Citation
Laminations, October, 1980

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Title:
Laminations, October, 1980
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
OCT. 1980
AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION
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LAMIIMOCnaNS
FUNDING: Deezine Club
The College of Environmental Design UCD Alumni
American Institute of Architects
STAFF: John David Powers, editor
Paul Worrell Willie Chiang Les Nelken Said Mahboubi Mark Jacobs Sara Semple Bob Perkins George Schusler Richard Bernstein Pelle Wahl in
Special thanks to:
David Friedman Paul Hopper Blue Green Mike Collins Dave Thomas
V&. FRIEDMAN
Laminations is a publication of the entire College of Environmental Design. Hopefully, this publication can be a step towards creating a closer relationship between the environmental disciplines.
One of the unique aspects to UCD is the fact that all the design disciplines share the same building and have a greater opportunity to learn from one another. Unfortunately, it seems to be more common to set up artificial territories and not take advantage of the possibilities.
Laminations is just one place where we can begin to communicate.
Laminations invites contributions from all faculty, students, and professionals in the Colorado design and planning fields.
EDITOR
Cover photo: "Versailles," by Blue Green
Mailing address: Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editng
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space.
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer.
The newspaper office is located .in Room 303 of the Bromley Building.
Meetings are held weekly at 12:30 Wednesdays. Everyone is welcome.


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
3
OPEN HOUSE
SATURDAY'OCT. 18,1380 4 PM TO 6 PM |
WINE AND CHEESE SERVED


IMAGINE... Paul Rudolph's "Yale School of Art and Architecture" transported and rebuilt on the VC Denver campus. Well, if they could move the London Bridge to Arizona, then certainly...Well. Well...
Yale certainly has not shown the respect that Rudolph's building so properly deserves. And, UCD, well UCD is obviously starving for a symbol of prestige. Imagine.••
This is but one alternative being discussed as the College of Environmental Design enters a new evolutionary stage in its development, just a few years after moving its graduate school to the Denver campus.
One of the changes being discussed is for each campus to have its own dean and administration, much like UCLA, Harvard, and Princeton where the graduate school is not directly connected to an undergraduate department. The name of the school in Denver might also be changed to the "University of Colorado Graduate School of Design and Planning."
In a separate, but related matter, a new building is being planned for the "West Bank" (Aurar-ia Campus)•
All of this discussion began in earnest on May 2 when former dean, Dwayne Nuzum, requested that


Dan Schler chair "The College of Environmental Design in the 80*s Task Force." The purpose of this task force was "to initiate discussion concerning the development and alternatives for. the college in the next decade. More specifically the Task Force was to develop alternative governance models for the college and to address the related implications of each alternative.
Original Task force members included Professors Davis Holder and Attila Lawrence from the UC Denver Campus; Professors Gerald.Cross and Mike Martin from the UC Boulder Campus; one student representative from each campus, and two professional practitioners, Phillip Flores and William Muchow, both of Denver.
issues...
The Task Force met on May 15, 1980, to review the status and discuss alternatives for the future of the College of Environmental Design. The current prevailing attitudes, staff alternatives, and structures of each campus were discussed and compared. On reviewing alternative program arrangements, some of the major issues and considerations were as follows:
At its June 5th meeting, the Task Force studied presentations about each of the options. The Task Force began to solidify its position by recognizing one alternative superior to the others.
The Task Force reinforced this view by naming an Acting Dean at each campus to temporarily replace Dean Nuzum.
On July 15, the Task Force presented the product of its research and investigation to the College of Environmental Design. This report outlines the history of the college, examines the societal need and purpose of the college, and discusses in general and specific terms, the various options researched.
alternatives...
Three specific alternatives were proposed:
—One dean, strongly integrated programs approach;
—Two deans, undergraduate, professional, and graduate education proposal;
—Statewide 2-2-2 Environmental Design and professional education proposal.
The Task Force temporarily suspended its duties with the intention of involving the college community in the process of determining the future administrative organization of the school.The Task Force did so with the recommendation to the college that the two dean option was,in their opinion, the most favorable.
This recommendation has met opposition from several people, including Mike Smith, director of the Center for Community Development and Design. The basic rational for opposition is that the recommendation of the Task Force might result in a failure to fully utilize the faculty and already limited resources of the two campuses.
The two most recent meetings have been publicly held in Boulder. Each meeting attracted about one hundred people.
proposal...
As a consequence of these meetings, it was decided to propose to the students, faculty, and administration of each campus the following :
—that the "College of Environmental Design" be renamed "the College of Design and Planning." The Boulder program would then be referred to as the "School of Environmental Design," and the Denver program would be known as the "Graduate School of Design and Planning;" and
—a student/faculty advisory committee will be formed to coordinate the two programs.
Denver Resident Dean John Prosser plans to schedule an "all school" meeting to discuss the future of the college, as well as
proposed name changes for the graduate program.
-Establish a quality comprehensive design education; -Serve and respond to state resources and services; -Prevent duplication and fragmentation through an enriched program;
-Establish a unified political front;
-Maximize utilization of instructional and physical resources;
-Recognize values, strengths, and benefits of all existing programs.
The prevailing attitude was that the Denver and Boulder campuses were separate entities, each having a unique direction and purpose. Because of this, each campus should continue its unique goals with separate administrators. Institutional .methods of sharing faculty and resources between the two campuses should also be provided, according to the recommendat ions


DEVON CARLSON AWARDED AIA SILVER MEDAL
JD Powers
DeVon H. Carlson, FAIA, professor and former dean of the College of Environmental Design, has been awarded the "Silver Medal" by the American Institute of Architects.
The award was given at the annual conference of the AIA/Western Mountain Region in Salt Lake City on October 11.
The Silver Medal is the highest award given for architecture in the region. It is awarded for distinguished contributions to the architectural, political, social or natural environment of the community, state or region.
During his 37-year career as a full-time educator, Devon Carlson directed the development of architectural education at the University of Colorado from a point of non-existence to one of full college status, providing both undergraduate and graduate programs in architecture and related fields.
Related to his teaching activities has been the development;, through co-authorship, of three publications: one directed specifically to design studio usage, one to general reader-ship, and the third grew out of his NCARB examination writing activities.
As a faculty member at C-U, Carlson’s major responsibilities have always been in the area of public service. These contributions have been supplemented by service on the State Registration Board, local citizen's study groups reporting respectively to the city planning director, school superintendents and numerous public organizations.
He has also participated in institutes, workshops and seminars, both on and off campus and has conducted in-plant training programs for both national and local groups. For many years he has been called upon to direct awards programs and to serve on awards juries.
Dev Carlson's career has uniquely combined a deep involvement in education for professional service - both to the profession and to the public it serves.
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THE VISIBLE ARCHITECT
WESTERN MOUNTAIN REGION /AIA 1980 CONFERENCE SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN POLICE BEAT
Willie Chiang IDs:
Public* Safety has asked the College if we would request all of our students who work in the Bromley Building after hours to obtain a photo ID. This will be helpful to them in that they will know you are authorized to be in the building after hours. From time to time we have transients and unauthorized people going thru the building, which is a serious theft problem for Security and the College. Also, if a student becomes ill, it would be helpful for Security to know you are a student here. Your cooperation in this matter will be greatly appreciated. You may obtain the Photo ID in the Student Center building, Room 210,Mon.-Thur. 9:30-11:30 and 2:00-6:00. All student IDs cost $1.00. (629-3185)
THEFT:
Please do not leave valuables unattended.
BIKES:
Diring the daytime, please do not bring your bikes onto the floor areas. In the case of a fire, someone might fall over a bike that is parked in the aisles.
LIQUOR:
There is only one place in the Bromley building that is authorized to have liquor, and that is the second floor of the building, for special occasions only, with the request being processed thru AHEC beforehand. We do not wish to jeopardize this privilege for the special times.
Also, liquor could be a serious problem for the students if students are not authorized to have it. Auraria's position is that students with liquor in their possession when not an authorized function, may be dismissed, YOUR COOPERATION IN THIS MATTER WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.
DOGS:
We all love them, but they are not allowed in the building at any time


