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Laminations, November, 1980

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Title:
Laminations, November, 1980
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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A11
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ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
NOV. 1980


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
LAMlIMflCnONS
FUNDING: Deezine Club
The College of Environmental Design
STAFF: John David Powers, editor
Paul Worrell Willie Chiang Les Nelken Said Mahboubi Mark Jacobs Sara Semple Bob Perkins George Schusler Richard Bernstein Pelle Wahl in
Special thanks to:
David Friedman Blue Green Mike Collins Dave Thomas Dolores Hasseman Liz Bravo
Leong
Colorado Society of Architects ANNUAL MEETING *1980!
December 5 and 6,1980
at the Broadmoor, Colorado Springs
Announcing a fantastic program on "Energy and Economics ...Emerging Colorado Architecture." Speakers include Edward Ma'zria, author of Passive Solar Design.
Non-members,$65; students,$15. (Such a deal!) Be there or be... Programs available at second fl. Bromley or AIA office,Larimer Sq.
a major contribu—^
Mailing address:
Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity . and space.
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer.
The newspaper office is located in Room 303 of the Bromley Building.
Cover photo: "Roman Forum" by Blue Graen
Meetings are held weekly at 12:30 Wednesdays. Everyone is welcome.


Robert A.M. Stern is an architect, teacher, and writer. Since 1977, he has been principal in the firm of Robert A.M. Stern Architects. The firm has received numerous awards for design, including a first place award in the national competition for 1,000 units of housing for Roosevelt Island
Mr. Stern is an associate professor of architecture at Columbia-University. He has been visiting critic and lecturer at a number of colleges and universities, among them Yale University, where he received a Master’s degree in architecture in 1965.
Mr. Stern is t he author of .Wic Directions in American Architecture, George Howe: Toward crModem American Architecture, and coauthor with Delairah Nevins of The Architect's Eye: American Architectural Drawings from 1977-I97S. He has contributed numerous articles and liook reviews to professional journals.
LECTURE 5:00 PM - FRIDAY • NOVEMBER 14 SCIENCE BUILDING AUDITORIUM - AURARIA
SPONSORED UN I V ERSITY
BY THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN OF COLORADO DENVER


a
In 1859, John Good, a young German immigrant travelled to Denver from Ohio with a wagon full of hops for one of Denver's first breweries. Good soon purchased the Gndlich Brewery and renamed it the Tivoli, after the famous beer gardens in Copenhagen. The Tivoli Brewery was one of the oldest continuously operating breweries in the United States having produced the golden brew for over 110 years untill it finally closed its doors in 1909.
The entire brewery complex includes the Turnhalle Opera House with a seating capacity of 600 to 800, a rathskellar, two bars, dining areas, dancing areas, all with extraordinary railings, mouldings, and architectural details.
The Turnhalle was Denver's first opera house, erected in 1882 and apparently was designed by Harold W. Baerrensen, a prominent Danish born Denver architect. The architecture of the brewery building is quite unique to the U.S. and was originally designed by F. C. Eberly, an early Denver architect. The style is part Bavarian, part German and is an excellent example of mid 1800 brewery architecture. The Tivoli contains the last example in the United States of an old country gravity type tower which provided storage at one time for the malt, barley, and hops.
Since first opening its doors in 1859, the Tivoli has changed hands several times. In 1972, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1973, the brewery was purchased by the Denver Urban Renewal Authority. Demolition hardly seemed appropriate for a structure so closely associated with the earliest history of Denver and DURA eventually transferred the property to the state as part of the new Auraria campus. After reviewing several schemes to incorporate Tivoli into the new campus, possibly as a student center, the Auraria Higher Education Center finally decided to reject this path. It was decided that the Tivoli complex would be put to better use as a commercial complex which could be shared by all residents of the city. It was noted that
Michael Collins


5
Michael Collins
the Tivoli is ideally located in terms of being part of the historic, cultural, entertainment, and business community. The Tivoli is located only four blocks from Larimer Square and within close proximity to Denver*s performing arts and convention centers.
Since 1974, AHEC has been seeking a strong developer with a good proposal for the restoration and use of the historic brewery. In the meantime, the Tivoli has been slowly disinte-
grating. The roof of the famed Turnhalle has begun to collapse and vandalism of the structure has become a major concern. In the summer of 1979, AHEC sponsored a national competition for new proposals to save Tivoli. The AHEC Board of Directors were impressed with the quality of Trizec Western Incorporated's work in real estate development and the company's financial stability, and awarded a lease to the firm. Twi,Inc. agreed to the lease option in May of 1980 and in August extended their option for an additional six months to clear up any remaining problems as well as hold out for possibly a more stabilized economy. Trizec did retain the architectural firm of Hellmuth Obata, and Kassabaum of St. Louis for the architectural planning and drawings. At this date the plans have been completed and some revisions are being prepared. Trizec's plans call for preserving the interior details in the Tivoli, restoring the Turnhalle as a theater, and establishing a number of stores and specialty boutiques along with restaurants and cinemas. Trizec's idea is to have a regional shopping mall in the city with similar amenities to malls in the suburbs. The one major similarity is that Trizec is considering providing free parking. At the present time, no projections for start of construction have been set and things still seem to be indefinite. Tivoli once again is at a standstill.
To date many plans have been developed for its rebirth but all have failed. The potential of the Tivoli is great but the economics are becoming increasingly hard to justify as years go by. Hopefully Trizec will see these great potentials and Tivoli will become a unique commercial center for the people of the Denver region to enjoy.


Said Mahboubi
blending traditional & contemporary forms
Kamran Diba and his architectural and planning firm, D.A.Z., have been leaders of a new and exciting change in Persian architecture. DibaTs influence upon Iran’s architecture has historical overtones, which he successfully blends with modern design. As a result, Diba achieves noble indigenous forms.
The Howard University-educated Diba has utilized the impact of his American education by Integrating his modern technological knowledge with his native sensitivity to Persian architectural values. He is committed to the resurgence of the native elements such as human scale, courtyards, pedestrian walks, open spaces and utilization of materials in harmony with nature. Diba does not want to just preserve these elements, he is committed to their revival.
And Diba has brought this revivalist philosophy and style to America, while working in Chicago.
Throughout Diba’s work, his ideas of complementing his designs to the vernacular and traditional values of existing architecture is apparent. He continues to make his mark upon architecture through his designs by retaining the traditional. He combines the new with the old in his Shushtar design, a developing sugar-industry town. He also maintains the atomic unity of modern function and traditional elements found in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tehran and he emphasizes traditional cultural elements in his proposed Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults through his customary courtyards, adapting the Institute to the surrounding nature and scaling it on a human scale.
Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran


7
Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran (top) Development Plan of Shushtar, Iran (above)
One of the challenges Diba faced while designing the developing town of Shushtar was to maintain its vernacular pattern while providing housing appealing to the in-coming sugar industry executives and the necessary parking space. Diba solved this problem by following the existing vernacular pattern: its one +two story levels, brickwork patterns and pedestrian walk ways.
Eighty-five percent of Dibs’s housing units are one-and two-story structures, the other 15 percent being four-stories. He describes these units as "high-density horizontal apartment houses." He added parking lots on the out-skirts of the first-phase neighborhoods in limited areas and provided more pedestrian walk ways. Bricklayers were encouraged to work out their own designs and Diba chose to use large multipurpose rooms, ranging in size from 10' by 15' to 16 square feet, instead of the Western design of several divided rooms. Diba's design objective was to provide an urban environment related to traditional social interaction patterns.
In Tehran's Museum of Contemporary Art, Diba unifies modern function with traditional elements. This 75,000 square foot building has a low, meandering form with curved light scoops. From the entrance lobby, seven modular galleries span out in a loop connected by gradually sloping ramps. In addition to displaying art, the museum contains an auditorium, a library, offices and workrooms.
Diba's Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults will be located in Western Tehran. This complex of six rectangular office towers are linked by courtyards. It includes a 700-seat auditorium with book storage facilities and underground parking. Diba maintains human scale by avoiding tall, overpowering towers. He does this by building on a deep valley site. Again, Diba emphasizes a community togetherness by building pedestrian walk ways and adding the courtyards.
Diba brings his commitment to the traditional values of a region's vernacular architecture to America.
However, his goal of blending modern function and technology with traditional architectural elements has a long way to go before it reaches perfection.


