s urban design for the Mile-Hi Center. The vault is flamboyant and heralds the entrance to the tower. It symbolizes the city’s entrance into a new decade of building.
The glass vault makes other atria in Denver seem bashful. It will be a long time before Johnson is upstaged in Denver.
Here again, the architect’s ego is involved in the creation of landmarks that pay tribute to the architect as much as to a place. The AIA Journal (February, 1980) called Denver a city full of nondescript buildings. I agree. Our city is a prime target for a landmark maker and Johnson took his opportunity to provide us with one.
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ASPIRIN CONFERENCE
Et B. Bravo
The Colorado Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects sponsored their annual fling in Aspen the weekend of March 30-April lc A range of topics on design for the community development process was covered.
Small scale design in Aspen was dicussed as well as an examination of such large scale development as Columbia, Maryland, a successful mid- 20th century new town.
The role of the designer in community development became a controversial issue and generated some lively crit sessions. One Aspen official of non-design background was a proponent of the Bulldog Method-take your idea and force it through the community development sieve to the point of going to court if you don't get your way. Other more mild-mannered types felt the community had a right to make their own decisions-it being their town and all- and the designer's role was to simply act as mediator to the process. Whatever, the conference ended on a note of encouragement as we seek energy conservation through better utilization of the existing built environment. Designers for the eighties were urged to pursue a good grasp of the political processes and regulations of the communities they were studying.
This writer understands a fine camaraderie amongst UCD LA department members emerged in the T-Lazy 7 swimming pool, various saunas and the congenial watering holes of Aspen-a benefit alone worthy of the trip to Colorado's finest.
BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS
COFFEE TABLE BOOKS TO WOW YOUR FRIENDS Reviewed by E. B. Bravo
Options for Passive Energy Conservation in Site Design , Prepared by the Center for Landscape Architecture Education and Research for the US Dept, of Energv under contract EC 77-C-01-5037. US Department of Commerce Technical Information Service, June 1973.
Landscape Planning for Energy Conservation, edited by Gary 0. Robinette, Prepared by the Center for Landscape Architecture Education and Research, a division of the Center for Environmental Design Education and Research, Reston, Virginia, Environmental Design Press, 1977.
A hard-to-find paper-covered gem that elucidates the essentials of climatic impacts of natural elements on shelters. Defensible processes for siting buildings or developments are outlined using such criteria as landforms and vegetation for solar radiation control, wind control, precipitation and humidity control. An excellent chapter on Site Planning and Development for Solar Energv Architecture and a section on Retrofiting for Energy Conservation make this book an invaluable manual for sharpening those intuitive site selection and design skills.
This book contends that in anv discusion or study of energy conservation it is absolutely essential to consider the potential of optimum site selection and site planning as a primary means for conserving energy.
The underlying simple premise for the study is that a maximum response to existing site conditions and processes will result in less expensive energy conservation measures than can be achieved bv any other menas. Topics discussed include options for passive energy conservation in site design and the principles of climate and(its varying effects on us. Of particular value is a section describing climate characteristics of the Temperate Region (of which Colorado is a part). Guidelines for design criteria, gross and discrete site selection techniques and use of natural and manmade elements for climate control are defined.
If you don't get this for your technical library, you might as well hang it up.


John Villa
A new decadeo When that LED in our brains that clicks only every ten years flashes a new digit, it triggers an appraisal/conjecture syndromeo Our base-ten minds are wont to group summarily the events of one of these arbitrarily defined periods and to fuse together the ideas therein for future reference. Clearly this is death to most of the actual goings on of any given decade—what did 1960 and 1968 have in common?—and emerges as a romantic stylized image of some facet of that time frame. Bearing this frailty in mind, the turning of the decade can be the impetus for a consideration of how our foresight and hindsight meet.
Journalists review the past decade ad nauseum and search for glimpses of coming issues, hoping for a new era in which many of society’s problems might be solved. In January, 1970, Walter F.
Wagner, Jr., ALA, then editor of Architectural Record claimed:
This is a time when architects are talking (and worrying) more than ever about their professional identity, their role in the scheme of things, their ability to adjust to the changes in practice that are sweeping across the profession, their participation in the creation of the "new America" that we as a people are planning to build—and indeed must build."
The revolutionary language of the "new America" concept is a bit strong today, but that statement would have been equally valid in 1930, 1945, or 1980. At the end of the decade Architectural Record still sees:
the need for a new kind of pioneering in design and thinking about design, in rebuilding our cities and towns, and in meeting the needs of all the people".
Did we fail completely during the 1970’s?
Did we make no progress whatsoever toward our noble ends?
We did not fail completely, except perhaps in part that we did not and still do not search diligently enough for the meaning of our words.
In the "sixties" we begged social responsibility. Then we argued for environmental responsibility, but mostly in the sense of external diseconomies. Energy became the centerpiece of the environmental pie, and through it a concern for limited materials, then water. And always economics. But the words remain the same, still pleading design to be conscientious in devotion to the person, the social group, the macro-organism. There
just appears to be little progress because of the temporal nature of values systems.
And we have failed in a few areas. We have failed to grasp a continuity that ties together our concerns for social and biological health.
We have certainly failed by committing a fallacy of composition: Our reliance on specialization has put more emphasis on the components than the sum or relationship of the components. Even those in the chain of specialization who are concerned with integration can deal only with a few specific concerns. Technology itself—our analytical tools, information retrieval systems, precise measurements of the human, social and macro-biotic systems—has spawned a new fallacy. It might be termed Relativism. The current obsession with energy demonstrates the inherent weakness of distorting everything in relation to one variable.
At the end of any given decade, we have jumped from pattern to non-connecting pattern.
We are culturally devoid of a medium through which to grasp a connecting pattern for all our efforts. Zoning regulations can't explain it in densities, height limits, setback requirements, or mix of uses. Historic preservation boards can't describe it in terms of proportions, or massing formulas, or material dictates.
After a day of manipulating variables, optimizing and minimizing relationships, and integrating systems, we fall exhausted into bed nervously hoping to get our work off the boards before another recognizable change in cultural values systems occurs. If we’re clever, we are already on vacation when this happens, but if we're mediocre, we are caught committing a faux-pas.
The emerging art and/or religion of the patterns which connect is (dash for your Hi-Liters) a metabolic Pantheism, long thought idly to be bourgeois esthetic yearnings. The reaction of the biosphere, including human civilization, the hydrosphere, and atmosphere are demonstrating more and more ^desparately the ultimate truth and necessity of the approach.
Our future audience is more diverse, more broadly educated, and more demanding of our best efforts than those of the past. The rhetoric of design journalism ait the beginning of future decades will undoubtedly call for swift action toward solving society's problems, and, with effort on our parts, be able to acknowledge some accomplishment in comprehensive, connecting directions.