ROYAL
TECH
Per "Pelle" Wahlin
^ /mwUnjh'P* funs. ’JaMy
Far away, very far up north, where many beleive that polar bears walk in the streets and that icebergs are common, they actually educate architects. Although the country is located at the same latitude as Alaska the climate is relatively mild and all igloos melt. It is the land of the midnight sun - SWEDEN. Being a small country, it is often mixed up with Switzerland, but I promise you no swede is a swiss.
Three institutions in Sweden offer education in architecturer all of them tuition-free and government-operated. The school in Stockholm is probably the most popular, because the town is such a wonderful city to live in. However only 80-90 students are accepted there each year to a strictly professional five year program including thesis and four months of internship. The program is in some ways comparable to the program at UCD, but although not called a masters it is our first professional degree.Two postgraduate programs are also offered, one two years and another four years including a dissertation. For this there are a fixed number of fellowships and for other higher education the central government provides grants and loans to all students who need aid.
The architectural school is a department of the Royal Institute of Technology, but is located within the towns street pattern some 1000 feet from the campus. This separation makes good sense in view of the traditional rivalry between architects and engineers at the campus. The architectural building is generally regarded as the ugliest building in Stockholm, but typically not among architects. It was built in 1970 designed in a brutalic high-tech manner by a former professor. All materials are clearly shown giving good (?) illustrative examples of building techniques to students. What people in general don’t like about the building is the main facade showing its concrete frame and blocks. Other facades are covered with copper.

The main building is L-shaped in plan and the entrance is at the centre. At the first floor you find administrative offices, lecture halls, classrooms and library. The library is very popular because of a cosy place to read magazines and newspapers. On three additional stories there are large studios and rooms for teachers and researchers. In a lower building surrounding an inner courtyard, superb for parties in spring, we have ateliers, workshops, full-scale lab, acoustics lab, photo


Main brutalic facade.
recruitment to studies in means of social class, sex and age. Other important elements were new forms of instructions, recurrent education, links between education and other areas of society, links with research and decentralization of decisionmaking powers and geographical locations.
Tty*) rr-juAl'.
The first two years of the program are meant to give you a thorough knowledge of all basic principles of architecture. Therefor all students take the same classes. The last two years you elect courses and choose different design projects according to your own interest. After that you do your thesis and your internship if you have not already done it. There is a strong emphasis on discussing and analyzing. The schools mission is not to provide the offices with production-oriented draughtsmen, rather to educate creative self-dependent architects, but opinions are dispersed. Today only pass or failure marks are given.

5.
Students have to spend a lot of time in school, but some donft. There are classes every day nine to five and above that you are expected to go to evening classes in sketching nudes and to extra lectures. For a lot of students it is too much. Wednesdays mornings are reserved for meetings of different kinds which sometimes means sleeping. Students take part in all decision-making and have n strong influence on curriculum and everything that concerns the school. This influence means a lot of work and responsibilities and it definitely gives you a deeper interest in school.
lab and crit space. At the basement there is a parking lot for everyone who is stupid enough to have a car in downtown Stockholm.
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Except for the lobby, where each student has his box for messages (hundreds), the meeting-place is the cafe. Everyone is anxious to get his morning or afternoon tea or coffee. Last year the cafe was closed for a week when our wonderful "tea-ladies" retired and that meant chaos. One could say that the cafe is where all bright ideas are born, big discussions take place and information is traded.
If you want to make your own tea or food there are kitchens for cooking. Many students form groups for making lunch when they get tired of all the restaurants.
There are approximately 400. students and a couple of hundred researchers, teachers and other employees. (Research is an important part of the Swedish higher education system). The average age in the first year is 23-24 and people have very different backgrounds varying from some who have worked as architects to those who have no experience at all. Half of the students are female as in all academic education. This is much due to the new higher education guidelines that went into effect in 1975. An important element in the reform was broadened


The peaceful inner courtyard.
So, what would a typical day for a student be like? Most students live downtown, but downtown is big. 1 live close to school and 1 am always late as a lot of students are. Because of an old academic tradition classes begin a quarter of an hour after scheduled time and most of us need that. The three to four hours before lunch are usually lectures with 10-80 students. For lunch we go to one of the many restaurants around school if you don't participate in a "cooking-group" which is more fun (and of course cheaper). McDonalds are hardly considered being a proper place to have lunch at. After lunch we have either classes or design studio, where most design is done in groups. When a project is due we more or less live at school for one or a couple of weeks, and we like it!
The Royal Institute of Technology has many traditions. One is that older students take care of new ones. The engineering students' have to make practical jokes, like once they welded a tram to the rail. All first year students also have to make a spectacular play and that is real fun and you get to know each other. At the architectural department we are nicer to newcomers and never force anyone to participate in jokes.The first day in’ school some of the old students take the new ones on a free picnic. We hire an old vintage steamer and cruise on one of the many lakes or the sea. Last year we went to a big castle; the kings new residence since he got sick of all the cars and the pul-lotion around his even bigger castle downtown. All students were served fish and wine and in the evening the party continued with dancing in the courtyard at the school, students are free to use spaces for parties at school.
It is too early to point out the differences between studying in Stockholm and Denver. One could say that the school in Stockholm is probably more concerned about the theoretical and social sides of architecture and it is perhaps more design-oriented. It seems to me like the emphasis is stronger on technical aspects at UCD. There are of course many differences because of the two distinct ways of living, culture and politics. Talking about politics; if you think that Sweden is a socialist or communist state,you are wrong.
We have a mixed capitalistic economy and the government is a coalition between liberals and conservatives. But, the country was governed by social democrats for 44 years , so the socialistic impact is much stronger in Sweden than here.If you think that we have lots of sex, sin and suicide; dispel your illusions - it is all wrong!
Architectural students' kite for the annual Kite competition.