RON RINKER
& ©©prrii^iry/SdL, z^tgHinfliiSTr
tzsjlks ^isoy'ir wiaoTtiis ®@klmms3
by Richard Bernstein
Ron Rinker, a principle in the firm of Barker, Rinker, Seacat, Architects was the designer of the Writer Square Project at 15th and Larimer. He was interviewed at his offices in the Blake Street Bath and Racquet Club.
Bernstein: To begin, I’d like to know your re-
action to what is happening to the scale ref lationships of the Writer Square development in terms of surrounding projects such as Larimer Place, Barclay Towers and the Windsor?
Rinker: Its a real mistake. It’s the kind of
thing that should have been addressed in the DURA design guidelines. That half block is a really important transitional block down to the warehouse district. They should have set some height restrictions that the developers would have to respond to. What we tried to do in Writer was to start the transitional-element from Park Central to the essentially two to three storey scale of Market Place and the others. Now all of a sudden a wall is being created. Whdt it is doing is dividing the lower part <»;f downtown with the rest of downtown so that it's becoming like Larimer Square in that instead of feeling integrated with downtown it becomes a cutesy area. I think it's probably the biggest failure of Skyline aside from the fact that the buildings themselves are incredibly boring. I think the way they are treating the street is obscene, they’re arrogant and they give nothing to the people on the street. Larimer Place is offensive to walk against. They could have pqt up the absolute grossest tower in the world but if they had done something at the base that gave back to the community, X could have forgiven them.
Bernstein: In your view how successful is the plus 15 skyway system?
Rinker^ My own impression is that the second level bridge concept was a good intellectual idea that doesn't really work. I don't think it ever will work. The reason is that the kind of things that need to happen at that level such as restaurants and shops to get people up off the street aren't happening.
We're required to have a bridge to go to Park Central from Writer but there is no reason to go across there because it's just office space and there is no reason for us to go to Larimer Place as it's just a private enclave. The bridges work in Minneapolis because of climate
and the retail activity that has developed there. But in Denver with the 16th Street
Mall going in that will be even that much more of a grounding influence. Denver is too far develop ed at the street level. Second level retail just doesn't work that well. They're having enough trouble leasing retail on the ground level, never mind creating it on a second level* To me, the bridges and the half block strip of high-rises are the biggest disappointments in Skyline.
Bernstein: Your project, Writer Square, seems to be an anomoly in the whole scheme of things. It's a little surprising that it even exists. I am wondering how you were able to convince the developer to go to,a,relatively low-rise, low density scheme on that site?
Rinker: It wasn't even a matter of convincing the
developer . The economics convinced him. The economics worked better at that scale'than it did when we were up at 290 housing units. A lot of it had to do with the fact that it was getting out*of hand. It all of a sudden became a 50 million dollar project and that made him very uneasy. He really wanted it to be around 15 million and -that's what worked for him. Also our developer, Joey Writer is a quality guy.
Bernstein: Could you have made a case that comparable profits could have been obtained from a low-rise high-density scheme on the Larimer Place block or was the tower necessary because, of the constrained limits of the site?
Rinker: If you're talking density in units per acre then of cQurse they're $0 times what'ours is but in terms of people density, ours is a lot more dense. They're paying proportionately much less for their land because they have all residential and therefore get the $5.00/sq.ft. land price. So they can't use the cost of the land as any criteria. Our land is more expensive because we went with a mixed-use development. We're paying for the retail and the office space so our land ended up averaging $10.00 or $11.00/sq.ft. It's pure greed as far as I'm concerned. You can make the numbers work.
Writer did and he's going to make a good profit. I'm convinced that you can get the density in the core area with a low-rise configuration.
It doesn't have to always be the big high-rise and plaza which don't really fit in Denver.
If were, really going to get serious about consolidating our city then we've got to offer some


COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202
Ancin, Melanie 148 S. Bnerson St. Oenver, Co* 80209 778-7394 Jacobs, Mark 1850 Folsom 503 3oulder, Co. 447-1498
Andress, Fred 523 A Corona St. Oenver, Co. 80218 733-3620 James, Gary N* 668 Gilpin St. Oenver, Co. 80218 355-4313
Brace, Connie 1175 Vine .#503 Oenver, Co. 320-1596 Johnson, Patrick 1190 S. Bellaire #206 Oenver, Co. 756-3116
Carlson, Martha 1020 15th Oenver, Co* 30202 Kahn, Diane 2217 Forest Oenver, Co. 80207 322-5532.
Carol, Susie 542 Pennsylvania Oenver, Co* 80203 722-9855 Kosnar, Ken 707 £. 5th Ave-. Oenver, Co* 777-0763
Cunningham, Kathie 1307 Franklin St. Oenver, Co. 30218 361-7831 Levar, Peter 899 Washington Apt.407 Oenver, Co. 337-8130
Oickey, Judd 13001 £• 8ethany Aurora, Co. 80014 751-5621 MacDonald, Nina 2111 1/2 Oownlng Oenver, Co* 80205 861-0999
Fltzwi111am, Mark 2263 So. Williams Oenver, Co. 30210 777-6901 Mega, Siulina 1025 Sherman Apt.203 Oenver, Co. 861-5779
Flores, Gerard M. 2751 W. 28th #3 Oenver, Co. 433-7783 Miller, Susan Rt. 2 Box 271-J Conifer, Co* 80433
Fort, Tony Sugarloaf Road Boulder, Co. 30302 444-5757 Moone, Kelly 1901 Spruce Boulder, Co. 442-6626
Gracey, Susan 995 Corona Oenver, Co. 832-5526 Nevins, Ryan 4755 Limestone Rd. #452 Palmer Lake, Co. 80133 481-3321
Greenberg, Beth 802 So. Ogden Oenver, Co. 744-6706 Noble, Kathy 7730 Simms Arvada, Co. 80005 423-9516
Hunter, Larry 500 Hapgood #A Boulder. Co. 80302 Pedrelli, Bruna 17111 £. Princeton Or. Aurora, Co. 30013 690-0401
Hashizume, John 909 Pearl St. *303 Oenver, Co. 80203 861-5621 Read, Mark 5381 £. Colorado Ave. Oenver, Co. 756-4827
Hicks, Steve 147 W. Irvington PI Oenver, Co. 722-6870 Seyferth, Brian 1020 £* 10th Ave. #308 Broomfield, Co. 469-4953
Hooper, Paul 945 Marion St. #7 Oenver, Co. 80218 332-4629 Shea, T1m 1311 Marion St. Oenver, Co. 30218 361-0840
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
DESIGN
Smith, J1nr 13945 H. Atlantic Denver, Co*
988-6104
Smith,, lyn 717 Logan Oenver, Co* 80203
831- 0051
Steckly, Chuck 7444 W. Roxbury Littleton, Co.
80123
Tanmi, Kai 1110 Clarkson St* Oenver, Co*
832- 4010
Melton, Jan 1311 Marion St«* Oenver, Co* 80218 861-0840
Wong,. Linda 5250 Cherry Cr. So. Oenver, Co*
756-6282
Wright, Anney 6095 S. Sterne Pkwy. Littleton, Co. 80120 798-7215
Allison, John 13350 Grove Way Broomfield, Co* 80020 469-4962
Sain, Anne 400 S.. Lafayette Oenver, Co. 80209 733-8276
Satish, Randall 4523 W. Ponds Circle Littleton, Co. 795-8868
Berger, Oebra 1231 Lafayette Oenver, Co.
832-0860
Boulette, Mark 429 £.14th Ave. ,#204 Oenver, Co.
831-1573
Bowen, Tom 6563 Welch St.
Arvada, Co. 80004 424-4508
Chang, W1ll1e 1661 £. Navarro Or. Oenver, Co.
693-3459
Connelly, Rory 3956 Navajo Oenver, Co. 30211