6
EISENMAN 1
Frances Mishler
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What happens to architecture when a conceptualist approach is used to generate architectural form?
Peter Eisenman, a controversial but highly original architect, has been exploring the use of a syntatic approach to produce an idealized form totally divorced from external references and cultural manifestations. Syntax, both a branch of modern logic which attempts to study symbols and their arrangement within a system, and the study of rules pertaining to the formation of formal grammatical structure, is the basis of this theoretical approach. Thus the arrangement of forms and signs in relation to one another and not to their context or function is what preoccupies this architect. Syntatics, when applied to architecture, thus becomes the study of the relationship between and interaction of ideal forms - planes and volumes, columns and beams, windows, doors, staircases. By misuse, exaggeration and repetition, attention can be called to these forms and the rules that govern their relationships.
House VI, a weekend retreat in Connecticut designed for a couple, illustrates the above principles. Stairs, both real and virtual, exist in mirror-image of one another, the "usable" set painted green, the virtual set red. Columns march throughout the house, painted grey or off-white to indicate function or "functionless-ness". Placed in odd positions throughout the house - uncomfortably next to the dining table, or indicated in absentia as the cleft down the middle of the master bedroom open originally to the living room below - they play mental games with the observer. Space is explored through the relationships of intersecting planes and volumes in surprising juxtapositions0
As in all the houses Eisenman has designed, process is an important part, perhaps the essential part of the design. Axonometric drawings by the architect illustrate the steps or transformations by which the design concept was generated. House III, for instance, begins with a cube which is divided and subdivided by planes and grids set at 45 . Volumes and surfaces are
sheared and space is developed. These drawings -point out the generation of design as well as an unending process. Infinite manipulations and infinite possibilities are thus suggested. The last design cannot be the "final” design. The sequence of drawings inevitably leads the observer to try to puzzle out the next step in the design transformation. A mental landscape is thus created, a game implied. Like Baroque music, point and counterpoint, the mind is at work deciphering the ways in which the rules are both used and violated, while at the same time the purely aesthetic visual pleasures are being enjoyed. Part of the pleasure in enjoying the "music” is comprehending the "score".
Peter Eisenman has thus created works of art in search of ideal form. In this sense his building* are successful. On the other hand, functionalism in architecture is not a mean and petty concern. Perhaps a reconciliation is in order. Buildings have an impact on both the landscape on which th< sit and on the people that they serve• Conceptualist architecture which faithfully serves the program for which it was created would truly be a work of genius.


Bob Perkins
Paul Rudolph, scheduled to sneak in Denver on April 11, represents a tradition of modern architecture in practice rivaled bv few of his contemporaries. Ironically, however, Rudolph must be a very happy man to see the decade of the Seventies behind him. For although conceded by all to possess brilliant talents, he has seen the philosonhv of the architectural profession shift radicallv against his own— the standard-bearer of modernism in America is now awash in an era of Post-Modernism. Moreover, Rudolph, by the very nature of his prolific work and uncompromising attitude, has become a symbol of the failed experiments of the Sixties now rejected by the young generation of architects. While this symbolism reached a culmination in the attempted razing of his Art and Architecture building by angry Yale students, the roots of the "re-evaluation" of Rudolph go deeply into the outlook of the profession today.
Robert Stern, in his influential work New Directions in American Architecture, classifies Rudolph as the most complete of the "second generation" of modern architects in America. This description recognizes him as essentially an interpreter of the precepts of the pioneer modernists. Indeed, Rudolph studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Design under Walter Gropius in the days of the American "bauhaus." As did others of his generation, Rudolph found his greatest challenge in evolving forms to fit the theories of modernism. Too close to the early modernists to turn to the historicism now being explored, he developed his own vocabulary of form using chiefly the examples of Wright and Le Corbusier. Wright’s main influence comes in the area of spatial organization, providing inspiration for the pinwheel plans and pronounced vertical-horizontal interplays so characteristic of Rudolph's work. Corbusier's later work, such as Chandigar and Ronchamps, seem to have influenced primarily in the fields of massing and sculptural treatment of the facade. To create a viable architecture within the modernist credo as he knew it, Rudolph could leave no element of the building unworked. Quite the opposite of Mies and the pavillion for universal space, Rudolph expresses every particularity-core elements, circulation, site factors, program, sun breaks all are manipulated to the utmost as expressive, formal elements. And as formal compositions these elements are often spectacularly combined, but in their very strength seem to rob the architecture of a more encompassing validity. The activities within the building become secondary to the majesty of the spaces containing them. Stern comments on the most infamous example of this dilemma, "it is now clear that the Art and Architecture building is a functional failure because the original conception, what Kahn calls its form, did not derive from an insight into how the building would be used, but from an abstract design idea." The Art and Architecture building boasts over thirty different levels in the height of a conventional six story building. Stern and Venturi have said "this more is a bore, and it doesn't work."
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As convenient a target as Rudolph has become for the new critics, many of his works are outstanding by any evaluation. During Rudolph's tenure as Chairman of the Yale Architecture School (1957-1965) Rudolph designed many outstanding structures in the New Haven area. Noteworthy are the Temple Street Garage, which boldly establishes freeway scale, and Yale Married Student Housing, which establishes an entirely different scale of intimacy.
Rudolph has also done excellent work in urban design as evidenced by the Boston Government Center and Southeastern Massachusetts University. His interests have even spanned to the generation of pre-formed megastructures in the tradition of the Japanese metabolists (Graphic Arts Center proposal, New York City). His current projects range from apartment buildings in Singapore to the New Haven Government Center.
Any appraisal of Rudolph at this scale can at best be a cursory one. He is a man of tremendous achievement and his presence represents a resource of architectural design in America. There can be little doubt that despite his current philosophical unpopularity, he will long be considered one of the foremost in development of modern architecture.


8
PHOTOS: All photos of the Spring Ball were by Jeff Miller except as noted.




COLORADO
ARCHITECTURE
John David Powers
Hi! I'm Lee-nerd Nemoy This month,"In Search Of..." takes you to exotic Denver, Colorado to search for indigenous Colorado architecture. Architects in this Western boom-town can often be heard at "chic" architecture parties discussing things like "relating" to Colorado and the essence of "appropriate design."
Boulderites often refer to this latest phenomenon as "getting down" or the "Neo-Laid-Back Style of Architecture."
These "chic" phrases often flow "odd nausia," much like D.C.fs quotable quotes, except these quotes often "don't have the bearing strength of a Japanese lantern (i.e. They ain't worth a pimple on a pickle!") Architects just can't seem to "define their terms" with the same style as engineers.
It is for 'this reason that "In Search Of" recently travelled to the wilds of Colorado to hunt for "native architecture."
Despite the opinions of a few prominent Chicago mobsters (see next article), we found that Colorado does, indeed, have a rich architectural heritage. Here are but a few examples of what we found to be "the essence of Denver."
(top) No, this is not a political statement made by some radical architect. Rather, it exemplifies the unique combination of fine food and architecture which can only be found in Denver. (bottom) This low-cost modular housing, recently built in Cherry Creek, blends in well with the more traditional architectural forms in the neighborhood.


11
(upper,left) Numerous urban parks have been developed in Denver. This downtown pedestrian mall was modeled after Nickolett Mall in Minneapolis. (lower, left) As in other American cities, historic preservation is "chic" in Denver. This historic structure has been meticulously neglected since it closed its doors.nearly a hundred years ago (following the Great Ukrainian Easter Egg Embargo of 1884). (upper,upper)
A city that prides itself with more cars per capita than any other American city, has found ingenious ways to store them, (upper, lower) Denver’s own "Arch d'Triomph" welcomes visitors to this moderately priced neighborhood.