no
ERICKSON
51
Richard Bernstein
Few architects today are doing as much to define and revitalize the cores of North American cities as Canada's Arthur Erickson. Recently chosen over an illustrious group of architects including Cesar Pelli, Lawrence Halprin, Charles Moore, Hugh Hardy, and Frank Gehry in the Los Angeles Bunker Hill Design Competition, Erickson has emerged on the U.S. scene with spectacular beginnings.
The Bunker Hill Design calls for a mixed-use complex consisting of hotel, office and retail space as well as a new museum of modem art on 11 acres in the heart of downtown L.A. It is anticipated that Erickson's project will bring a strong central focus to a city characterized by an amorphous maze of freeways and non-descript buildings and a downtown which has seemingly never really existed.
In Erickson's scheme, the buildings are aligned along a midblock landscaped spine starting with a hotel in the foreground and ending with an office tower. The lower, slanted base structures are residential and the triangular shaped glass notched into the hotel and residential buildings houses part of the museum.
Bunker Hill is not the first time the 55 year old, Vancouver bom Erickson has applied his architectural and urban design talents on such a significant scale. Last year in his native Vancouver, Erickson produced an impressive three block multi-level government complex which includes a seven story courthouse covered with a 53,000 sq. ft. cool green glass roof that slices to street level, exhibition halls, restaurants, theatres waterfalls, a skating rink, plazas, offices, a library, and perhaps the most extensive urban planting of trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers in any North American city. The project includes more than 50,000 indigenous maples, dogwoods, pines, junipers,rhododendrons, yews and creeping roses, In some green areas traffic cannot be seen or heard over the splashing of waterfalls. All this from an architect who has said he takes a landscape approach to architecture and an architectural approach to landscape.
Erickson's previous major projects are Simon Fraser University, The University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology, Expo 67's Man in the Community Building and the Canadian Pavillion at Expo 70 in Osaka Japan which won the top architectural award amongst 1000 buildings from 78 countries.
After studying architecture at McGill in 1946, Erickson was invited to apprentice with Frank Lloyd Wright. Instead he chose to accept a travelling scholarship which allowed him to be. immersed in European and Japanese Architecture, the latter which has strongly influenced his approach to combining a building with its site. Erickson points to three underlying principles which affect his philosophy towards architectural design. These include Site, Light and Cadence.
Bunker Hill Design Winner
Law Courts Complex, Vancouver


Following Wright’s "Organic" design philosophy, Erickson has defined architecture to mean "unifying the duality of site and building - which implies that the building cannot be removed from its setting and studied as a seperate entity. It is the dialogue between building and setting that is the essence of architecture." (Photo: Eppich Residence, Vancouver)
Light
For Erickson, no matter what the subject or location the quality of local light will eventually determine the architectural style. "The importance of technique - of applied technology - has been overstated in ohr views of historical development. Most techniques had been known at least up to the nineteenth century, for several thousand years, and can hardly be invoked to explain the proliferation of styles during that long period. " Erickson believes that each culture had found a perfect solution for its climate - one that not only looked good but also complemented the setting."
(Photo: Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver)


Cadence
Cadence refers to the rhythm of a building. "In its simplest form, as in music, rhythm involves repetition.-which can be monotonous or exciting, stately or graceful, heavy or light.. At a more sophisticated level, architecture offers many possibilities of overlaying various rhythms - rhythm in the overall structure, in details of the structure, in the size of spaces which the structure supports and in the patterns and textures of the surface materials. Stairs add another dimension for the rhythm of the ascent or descent is strongly kinaesthetic. (Photo: Law Courts, Vancouver)
In addition to the Bunker Hill Project, Erickson is currently designing a whole new city in Kuwait, a new ministry of foreign affairs building in Saudi Arabia and a tourist hotel in the Peoples Republic of China.
Philip Johnson has called Erickson "by far the greatest architect in Canada and maybe the greatest on this continent."
Whether this assessment is accurate or not hardly seems relevent for it is undeniably true that Arthur Erickson is rapidly earning the title of "City Core Creator".
notes from dolores...
Willie Chiang THANKS:
Dolores would like to thank the students for the extra cleaning last week when there were staff visitors through the building. It was very much appreciated.
KEYS:
If you wish to be in the building after hours, please fill out a key request card in the office. It takes about a week to ten days to process a key, so please allow time. You pick them up at Auraria Physical Plant, under the Lawrence St. viaduct, at a cost of $3.00 which is reimbursed after you return the key.
COPYING:
There is a copy machine on the second floor of Bromley in the office. Copies cost .05 a copy.
We only ask that the copy Room be kept reasonably clean.
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES:
The office is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The three staff members will be happy to help you with any problems. Dolores Hasseman, Donna Lee and our newest staff member- Joy Breeze.
PORTFOLIOS:
We have a few portfolios left and would appreciate students picking them up as soon as possible. Please see Donna.
DIPLOMA CARDS:
If you plan to graduate in December, please obtain a diploma card from the office, fill it out and return it to the College office by October 15.
PHOTO LAB:
The faculty person in charge is Gary Crowell, and the student coordinator is Erich Hill.
Time for use are posted on the door.
MODEL SHOP:
The faculty person in charge is Jeff Samson, and the student coordinator is Greg Gidez.
Time for use are posted on the door.


EVENTS
ESSHM €§MIPET1T1©M
"Forum Eighty", a seminar on architectural education in the 1980Ts and beyond, will be hosted by the Temple University ASC/AIA Chapter in Philadelphia November 26th through 29th. Architectural educator Serge Chermayeff will be the featured speaker. Architectural design projects will presented to the students by such firms as Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown, Mitchell/Guir-gola, and Geddes, Brecker, Qualls, Cunningham. Registration is $39 if received before Oct. 31,
$45 for late registration. Further information is available from announcements posted in Bromley or your ASC/AIA Student Contact.
CHAIPTI
The Denver Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) presents the following upcoming events.
10/18 1:00 pm, UCD Open House, Bromley.
4:00 pm, Reception, 2nd Floor, Bromley.
10/20 Noon, Luncheon program "Design Education for the 80*s", with UCD Architect/Administrators Dwayne Nuzum, John Prosser, and Gary Long. Reservations are due Oct. 16, fee is $9.50 for non-members.
10/22 5:30 pm, Interior Architecture Committee
Meeting featuring reports from Chris Nims and Roger Crosby on the AIA National Interior Architecture Meeting in New York, Chapter Office, 1420 Larimer.
10/31 5:00 - 7:00 pm, Architectural Firm Open
House, Morgan Associates, 1215 Lawrence St., Suite 270.
The Tile Council of America and ASC/AIA have announced the Council’s Fall 1980 Design Competi tion, "Visitor’s Center at the Washington Monument." The Center, programmed at 15,000 square feet, will have dual function as a waiting area for the Monument itself and as welcoming station for visitors to Washington, D.C. Judging areas will include functional requirements, context, energy efficiency, and innovative use of tile products. Resources available upon payment of the $5.00 Registration Fee are a site plan, section and elevation of the Monument, a map of Washington, and a handbook of ceramic tile products. Presentation requirements specify not more than four 18" x 24" sheets mounted on 1/4" foamcore. Prizes are $2250(First), $1150 (Second), $850(Third) as well as five Honorable Mentions at $350 each. Registration Fee is due not later than October 29, 1980, and all final submissions are due November 19, 1980. Annouce-ments are posted ih Bromley Building or in "ASC/AIA News". For further information, contact
ASC/AIA
1735 New York Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006


TDQL5
â–¡ F THE TRHDE
Les Nelken
Itfs three A.M. and only a few hours before we go to the Presentation Chamber. The lightpen is getting heavier and heavier, the buttons harder to push. I can’t decide whether this wall of the building I’m designing should be marble or plastisteel. Whatever I choose better be good because our project design is supposed to stay up at least two weeks on-site. And people get bored fast...
Maybe a subtle onyx finish? 1*11 see how it looks. I turn to my design terminal and type it in, the words move across my dim reflection in the readout screen. I look at my holo—model as the onyx finish appears on it and note what it does for the design. Not much. I won’t erase it completely though, better store it in case I want to look at it later. At this time of night decisions don’t come easy, not with a data bank full of alternatives. I bet decisions were easier in the old days. Hell, I bet when they used to build models out of cardboard and wood no one had to stay up all night. And I guess architecture had more meaning back then. Not like nowadays...
My mind drifts back to my Architectural History class, and what was discussed there.
The computer and the laser brought about some solutions in the business, before they themselves brought about the Big Bright Idea.
By the mid 1980*s computers became small and cheap enough for architects to own and use. At first they were mostly used just for bookkeeping and cost estimation. But then came the perfection of lower cost, computerized drafting machines, and the development of drawing terminals. With the fusion of the two, an archi tect could loosely sketch and dimension (as he would on bumwad) a floor plan, elevation, or detail using a lightpen on the screen of the drawing terminal. The computer and drafting machine would straighten all lines, draw and dimesion it to scale. The computer could auto-