Oaniel, Henry 1311. W. Marlon St. Oenver, Co. Irving, Wendy 1209 Pennsylvania #8 Oenver, Co. 831-9197 Phillips, Michael 1430-502 Humboldt St. Oenver, Co. 332-7699 Anderson, Qarlene 1525 Perry #5 Oenver, Co. 80204 534-0022 Mac Mfllan, Randy 347 Bannock St. Oenver, Co. 80223 744-8291 Williams, Chris 1073 Steele St. Oenver, Co. 80 399-4543 W82S-8
Davidson, Rob 1211 S. Quebec Way Oenver, Co. 750-1376 Tshizaki, Masashi 6205 W.25th Ave. #30: Edgewater. Co. 238-1506 Rlgley, Steve 1423 Race St. Denver, Co. 80206 333-7252 Beck* Thomas 117 Fox St. Oenver, Co. 892-0683 Madeira* David 3232 ilth St. 8ou1der, Co. 80302 447-1730 Williamson, Ran 1300 30th IA3-1 Boulder, Co. 8 442-0632
Devin, Gary 1275 Corona #203 Oenver,: Co. 832-3253 Jenson* Emmy 912 E. 10th Ave. Oenver, Co. 80218 837-9570 Rooney, Mark 1519 S. Peon St. Oenver, Co. 80210 733-9870 8emstein, Richard #10-204 1200 S.Oneida Oenver, Co. 759-8958 Mahboubf, Said 4277 E. Illff #312 Oenver, Co. 80222 757-0077 Worrell, Paul 2693 Java Ct. Oenver, CO. 8G 433-4639
Fisctier, Ben 1029 Steele Denver, Co. 322-8241 kaiser* Frank 2010 Sherrelwood Cr. Oenver, Co 429-1652 Schusler, George 7480 c. Wlndewood Parker, Co. 341-2521 Carpenter, Terry 1020 15th St. #23C Oenver,Co. 80202 573-6452 W825-3100 Mueller, Henry w. 806 Soruce #1 Oenver, Co. 443-3162 W231-1944 Wright, Jim 982 S. York Denver, Co. 722-6918
Foster,. Carl E. 2833 E.13th Ave. Denver, Co. 80206 333-6591 Kamo, Roger 266 S. Williams Oenver, Co. 30209 733-6297 Schuyler, Steve 978 Steele Oenver, Co. 80206 322-0056 Chreitzberg, Mike 1350 Josephine Apt.208 Oenver, Co. 80206 333-9881 W573-9542 Munyen* 3111 7100 #2-210 E. Miss. Denver, Co. 80224 753-0188 Wahlin* Pei 1041 Coron* Denver, Co.
Frauenglass, Mark 635 S. Logan Oenver, Co. 80209 733-8502 Kaufman, Oebra 2526 W. 34th Ave. Oenver, Co.. 477-3004 Simes, Woody 252 S. Spruce Ct. Boulder, Co. 443-0505 Collins, Michael 3619 W. 32nd St. Oenver. Co. Nardln, 8111 2849 Utica St. Oenver, Co. 80212 477-5068 832-3253
Gamuchean, Melanie 1200 Gaylord Oenver, Co. Kimball, Kenneth 1260 Gaylord St. Oenver, Co. 333-2372 Smith, Nancy 2520 River Or. Denver, Co. 477-9975 Ooutre, A1 929 Marlon St. #401 Oenver, Co. 861-5140 Nelss, David 800 Pennsylvania Oenver, Co. 80203 832-5432
Gasbarro, Anna 8 S. Grape Oenver, Co. 388-2955 Koch, Jeff P.0. 3ox 10125 Oenver, Co. 789-9961 Tastier, Mark 3 S. Grape Denver, Co. 388-2955 Qoyle, Joe 2614 W. 24th Ave, Oenver, Co. 80211 477-5118 0*0owd, John 101 E.2nd Ave. Oenver, Co. 80203 733-1886
Gldez, Greg 2614 Vi. 24th Ave. Oenver, Co. 477-6292 Leswick, Robert #1202-901 Sherman St. Oenver, Co. 839-5379 Tryba, Qavld 396 18th 3oulder, Co. 449-0490 Engelbrecht, Oan 10555 W. Jewell Ave. Lakewood, Co. 80226 986-6320 Peirce, Paul 930 Washington St. #€ Oenver, Co. 861-5089
Grady, Scott 785 Humboldt St. Oenver, Co. 331-8755 Long, Susan 925-S. Pearl #8 Oenver, Co. 30209 722-8009 Ware, Terrance 5250 S. Cherry Cr. Or. Oenver, Co. 759-9121 Falk, Randy 2950 Eudora St. Oenver, Co. 80207 377-5782 Powers, John David 5250 Cherry Cr. S. Or. Oenver, Co. 30222 756-9133
Green, Gary Luna, Charles R. 1121 So. Yosemite Wy. Denver, Co. 750-0446 Watson, Tom L. 14001 E. Tufts Or. Oenver, Co. 590-7103 Foreman, Oean 1300-30th B2-23 Boulder, Co. 80303 444-7448 Rioth Lila 1827 S. Franklin Oenver, Co. 80210 722-8052
Haas, Richard 301-E. Mallet. Or. Northglenn, Co. 457-9406 Miller, David S., 5127 S. Perry St. Littleton, Co. 798-6246 Yonushewskl, John 544 Marion St. Denver, Co. 80218 361-4741 Friedman, David 780 Clermont Apt.2 Oenver, Co. 80220 399-3704 Rodrigues, Michael 1343 High St. #9 Oenver, Co. 80218 355-1959
Hewitt, Jill 639 Downing Denver, Co. 839-5388 Mlshler, Frances C. 5715 31g Canon Or. Englewood, Co. 770-8540 York, J1m 799 Oahlla #505 Oenver, Co. 320-5933 Gllstad, Pete 1255 Oowning St. Oenver, Co. Semple* Sarah 2121 So. Walnut #30 8ou1der, Co. 80302 449-8876
Hill, Erich 2614 W. 24th Ave. Denver, Co, 477-6292 Morris, Shannon 600 S. Franklin Denver, Co. 777-8918 YosMda, Toshlka 820-Humboldt #4 Oenver, Co. 831-6804 Gloss, Jerry I043Q Independence Cir. Veotarinster, Co. 80Q39 466-9550 Silverman, Alima 655 Hawthorn 8ou1der, Co. 80302 449-5252
Hohn, Peter 1563 Washington St. Denver, Co. 80203 861-0547 Nielsen, Christopher 1000 Sherman St. #301 Oenver, Co. 30203 837-8179 Hamal, Richard 8151 Stuart St. Westminster, Co. 429-4006 Sfflotherman, James 941 S. Williams Oenver, Co. 80209 778-1353
Hourigan, Steve P.0. 3ox 751 Denver, Co. 30201 O'Ooud, John 101 East 2nd Ave. Oenver, CO. 733-1886 Hepp* Gregg 328- W. 12th Ave. Denver, Co. 80204 893-2769 Ward, Mark ll61-llth #1 Boulder, Co. 80302 442-5613
Huston,. Debbie 1070 Race Unit K Denver, Co. 80206 333-4315 Paulson, Robert 3147 S. Cathay Circle Aurora, Co. 80013 590-7966 Lay* David 785 Souttr Dale Ct. Oenver. Co. 80219 934-0678' Wheeler, Chris 1266 Emerson #6 Oenver, Co. 80218 861-1341


ARCHITECTURE FACULTY OFFICE HOME
Long, Chalmers G., Jr. 01 rector and Assoc. Barrett, Oavid, Visiting Lecturer 629-2877 449-1141
Cronenwett, Laura, Visiting Lecturer Crowell, Gary J., Assoc. Prof. 629-2650 388-1237
Holder, Davis C«, Assoc. Prof. 629-2479
Klndlg, Robert W., Prof. 629-2857
Nagel, Chester N., Lecturer 629-2877
William Taber, Visiting Lecturer 629-3291
Vetter, G.;<., Prof. 629-2615
Cousins, Mary 487 Hunboldt Denver, CO '80218 733-07/9
Weller, Lindy 1607 6th St. Doulder, CO. 80302 <47-8694
Smith, Kendie 600 So. Franklin Denver, CO. 80209 777-8918
Newton, Jody
1250 S. Clermont, Bldg $ Denver, CO. 80222 759-8739
Deeter, Mike 1228 Corona, Apt. 7 Denver, CO. 80218
832-95?'*
Howe, Arlene 6165 E. Iliff Denver. CO. 80222 757-1481
Will ions, Lore 491 Humboldt St. Denver, CO. 80213 777-9740
Evans, Bob 276 Harrison St. Denver, CO. 80206 388-3496
Sullivan, Tom 2760 Darley Boulder, CO. 80303 499-3763
Kyrigaard, Sandra 3835 Lakebriar Dr. Boulder, CO. 80302 442-2673
Rice, Elizabeth 16-2 Halloran Circle Aurora, C9. 80045 341-3369
Spencer, Jill 1590 South St. Paul Denver, CO. 80210
733-6545
Johnson, David 507 Detroit Street Denver, CO. 80906
Figliuolo, Barbara 1882 So. St. Paul Denver, CO. 80210 756-1837
Bravo (Ber.son) Liz 967 S. Ogden Denver, CO. 30209 778-6205
Taylor, Courtney 1350 $. Race Denver, CO. 30210 777-1475
LaFleur, Joyce 313ft Cole St. Golden, CO. 80701 278-9620
Little, Jim 570 Highland Ave. Boulder, CO. 80302 444-3876
Grote, Karen 226 Jackson Ct.
Denver, CO. 80206 333-5844
Johnson, Karen 7907 E. Jefferson Ave. Denver, CO. 80237 771-4254
Ranson, Dave 2095 S. Corona Denver, CO. 80210 722-2371
Lee, Gina
625 S. Elm Apt. 17 Denver, CO. 8022? 377-5506
Rislev. Carrie McGown. Mary
1423 Race St.-Carriage House 707 S. Ogden Denver, CO. 80206 Denver, CO. 80209
333-7252 722-3066
Schultz, Margaret 1362 Alpine Boulder. CO. 80302 449-0834
Spackman, Mike
6165 E. Iliff, Apt.105-3
Denver. CO. 80222
757-0072
McMahon, Suzanne 3555 Federal, Apt. 2 Denver, CO. 80211 433-1995
Schulte, Paula 3030 15th St. Bouldpr, CO. 449-01G1
Sutherland. Mike 1815 Marion St. £102 Denver, CO, 80218 832-6153
Sutton, Doug
Thorsheim, Robert 12398 W. 14th Ave. Golden, CO. 80213 823-9523
Schweiger, Catherine 628 Maxwell Boulder, CO. 30302 443-6548
Seward (Forbes)
Sara Jane 4652 Elm Court Denver, CO. 80211
477-983?
Watkins, Cathy 185 S. Zang £7-303 Lakewood, CO. 80228 985-5277
Shimokawa, Masashi 1269 Marion St., Apt. #8 Denver, CO. 80218 831-0356
Bruce, Col eon 3817 Osage Denver, CO.
433-4020
Burton, Jan 3431 VI. ?5th Ave. Denver, CO.
458-5227 (H)
232-6262 (0) ext. 205W
Foster, Laurie 4264 Greenbriar Boulder, CO. 80303 499-1222
Grey, Crystal 1709 Spruce Boulder, CO. 80302 449-9680
Hamilton, Kathy 3555 Federal Denver, CO. 80211 433-1995
Horgan, Larry 2375 S. Gilpin Denver, CO. 80210,^^’ 722-5814 a
Kaehny, Karen 5100 Montview Blvd Denver, CO. 80207 321-3791
Korbobo, Tad 1234 York St. #2 Denver, CO. 333-7507
Mitchell, Cathe 1840 Race St. I Denver, CO. 355-0434 (H) 377-4812 (0)
Walker, Steve 510 Columbine Denver, CO. 80206 399-5129
FACULTY
Gail G. Gunter 11986 E. Harvard 695-6505 Denver, CO. 80014
Carl Norbeck 756-5911
Daniel B. Young 5574 S. Lansing Ct.
Englewood, CO. 80111 777-4167


â–  ^1 Cavaliere, Janice Ganucheau, Melanie Harris, Pat
III 6730 E. Eastman Ave. 1200. Gaylord 2619 Juniper Street
Denver, Co. 80224 Denver, Co. 30206 Boulder, Co. 80302
MP 759-0271 443-8293
Hfll Cunninghan, Steven W. Huston, Debbie Mandel , Donna
1610 Humboldt *3 1070 Race, «K 38 Sedgwick Drive
V 1 Denver, Co. 80218 Denver, Co. 80206 Englewood, Co. 80110
u 333-4315 789-2011
Harley, Ned R., M.b. Lahier, Claire Van Gy t#*nbeO k t
flP 679 North St. 2385 S. Col unbone 5 Bello view °’ace
â–  B Boulder, Co. 80302 Denver, Co. 30210 Englewood, Co. 80110
HB 44 3-7 793 722-2259 761-9595
III Holzman, Candace McCulloch, Jan
3637 Hazelwood Ct. 615 Williams St.
B Boulder, Co. 80302 Denver, Co. 80218
â– B 443-0404 399-7236
â– H Johnson, Geoffry R. McLoud-Smitn, Sonny
840 Cherry St. Apt201 7525 E. Harvard s205
Denver, Co. 80220 Denver, Co. 80231
35 5-7218 755-5065
Neir, Cass Waldbaum, Iri t
936 Fillmore 45 S. Grape
Denver, Co. 80206 Denver, Co. 30222
399-0842 377-4726
Plant, Donna Young, 8.J.
8719 Jay Ct. 5574 S. Lansing Ct.
Arvada, Co. 80224 Englewood, Co. 80121
422-5913 779-4167
Vargas, Linda
712 Lafayette St.
Denver, Co. 80218
861-1101