COLORADO
KARMA jjr
1 !
Paul Gapp, Chicago Tribune architecture critic IfiH
and 1979 Pulitzer Prize winner, recently joined with two other Tribune reporters to write several arti- r> i rv o r\ ri TU /a n -v* 4- -5 n 1 r* a a f a a a -»a 4 a a "?;WHBM» JMBMMMIII
cles on Denver. The articles are part of a series .,... WSSsSBe^ being published by the Tribune examining the strengths-. SSBi afpKwfe,1 and shortcomings of 11 American cities. J

While the article would lead one to believe that Gapp and his fellow cohorts probably spent little more than a long weekend at the Brown Palace, it is nevertheless interesting in its portrayal of Denver from a Chicago perspective. Following are excerpts from Gapp’s article: w
^^This city is booming, energy-rich, polluted, worried about water, and blessed with some of the most magnificent mountain scenery on earth. This is basically a city of middle-class people living in neat, single-family houses in neighborhoods with names like Five Points...(Editor: If Five Points is middle-class, then Chicago must be in Bangladesh)•
It is also insular, a bit smug, and a little square. Still, it is one of the most appealing big cities in the U.S., deserving of the high ratings it gets in national quality-of-life studies.... ...Couple all this with Denver’s benign and sunny climate (the winter’s are milder than Chicago’s) and it’s easy to see why so many people get hooked on the city.
...But even if growth is the Denver area’s biggest problem, air pollution is a far more visible and distasteful one. Federal officials rank Denver’s air as the second dirtiest in the nation (after Los Angeles). An ugly brown cloud often hangs over the city and obscures views of the mountains. The thing that ties this whole town together is the mountains," said Ron Wolfe, editor of a weekly newspaper here, "Denver is like one big barracks housing 500,000 people who are waiting for the week-^A end so they can take off for those gorgeous slopes, r"
The main source of pollution is the automobile. Denver has more cars per capita than any other Editor: The following are excerpts from a related article by John McCarron titled, "Seekers, The TT ... T/ - 11
city in the U.S. - one for every 1.2 people. Hunt for Colorado Karma:
Whatever its problems, though, booming Denver the *MeM generation has an intellectual head-
is happily riding on the crest of its importance as the nation’s second most important quarters, this is it.
energy center (surpassed only by Houston)... ...Still it is not the chance of getting rich that attracts thousands of Americans to the Denver area every year. Rather, it is the presence of the mighty Rockies and way of life they encourage. "Without the mountains, Denver would be just another Omaha," said a convention promoter. For the last decade, America's college-educated young have flocked by the tens of thousands to Denver and nearby Boulder. Having turned their backs on stressful careers in the workaday cities of the East, they have sought a new lifestyle - the "Rocky Mountain high." But the hunt for Colorado karma often proves more difficult than trading in one’s necktie for a goose-down vest and chukka boots...
Denver’s geographical isolation probably accounts for some of its satisfied smugness and resistance to most forms of urban sophistication. "Basically, this city has a TV mentality when it comes to culture," said Robert Sheets, executive Denver is a young people’s city. Some come for the skiing and hang-gliding. The official singles-bar greeting is: "Hi! What’s your major? Your sign? Do you ski?" Others cofae for the sense of emotional space you get here. It’s like throwing your fantasy ahead of you and following it.
director of the Colorado Council on the Arts and Humanities. "Denver has a great tolerance for mediocrity." The city’s boosters tend to brag about the new Boettcher Concert Hall, which houses the symphony The more ”spaced-out” free thinkers,... are drawn to Boulder, home of the University of Colorado, and ’’sort of a heat sink that draws off the crazies from Denver." She (a Denverite) calls the Denver-Boulder axis "America’s navel."
and has an acoustically tricked-up interior that looks like the results of an explosion in a flying saucer factory. Then there's the joke about how many young Coloradans it takes to replace a light bulb. It's three: One to screw it in, and two to share in the experience. jT
POWERS


POINT
GAMMA REA.
Reese, you misguided soul. Nuclear energy is the saving grace of our gas depleted society. Huge uranium lodes are waiting to be strip mined to provide more and more nuclear power plants like Fort St. Vrain and Three Mile Island.
Minor problems in the past should not disallow the wave of the future. We need to achieve an ordered society and put an end to dissidents who are underming our society and making a mockery of our social order. As wood burning stoves deplete our forests and pollute our air, you are blithly living in the 17th century. Reese wake up and smell the coffee - Your arguments have grown stale with age.
Split atoms, not wood!
REESE EIKEL
Gamma, when are you going to wake up to the fact that our natural resources are gone? The time has come to mellow out and get in touch with the basics. What could be more cosmic than a passive solar heated log cabin, supplementally heated with a wood burning stove and lit by candle? This type of environment caresses the senses into a void, and what could be better in this day of the overbuilt environment? But, no, you are forever rambling on about the wonder boy heroics of the nuclear energy industry and you’re content to allow the nuclear energy industry ramrod the public into building more and more nuclear power plants and turning all of us into genetic defects. Let's get back to the day of the holistic horse drawn carriage and really live.


...VOTES ON THE UNPUBLISHED
ARTICLE...
The following notes refer to an article by the same writer that was to appear in this month’s Laminations.
RAMBLING NOTES AND PARAPHRASED QUOTES... ... FEARS AND LOATHINGS NEED NOT APPLY... o.o THE WRITER FINDS WHEN HE IS TRYING TO BE TWO PEOPLE AT ONCE, HE’S REALLY NO ONE AT ALL...
..o AND WELCOME MY FRIENDS TO THE SHOW THAT NEVER ENDS...
"If you hang aroung yoyo people, you’re going to have yoyo friends, if you hang around smart people you're going to have smart friends, and if you hang around nice people, you're going to have nice friends..."
Rocky Balboa
The jaded concept of the Unpublished Article was to give a fairwell vignette by way of some fairly outrageous personal glimpses of one person's life and times here at UCD. Included in the piece, complete with Gonzoesque lung ripping trimmings, was a first impression encounter with students and faculty. This involved an obscene shouting match with a high strung manic-depressive student, an innocent bystander’s cameo role and a too short interview with the director of the department. Not bad stuff, although a little on the heavy side of off-balanced paranoia. The Unpublished Article didn’t read too badly either. Interspersed, in true Raoule Duke style, were quotes from the ex-heavyweight champ, that's right, Ali himself, and there still may be a place for that. Rafts Law (who? what?) was the theme, and although the article meandered a bit and was disjointed in places it managed to return on itself in respectable fashion. And the concept didn’t have to stop there. It would have been easy enough to expand into equally outrageous personal traversties. Finding a place to live, disallusion-ment with the campus. Let’s not forget finding the car on its rims at 11:00 one Friday night in Greater Denver, or being physically pulped by Brown-power facists at Speer and Lawrence.
Or maybe all-nighters aftermaths resembling the joys of a full tilt acid flashback while driving 1-25 at rush hour. So what was the article's real intention? The writer may have told you he wanted to serve up the slice of his thoughts as the Final Days of School close in. OK, but what about a scene involving happy hour at Soapy's with someone from N.C., N.J., Colorado,
Georgia, Washington, Nebraska, California, Ohio, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and on and on to trade lies on subjects as profound as younger women, older whiskey, faster cars and more money? How significant was that? Now, if putting the idea of Fear and Loathing on the Fourth Floor to words suddenly seems less of an event to share... what is important? Could it be the feeling of gaining confidence in yourself as well as those around you? Realizing when you’ve done something good your own ideas as well as those of your peers were involved in the final product? Maybe.
At this point, these notes would like to get a bit sloppy and tangent off into cold mornings at Cement Creek and hot nights of schnapp-laced parties, but they won't. Instead, the writer recalls another time when in the midst of long-winded fairwells, packed with nostalgic tidbits, a good ol* boy simply left with saying "Goodbye and good luck to you all. I won't forget you."
The writer bets.(just as sure as anything worth doing is worth overdoing) that the good ol' boy said what the Unpublished Article wanted to say all along.o.
"...and these are the memories that make me a wealthy soul..."
Bob Seeger
'M!