matically correct any dimesioning errors, improper use of building materials, and inform the architect of any building code or zoning violations. It could calculate square footage and, knowing what it had drawn and being tied into a central data network, could give accurate cost estimates based on the most current materials, equipment, and construction costs, even taking construction time and inflation rates into account. It used to be that contractors could, during bidding negotiations, look for inconsistencies between drawings and specifications and bid on whatever would cost them less. Later, when the architect would demand what he had originally intended to be done, the contractor would point out the incosistency, point at his contract, and charge for an extra.
But the architectural office computer eliminated this problem since it knew what it had drawn and what the specs said. If any inconsistencies existed, it would let the architect know often with colorful comments on the architects organizational ability.
Of course professional draftsmen weren't very happy about all this. Soon there were no professional draftsmen.
The next big advancement in the tools of the trade was holography. Bom of laser light, holography grew to a highly developed visual media by the late 1990's. With movies and television in three dimensions, the line between reality and illusion became very thin. Holo-theatres became land users, sometimes taking up several square miles. Why sit and watch a movie of, say the Oil Wars, when you can walk around it, walk through it, be in it, dodging images of bullets, missies, and parts of human bodies? Great fun on a Sunday afternoon.
In architecture, holography became an alternative to building scale models out of paper and plastic. Three-dimensional holo-images could be constructed, and changed when necessary, in a matter of minutes simply by pressing a few buttons. Sections could be cut through the holo-image just as easily. Building material types and even complete building details could be stored in the computer and added to the model when needed.
With a portable projector, the architect could show the client what his building would look like, full scale, right on the site. In architecture schools f^.nal presentations began to be done in large Presentation Chambers, where
the student's building design, and the surrounding site, could be projected full scale. Also, the jurors could sit and be shown the interior of the student's building by projecting each room around them. One wiseguy in my class, when showing the jury his interior design in just this manner, constructed his holo-projection so that when the public restroom flicked on around them, the jurors found themselves seated on the toilets. That was good for a few laughs. Of course, it wasn't very funny when it turned out he'd forgotten to include one whole side of the building on his full scale, exterior holo-model.
There were fears, naturally, as to what these technological tools would do to the "free artistic spirit" of the architect. But amid all the philosophical bantering, it became increasingly obvious that, with these tools, the architect could design faster and more spontaneously. The computerized production end was very fast, highly efficient, and thus low cost. The business was becoming much more profitable and less tedious. It looked as if Architecture was entering a Golden Age.
But then somebody, I think it was a developer, got a real Bright Idea.
Since holo-images are so absolutely realistic, what does it matter what the actual building looks like, or is made of? By projecting a holo-image around it, you can make the exterior of your building, and parts of the interior, appear to be any form or style you want! A man can leave his Victorian house in the morning and come back to an English Tudor mansion. Meanwhile the building he works in has changed from Chinese Palace to twenty first Century Neo-Baroque. Your fantasies fulfilled and a surprise each day. And so why bother having the actual, permanent structure beneath your holo-image be designed by some fancy architect? No one will see it anyway. Let your building be a standardized cube of standardized parts, cheaply and easily assembled by a contractor. Let the architect design the holo-images you will put on your building...
And the bastard's idea caught on. Almost overnight the architect's role was reduced to a designer of hollow illusions. True, architects still get to develop and lay out floor plans, but the soul of Solid, Total Design was ripped out of his being. It is not as it was.
It's almost time to go to the Presentation Chamber. I'm still not finished. Somehow I don't care...


UCD
AWARD
WINNER
A solar house designed by Richard C. Bernstein, has tied for the grand prize in a national competition for students in architectural schools.
The competition to design the "Energy House of the 80*s" was sponsored by the Association of Student Chapters of the American Institute of Architects and New England Techbuilt, a panel-ized housing manufacturer.
More than 230 entries were submitted. Bernstein aid Ricki Fisher, Louisiana State University, have been awarded $3,500 each, splitting the first and second prizes. Techbuilt has announced to construct both prize homes, one in Washington, D.C., and one near its factory in North Dartmouth, Mass.
The competition objectives called for an energy efficient, single-family residence that would be "exciting, attractive, marketable and buildable" aid that would include the maximum practical passive solar techniques available today.
The home also had to have the capability of including a partial or complete active solar system, aid to be energy-efficient 12 months of the year - in the northeast section of the United States.
This was to be accomplished at a cost of "no more than a conventionally constructed house, given the same size and location."
The contest was suggested as a four-week problem by Gary Crowell, UCD design instructor.
Bernstein, a graduate of the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, has a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and is in the final year at UCD.
oops...
The historic Rinker house - believed to be the second oldest house in the city of Chicago -was demolished in a mistake by a wrecking company, a landmark commission official said.
Community residents said they tried to stop the wrecker from damaging the house, but the crew leader would not believe them when they said the structure was of historical significance.
"I had a signed contract with the owner to tear it down," A1 Cirro, the owner of the wrecking firm, said. "We started the work and then we
Energy House of the Eighties
Bernstein’s design, which features a combination of of active and passive energy concepts, will be published in the next edi^i^n of Crit as well as other publications. Drawings of the prizewinning design on on display on the se‘*o~d level Bromley Building.
Congradulations to Rich on his winning design!
found the sign on the side of the building saying it was a historical landmark.
"By that time it was 50 percent torn down so we just finished the job."
"The house was ugly but it was significant," Bill Serviss of the Commission on Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks said. "I feel like someone kicked by mother and knocked her down."
The house had a balloon frame, a construction innovation invented in Chicago. It was also built in the Gothic revival style - a style rarely used during the period of its construction.


T7
SCHEDULES
PHOTOGRAPHY DARK ROOM SCHEDULE
MODEL SHOP SCHEDULE
MONDAY
*8-1 p.m. *1-5 p.m.
TUESDAY
*8 - 12noon *12 - 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY *8-1 p.m. *1-6 p.m.
THURSDAY *8 - 1p.m.
*1 - 5p.m.
*5 - 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
*8 - 1p.m.
MONDAY
Tentatively closed-(need assist) *8 - 12noon Chris Penney - assistant
*1-5 p.m.
Chris Penney - assistant TUESDAY
Tentatively closed-(need assist) ” 12noon
*2:30 - 6:30 p.m.
Mark Boulette - assistant WEDNESDAY
Tentatively closed-(need assist] ~ *2noon
Chris Penney - assistant Steve Hourigan - "
Mark Boulette - "
*1-8 p.m.
THURSDAY *8 - 12noon *1-5 p.m.
Mark Boulette - assistant
FRIDAY
*8 - 12noon *1-5 p.m.
Furniturd Design 600 Jeff Sampson
Adrienne Laws - shop assistant CLOSED
Mark Frauenglass - shop assist
Furniture Design 600 Jeff Sampson
Mark Frauenglass - shop assist
CLOSED
Mark Fitzwilliam - shop assist
Eric Hill - teacher assistant Mark Frauenglass - shop assist
** Coordinator - Greg Gidez (4th floor studio) ***Seminars will all be scheduled on Thursday nights. ***Shop will be closed at all other times ***For all other photo use,refer to 4th floor office.
** Coordinator - Eric Hill (4th floor studio)
*** Lunch (12-lpm) - Eric Hill
*** Shop will be closed at all other times.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION OCT. 1980 . •