WRITER SQUARE
alternatives. It’s a matter of scale and identity It's not having to walk down long corridors to ride elevators... it's having some space of your own. I've done some studies which show that we can get all those things...identifiable units, defensible space and outdoor areas and still have 60 to 70 units per acre. This begins to be very comparable to some of the high-rises.
We need to provide this kind of choice and alternative.
Bernstein: What is the role of the architect in a situation where you do not get an innovative developer like Joey Writer but instead the type of developer that produced Larimer Place? Do you act as an educator, suggesting alternative scale and density schemes that will still produce substantial profits or do you become the puppet simply following the developer's instructions?
Kinker: I've never worked with a developer
like Fulenwider (Larimer Place) and I wouldn't want to. With Joey we had a long design process. But he came from the view that he wanted to do it right... to build a project he wpuld feel comfortable with. I was the one that had to be educated about the town-houses because to me they seemed a little inappropriate. ..a little suburbia planted downtown. But now I'm really glad they're there.
Joey knows an awful lot about housing...he knows what people want and on that level I think he?s much more of an educator than I am.
He's been an innovator. He was the first to do zero lot line in Denver. He's very willing to be on the leading edge and I'm glad he was so involved. I don't like projects where the client or owner says,"create a personality".
I like the dynamics and energy where you create
together. In many ways the townhouses are Joey's. If it was left up to me I would have created something entirely different. But probably a whole lot more people will love them because of his involvement.
Bernstein: The Writer Square office building seems to go against the traditional methods of prestige office design particularly with its minimal number of windows. Were any problems anticipated with its image?
Rinker: Its tied to a five foot module which
is the standard office module and if you look at a facade you can partition it into 10 foot offices and everyone will have a window. It was done for two reasons; (1) to cut down on energy loss and (2) we had chosen the brick vernacular and the kind of windows you have in Larimer Square are punched windows and we wanted to carry on that theme. We were really respecting what brick is and how it works. To have a 800 foot strip of windows looks unnatural and if yon're trying to respond to brick that means some kind of steel lintel that's 800 feet long. That whole project ties into a 28x32 foot grid and I am thrilled by the complexity we were able to create. It will take a long time to understand the project. Everywhere you walk is different...Itfe not something you get in one glance like some of the other projects downtown which you quickly become bored with because they give you everything at once and there are no surprises. Another conscious choice is that we have no idea what the street will look like as we are going to allow every store to design their own storefront...we are looking for variety not uniform graphics to reinforce' the street experience.
Bernstein: In closing would you say that your


io
b.r.s. con’t.
firm has a consistent philosophy that you bring to each project?
Rinker: We have a lot of strong individuals and so the outcome of the projects have a lot to do with those individuals. We don't have an identifiable style and I'm proud of that fact. I don't think you can go around and say that’s a Barker, Rinker, Seacat building whereas I think there are some firms In Denver that are identifiable by a style. I think in our case because we work on a team basis...because we don't have a separate* design department, a separate production department and a separate field supervision department
we avoid the horizontal stratification that some other firms have. The team works on the project the whole way through. Also the people we attract are the people we look for. Wefre not necessarily form architects. We believe very strongly in user participation and not token involvement with the clients...we try to interpret their personalities and their desires rather than our own. I think often times form architects come from their own ego. They visualize a form and make everything1 work around it. Our forms very much evolve in response to the context that we are dealing with the physical surroundings, the budget realities and the goals of the users and clients.
LANDSCAPE HEAVEN
Liz Bravo
Watch for a city full of landscape architects. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting will convene at the Fairmont Hotel November 22-25. This year's theme is Frontiers for the 80's: Response to Change Three days of education sessions include discussions of energy, economics, communications, creative management and design quality and values. Landscape architects such as William J. Johnson of Johnson,
Johnson and Roy, J.B. Jackson, LA historian, Robert Royston of Royston, Hanamoto, Alay and Abey and Angela Danadjieva, Halprin associate and designer of Seattle's Freeway Park are among the nationally recognized hot shots leading the sessions. Unfortunately, Dick Lamm-e-pie won't be attending as formerly believed however,
Alan Gussow, artist and landscape commentator, will provide an undoubtedly more uplifting introductory speech with the topic "Towards A Landscape of Interdependence". November 24 is the date for the wind-up party at the Apex Mining Company in Heritage Square where students and t
professionals alike will mash together to celebrate this curious ritual. All the above should provide some much needed inspiration at this time of the semester.
good enuf for governmint work...
The Federal register opened October 15 for recruiting landscape architects. If you're interested in getting your name on the rolls, contact the Office of Personnel Management, 1845 Sherman St,,
Denver 80203. This recruitment continues indefinitely but will most likely close abrubtly when Ronald gets sworn in this January.
DURP SPACE
In keeping with out policy of providing space to all departments of the College, we would like to provide this space for the exclusive use of the Dept, of Urban and Regional Planning. True, we haven't yet received an article from DURP, but at least now that department has its own column
Be creative with this space! Perhaps you'd like to plan your Thanksgiving menu. Or... maybe think of a creative use for a Planning degree once "Ronnie's Revolution" has begun. You might even want to write an article for the next Laminations. Express yourself; this is your space!


michael collins
CLU
You may not know it, but you are a member of the Deezine Club.... Big deal, huh? Well, the Deezine Club was created to serve you, and your input is important in keeping the Club alive. We try to encourage social and academic interaction between departments by organizing picnics and parties. Each year the Executive Council grants the Club funds which can be spent in numerous ways. This year, in addition to funding Laminations, we plan on buying some goodies. By next week there should be an ample supply of blue and blackline print paper available at a modest price (approx. 10 The word is that the school may get a Kroy lettering machine and if these dreams materialize, the Deezine Club will supply additional lettering cassettes for the machine.
Currently we are working on buying, hard to get "non-architecture books" for the library, as well as organizing some periodicals for sale These periodicals will be available next semester on a single issue or complete volume basis.
Next week there will be a meeting to discuss these and other great events... Look for notices!
WADBALL REVISITED
michael collins & george schusler
Well sports fans, once again its time for historical architectural sports. This month our obscure sport is the famous pastime of architecture' students all over the world, Wadball more intimately known as "Waddyball". Now we're sure many of you were probably born too early or came to school too late and you're asking yourself what the heck are these guys talking about. Well permit us to enlighten you
Wadball has ties back to the ancient Japanese culture of paper folding. It's roots sink deep into the depressed middle ages where it was played as a form of stimulation. It's violence and degeneration stem back to the final days of the Roman Empire. The spirit of competition and the desire for the perfect team reflects its Grecian ancestory as well. Wadball was resurrected most recently by the Elders of Bromley in 1978. It may have been played under another name, in another form, by another ancient class although no records have been recovered as of yet.
The "Ball" is how the game ties back to the ancient Japanese paper-morphic culture. The Elders would save all their remnants of bumwad. Even though designs were discarded and ideas had changed, the "Wad" remained... on desks, on floors, in lockers....everywhere. Somehow it was regarded as sacred —- no one dared to discard it... except one... George, the elder Elder. He was wiser and more experienced than the others. He convinced them that they could'not only throw the wad away but they could throw it around. The Elders created a sacred "Court of Wadball" by using the Mike Doyle Magical Mirror as a separating device or "net". The carefully folded "ball", proportioned in harmony with the universe, became the projectile and the mirror was the division. Teams began to spring up, male-female, shirts-skins, and competitions were fierce. The traditional starting time for matches was set at 2:30 a.m. and champions were born overnight. It was a grand period of time... the 7 days and 7 nights it lasted,/but like the wad itself and the designs that generated the sport... it simply wasted away.
Today, if an archeological expedition were to excavate the ruins of the architectonic cardboard and paper, they would discover the magical mirror/separating device. Boundary lines are still faintly visible under the debris on the carpet, and the potential for the next ball can be found on your drawing boards.
*For your very own personal rule book, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: •
The Society For The Preservation Of Wadball 600 Madison Avenue New York, New York 101010 *** Please include $2.50 for postage and handling