fTHURSDAY PM, 24 APRIL
1:00- 2:00 ROVELSTAD CULTURAL CENTER, TAOS, N.M.
2:00- 3:00 FULGENZI HIGH-RISE HOUSING. PLATTE R.
3:00- 4:00 PRINDLE MODULAR HOUSING
4:00- 5:00 KEHR ANIMAL HOUSE, DENVER ZOO
CROWELL, NAGEL, VETTER, LONG
• FRIDAY AM, 25 APRIL
8:30- 9:30 MIKI MAURA ATHLETIC CLUB
9:3u- 10:30 BEBLAVI HOTEL/CONVENTION CENTER
10:30- 11:30 SCHNAUTZ HOUSING/SHOPPING, GUNNISON
PROSSER, VETTER, KINDIG, LONG
• FRIDAY PM, 25 APRIL
1:00- 2:00 GORE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, C0L0o
2:00- 3:00 BURGESS BOTANICAL RESEARCH FACILITY
3:00- 4:00 WEST RECREATION CENTER, GREEI.EY
4:00- 5:00 HUTCHINSON MAMMOTH GARDENS
CARLSON, BENDA, KINDIG, LONG
• MONDAY AM, 28 APRIL
8:30- 9:30 GREENWALD SHOPPING/OFFICE, VILLA ITALIA
9:30- 10:30 SCHLER SHOPPING COMPLEX - SOLAR
10:30- 11:30 EVANS HOUSING/MULTI-FAMILY
PROSSER, STEELE, VETTER, LONG
• MONDAY PM, 28 1 APRIL
1:00- 2:00 WEIL STUDENT BOOK STORE, BOULDER
2:00- 3:00 MARKWITH REHABILITATION - COMMERCIAL,
3:00- 4:00 WINTERS SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER
4:00- 5:00 MURPHY HOUSING POST INDUSTRIAL
CARLSON, STEELE, KINDIG, LONG
• TUESDAY AM, 29 APRIL
8:30- 9:30 LOPEZ
9:30- 10:30 McCLURE TWO SCHOOLS IN DELTA,
10:30- 11:30 MILES STUDENT HOUSING
CROWELL, BENDA, KINDIG, LONG
$ TUESDAY PM, 29 APRIL
1:00- 2:00 BUJALSKI AIRPORT TERMINAL - SOLAR,
2:00- 3:00 FORD PAGOSA SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL
3:00- 4:00 , FULLER SHOPPING/HOUSING, BASALT
4:00- 5:00 GUSTAFSON TRANSIT STATION, CASTLE ROCK
CROWELL, KINDIG, VETTER, LONG
•WEDNESDAY AM, 30 APRIL
8:30- 9:30 MOSTELLER MIXED USE, LOWER DOWNTOWN
9:30- 10:30 WRIGHT
10:30- 11:30 ETMAN HOTEL/CONVENTION COMPLEX,
PROSSER, STEELE, VETTER, LONG
•WEDNESDAY PM. , 30 APRIL
1:00- 2:00 HADJIHABIB DOWNTOWN OFFICE BLOCK
2:00- 3:00 OLASON RESORT HOUSING/LODGE, COPPER
3:00- 4:00 ALVAREZ TOWN PLAN, VENEZUELA
4:00- 5:00 ALVAREZ SHOPPING CORE, VENEZUELA
CARLSON, STEELE, NAGEL, KINDIG, LONG
•THURSDAY AM, 1 MAY
8:30- 9:30 REO SHOPPING CENTER, GRAND JUNCTION
9:30- 10:30 MAY DOWNTOWN MIXED USE
10:30- 11:30 CUNEO STUDENT UNION, NEW YORK
BENDA, HOLDER, KINDIG, VETTER
•THURSDAY PM, 1 MAY
1:00- 2:00 MOORE HOTEL, WINTER PARK
2:00- 3:00 RICHISSIN TIVOLI ADDITION, THEATER
3:00- 4:00 ZAVIST
4:00- 5:00 STUCKEY CONDOMINIUMS
CROWELL, KINDIG, VETTER, LONG
fFRIDAY AM, 2 MAY
8:00-8:45 METCALF HIGHLANDS RANCH, TOWN CENTER
8:45-9:30 HENNESEY HIGHLANDS RANCH, COMPREHENSIVE &
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
9:30- 10:30 STANSEN REVITILIZATION, SANTA FE DRIVE
10:30- 11:30 SLATER SCIENCE LAB, DENVER UNIVERSITY
PROSSER, KINDIG, VETTER, LONG
IFRIDAY PM, 2 MAY
1:00- 2:00 McGinnis ELDERLY HOUSING
2:00- 3:00 KUNKEL WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT, BALT
3:00- 4:00 BAKER TRANSIT CENTER, MINNESOTA
4:00- 5:00 HUMPHRIES
PROSSER, BENDA, KINDIG, HOLDER, LONG
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS PRESENTATIONS WILL BE AT THE AURARIA STUDENT CENTER CONFERENCE ROOMS
SCHEDULES NOT AVAILABLE AT THIS TIME FOR L.A. AND PLANNING PROGRAMS.
URBAN DESIGN:
MONDAY PM, 28 APRIL
3:00+ STRUBER STUDENT HOUSING, AURARIA
3:00+ ASHLEY CONDOMINIUMS, CHERRY CREEK


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AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION APRIL 1980