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UNIVERSITY . OF COLORADO AT DENVER FUNDING: STAFF: Deezine Club The College of Environmental Design UCD Alumni .Ameriean Institute oE Architec.ts John David Powers, editor Paul Worrell Willie Chiang Les Nelken Said Mahbonbi Hark Jacobs Sara Semple Bob Perkins George Schusler Richa.rd Be_.rustein Pelle Wahlin Special thanks to: Dav"id Friedman Paul Hopper 'Blue Green Mike Collins Dave Thomas Laminations is a publication of the entire College of Environmental Design. Hopefully, this publication can be a step towards creating a closer relationship between the environmental disciplines. One of the unique aspects to UCD is the fact that all the design disCiplines share the same building and have a greater opportunity to learn from one another. Unfortunately, it seems to be more common to set up artificial territories and not take advantage of the possibilities. Laminations is just one place where we can begin to communicate. 'Laminations invites contributions from all faculty, students, and professionals in the Colorado design and planning fields. EDITOR Cover photo: "Versailles," by Blue Green -------0..8. FRIEOM/\N Mailing address: Lami.nations :./ o College of Ewircnmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to groJp editng Articles and letters must be signed and ac c.ompanied by a mailing address Materials are subject to group editing for Leasons of clarity and space. Opinions expresscc ere not necessarily those of anyone oth=r than the writer. The newspaper offiee is located in Room 303 of the Bromley BuiJ.ding. Meetings are held weekly at 12:30 Wednesdays. Everyone is come.

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN SATURDAY • OCT. 18,1980 4PM TO &PM WINE AND CHEESE SERVED c c::J

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4 Sara Semple IMAGINE ••• Paul Rudolph's "Yale School of Art and Architecture" transported and rebuilt on the UC Denver campus. Well, if they could move the London Bridge to Arizona, then certainly ••• Well. Well ••• Yale certainly has not shown the respect that Rudolph's building so properly deserves. And, UCD, well UCD is obviously starving for a symbol of prestige. Imagine ••• This is but one alternative being discussed as the College of Environmental Design enters a new evolutionary stage in its development, just a few years after moving its graduate school to the Denver campus. One of the changes being discussed is for each campus to have its own dean and administration, much like UCLA, Harvard, and Princeton where the graduate school is not directly connected to an undergraduate The name of the school in Denver mjght also be changed to the "University of ColoradoGraduate School of Design and Planning." In a separate, but related matter, a new building is being planned for the "West Bank" (Aurar ia Campus) • All of this discussion began in earnest on May 2, when former dean, Dwayne Nuzum, requested that ' 8

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-------------Dan Schler chair "The College of Environmental Design in the 80's Task Force." The purpose of this task force was "to initiate discussion concerning the development and alternatives for. the college in the next decade. More specifically the Task Force was to develop alternative governance models for the college and to address the related implications of each alternative. Original Task force members included Professors Davis Holder and Attila Lawrence from the UC Denver Campus; Professors Gerald_Cross and Mike Martin from the UC Boulder Campus; one student representative from each campus, and two professional practitione1-s, Phillip Flores and william Muchow, both of Denver. issues ... The Task Force met on May 15, 1980, to review the status and discuss alternatives for the future of the College of Environmental Design. The current prevailing attitudes, staff alternatives, and structures of each campus were discussed and compared. On reviewing alternative program arrangements, some of the major issues and considerations were as follows: -Estaplish a quality comprehensive design education; -Serve and respond to state resources and services; -Prevent duplication and fragmentation through an enriched program; -Establish a unified political front; -Maximize utilization of instructional and physical resources; -Recognize values, strengths, and benefits of all existing programs. At its June 5th meeting, the Task Force studied presentations about each of the options. The Task Force began to solidify its position by recognizing one alternative superior to the others. The prevailing attitude was that the Denver and Boulder campuses were separate entities, each having a unique direction and purpose. Because of this, each campus should continue its unique goals with separate administrators. Institutional.methods of sharing faculty and resources between the two campllses should also be provided, according to the recoiiDDendations The Task Force reinforced this view by naming an Acting Dean at each campus to temporarily replace Dean Nuzum. On July 15, the Task Force presented the product of its research and investigation to the College of Environmental Design. This report outlines the history of the college, examines the societal need and purpose of the college, and discusses in general and specific terms, the various options researched. alternatives ... Three specific alternatives were proposed: --One dean, strongly integrated programs approach; --Two deans, undergraduate, professional, and graduate education proposal; --Statewide 2-2-2 Environmental Design and professional education proposal. The Task Force temporarily suspended its duties with the intention of involving the college community in the process of determining the future administrative organization of the school.The Task Force did so with the recommendation to the college that the two dean option was,in their opinion, the most favorable. This recommendation has met opposition from several people, including Mike Smith, director of the Center for Community Development and Design. The basic rational for opposition is that the recommendation of the Task Force might result in a failure to fully utilize the faculty and already limited resources of the two campuses. The two most recent meetings have been publicly held in Boulder. meeting attracted about one hundred people. proposal ... As a consequence of these meetings, it was decided to propose to the students, faculty, and administration of each campus the following: --that the "College of Environmental Design" be renamed "the College of Design and Planning." The Boulder program would then be referred to as the "School of Environmental Design," and the Denver .program would be known as the "Graduate School of Design and Planning;" and --a student/faculty advisory committee will be formed to coordinate the two programs. Denver Resident Dean John Prosser plans to schedule an "all school" meeting to discuss the future of the college, as well as proposed name changes for the graduate program.

PAGE 6

B ------------------------DEVON CARLSON A\NARDED AlA SILVER MEDAL JD Powers DeVon M. Carlson, FAIA, professor and former dean of the College of Environmental Des _ign, has been awarded the "Silver Medal" by the American Institute of Architects. The award was given at the annual conference of the AlA/Western Mountain Region in Salt Lake City on October 11. The Silver Medal is the highest award given for in the region. It is awarded for distinguished contributions to the architectural, political, social or natural environment of the community, state or region. During his 37-year career as a full-time educator, Devon Carlson directed the development of architectural education at the Univer sity of Colorado from a point of non-existence to one of full college status, providing both undergraduate and graduate programs in architecture and related fields. Related to his teaching activities has been the development:, through co-authorship, of three publicat{ons: one directed specifically to design studio usage, one to general readership, and the third grew out of his NCARB examination writing activities. As a faculty member at C-U, Carlson's major responsibilities have always been in the area of public service. These contributions have been supplemented by service on the State Registration Board, local citizen's study groups reporting respectively to the city planning director, school superintendents and numerous public organizations. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICE BEAT Willie Chiang IDs: Public Safety has asked the College if we would request all of our students who work in the Bromley Building after hours to obtain a photo ID. This will be helpful to them in that they will know you are authorized to be in the building after hours. From time to time we have transients and unauthorized people going thru the building, which is a serious theft problem for Security and the College. Also, if a student becomes ill, it would be helpful for Security to know you are a student here. Your cooperation in this matter will be greatly appreciated. You may obtain the Photo ID in the Student Center building, Room 210,Mon.-Thur. 9:30-11:30 and 2:00-6:00. All student IDs cost $1.00. (629-3185) THEFT: PRase do not leave valuables unattended. He has also participated in institutes, workshops and seminars, both on and off campus and has conducted in-plant training programs for both national and local groups. For many years he has been called upon to direct awards programs and to serve on awards juries. Dev Carlson's career has uniquely combined a deep involvement in education for professional service -both to the profession and to the public it serves. ' ' t ' t ' ' ' • ' ' ' t ' t t ' t t t t t t • t t ' ' ' ff q • t: ' tt t. '' ' t ' • • t t t t • ' f ' ' ' ' t t t ' ''''' ,,,,. THl VISIBLl ARCHITlCT WESTERN MOUNTAIN REGION I AlA 1980 CONFERENCE SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH DESIGN BIKES: the daytime, please do not bring your bikes onto the floor areas. In the case of a fire, someone might fall over a bike that is parked in the aisles. LIQUOR: There is only one place in the Bromley building that is authorized to have liquor, and that is the second floor of the building, for special occasions only, with the request being processed thru AHEC beforehand. We do not wish to jeopardize this privilege for the special times. Also, liquor could be a serious probiem for the students if students are not authorized to have it. Auraria's position is that students with liquor in their possession when not an authorized function, may be dismissed. YOUR COOPERATION IN THIS MATTER WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED. DOGS: We all love them, but they are not allowed in the building at any time