THEFT:
Just a reminder not to leave valuables unattended. Please notify Public Safety if you see anyone suspicious in the building.
IDs:
Please obtain a Photo ID in the Student Center building, Room 210, Mon- Thurs. 9:30-11:30 and 2:00-6:00. This was a request by our Public Safety because our students are working in the building after hours. It is a protection for you if you become ill.
PORTFOLIOS:
We have a few portfolios left and would appreciate having them picked up. Please see Donna Lee in the office.
HOURS:
The Administrative Offices will be closed for Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 27, and Friday, Nov. 28. The library will also be closed.
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS: the University will be closed December 24, 1980 until January 5, 1981. Building Hours will resume January 5, 1981.
SCHOLARSHIP FOR A NEEDY WOMAN STUDENT:
Any woman student in the College who wishes to apply for an American Business Women*s scholarship, please see Dolores in the office for an application.
AND READ THIS:
MAIL REGISTRATION- All currently enrolled students will receive a schedule of Courses for Spring 1981 in the mail in the next two weeks. PLEASE FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAIL-IN REGISTRATION. Mail registration Couifse Requests must be received by the Office of Admissions and Records NO LATER than 5:00 p.m. on December 1, 1980 for the Spring 1981 semester.
SCHEDULE OF COURSES:
The Spring, Schedule of courses will be out in the next two weeks. One class that was omitted that will be offered is:
PCD 750-3 PLANNERS IN THE REAL WORLD,
18:45-21:35 Tues. Bromley 202 Phil Milstein
GETTING DOWN
The American Underground-Space Association (AUA) announces a Design Competition to be held in conjunction with the Underground Space Conference and Exposition (USCE *81) , Kansas City, Missouri, June 8-10, 1981. USCE *81 is the first international underground/earth sheltered event to take place in America. The event will feature a Conference, based pn the theme THINK DEEP, that will be devoted to technical and policy issues related to both deep space and earth sheltered uses, an international, exposition of products and services essential to the design and construction of underground facilities, and Tours of Kansas City's vast subsurface commercial space and a variety of earth sheltered homes.
The purpose of the Design Competition is to recognize and encourage outstanding work in the field of earth sheltered and underground, energy conserving, architecture by professionals and students of architecture and engineering from around the world. Works-in-Progress are invited in residential, non-residential and research categories. Entries will be judged by a distinguished multidisciplinary jury.
The Design Competition will be highlighted at USCE '81 in several ways. Winning and other selected entries will be on display at the Exposition and will be featured in a new book,
GROUND
"directions in Earth Sheltered and Underground Construction". Local and national media attention will be sought and winners will be announced at the Conference. Cash Prizes ranging from $200 to $1000 will be awarded in each of the four categories.
Deadline for submissions will be February 15, 1981, addressed to the AUA, care of TLH Associates* Inc., Suite 900, Minnesota Building,
St. Paul, MN 55101. Questions pertaining to these guidelines; will be accepted up to December 1, 1980. Mail to the same address. Answers will be mailed to all participants by January 1, 1981.


The award is to be given to the worst example of architecture, landscape architecture or planning project recently completed in Colorado. Decisions are to be made by the the students but LAMINATIONS will accept all responsibility. Look out for posters.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

L AN ENVIRONM.ENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION -NOV. 1980

PAGE 2

2 UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER FUNDING: STAFF: INS Deezine Club The College of Environmental Design John David Powers, editor Paul Worrell Willie Chiang Les Nelken Said Mahboubi Mark Jacobs Sara Semple Bob Perkins George Schusler Richard Bernstein Pelle W hhljn Special thanks to: David Friedman Blue Green Mik e Collins Dav e Thomas Dolores Hasseman Liz Bravo Timothy Leong Colorado Society of Architects ANNUAL MEETING 1980! December 5 and 6,1980 at the Broadmoor, Colorado Springs Announcing a fantastic program on "Energy and Economics •.. Emerging Colorado Architecture." Speakers include Edward Mazria, author of Passive Solar Design. Non-members,$65; students,$15. (Such a deal!) Be there or be ... Programs available at second fl. Bromley or AlA office,Larimer Sq. a major contribuct a =s fto • -----------------... . . . . Hailing address: Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. The newspaper office is located 1n Room 303 of the Bromley Building. Meetings are held weekly at 12:30 Wednesdays. Everyone is welcome. • • . I • . • ., . . . , (f,(f ---. " .. ' . . . . , . Cover photo: "Roman Forum" by Blue Green

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Robert A.!vl. Stern i!" an architect, teacher, and writer. Since 1977. he has been princ:i pal in the firm of Robert Stern .r\rchitens. The firm has recci\'ed numerous awards for design. including a first place a\\'ard in the national competition for l ,noo units of f(nRoose\'eh Island Mr. Stern is an associettt : professor of architecture at Cohunhia Lniversitv. He has been critic: and lecturer at a number of colleges and uni\'ersities, among them Yale l.'ni,ersity. where he recei,ed a \laster's degree in architecture < . ill 1965 . !\lr. Stern is 1 he author of .\'r11 ' Dirrrtiom hi Amrrim11 Arrltiffrltnt•, 1-/m.l'l'.' Tou'flrrl a 1\1orlrrn Amnium Arrhitnlurt', and co author with Dehorah :\e,ins of Thr .'\ rrhltrrt\ 1:\t: :\ 11/t'riam A. ' rrhtf('(/11 /)mu•iu I rom 1
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George Schusler In 1859, John Good, a young German immigrant travelled to Denver from Ohio with a wagon full of hops for one of Denver's first breweries. Good soon purchased the Endlich Brewery and renamed it the Tivoli, after the famous beer gardens in Copenhagen. The Tivoli Brewery was one of the oldest continuously operating preweries in the United States having produced the golden brew for over 110 years untill it finally closed its doors in 19 .69. The entire brewery complex includes the Turnhalle Opera House with a seating capacity of 600 to 800, a rathskellar, two bars, dining areas, dancing areas, all with extraordinary railings, mouldings, and architectural details. The Turnhalle was Denver's first opera house, erected in 1882 and apparently was designed by Harold W. Baerrensen, a prominent Danish born Denver architect. The architecture of the brewery building is quite unique to the U.S. and was originally designed by F. C. Eberly, an early Denver architect. The style is part Bavarian, part German and is an excellent example of mid 1800 brewery architecture. The Tivoli contains the last example in the United States of an old country gravity type tower which provided storage at one time for the malt, barley, and hops. Since first opening its doors in 1859, the Tivoli has changed hands several times. In 1972, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1973, the brewery was purchased by the Denver Urban Renewal Authority. Demolition hardly seemed appropriate for a structure so closely associated with the earliest history of Denver and DURA eventually transferred the property to the state as part of the new Auraria campus. After reviewing several schemes to incorporate Tivoli into the new campus, possibly as a student center, the Auraria Higher Education Center finally decided to reject this path. It was decided that the Tivoli would be put to use as a commercial complex which could be shared by all residents of the city. It was noted that . , •... ... , . : . . , . •... , ... • ... _: ; : . : : . . . . . . : . . :_ : . . . ' ' 1i;, :' 1:. (/) c •..-l r-t r-t 0 u

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Michael Collins .Michael Collins the Tivoli is ideally located in terms of being part of the historic, cultural, entertainment, and business community. The Tivoli is located only four blocks from Larimer Square and within close proximity to Denver's performing arts and convention centers. Since 1974, AHEC has been seeking a strong developer with a good proposal for the restoration and use of the historic brewery. In the meantime, the Tivoli has been slowly disinte-grating. The roof of the famed Turnhalle has begun to collapse and vandalism of the structure has become a major concern. In the summer of 1979, AHEC sponsored a national competition for new proposals to save Tivoli. The AHEC Board of Directors were impressed with the quality of Trizec Western Incorporated's work in real estate development and the company's financial stability, and awarded a lease to the firm. Twi,Inc. agreed to the lease option in May of 1980 and in August extended their option for an additional six months to clear up any remaining as well as hold out for possibly a more stabilized economy. Trizec did retain the architectural firm of Hellmuth Obata, and Kassabaum of St. Louis for the architectural planning and drawings. At this date the plans have been completed and some revisions are being prepared. Trizec's plans call for preserving the interior details in the Tivoli, restoring the Turnhalle as a theater, and establishing a number of stores and specialty boutiques along with restaurants and cinemas. Trizec's idea is to have a regional shopping mall in the city with similar amenities to malls in the suburbs. The one major similarity is that Trizec is considering providing free parking. At the present time, no projections for start of construction have been and still seem to be indefinite. Tivoli once again is at a standstill. To date many plans have been developed for its rebirth but all have failed. The potential of the Tivoli is great but the economics are becoming increasingly hard to justify as years go by. Hopefully Trizec will see these great potentials and Tivoli will become a unique commercial center for the people of the Denver region to enjoy. !5

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B ------------ICAlVIB.AN DIBA Said Mahboubi blending traditional & contemporary forms • • Kamran Diba and his architectural and planning firm, D.A.Z., have been leaders of a new and exciting change in Persian architecture. Diba's influence upon Iran's architecture has historical overtones, which he successfully blends with modern design. As a result, Diba achieves noble indigenous forms. The Howard University-educated Diba has utilized the impact of his American education by integrating his modern technological knowledge with his native sensitivity to Persian architectural values. He is committed to the resurgence of the native elements such as human scale, courtyards, 'pedestrian walks, open spaces and utilization of materials in harmony with nature. Diba does not want to just preserve these elements, he is committed to their revival. And Diba has brought this revivalist philosophy and style to America, while working in Chicago. ' Throughout Diba's work, his ideas of complementing his designs to the vernacular and traditional values of existing architecture is apparent. He continues to make his mark upon architecture through his designs by retaining the traditional. He combines the new with the old in his Shushtar design, a developing sugar-industry town. He also maintains the atomic unity of modern function and traditional elements found in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tehran and he emphasizes traditional cultural elements in his proposed Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults through his customary courtyards, adapting the Institute to the surrounding nature and scaling it on a human scale. Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran

PAGE 7

Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran (top) Development Plan of Shushtar, Iran (above) --One of the challenges Diba faced while designing the developing town of Shushtar was to maintain its vernacular pattern while providing housing appealing to the in-coming sugar industry executives and the necessary parking space. Diba solved this problem by following the existing vernacular pattern: its one +two story levels, brickwork patterns and pedestrian walk ways. Eighty-five percent of Diba's housing units are one-7 and two-story structures, the other 15 percent being four-stories. He describes these units as "high-density horizontal apartment houses." He added parking lots on the out-skirts of the first-phase neighborhoods in limited areas and provided more pedestrian walk ways. Bricklayers were encouraged to work out their own designs and Diba chose to use large multipurpose rooms, ranging in size from 10' by 15' to 16 square feet, instead of the Western design of several divided rooms. Diba's design objective was to provide an urban environment related to traditional social interaction patterns. In Tehran's Museum of Contemporary Art, Diba unifies modern function with traditional elements. This 75,000 square foot building has a low, meandering form with curved light scoops. From the entrance lobby, seven modular galleries span out in a loop connected by gradually sloping ramps. In addition to displaying art, the museum contains an auditorium, a library, offices and workrooms. Diba's Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults will be located in Western Tehran. complex of six rectangular office towers are linked by courtyards. It includes a 700-seat auditorium with book storage facilities and underground parking. Diba maintains human scale by avoiding tall, overpowering towers. He does th1s by building on a deep valley site. Again, Diba emphasizes a community togetherness by building pedestrian walk ways and adding the courtyards. Diba brings his commitment to the traditional values of a region's vernacular architecture to America. However, his goal of blending modern function and technology with traditional architectural elements has a long way to go before it reaches perfection.