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I UNIVERSITY • OF COLORADO AT DENVER IAVIII\It\l I 11\E Mailing address: Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and spaceo Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The newspaper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building. PAUL Pf T e R 1 c. \.. ( r \ ----( \ ( r • I RUDOLPH o EISEnmRn r r 'It -\. \, r r , Ill ;:, "' ... (,J 'II Q .. I ..,i' -, -'\ c. 0 0,. 4"'" -.. ,.,c.'
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John O'Dowd The most publicized building tale in Denver besides the formerly wanton fate of the D & F Tower has got to be the public announcement of One United Bank Center by Philip Johnson. One might think that all an architect need do to achieve fame and a certain notoriety would be to make the top of a skyscraoer anything but horizontal. Seemingly trite to some, the avantgarde in building form,(specifically in the form of the top of the building), has proven to be effective in drawing attention from architects and the general public alike • . Pennzoil Place, AT&T (both by Johnson-Burgee), & Citicorp Center (by Hugh Stubbins), are a few examples of buildings that exhibit unusual profiles on their skylines. The skyscraper presents the architect with a myriad of decisions to be made concerning form. Some architects (like Guirgola) treat each floor and each building elevation distinctly. Other architects (like Johnson) have strong ties to the international style and treat the tower as a continuously patterned shaft. They mak e their strongest design statements at the base and at the cap. The skyscraper cap has potential significance for every architect because of its power within the field of view; from close up, and from afar. For Johnson, the building cap has special design significance. His treatment is symbolic of his break from the international style. Treating the cap in a box-like manner was Miesian influenced -pure expression on the exterior of the structural framework sheathed Jn the interior. Today, economics more so than Miesian philosophy, encourages repetition of building elements and sameness of large building facades. Critics of Johnson's latest work for United Bank point out that the glass vault proposed to go over the present outdoor plaza is out of scale and is not sympathetic to I. H. Pei' s urban design for the Mile-Hi Center. The vault is flamboyant and heralds the entrance to the tower. It symbolizes the city's entrance into a new decade of building. The glass vault makes other atria in Denver seem bashful. It will be a long time before Johnson is upstaged in Denver. Here again, the architect's ego is involved in the creation of landmarks that pay tribute to the architect as much as to a place. The AlA Journal (February, 1980) called Denver a city full of nondescript buildings. I agree. Our city is a prime target for a landmark maker and Johnson took his opportunity to provide us with one.

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ASPIJllll E , B. Bravo The Colorado Chapter of the. American Society of Landscape Architects sponsored their annual fling in Aspen the weekend of March 30April l o A range of topics on design for the community development process was covered. Small scale design in Aspen dicussed as well as an examination of such large scale development as Columbia, Haryland, c. suc:cessful mid20th century new town. The role of the designer in community development became a controversial issue and generated some lively crit sessions. One Aspen official of non-design background was a proponent of the Bulldog Method-take your idea and force it through the community. development sieve to the point of going to court if you don't get your way. Other more mild-mannered types felt the community had a right to make their own decisions-it being their town and all-and the desioner's role ,., was to simply act as mediator to the process. vfuatever, the conference ended on a note of encouragement as we Seek energv conservation b etter utilization of the existing built environment. Desig n ers for the eighties were urged to pursue a good grasp of the political processes and regulations of the communities they w e r e studying . This writer a fine camaraderie amongst UCD LA department members eme rged in the T-Lazy 7 swimming pool, various saunas and the congenial waterinp, holes of Asp en-a benefit alone worthy of the trip to Colo rado's finest. BBITCB BOOKS, BOOKS. BOOKS COFFEE TABLE BOOKS TO WOW YOUR FRIENDS Reviewed by E . B. Bravo Landscape Planning for Energy Conservation, edited by Gary 0. Robinette , Prepare d b y the C ente r for Landscap e Architecture Ed ucation and Research, a division of the Cent e r for Environmental Design Education and Research, Reston, Virginia, Environmental Design Press, 1977. A hard-to-find paper-covered gem that elucidate s the essentials of climatic impacts of natural ele m ents on shelters. Defensible processes for siting buildings or developments are outlined using such criteria as landforms and vegetation for solar radiation control, wind control, precipitation and humidity control. An excellent chapte r on Site Planning and Development for Solar E n e rgv Architecture anrl a section on R etrofiting for E n e rgy Conservation make this book an invaluable manu a l for sharpeninp, those intuitive sit e selection and design skills. Options for Passive Ene rgv Conservation in Site Design , Prepared b y the Cente r for L a ndscape Architecture Education and R e sear c h for the US D ept. of E n e rgv under contrac t # EC 77-c-01-5037. US Department of Commerce Technical Information S ervice , June 197 3 . This book contends that in a n v discusio n o r study of e n e r?,v conservation it is absolutely essential t o consider the potential of optimum site selection and site plannin g as a primary mean s for conserving e n e rGY The und erlying simple premise for the study i s that a maximum response t o existing sit e conditions and processes will result in less expensiv e energy conservation measures than can h e achie v e d bv any other menas. Topics discusse d include options for passive energy conservation in site design and the principles of climate and(its varyinp, effect s on us. Of particular va1ue is a section describing climat e characteristics of the T emperate Rep,ion (of which is a part). \,uideline s for desi g n criteriG, gross and discre t e site selection techniques and use of Datural and man made elements for clima t e control a r e defined. If y ou don't get this for your t echnical library , you mi ght as w ell hanr; it up.

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John Villa A new decadeo When that LED in our brains that clicks only every ten years flashes a new digit, it triggers an appraisal/conjecture syndromeo Our base-ten minds are wont to group summarily the events of one of these arbitrarily defined periods and to fuse together the ideas therein for future reference. Clearly this is death to most of the actual goings on of any given decade--what did 1960 and 1968 have in common?--and emerges as a romantic stylized image of some facet of that time frame. Bearing this frailty in mind, the turning of the decade can be the impetus for a consideration of how our foresight and hindsight meeto Journalists review the past decade ad nauseum and search for glimpses of coming issues, hoping for a new era in which many of society's problems might be solved. In January, 1970, Halter F. Wagner, Jro , AIA, then editor of Architectural Record claimed: This is a time when architects are talking (and worrying) more than ever about their professional identity, their role in the scheme of things, their ability to adjust to the changes in practice that are sweep-ing across the profession, their participation in the creation of the "new America" that we as a people are planning to build--and indeed must build." The revolutionary language of the "new America" concept is a bit strong today, but that statement would have been equally valid in 1930, 1945, or 1980. At the end of the decade Architectural Record still sees: the need for a new kind of pioneering in design and thinking about design, in rebuilding our cities and towns, and in meeting the needs of all the people"o Did we fail completely during the 1970's? Did we make no progress whatsoever toward our noble ends? We did not fail completely, except perhaps in part that we did not and still do not search diligently enough for the meaning of our words. In the "sixties" we begged social responsibility. Then we argued for environmental responsibility, but mostly in the sense of external diseconomieso Energy became the centerpiece of the environmental pie, and through it a concern for limited materials, then water. And always economics. But the words remain the same, still pleading design to be conscientious in devotion to the person, the social group, the macro-organismo There just appears to be little progress because of the temporal nature of values systems. And we have failed in a few areaso We have failed to grasp a continuity that ties together our concerns for social and biological health. We have certainly failed by committing a fallacy of composition: Our reliance on has put more emphasis on the components than the sum or relationship of the componentso Even those in the chain of specialization who are concerned with integration can deal only with a few specific concernso Technology itself--our analytical tools,. information retrieval systems, precise measurements of the human, social and macro-biotic systems--has spawned a new fallacy. It might be termed Relativism. The current obsession with energy demonstrates the inherent weakness of distorting everything in relation to one variableo At the end of any given decade, we have jumped from pattern to non-connecting patterno We are culturally devoid of a medium through which to grasp a connecting pattern for all our efforts. Zoning regulations can't explain it in densities, height limits, setback requirements, or mix of uses. Historic preservation boards can't describe it in terms of proportions, or massing formulas, or material dictates. After a day of manipulating variables, optimizing and minimizing relationships, and integrating systems, we fall exhausted into bed nervously hoping to get our work off the boards before another recognizable change in cultural values systems occurso If we're clever, we are already on vacation when this happens, but if we're mediocre, we are caught committing a faux-pas. The emerging art and/or religion of the patterns which connect is (dash for your Hi-Liters) a Pantheism, long thought idly to be bourgeois esthetic yearnings. The reaction of the biosphere, including human civilization, the hydrosphere, and atmosphere are demonstrating more and more )desparately the ultimate truth and necessity of the approachu Our future audience is more diverse, more broadly educated, and more demanding of our best efforts than those of the pasto The rhetoric of design journalism at the beginning of future will undoubtedly call for swift action toward solving society's problems, and, with effort on our parts, be able to acknowledge some accomplishment in comprehensive, connecting directionso 6