PAGE 7

ROYA L Per "Pelle'' W
PAGE 8

B ----Main brutalic facade. lab and crit space. At the basement there is a parking lot for everyone who is stupid enough to have a car in downtown Stockholm. Except for the lobby, where each student has his box for messages (hundreds), the meeting-place is t he cafe. Everyone is anxious to get his morning or afternoon tea or coffee. Last year the cafe was closed for a week when our wonderful "tea-ladies" retired and that meant chaos. One could say that the cafe is where all bright ideas are born, big discussions take place and information is traded. If you want to make your own tea or food there are kitchens for cooking. Many students form groups for making lunch when they get tired of all the restaurants. There are approximately 400_students and a couple of hundred researchers, teachers and other employees. (Research is an important of the swedish higher education system). The average age in the first year is 23-24 and people have very different b .ackgrounds varying from some who have worked as architects to those who have no experience at all. Half of the students are female as in all academic education. This is much due to the new higher education guidelines that went into effect in 1975. An important element in the reform was_br0adened recruitment to studies in means of social class, sex and age. Other important elements were new forms of instructions, recurrent education, links between education and other areas of society, links with research and decentralization of decisionmaking powers and geographical locations. The first two years of the program are meant to give you a thorough knowledge of all basic principles of architecture. Therefor all students take the same classes. The last two years you elect courses and choose different design projects according to your own interest. After that you do your thesis and your internship if you have not already done it. There is a strong emphasis on discussing and analyzing. The schools mission is not to provide the offices with production-oriented draughtsmen, rather to educate creative self-dependent architects, but opinions are dispersed. Today only pass or failure marks are given. Students have to spend a lot of time in school, but some don't. There are classes every day nine to five and above that you are expected to go to evening classes in sketching nudes and to extra lec-tures. For a lot of students it is too much. Wed nesdays mornings are reserved for meetings of different kinds which sometimes means sleeping. Students take part iri all decision-making and have a strong influence on curriculum and everything that concerns the school. rhis influence means a lot of work and responsibilities and it definitely gives you a deeper interest in school.

PAGE 9

The peaceful inner courtyard. So, what would a typical day for a student be like? Most students live downtown, but downtown is big. I live close to school and I am always late as a lot of students are. Because of an old academic tradition classes begin a quarter of an hour after scheduled time and most of us need that. The three to four hours before lunch are usually lectures with 10-80 students. For lunch we go to one of the many restaurants around school if you don't participate in a "cooking-group" which is more fun (and of course cheaper). McDonalds are hardly considered being a proper place to have lunch at. After lunch we have either classes or design studio, where most design is done in groups. When a project is due we more or less live at school for one or a couple of weeks, and we like it! The Royal Institute of Technology has many traditions. One is that older students take care of new ones. The engineering students have to make practical jokes, like once they welded a tram to the rail. All first year students also have to make a spectacular play and that is real fun and you get to know each other. At the architectural department we are nicer to newcomers and never force anyone to participate in jokes. The first day in school some of the old students take the new ones on a free picnic. We hire an old vintage steamer and cruise on one of the many lakes or the sea. Last year we went to a big castle; the kings new residence since he got sick of all the cars and the pullotion around his even bigger castle downtown. All students were served fish and wine and in the evening the party continued with dancing in the courtyard at the school. students are free to use spaces for parties at school. It is too early to point out the differences between studying in Stockholm and Denver. One could say that the school in Stockholm is probably more concerned about the theoretical and social sides of architecture and it is perhaps more designoriented. It seems to me like the emphasis is stronger on technical aspects at UCD. There are of course many differences because of the two distinct ways of living, culture and politics. Talking about politics; if you think that Sweden is a socialist or communist state,you are wrong. We have a mixed capitalistic economy and the government is a coalition between liberals and conservatives. But, the country was governed by social democrats for 44 years , so the socialistic impact is much stronger in Sweden than here.If you think that we have lots of sex, sin and suicide; dispel your illusions -it is all wrong! Architectural students' kite for the annual Kite competition.

PAGE 10

I --------------------. --Richard Bernstein Few architects today are doing as much to define and revitalize the cores of North American cities as Canada's Arthur Erickson. chosen over an illustrious group of architects including Cesar Pelli, Lawrence Halprin, Charles Moore, Hugh and Frank Gehry in the Los Angeles Bunker Hill Design Competition, Erickson has emerged on the U.S. scene with spectacular beginnings. The Bunker Hill Design calls for a mixed-use complex consisting of hotel, office and retail space as well as a new museum of modern art on 11 acres in the heart of downtown L.A. It is anticipated that Erickson's project will bring a strong central focus to a city characterized by an amorphous maze of freeways and non-descript buildings and a downtown which has seemingly never really existed. In Erickson's scheme, the buildings are aligned along a midblock landscaped spine starting with a hotel in the foreground and ending with an office tower. The lower, slanted base structures are residential and the triangular shaped glass notched into the hotel and residential buildings houpes part of the museum. Bunker Hill is not the first time the 55 year old, Vancouver born Erickson has applied his architectural and urban design talents on such a significant scale. Last year in his native Vancouver, Erickson produced an impressive three block government complex which includes a seven story courthouse covered with a 53,000 sq. ft. cool green glass roof that slices to street level, exhibition halls, restaurants, theatres waterfalls, a skating rink, plazas, offices, a library, and perhaps the most extensive urban planting of trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers in any North American city. The project includes more than 50,000 in-digenous maples, dogwoods, pines, dendrons, yews and creeping roses, In some green areas traffic cannot be seen or heard over the splashing of waterfalls. All this from an architect who has said he takes a landscape approach to architecture and an archi tectural approach to landscape. Erickson's previous major projects are Simon Fraser University, The University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology, Expo 67's Man in the Community Building and the Canadian Pavillion at Expo 70 in Osaka Japan which won the top architectural . award amongst 1000 buildings from 78 countries. After studying architecture at McGill in 1946, Erickson was invited to apprentice with Frank Lloyd Wright. Instead he chose to accept a travelling scholar• ship which allowed him to immersed in European and Japanese Architecture, the latter which has strongly influenced his approach to combining a building with its site. Erickson points to three underlying principles which affect his philosophy towards architectural design. These include Site, Light and Cadence. Bunker Hill Design Winner Law Courts Complex, Vancouver