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B ..... _; . by Richard Bernstein Ron Rinker, a principle in the firm of Barker, Rinker, Seacat, Architects was the designer of the Writer Square Project at 15th and Larimer. He was interviewed at his offices in the Blake Street Bath and Racquet Club. To begin, I'd like to know your reaction to what is happening to the scale relationships of the Writer Square development in terms of surrounding projects such as Larimer Place, Barclay Towers and the Windsor? Rinker: lt's a real mistake. It's the kind of thing that should have been addresse d in the DURA design guidelines. That half block is a really important transitional bloc k down to the warehouse district. They should have set some height restrictions that the developers wou l d have to respond to. What we tried to do in Writer was to start the transitional element from Park Central to the essentially two to three storey scale of Market Place and the others. Now all o f a sudden a wall is being created. Wh.1t it is doing is dividing the lower part
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[ ] • J u I .. I ! I r l ! f j l ' I I I t ; l i . UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 11 00 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Anc:in, Melanie Jac:obs, . Marie Smith, Jint 148 S. Emerson St. 1850 F o 1 san 503 13945 Atlantic: Denver, Co. 80209 Boulder, Co. Denver, Co. 447-1498 988-6104. Andress , Fred James, Gary N. Saaith,. Lyn 523 A Corona St. 668 Gilpin St. n1 Logan Denver, Co._ 80218 Denver, Co • . 80218 Denver, Co. 80203 733-3620 355-4313 831.0051 Brac:e, Connie Johnson, Patrick Steckly, Chuc:k ll75 Vine .+503 1190 s. Bellaire t206 7444 w. Roxbury Denver, Co. Denver, Co. Littleton. Co. 320-1596 756-3116 80123 Carlson, Martha Kahn, Diane Tarua, Kai 1020 15th 2217 Forest . 1110 Clartso" St. Denver, Co .. 80202 Denver, Co. 80207 Denver, Co. 322-5532. 83%-4010 Cc,rt) 1 , Su.si e. Kosnar, Ken Welton,. Jan 542 Pennsylvania 707 E • . 5th 1311 Mar1 on St. Denver, Co. 80203 Denver, Co •. Denver, Co. 80218 722-9855 i77-o763 861-0840 Cunningham, Kathie Levar, Peter Wong,. Lfnda 1307 Franklin St. 899 Washington Apt.407 5250 Cherry Cr. So. Denver, Co. 80218 Denver, Co. Denver, Co. 861-7831 837-8130 756.0282 Dickey, Judd MacDonald, Nina Wright, Anney 13001 E. Bethany 2111 l/2 Downing 6095 s. Sterne Pkwy. Aurora, Co. 80014 Denver, Co. 80205 Littleton, Co. 80120 751-5621 861-0999 798-7215 Fitzwilliam, Mark Mega, Siulina 2263 So. Williams 1025 Sherman Denver, Co. 80210 Denver, Co. n1-0901 861-5779 F1 ores, Gerard M. M11 1 e,., Susan Allison, John 2751 w. 28th f3 Rt. 2 Box 271-J 13350 Grove Way Denver, Co. Conifer. Co. 80433 Broomfield. Co. 80020 433-i783 469-496l Fort, Tony Moone, Kelly Sain., Anae Sugarloaf 1901 Spruce 400 s •. Lafayette Soulder, Co. 80302 Boulder, Co. Denver, Co. 80209 444-5757 442-0626 733-8276 Gracey, Susan Nevins, Ryan Batish. Randall 995 Corona 4755 Limestone Rd. 1452 4523 w. Ponds Cfrcle Denver, Co. Palmer Lake. Co. 80133 Littleton. Co. 832 481-3321 795-8868 G reenber-9, Beth Noble, Kathy Ber9er. Debra 802 So. Ogden 7730 Sinms 1231 Lafayette Denver, Co. Arvada, Co. 80005 Denver, Co. 744-6706 423-9516 832.0860 Hunter, Larry Pedre 11 i, Bruna Boulette, Mark 17111 E. Princeton Dr. 429 E.l4th Ave. 1204 500 Hapgood #A . Co. 80013 Denver, Co • Roulder. Co. 80302 690-0401 831-1573 Hashizune, John Read, Mark Bowen, Tom 909 Pearl St. 5381 E. Colorado Ave. 6563 Welch St. Denver, Co. 80203 Denver, Co. Arvada, Co. 80004 861-5621 756-4827 424-4508 Hicks, Steve Seyferth, Brian Chang, Willie 147 '14. Irvington Pl 1020 E. lOth Ave. 4308 1661 E. Navarro Dr. Denver, Co. Broomfield, Co. Denver, Co. 722 469-4953 693-3459 Hooper, Paul Shea, Tim Conna 11 y, Rory 945 Marion St. :;7 1311 Marion St. 3956 Navajo Co. 80218 Denver, Co. 80218 Denver, Co. 80211 332 .. 4629 861-0840 •. DIRECTORY -. 1l CJ 0 +J Cl) -

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Oani e 1 • Henry 1311. w. Marion St. Denver, Co. Davidson, Rob lZll S. Quebec Way Denver, Co. 750-1376 Devin, Gary 1275 Corona '203 Co. 832-3253 Ffscner. Ben 1029 Stele Denver, Co .. 322.-8241 F'oster • . Carl E' • . 2833 E.lJth Ave. Denver, Co. 80206 333-6591 Frauen9lass. Marx 535 S. Logan Denver, Co. 80209 733-8502 Gamuchean, Melanie 1200 Gay 1 ord Denver, Co. Gasbarro, Anna 8 S. Grape Denver, Co. 388-2955 Gfdez. Greg 2614 w. Z4th Ave. Denver, Co. 477...0292 Grady, Scott 785 Humboldt St. Denver, Co. 831-8755 Green , Gary Haas., R.1\ chard 301-E. Or. Northglenn, Co. 457-9406 Hewitt. Jill 639 Downing Denver, Co. 839-5388 H111, Erich 2614 W. 24th Ave. Denver, Co. 47.7-6292 Hohn, Peter 1563 St. Denver, Co. 80203 861-0547 Hourigan, Steve ?.0. Box 751 Denver, Co. 80201 Wuston,. Debbie 1070 Race K Denver, Co. 80206 333-4315 Irving, Wendy 1209 ?ennsylvania f8 Denver, Co. 831-9191 rshizaki, Masash1 6205 W.Z5th Ave. +30: Edgewater. Co. 238-1!06 Jason. Enny 912 E. lOttt Ave. Denver,. Co. . 80218 837-9570 Kaiser,. Frank 2010 Sherrelwood c,.. Denver,. Co 429-1652 266 s. Williams Denver, Co. 80209 733-6297 Kaufman, Debra 2526 Ave. Denver, Co •. 477-3004-Kfmba 11 , . Kenneth 1260 Gaylord St. Denver, Co. 333-2372 Koch, Jeff P.O. Box 10125 Denver, Co. 789-9961 Lesw1ck. Robert 11202-901 Sherman St. Denver, Co. 839-5379 Long, Susan 925-s. Pearl J8 . Denver, Co. 80209 722 Luna, Charles . R. 1121 So. Yosemite Denver, Co. 750-0446 Miller, DavidS., 5127 S. Perry St. Littleton, Co. 798-6246 Mishler, Frances C. 5715 Big Canon Or. E'ng 1 ewood, Co. 770-8540 Morris, Shannon 600 S. Frank 1 in Denver, Co. i77-8918 Nielsen, Christopher 1000 Sherman St. Denver, Co. 30203 837-8179 0 r John 101 East 2nd Ave. Oe1wer. Co. 7J3-l886 Pau 1 san. Robert 3147 s. Cathay Circle Aurora, Co • . 80013 590-79&6 Michael 1430-502 Humboldt St. Cenver. Co. SJZ-7699 R1gley, Steve 1423 Race St. Denver. Co. 80206 333 Mark . 1519 s. Pean St. Oemer. Co. 80210 133-9870 SOus ler-. George 7480 E. Wfndewod eo. 341-l5Z1 Souyler, Steve 978 Steele r.nver, Co. 80206 a22..0056 Simes, Woody ZSZ s. Spruce Ct. . 3ou 1 der, Co. :.43-'1505 S.i tn, Nancy 2520 River Or. Oenver, Co. 4n-997S rasher, Marte 3 S. Grape Oenver, Co .. 388-Z955 iryba, David 396 18th 3oulde,., Co. 449.0490 'Ware, Terrance :zso S. Cr. Or. Oenver, Co. 759-9121 Watson, T0111 L. 14001 E. Tufts Or. Denver, Co. 590-7103 Yanushewskf. John 544 Marion St. Denver, Co. 80218 861-4741 Yort, Jim 799 Dahlia 1505 Denver, Co. 320-5933 Yoshida. rosh1ka 820-HUDboldt.' 14 Denver, Co .. 831-8804 Anderson. Darlene 1525 Perry IS Denver, Co. 80204 534-0021 Beck;,. Thomas 117 Fox St. Denver. co. 892.0683 Bernstef n. R1 chard 110-204 1200 S.Oneida Denver, Co. 759-8958 Ca1"'1'enter. Terry 1020 15th i23C Denver ,Co. 80202 573-6452 W825-3100 Chreitzberq, Mike 1350 Josephine Apt.ZOS Denver, Co. 80206 333-9881 W573-9542 Collfns. Michael 3619 w. 32nd St. Denver. Co • Doutre, Al 929 Marion St. 1401 Denver, Co. 861-5140 Ooyl& .. Joe Z614 24th /Ave. Denver, Co. 80211 477-5118 Engelbrecht, Dan 10555 w. Jewell Ave. Lakewood, Co. 80226 986..0320 Falk, Randy 2950 Eudora St. Denver, Co. 80207 Jn:..s7az Fon!llaft. Dean . 1300-30tn BZ-23 Boulder, Co. 80303 444'-7448 Fr1 edlnan, Davf d 780 Clennont Apt.2 Denver, Co. 80220 399-3704 Gflstad, Pete 1255 Downing St. Denver, Co. Hamai , Richard 8151 Stuart St. West:mfnster, Co. 429 400& HeQp • Grec}g 328-w. lZth Ave. Denver, Co. 80204 893-l1&9 Lay .. Darid 785 Soum-Da 1 e Ct. Oen'ler. Co. 80219 934-0678 Madeira. Oavfct 3232 Ut!l St.. Sou 1 der. 8030% 447-1130 Mahbaubf. Sa 1 d 42n E. Iliff lllZ Denver. Co. 8022Z 157-JTT Mueller, Henry w. 806 Scmlca 11 Denver, Co. 443-3162 \1"231-1944 Bill 7100 #Z-210 E". Miss. Oenwr, eo. 802%4 "753-0188 Nardin, Sfll 2849 Ut1 a St. OenYer, Co. 802l.Z 4n-5068 Nefss, Oavid 800 ?ennsylvania Denver. Co. 802fl3 0 • ac..d, John 101 E.Znd Ave. Denver, Co. 80203 733-!886 Peirce, ?aul 930 Was hi ngtan St. #E Denver, Co. 861-5089 Pa.trs, John Darid SZSO Cherry.C,.. S. Or. Denver, Co. 8"2?2 75o-;1JJ R1otn Lila 1821 S. Franktfn Denver, eo. 802!.0 7Z2-al52 Rodriguez. M1 chael 1343 High St. #9 Denver, Co. 80218 355-1959 Seiple .. Sarah 2121 So. Walnut 130 Boulder, Co.. 8030t 449-8876 Sf1vennan, Alima OS5 Hawthorn Boulder, Co. 803DZ 449-SZSZ Smotherman. James 941 s. Williams Denver, Co. 80209 na-1353 Ward., Mark 1161-11th #1 Boulder, Co. 80302 442-5613 Wheeler • . Chns 1266 Emenort H Denver, Co. 80218 861-1341 Wfllf•s, Olns 1073 Steele St. Denver. Co. 80 399-4543 W825-8 Wfllfamsan. Ran 1300 30th Mll' Boulder, Co. 8 442.0632 WorTe11.Pau1 2693 Java Ct. Denver. Co. sa 433-4639 Wr-ight, Jill 982 s. York Denver, Co. i22-6918 Wahlin; Pe1 1041 Coronc: Denver, Co. 832-3253