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6 Frances 't-lishler I 1 !__ ______ ___ _ l{hat happens to architecture when a conceptualist approach is used to generate architectural form? Peter Eisenman, a controversial but highly original architect, has been exploring the use of a syntatic approach to produce an idealized form totally divorced from external references and cultural manifestations. Syntax, both a branch of modern logic which attempts to study symbols and their arrangement within a system, and the study of rules pertaining to the formation of formal grammatical structure, is the basis of this theoretical approach. Thus the arrangement of forms and signs in relation to one another and not to their context or function is what preoccupies this architect. Syntatics, when applied to architecture, thus becomes the study of the relationship between and interaction of ideal forms -planes and volumes, columns and beams, windows, doors, staircases. By misuse, exaggeration and repetition, attention can be called to these forms and the rules that govern their relationships. House VI, a weekend retreat in Connecticut.designed for a c ouple, illustrates the above principles. Stairs, both real and virtual, exist in mirror-image of one another, the "usable" set painted green, the virtual set red. Columns march throughout the house, painted grey or off-white to indicate function or "functionlessness". Placec; in odd positions throughout the house -uncomfortably next to the dining table, or indicated in absentia as the cleft down the middle of the master bedroom open originally to the living room belo-v J -they play mental games with the observer. Space is explored through the relationships of intersecting planes and volumes in surprising juxtapositionso As in all the houses Eisenman has designed, process is an important part, perhaps the essen-tial part of _the design. Axonometric drawings by the architect illustrate the steps or transformations by which the design concept was generated. House III, for instance, begins with a cube which is divided and subdivided by planes and grids set at 45. Volumes and surfaces are E.ilenman: HOUM sheared and space is developed. These drawings -point out the generation of design as well as an unending process. Infinite manipulations and infinite possibilities are thus suggested. The last design cannot be the "final" design. The sequence of drawings inevitably leads the observer to try to puzzle out the next step in the design transformation. A mental landscape is thus created, a game implied. Like Baroque music, point and counterpoint, the mind i s at work deciphering the ways in which the rules are both used and violated, while at the same time the purely aesthetic visual pleasures are being enjoyed. Part of the pleasure in enjoying the "music" is comprehending the "score". Peter Eisenman has thus created works of art in search of ideal formo In this sense his buildings are successful. On the other hand, functionalism in architecture is not a mean and petty concern. Perhaps a reconciliation is in order. Buildings have an impact on both the landscape on which they sit anG on the people that they serve. Conceptualist architecture which faithfully serves the program for which it was created would truly be a work of genius.

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Bob Perkins Paul Rudolph, scheduled to sneak in Denver on April 11, represents a ,tradition of modern architecture in practice rivaled bv few of his contemporaries. Ironically, however, Rudolph must be a very happy man to see the decade of the Seventies behind him. For although conceded b y all to possess brilliant talents, he has seen the philosophy of the architectural profession shift radically against his own--the standard-bearer of modernism in America is now awash in an era of Post-t1odernism. t1oreover, Rudolph, by the very nature of his prolific work and uncompromising attitude, has become a svmbol of the failed experiments of the Sixties now rejected by the young generation of architects. Hhile this symbolism r eached a culmination in the attempted razing of his Art and Architecture building b y angry Yale students, the roots of the "re-evaluation" of Rudolph go deeply into the outlook of the profession today. Robert Stern, in his influential work NeH Directions in .AI",erican Arc hi tee ture, classifies Rudolph as the most comolete of the "second generation" of modern architects in America. This description recognizes him as essentiallv an internreter of the precepts of the modernists. Indeed, Rudolph studied at the Harvard Graduate School of Design under \..Jalter Gropius in the days of the American "bauhaus." As did others of his generation, Rudolph found his greatest challenge in evolving forms to fit the theories of modernism. Too close to the earlv modernists to turn t o the historicism now b eing explored, he developed his own vocabulary of form using chiefly the examples of Hright and Le Corbusier. Hright's main influence comes in the area of spatial organization, providing inspiration for the pinwheel plans and pronounced vertical-horizontal interplays so characteristic of Rudolph's work. Corbusier's later work, such as Chandigar and Ronchamps, seem to have influenced primarily in the fields of massing and sculptural treatment of the facade. To create a viable architecture within the modernist credo as he knew it, Rudolph could leave no element of the building unworked. Quite the opposite of Mies and the pavillion for universal space, Rudolph expresses every particularity-core elements, circulation, site factors, program, sun breaks all are manipulated to the utmost as expressive, formal elements. And as formal compositions these elements are often spectacularly combined, but in their very strength seem to rob the architecture of a more encompassing validity . The activities within the building become secondary to the majesty of the spaces containing them. Stern comments on the most infamous example of this dilemma, "it is now clear th;H tt>e Art and Architecture building is a functional failure because the original conception, what Kahn calls its form, did not derive from an insight into how the building would be used, but from an abstract design idea." The Art and Architecture building boasts over thirty different levels in the height of a conventional six story building. Stern and Venturi have said "this more is a bore, and it doesn't work." ----------UN tV. PAUL-As convenient a target as Rudolph has becom e for the new critics, many of his works are outstanding by any evaluation. During Rudolph's t enure as Chairman of the Yale Architecture School (1957-1965) Rudolph desiKned many outstanding structures in the New Haven area. Noteworthy are the Temple Street Garage, which boldly establishes freeway scale, and Yale Harried Student Housing, which establishes an entirely different scale of intimacy . Rudolph has also done excellent work in urban desig n as evidenced by the Boston Government Cente r and Southeastern Hassachusetts University. His interests have e v e n spanned to the generation of pre-formed megastructures in the tradition of the Japanese metabolists (Graphic Arts Center proposal, New York City). His current projects range froQ apartment buildings in Singapore to the New Haven Government Center. Any appraisal of Rudolph at this scale can at best be a cursory one. He is a man of tremendous achievement and his presence represents a resource of architectural design in America. There can be little doubt that despite his current philosophical unpopularity, he will long be considered one of the foremost in development of modern archi.tecture. 7

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8 , . • . : PHOTOS: All photos of the Spring Ball were by Jeff Miller r except as noted. \!,. '

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1 COLORADO ARCHITECTURE John David Powers Hi! I'm Lee_:-nerd Nemoy This month,"In Search Of ••• " takes you to exotic Denver, Colorado to search for indigenous Colorado architecture. Architects in this Western boom-town can often be heard at "chic" architecture parties discussing things like "relating" to Colorado and the essence of "appropriate design." Boulderites often refer to this latest phenomenon as "getting down" or the "Neo-Laid-Back Style of Architecture." These "chic" phrases often flow "odd nausia," much like D.C.'s quotable quotes, except these quotes often "don't have the bearing strength of a Japanese lantern (i.e. They ain't worth a pimple on a pickle!") Architects just can't seem to "define their terms" with the same style as engineers. It is for 'this reason that "In Search Of" recently travelled to the wilds of Colorado to hunt for "native architecture." Despite the opinions of a few prominent Chicago mobsters (see next article), we found that Colorado does, indeed, have a rich architectural heritage. Here are but a few examples of what we found to be "the essence of Denver." (top) No, this is not a political state-ment made by some radical architect. Rather, it exemplifies the unique combination of fine food and architecture which can only be found in Denver. (bottom) This low-cost modular housing, recently built in Cherry Creek, blends in well with the more traditional architectural forms in the neighborhood.