PAGE 11

----------------------------------------Site Following Wright's "Organic" design philosophy, Erickson has defined architecture to mean "unifying the duality of site and building -which implies that the building cannot be removed from its setting and studied as a seperate entity. It is the dialogue between building and setting that is the essence of architecture." (Photo: Eppich Residence, Vancouver) Light For Erickson, no matter what the subject or location the quality of local light will eventually determine the architectural style. "The importance of technique of app.lied technology -has been overstated in our views of historical development. Most techniques had been known at least up tc the century, for several thousand years, and can hardly be invoked to explain the pro. liferation of styles during that long period. " Erick-son believes that each culture had found a perfect solution for its climate -one that not only looked good but also complemented the setting." (Photo: Museum of Anthropology,.Vancouver)

PAGE 12

-----------------------------Cadence Cadence refers to the rhythm of a building. "In its simplest form, as in music, rhythm involves repetition.which can be monotonous or exciting, stately or graceful, heavy or light.. At a more sophisticated level, architecture offers many possibilities of overlaying various rhythms -rhythm in the overall structure, in details of the structure, in the size of spaces which the structure supports and in the patterns and textures of the surface materials. Stairs add another dimension for the rhythm of the ascent or descent is strongly kinaesthetic. (Photo: Law Courts, Vancouver) In addition to the Bunker Hill Project, Erickson is currently designing a whole new city in Kuwait, a new ministry of foreign affairs building in Saudi Arabia and a tourist hotel in the Peoples Republic of China. Whether this assessment is accurate or not hardly seems relevent for it is undeniably true that Arthur Erickson is rapidly earning the title of "City Core Creator". Philip Johnson has called Erickson "by far the greatest architect in Canada and maybe the greatest on this continent." notes from dolores ... Willj.e Chiang THANKS: Dolores would like to thank the students for the extra cleaning last week when there were staff visitors through the building. It was very much appreciated. KEYS: If you to be in the building after hours, please fill out a key request card in the office. It takes about a week to ten days to process a key, so please allow time. You pick them up at Auraria Physical Plant, under the Lawrence St. viaduct, at a cost of $3.00 which is reimbursed after you return the key. COPYING: There is a copy machine on the second floor of Bromley in the office. Copies cost .OS a copy. We only ask that the Room be kept reasonably clean. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES: The office is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The three staff members will be happy to help you with any problems. Dolores Hasseman, Donna Lee and our newest staff member-Joy Breeze. PORTFOLIOS: We have a few portfolios left and would appreciate students picking them up as soon as possible. Please see Donna. DIPLOMA CARDS : Ifyou plan to graduate in December, please obtain a diploma card from the office, fill it out and return it to the College office by October 15. PHOTO LAB: The faculty person in charge is Gary Crowell, and the student coordinator is Erich Hill. Time for use are posted on the door. MODEL SHOP: The faculty person in charge is Jeff Samson, and the student coordinator is Greg Gidez. for use are posted on the door.

PAGE 13

II "Forum Eighty", a seminar on architectural education in the 1980's and beyond, will be hosted by the Temple University ASC/AIA Chapter in Philadelphia November 26th through 29th. Architectural educator Serge Chermayeff will be the featured speaker. Architectural design projects will presented to the students by such firms as Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown, Mitchell/Guirgola, and Geddes, Brecker, Qualls, Cunningham. Registration is $39 if received before Oct. 31, $45 late registration. Further information is available from announcements posted in Bromley or your ASC/AIA Student Contact. The Denver Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AlA) presents the following upcoming events. 10/18 10/20 10/22 10/31 1:00 pm, UCD Open House, Bromley. 4:00 pm, Reception, 2nd Floor, Bromley. Noon, Luncheon program "Design Education for the 80's", with UCD Architect/Administrators Dwayne Nuzum, John Prosser, and Gary Long. Reservations are due Oct. 16, fee is $9.50 for non-members. 5:30 pm, Interior Architecture Committee Meeting featuring reports from Chris Nims and Roger Crosby on the AlA National Interior Architecture Meeting in New York, Chapter Office, 1420 Larimer. 5:00 7:00 pm, Architectural Firm Open House, Morgan Associates, 1215 Lawrence St., Suite 270. The Tile Council of America and ASC/AIA have announced the Council's Fall 1980 Design Competition, "Visitor's Center at the Washington Monument." The Center, programmed at 15,000 square feet will have dual function as a waiting area , . for the Monument itself and as welcoming stat1on for visitors to Washington, D.C. Judging areas will include functional requirements, context, energy and innovative use of tile products. available upon payment of the $5.00 Registration Fee are a site plan, section and elevation of the Monument, a map of Washington, and a handbook of ceramic tile products. Presentation requirements specify not more than four 18" x 24" sheets mounted on 1/4" foamcore. Prizes are $2250(First), $1150 (Second), $850(Third) as well as five Honorable Mentions at $350 each. Registration Fee is due not later than October 29, 1980, and all final submissions are due November 19, 1980. Annoucements are posted ih Bromley Building or in "ASC/AIA News". For further information, contact ASC/AIA 1735 New York Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 /

PAGE 14

------Les Nelken ----It's three A.M. and only a few hours before we go to the Presentation Chamber. The lightpen is getting heavier and heavier, the buttons harder to push. I can't decide whether this wall of the building I'm designing should be marble or plastisteel. Whatever I choose better be good because our project design is supposed to stay up at least two weeks on-site. And people get bored fast ••• Maybe a subtle onyx finish? I'll see how it looks. I turn to my design terminal and type it in, the words move across my dim reflection in the readout screen. I look at my halo-model as the onyx finish appears on it and note what it does for the design. Not much. I won't erase it completely though, better store it in case I want to look at it later. this time of night decisions don't come easy, not with a data bank full of alternatives. I bet decisions were easier in the old days. Hell, I bet when they used to build models out of cardboard and wood no one had to stay up all night. And I guess architecture had more meaning back then. Not like nowadays .•• My mind drifts back to my Architectural History class, and what was discussed there. The computer and the laser brought about some solutions in the business, before they themselves brought about the Big Br_ight Idea. By the mid 1980's computers became small and cheap enough for architects to own and use. At first they were mostly used just for bookkeeping and cost estimation. But then came the perfection of lower cost, computerized drafting machines, and the development of drawing terminals. With the fusion of the two, an architect could loosely sketch and dimension (as he would on bumwad) a floor plan, elevation, or detail using a lightpen on the screen of the drawing terminal. The computer and drafting machine would straighten all lines, draw and dimesion it to scale. The computer could auto-