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w D. c( u rn [J 2 c( ..1 ARCHITECTURE FACULTY Long, Chalmers G., Jr. Director and Assoc. Barrett, David, Visiting Lecturer Cronenwett, Laura. Visiting Lecturer Crowell, Gary J., Assoc. Prof. Holder, Davis C., Assoc. Prof. Kindig. Robert w., Prof. Chester N., Lecturer Taber, Visiting Vetter, G.K., . ' Cousins, 487 Hunboldt Denver, CO ,80218 733-0779 Deeter, r1 ike 1228 Corona, Ant. 7 Denver. CO. 80218 832-95/'i Howe, Arlene 6165 E. Iliff Denver. CO. 80222 ' . 757-t48i Johnson, David 507 Detroit Street Oenve r, CO. 80906 LaFleur, Joyce 313Q Cole St. Golden. CO. 80701 278-9620 Little, Jim 570 Highlario Ave. gau1der, CO. 80302 444-3876 Ranson, Dave 2095 S. Corona Denver, CO. 80210 722-2371 Rislev. Carrie 1423 Race House Denver, CO. 80206 333-7252 Schultz, Margaret 1362 Alpine Boulder. CO. 80302 449-0884 Spackman, P1i ke 6165 [. Iliff, Apt.l05-S Denver. CO. 80222 757-0072 Sutherland. Mike 1815 r1arion St. #10?. Denver, CO. 80218 832-6153 Sutton, Doug ThorsheiM, Robert 12398 W. 14th Ave. Golden, CO. 80218 823-9523 Watkins, Cathy 185 S. Zang #7-303 lakewood, CO. 80228 985-5277 Heller, Lindy 1607 6th St. Coulder, CO. R0302 (47-8694 Wi 11 ii1riS, lore 491 Hllolboldt St. DenvPr, CO. 80213 777-9740 Evans, Bob 276 Harrison St. Denver, CO. 80206 388-3496 Figliuolo, Barbara 1882 So. St. Paul Denver, CO. 80210 756-1837 Grote, Karen 226 Jackson Ct. Denver, CO. 80206 333-5844 Johnson, Karen 7907 E. Jefferson Ave. Denver, CO. 80237 771-4254 lee, Gina 625 S. Apt. 17 Denver, CO. t1cGown • Mary 707 S. Ogden Denver, CO. 80209 1!22-3066 lkf1ahori SuzannP 3555 Federal, Apt. 2 Denver, CO. 80211 433-1995 St;hulte, Paula 3030 15th Bo•Jl drr, CO. 449-0lCl 628 r1axvte 11 Bouider, CO. 30302 443-6548 Seward (forbes) Sara Jane 4652 Elm Court Denver, CO. 80211 477-983? Shimokawa, P1dsashi Marion St., Apt. #8 Oenve,, CO. 80218 831-0356 OFFICE HOME 629-2877 4.t9-1141 388-1237 629-2650 629-2479 629-2857 629-2877 629-3291 629-2615 Smith, Kendie 600 So. Franklin Denver, CO. 80209 177 Sullivan, Tom 2760 Boulder, CO. 81303 499-3763 Sandra 3835 lakcbriar Dr. Boulder, CO. 80302 442-2678 Bravo (Benson) liz 967 S. Ogden CO. 77A-6205 BrucP., Cr>leen 3817 Drn:er, CO. 433-4020 Burton, Jo, iad 1234 York St. #2 Denver, CO. 333-7507 Mitchell, Cat he 1840 Race St. \. Denver, CO. 355 (H) 377-4812 (0) . . . .. , \,lody }250 S. C 1 ennont, Denver, CO. 80222 Bldn 5 ..; -: 759-8739 Rice, Elizabeth 16-2 Halloran Circle Aurora, CO. 341-8369 Spence1, Ji 11 1590 South St. Denver, CO. 8U210 733-6545 Taylor, Courtney 1350 S. Race Denver, CO. 80210 777-14)5 Walker, Steve 510 Colur.Jbine Denver, CO. 80206 399-5129 FACUl TV , < Gail G. Gunter 11986 E. l!arvard Denver, CO. 80014 Carl Uorb,xk Daniel B. Yeung 5574 S. Ct. 695-6505 756-5911 Englewood, CO. 80111 777-4167 .,

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Ill II D II w t2 Cavaliere, Janice 6730 E. Eastman Ave. Denver, Co. 759-0271 cunr.inghan, Steven W. 1610 :#3 Denver, Co. 80218 Harley, Ned R •• 679 North St. Boulder, Co. 80302 443-7793 Holzman, Canc!ar.c 3637 HJzelwood C t. Co. 80302 443-0404 Johnson, Geoffry R. 840 Cherry St. Apt201 Denver, Co. 80220 J5 5-72-18 Neir, Cass 936 Fillmore Denver, Co. 80206 399-08 Plant,. Donna 8719 Jay Ct. Arvada, Co. 80224 422-5913 '/drgas, linda /12 Lafayette St. Denver, Co. 80218 861-1101 Ganucheau, 1 2 0 0 . y 1 () r d Den v c r , Co. 3 0 2 0 6 Huston, Debbie 1 07() L!acr:, • v. Denver, Co. 80206 3J3-4Jl5 luhier, ClJirp 23R5 S. Co. 30210 12 2-2 2 59 McCulloch, Jcsn 615 Williitms St. Denver, Co. 30218 399-7236 McLoud-Smith, Bonny 7525 E. Harv:Jrd =205 Denver, Co. e0231 755-5065 Waldb!lum, lrit 45 S. Grape Oen\'er, Co. 80222 . 377-4726 Young, B.J. 5574 S. Lansing Ct. Englewood, Co. 80111 779-4167 Harris, Pat 2619 Strr:et Boulder, Co. 80302 443-A293 Donna 38 Englewood, Co. 80110 789-2011 V;, n G v t f• n hpr-k, P n t t" 5 01acc Englc\-:ood, Co. 801!0 761-9595 -0 08 u •M ..c:: u -