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(upper,left) Numerous urban parks have been developed in Denver. This downtown pedestrian mall was modeled after Nickolett Mall in Minneapolis. (lower, left) As in other Ameri-can cities, historic preservation is "chic" in Denver. This historic structure has been meticulously neglected since it closed its doors.nearly a hundred years ago (following the Great Ukrainian Easter Ege.Embargo ofl884). (upper,upper) A city that prides itself with more cars per capita than any other American city, has found ingenious ways to store them. (upper, lower) Denver's own "Arch d'Triomph" welcomes visitors to this moderately priced neighborhood.

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COLORADO KARMA Paul Gapp, Chicago Tribune architecture critic and 1979 Pulitzer Prize winner, recently joined with two other Tribune reporters to write several articles on Denver. The articles are part oi a series being published by the Tribune examining the and shortcomings of 11 American cities. While the article would lead one to believe that Gapp and his fellow cohorts probably spent little more than a long weekend at the Brown Palace, it is nevertheless interesting in its portrayal of Denver from a Chicago Following are excerpts from article: city is booming, energy-rich, polluted, worried about water, and blessed with some of the most magnificent mountain scenery on earth. It is also insular, a bit smug, and a little square. Still, it is one of the most appealing big cities in the U.S., deserving of the high ratings it gets in national quality-of-life studies ••. • ••• But even if growth is the Denver area's biggest problem, air pollution is a far more visible and distasteful one. Federal officials rank Denver's air as the second dirtiest in the nation (after Los Angeles). An ugly brown cloud often hangs over the city and obscures views of the mountains. The main source of pollution is the automobile. Denver has more cars per capita than any other city in the U.S. -one for every 1.2 people. This is basically a city of middle-class people living in neat, single-family houses in neighborhoods with names like Five Points ••• (Editor: If Five Points is middle-class, then Chicago must be in Banglcdesh). ••• Couple all this with Denver's benign and climate (thP winter's are milder than Chicago's) and it's easy to see why so many people get hooked on the city. ThP. thing that ties this whole town together is the mountains," said Ron Wolfe, editor of a week-ly newspaper here, "Denver is like one big barracks housing 500,000 people who are waiting for the week-,, end so they can take off for those gorgeous slopes. Editor: The following are excerpts from a related article by John McCarron titled, "Seekers, The Hunt for Colorado Karma:" Whatever its problems, though, booming Denv2r is happily riding on the crest of its importance as nation's second most important energy center (surpassed only by Houston) ••• ,,If the ,Me" generation has an intellectual headquarters, this is it. ••• Still it is not the chance of getting rich that attracts thousands of Americans to the Denver area every year. Rather, it is the presence of the mighty Rockies and way of life they encourage. "Without the mountains, Denver \vould be. just another Omaha," said a convention promoters Denver's geographical isolation probably accounts for some of its satisfied smugness and resistance to most forms of urban sophistication. "Basically, this city has a TV mentality when it comes to culture," said Robert Sheets, executive director of the Colorado Council on the Arts and Humanities. "Denver has a great tolerance for mediocri. ty." The city's Boettcher and has an looks like ing saucer boosters tend to brag about the new Concert Hall, which houses the symphony acoustically tricked-up interior that the results of an explosion in a flyfactory. For the last decade, America's college-educated young have flocked by the tens of thousands to Denver and nearby Boulder. Having turned their backs on stressful careers in the workaday cities of the East, they have sought a new lifestyle -the "P.ocky Hountain high." But the hunt for Colorado karma often proves more difficult than trading in one's necktie for a goose-down vest and chukka boots ••• Denver is a young people's city. Some come for the skiing and hang-gliding. The official singles-bar greeting is: "Hi! What's your major? Your sign? Do you ski?" Others come for the sense of emotional space you get here. It's like throwing your fantasy ahead of you and following it. The more "spaced-out" free thinkers, ••• are drawn to Boulder, home of the University of Colorado, and "sort of a heat sink that draws off the crazies from Denver." She (a Denverite) calls the DenverBoulder axis "America's navel. " Then there's the joke about how many young Coloradans it takes to a light It's three: One to screw it in, and two to share in the experience.''

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POIB'T ... GAMt1A REA . Reese, you misguided soul. Nuclear energy is the saving grace of our gas depleted society. Huge uranium lodes are waiting to be strip mined to provide more and more nuclear power plants like Fort St. Vrain and Three Mile Island. Minor problems in the past should not disallow the wave of the future. We need to achieve an ordered society and put an end to dissidents who are underming our society and making a mockery of our social order. As wood burning stoves deplete our forests and pollute our air, you are blithly living in the 17th century • . 'Reese wake up and smell the coffee Your arguments have grown stale with age. Split atoms, not wood! REESE EIKEL Gamma, when are you going to wake up to the fact that our natural resources are gone? The time has come to mellow out and get in touch with the basics. What could be more cosmic than a passive solar heated log cabin, supplementally heated with a wood burning stove and lit by candle? This type of environment caresses the senses into a void, and what could be better in this day of the overbuilt environment? But, no, you are forever rambling on about the wonder boy heroics of the nuclear energy industry and you're content to allow the nuclear energy industry ramrod the public into building more and more nuclear power plants and turning all of us into genetic defects. Let's get back to the day of the holistic horse drawn carriage and really live.