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matically correct any dimesioning errors, improper use of building materials, and inform the architect of any building code or zoning violations. It could calculate square footage and, knowing what it had drawn and being tied into a central data network, could give accurate cost estimates based on the most current materials, equipment, and construction costs, even taking construction time and inflation rates into account. It used to be that contractors could, during bidding negotiations, look for inconsistencies between drawings and specifications and bid on whatever would cost them less. Later, when the architect would demand what he had originally intended to be done, the contractor would point out the incosistency, point at his contract, and charge for an extra. But the architectural office computer eliminated this problem since it knew what it had drawn and what the specs said. If any inconsistencies existed, it would let the architect know often with colorful comments on the architects organizational ability. Of course professional draftsmen weren't very happy about all this. Soon there were no professional draftsmen. The next big advancement in the tools of the trade was holography. Born of laser light, holography grew to a highly developed visual media by the late 1990's. With movies and television in three dimensions, the line between reality and illusion became very thin. Holetheatres became land users, sometimes taking up several square miles. Why sit and watch a movie of, say the Oil Wars, when you can walk around it, walk through it, be in it, dodging images of bullets, missles, and parts of human bodies? Great fun on a Sunday afternoon. In architecture, holography became an alternative to building scale models out of paper and plastic. Three-dimensional bolo-images could be constructed, and changed when necessary, in a matter of minutes simply by pressing a few buttons. Sections could be cut through the boloimage just as easily. Building material types and even complete building details could be stored in the computer and added to the model when needed. With a portable projector, the architect could show the client what his building would look like, full scale, right on the site. In architecture schools presentations began to be done in large Presentation Chambers, where -----the student's building design, and tha surrDunding site, could be projected full scale. Also, the jurors could sit and be shown the interior of the student's building by projecting each room around them. Ope wiseguy in my class, when showing the jury his interior design in just this manner, constructed his bolo-projection so that when the public restroom flicked on around them, the jurors found themselves seated on the toilets. That was good for a few laughs. Of course, it wasn't very funny when it turned out he'd forgotten to include one whole side of the building on his full scale, exterior holo-model. There were fears, naturally, as to what these technological tools would do to the "free artistic spirit" of the architect. But amid all the philosophical bantering, it became increasingly obvious that, with these tools, the architect could design faster and more spontaneously. The computerized production end was very fast, highly and thus low cost. The business was becoming much more profitable and less tedious. It looked as if Architecture was entering a Golden Age. But then somebody, I think it was a developer, got a real Bright Idea. Since bolo-images are so absolutely realistic, what does it matter what the actual building looks like, or is made of? By projecting a holo-image around it, you can make the exterior of your building, and parts of the interior, appear to be any form or style you want! A man can leave his Victorian house in the morning and come back to an English Tudor mansion. Meanwhile the building he worka in has changed from Chinese Palace to twenty first Century Nee-Baroque. Your fantasies fulfilled and a surprise each day. And so why bother having the actual, permanent structure beneath your holo-image be designed by some fancy architect? No one will see it anyway. Let your building be a standardized cube of standardized parts, cheaply and easily assembled by a contractor. Let the architect design the bolo-images you will put on your building ••• And the bastard's idea caught on. Almost overnight the architect's role was reduced to a designer of hollow illusions. True, architects still get to develop and lay out floor plans, but the soul of Solid, Total Design was ripped out of his being. It is not as it was. It's almost time to go to the Presentation Chamber. I'm still not finished. Somehow I don't care •••

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UCD ARD WINNER A solar house designed by Richard C. Bernstein, has tied for the grand prize in a national competition for students in architectural The competition to design the "Energy House of the 80's" was sponsored by the Association of Student Chapters of the American Institute of and New England Techbuilt, a panelized housing manufacturer. More than 230 entries were submitted. Bernstein ani Ricki Fisher, Louisiana State University, have been awarded $3,500 each,' splitting the first and prizes. Techbuilt has announced to construct both prize homes, one in Washington, D.C., and one near its factory in North Dartmouth, M.:Bs. The competition objectives called for an energy efficient, single-family residence that would be attractive, marketable and buildable" anl that would include the maximum practical passive solar techniques available today. The home also had to have the capability of in cbding a partial or complete active solar system, arrl to be energy-efficient 12 months of the year -in the northeast section of the United States. This was to be accomplished at a cost of "no more than a conventionally constructed house, g::iven the same size and location." The contest was suggested as a four-week problem byGary Crowell, UCD design instructor. Bernstein, a graduate of the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, has a master's degree in urban planning from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and is in the final year at UCD. oops ••• The historic Rinkerhouse -believed to be the second oldest house in the city of Chicago was demolished in a mistake by a wrecking com a landmark commission official said. Community residents said they tried to stop the wrecker from damaging the house, but the crew leader would not believe them when said the structure was of historical significance. "I had a signed contract with the owner to tear it down," Al Cirro, the owner of the wrecking firm, said. "We started the work and tben we House of the Eighties Bernstein's design, which features a combination of of active and passive energy concepts. will be pub lished in the next of Crit as well as other puhlications. Dra\o1i:1.gs of the prize ,d. nn.:'_ng design on on d l8pJ ay on the seto-d l eve 1 Bromley Building. Congradulations to Rich on his design! found the sign on the side of the building saying it was a historical landmark. "By that time it was 50 percent torn down so we just finished the job." "The house was ugly but it was signi!icant," Bill Serviss of the Commission on Chicago Historical and Architectural Landmarks said. "I feel like someone kicked by mother and knocked her-down." The house had a balloon trame, a construction innovation invented in Chicago. It was also built in the Gothic revival style -a style rarely used during the period of its construction.

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,-... . s:: Q) Q) 1-4 c.!) Q) ::l .-t I=Q >-. ..0 '-" >-. .-t cu .j,.l H "' m s:: bO 0 .-t 0 I=Q = .. Q) s:: ::l .j,.l p.. 0 s:: r-f -m .j,.l s:: ::l 0 r:.. = PHOTOGRAPHY DARK ROOM SCHEDULE MONDAY *8 -1 p.m. *1 -5 p.m. TUESDAY *8 12noon *12 5 p.m. WEDNESDAY *8 -1 p.m. *1 6 p.m. THURSDAY *8 1p.m. *1 -5p.in. *5 9:30 p.m. FRIDAY *8 lp.m., Tentatively closed-(need Chris Penney -assistant Chris Penney -assistant Tentatively closed-(need Mark Boulette -assistant Tentati:vely closed-(need Chris Penney -assistant Steve Hourigan Mark Boulette " " Mark Boulette -assistant assist) assist) assist) ** Coordinator Greg Gidez (4th floor studio) ***Seminars will all be scheduled on Thursday will be closed at all other times ***For all oeher photo use-refer to 4th floor nights. ' . . office. r MODEL SHOP SCHEDULE MONDAY *8 12noon *1 -5 p.m. TUESDAY *8 12noon *2:30 6:30 WEDNESDAY *8 12noon *1 -8 p.m. THURSDAY . *8 12noon *1 -5 p.m. FRIDAY *8 . 1Znoon *1 -5 p.m. p.m. Design 600 Jeff Sampson Adrienne Laws -shop assistant CLOSED Mark Frauenglass -shop assist Design 600 Jeff Sampsori Mark Frauenglass -shop assist CLOSED Mark Fitzwilliam shop a ss is t Eric Hill -teacher assistant Mark Frauenglass -shop assist Coordinatqr' Eric,Hill (4th studio) *** Lunch (12-1pm) -Eric Hill *** Shop will be at all other times. ..... .A: .... ,. .. . .,

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SUND-'Y MONDAY TUESDAY UILHA HAJt>fL 14-'rft L-L"!Z-it4:. NtJt'lJ -f:.IJ(j p,., e f:;IL-1-1 IZ.,•t;;', z,: )':f. -t1 'f. 15"4 C..."r=J " • e:Jfl=--rr+E. (p e..ge.. w()t-1" -OUCAlfDM Felt. Ao' S. "' + 4f,J5b L u"' "e J.l4. WEDNESDAY T JA AU-0 fo1 rz. . H( o ii e '"e.-I:U\JN": THURSDAY FRIDAY FoR. '' A 1-0 l'tt !::-,. T tt.JAl-T ,i.lr7E eJF Pf'IA t-4 e>F TH'E > 'Y W,i-U 5":e -7: t!XJ pJ'1. •• ,A(tQt . t-\o 0,1:; I 1 L..t&.Hf 11-1"'-=' -n "1e. • e .--rrtt=. Veiii!M7 _, L.J tJ.r6tiT l..A"l _. L 1..15' 1--10 SATURDAY . , w• .. ,, UL.O &:oopM 2., Ft...