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I ) ••• 011 2Bil ISBBD ... The following notes refer to an article by the same writer that was to appear in this month's Laminations. .o RAMBLING NOTES AND PARAPHRASED QUOTES ••• o • o FEARS AND LOATHINGS NEED NOT APPLY.o o coo THE WRITER FINDS WHEN HE IS TRYING TO "BE TWO PEOPLE AT ONCE, HE'S REALLY NO ONE AT ALLoo• •• 0 AND WELCOME MY FRIENDS TO THE SHO\V THAT NEVER ENDS. o • "If you hang aroung yoyo people, you're going to have yoyo friends, if you hang around smart people you're going to have smart friends, and if you hang around nice people, you're going to have nice friends ••• " Rocky Balboa The jaded concept of the Unpublished Article was to give a fairwell vignette by way of some fairly outrageous personal glimpses of one person's life and times here at UCD. Included in the piece, complete with Gonzoesque lung ripping trimmings, was a first impression encounter with students and faculty. This involved an obscene shouting match with a high strung manic-depressive student, an innocent bystander's cameo role and a too short interview with the director of the department. Not bad stuff, although a little on the heavy side of off-balanced paranoia. The Unpub lished Article didn't read too badly either. Interspersed, in true Raoule Duke style, were quotes from the champ, that's Ali himself, and there still may be a place for that. Rafts Law (who? what?) was the theme, and although the article meandered a bit and was disjointed in places it managed to return on itself in respectable fashiono And the concept didn't have to stop there. It would have been easy enough to expand into equally outrageous personal traversties. Finding a place to live, disallusionment with the campus. Let's not forget finding the car on its rims at 11:00 one Friday night in Greater Denver, or being physically pulped by Brown-power facists at Speer and Lawrence. Or maybe all-nighters aftermaths resembling the joys of a full tilt acid flashback driving I-25 at rush hour. So what was the article's real intention? The writer may have told you he wanted to serve up the slice of his thoughts as the Final Days of School close in. OK, but what about a scene involving happy hour at Soapy's with someone from N oC., N.J., Colorado, i/ / I f ( \ \ Georgia, Washington, Nebraska, California, Ohio, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and on and on to trade lies . / on subjects as profound as younger women, older whiskey, faster cars and more money? How sig nificant was that? Now, if putting the idea of Fear and Loathing on the Fourth. Floor to words suddenly seems less of an event to share ••• what is important? Could it be the feeling of gaining confidence in yourself as well as those around you? Realizing when you've done something good your own ideas as well as those of your peers were involved in the final product? Maybe. At this point, these notes would like to get a bit sloppy and tangent off into cold mornings at Cement Creek and hot nights of schnapp-laced parties, but they won'ta Instead, the writer recalls another time when in the midst of longwinded fairwells, packed with nostalgic tidbits, a good ol' boy simply left with saying "Goodbye and good luck to you all. I won't forget you." The writer bets (just as sure as anything worth doing is worth overdoing) that the good ol' boy said what the Unpublished Article wanted to say all alongooo 11o •• and these are the memories that make me a wealthy soul •• o " Bob Seeger

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tTHUPSDAY PM, 24 APRIL 1:00-2:00 ROVELSTAD CULTURAL CENTER, TAOS, N.M. 2:00-3:00 FULGENZI HIGH-RISE HOUSING. PLATTE R. 3:00-4:00 PRINDLE HODULAR HOUSING 4:00-5:00 KEHR ANIMAL HOUSE, DENVER ZOO CROWELL, NAGEL, VETTER, LONG eFRIDAY AM, 25 APRIL 8:30-9:30 MIKI 9:3u10:30 BEBLAVI 10:30-11:30 SCHNAUTZ MADRA ATHLETIC CLUB HOTEL/CONVENTION CENTER HOUSING/SHOPPING, GUNNISON PROSSER, VETTER, KINDIG, LONG eFRIDAY PM, 25 APRIL 1:00-2:00 GORE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, COLO" 2:00-3:00 BURGESS BOTANICAL RESEARCH FACILITY 3:00-4:00 WEST RECREATION CENTER, GREELEY 4:00-5:00 HUTCHINSON MAl1MOTH GARDENS CARLSON, BENDA, KINDIG, LONG • AH, 28 APRIL 8:30-9:30 9:30-10:30 10:30-li: 30 GREENWALD SCHLER EVANS PROSSER, SHOPPING/OFFICE, VILLA ITALIA SHOPPING COMPLEX SOLAR HOUSING/MULTI-FAMILY STEELE, VETTER, LONG • MONDAY PM, 28 APRIL 1:00-2:00 2:00-3:00 3:00-4:00 4:00-5:00 e TUESDAY AM, 8:30-9:30 9:30-10:30 10: 3011 : 30 f TUESDAY PM, 1:00-2:00 2:00-3:00 3:00-4:00, 4:00-5:00 WEIL MARKWITH WINTERS MURPHY STUDENT BOOK STORE, BOULDER REHABILITATION COMMERCIAL, SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER HOUSING POST INDUSTRIAL CARLSON, STEELE, KINDIG, LONG 29 APRIL LOPEZ McCLURE MILES TWO SCHOOLS IN DELTA, STUDENT HOUSING CROWELL, BENDA, KINDIG, LONG 29 APRIL BUJALSKI FORD :FI'LLER GUSTAFSON AIRPORT TERMINAL SOLAR, PAGOSA SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL SHOPPING/HOUSING, BASALT TRANSIT STATION, CASTLE ROCK KINDIG, VETTER, LONG tWEDNESDAY AM, 30 APRIL 8:30-9:30 MOSTELLER USE, LOWER DOWNTOWN 9:30-10:30 WRIGHT 10:30-11:30 ETHAN HOTEL/CONVENTION COMPLEX, PROSSER, STEELE, VETTER, LONG 30 APRIL HADJIHABIB OFFICE BLOCK tHEDNESDAY PM, 1:00-2:00 2:00-3:00 3:00-4:00 4:00-5:00 OLASON RESORT HOUSING/LODGE, COPPER ALVAREZ TOWN PLAN, VENEZUELA ALVAREZ SHOPPING CORE, VENEZUELA CARLSON, STEELE, NAGEL, KINDIG, LONG eTHUFSDAY AM, 1 HAY 8:30-9:30 9:30-10:30 REO MAY CUNEO SHOPPING CENTER, GRAND JUNCTION DOWNTOWN MIXED USE 10:30-11:30 PM, 1:00-2:00 2:00-3:00 3:00-4:00 4:00-5:00 STUDENT UNION, NEl.V YORK BENDA, HOLDER, KINDIG, VETTER 1 HOORE RICHISSIN ZAVIST STUCKEY HOTEL, WINTER PARK TIVOLI ADDITION, THEATER COHDOHINIUHS CRO\.vELL, KINDIG, VETTER, LONG .fFRIDAY AM, 2 MAY 8:00-8:45 METCALF 8:45-9:30 HENNESEY HIGHLANDS RANCH, TOWN CENTER HIGHLANDS RANCH, Cm1PREHENSIVE & NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 9:30-10:30 STANSEN 10:30-11:30 SLATER REVITILIZATIOU, SANTA FE DR.IVE SCIENCE LAB, DENVER UNIVERSITY PROSSER, KINDIG, VETTER, LONG l"RIDAY PM, 2 MAY 1:00-2:00 HcGINNIS ELDERLY HOUSING 2:00-3:00 KUNKEL WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT, 3:00-4:00 BAKER TRANSIT CENTER, MINNESOTA 4:00-5:00 HUMPHRIES PROSSER, BENDA, KINDIG, HOLDER, LONG ARCHITECTURAL THESIS PRESENTATIONS WILL BE AT THE AURARIA STUDENT CENTER CONFERENCE ROOMS SCHEDULES NC'T AVAILABLE AT THIS TH1E FOR L.A. AND PLANNING PROGRAMS. URBAN DESIGN: MONDAY PM, 28 APRIL 3:00+ STRUBER 3:00+ ASHLEY STUDENT HOUSING, AURARIA CONDOMINIUNS, CHERRY CREEK BALT /

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SUNilAY MONDAY 0 TUESDAY "'!(-It: DD 1 1 :Ot!J ... WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 0 "I"W-11-iA.T-rAN • '' t:>Ol-Pt\ 7pM 0 F I L.M SfRJ CS, '310 . rz:. c') 1 -z; 4: 1.; I 1 1c; cl I