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-------I I I • I II II II II II II \ ' \ \ . \ \ . ----... . . . -! .. . . ----. . WRITER SQUARE alternatives. a matter of scale and identity It's not having to walk down long corridors to ride elevators ... having some space of your own. I've done some studies which show that we can get all those things ... identifiable units, defensible space and outdoor areas and still have 60 to 70 units per acre. This begins to be very comparable to some of the high-rises. We need to provide this kind of choice and alternative. Bernstein: What is the role of the architect in a situation where you do not get an innovative developer like Joey Writer but instead the type of developer that produced Larimer Place? Do you act as an educator, suggesting alternative scale and density schemes that will still produce substantial profits or do you become the puppet simply following the developer's instructions? Rinker: I've never worked with a developer like Fulenwider (Larimer Place) and I wouldn't want to. With Joey we had a long design process. But he carne from the view that he wanted to do it right ... to build a project he would feel comfortable with. I was the one that had to be educated about the townhouses because to me they seemed a little inappropriate ... a little suburbia planted downtown. But now I'm really glad they're there. Joey knows an awful lot about housing ... he knows what people want and on that level I think much more of an educator than I am. He's been an innovator. He was the first to do zero lot line in Denver. He's very willing to be on the leading edge and I'm glad he was so involved. I don't like projects where the client or owner says,"create a personality". I like the dynamics and energy where you create together. In many ways the townhouses are Joey's. If it was left up to me I would have created something entirely different. But probably a whole lot people will love them because of his involvement. Bernstein: The Writer Square office building seems to go against the traditional methods of prestige office design particularly with its minimal number of windows. Were any problems anticipated with its image? Rinker: Its tied to a five foot module which is the standard office module and if you look at a facade you can partition it 10 foot offices and everyone will have a window. It was done for two reasons; (1) to cut down on energy loss and (2) we had chosen the brick vernacular and the kind ot windows you have in Larimer Square are punched windows and we wanted to carry on that theme. We were really respecting what brick is and how it works. To have a 800 foot strip of windows looks unnatural and if yea 're trying to respond to brick that means some kind of steel lintel that's 800 feet long. That whole project ties into a 28x32 foot grid and I am thrilled by the complexity WE W'ere able to create. It will take a long time to understand the project. Everywhere you walk is different ... rt•s not something you get in one glance like some of the other projects downtown which you quickly become bored with because they give you everything at once and there are no surprises. Another conscious choice is that we have no idea what the street will look like as we are going to allow every store to design their own storefront ... we are looking for variety not uniform graphics to reinforce' the street experience. Bernstein: In closing would you say that your

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b.r.s. con't. firm has a consistent philosophy that you bring to each project? Rinker: We have a lot of strong individuals and so the outcome of the projects have a lot to do with those individuals. We don't have an identifiable style and I'm proud of that fact. I don't think you can go around and say a Barker, Rinker, Seacat building whereas I think there are some firms In Denver that are identifiable by a style. I think in our case because we work on a team basis ... because we don't have a design department, a production department and a separate field supervision department w b J LANDSCAPE HEAVER Liz Bravo Watch for a city full of landscape architects. American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting will convene at the Fairmont Hotel November 22-25. This year's theme is Frontiers for the SO's: Response to Change Three days of education sessions incLude discussions of energy, economics, communications, creative management and design quality and values. Landscape architects such as William J. Johnson of Johnson, Johnson and Roy, J.B. Jackson, LA historian, Robert Royston of Royston, Hanamoto, Alay and Abey and Angela Danadjieva, Halprin associate and designer of Seattle's Freeway Park are among the nationally recognized hot shots leading the sessions. Unfortunately, Dick Lamm-e-pie won't be attending as formerly believed however, Alan Gussow, artist and lanGscape tator, will provide an undoubtedly more uplifting introductory speech with the topic "Towards A Landscape of Interdepend.ence". November 24 is the date for the wind-up party at the Apex Mining Company in Square where students and DURP SPACE we avoid the horizontal stratification that somt other firms have. The team works on the project the whole way through. Also the people we attract are the people we look for. not necessarily form architects. We believe very strongly in user participation and not token involvement with the clients ... we try to interpret their personalities and their desires rather than our own. I think often times form architects come from their own ego. They visualize a form and make every thing.work around it. Our forms very much evolve in response to the context that we are dealing with the physical surroundings, the budget realit:j_es and the goals of the users and clients. professionals alike will mash together to celebrate this curious ritual. All the above should provide some much needed inspiration at this time of the semester. good enuf fer governmint work ... The Federal register opened October 15 for recruiting landscape architects. If you're interested in getting your name on the rolls, contact the Office of Personnel Management, 1845 Sherman St., Denver 80203. This recruitment continues indefinitely but will most likely close abrubtly when Ronald gets sworn in this January. In keeping with our policy of providing space to all departments of the College, we would like to provide this space for the exclusive use of the Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning. True, we haven't yet received an article from DURP, but at least now that department has its own column Be creative with this space! Perhaps you'd like to plan your Thanksgiving menu. Or •.• maybe think of a creative use for a Planning degree.once "Ronnie's Revolution" has begun. You might even want to write an article for the next Laminations. Express yourself; this is your space!

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DN DEEZINE CLUB michael collins You may not know it, but you are a member of the Deezine Club •••. Big deal, huh? Well, the Deezine Club was created to serve you, and your input is important in keeping the Club alive. We try to encourage social and academic interaction between departments by organizing picnics and parties. Each year the Executive Council grants the Club funds which can be spent in numerous ways. This year, in addition to funding Laminations, we plan on buying some goodies. By next week there should be an ample supply of blue and blackline print paper available at a modest price(approx. 10 a sheet). Or if you wish, you can purchase 10 sheets(24 x 36") in a cardboard mailing tube for 4 dollars! Such a deal! The word is that the school may get a Kroy lettering machine and if these dreams materialize, the Deezine Club will supply additional lettering cassettes for the machine. Currently we are working on buying, hard to get "non-architecture books" for the library, as well as organizing some periodicals for sale. These p eriodicals will be available next semes-ter on a single issue or complete volume basis. Next week there will be a meeting to discuss these and other great events ••• Look for notices! WAD BALL REVISITED michael collins & george schusler Well sports fans, once again its time for historical sports. This month our obscure sport is the famous pastime of architec ture students all over the world, Wadball more intimately known as Now we're sure many of you were probably born too early or came to school too late and you're asking yourself what heck are these guys talking about. Well permit us to enlighten you Wadball has ties back to the ancient Japanese culture of paper folding. It's roots sink deep into the depressed middle ages where it was played as a form of stimulation. It's violence and degeneration stem back to the final days of the Roman Empire. The spirit of competitionand the desire for the perfect team reflects its Grecian ancestory as well. Wadball was resurrected most recently by the Elders of Bromley in 1978. It may have been played under another name, in another form, by another ancient class although no records have been recovered as of yet. . '\. \ '.., . . ' \ The "Ball" is how the game ties back to the ancient Japanese paper-morphic culture. The Elders would save all their remnants of bumwad. Even though designs were discarded and ideas had changed, the "Wad" ••• on desks, on floors, in •••• everywhere. Somehow it was regarded as sacred--no one dared to discard it ••• except one ••• George, the elder Elder. He was wiser and more experienced than the others. He convinced them that they could"not only throw the wad away but thei could throw it around. The Elders created a sacred "Court of Wadball" by using the Mike Doyle Magical Mirror as a separating device or "net". The carefully folded "ball", proportioned in harmony with the universe, became the projectile and the mirror was the division. Teams began to spring up, male-female, shirts-skins, and competitions were fierce. The tradi tiona! s tarting time for matches was set at 2:30 a.m. and champions were born overnight. It was a grand period of time •.• the 7 days and 7 nights it lasterl,/bnt like the wad itself and the designs that generated the sport ••• it simply wasted away. Today, if an archeological expedition were to excavate the ruins of the architectonic card.,... board and paper, they would discover the magical mirror/separating device. Boundary lines are still faintly visible under the debris on the carpet, and the potential for the next ball can be found on your drawing boards. *For your very own personal rule book, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: The Society For The Preservation Of Wadball 600 Madison Avenue New York, New York 101010 *** Please include $2.50 for postage and handling

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NOTES FADM DOLORES THEFT: Just a reminder not to leave valuables unattended Pase notify Public Safety if you see anyone suspicious in the building. IDs: Please obtain a Photo ID in the Student Center building, Room 210, Mon-Thurs. 9:30-11:30 and 2:00-6:00. This was a request by our Public Safety because our students are working in the building after hours. It is a protection for you if you become ill. PORTFOLIOS: We have a few portfolios left and would appreciate having them picked up. Please see Donna Lee in' ' the office. "Montreal" by Blue Green I GETTING The American Underground-Space Association (AUA) announces a Design Competition to 9e held in ' conjunction with the Underground Space Conference and Exposition (USCE '81) , Kansas City, Missouri, June'8-10, 1981. USCE '81 is the first international underground/earth sheltered event to take .place in America. The event will feature a Conference, based qn the theme THINK DEEP, that will be devoted to technical and policy ' ' issues related to both deep space and earth sheltered uses, an internatL:,nal. exposition of products and services essential to the design and construction of undergrou. nd facilities, and Tours of Kansas City's vast subsurface commercial space and a variety of earth sheltered homes. The purpose of the Design is to recognize and encourage outstanding work in' the field of earth sheltered and underground, energy conserving, architecture by professionals and students of architecture and . engineering from around the world. Works-in-Progress are invited in residential, and research categories. Entries will be judged by a distinguished multidisciplinary jury. The Design Competition will be highlighted at USCE '81 in several ways. Winning and oiher selected entries will be on display at the Exposition and will be featured in a new book, , ( HOURS: The Administrative Offices will be closed for Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 27, and Friday, Nov. 28. The library will also be closed. CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS: the University will be closed December 24, 1980 until January 5, 1981. Building Hours will resume January 5, 1981. SCHOLARSHIP FOR A NEEDY WOMAN STUDENT: Any woman student in the College who wishes to apply for .an American Business Women's scholarship, please see Dolores in the office for an application. I' AND' READ THIS: MAIL All currently enrolled students will receive a schedule of Courses for Spring 1981 in the mail in the next two weeks. PLEASE FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAIL-IN REGISTRATION. Mail registration Couise Requests must be received by the Office of Admissions and Records NO LATER than 5:00p.m. on ' December 1, 1980 for the Spring 1981 semester. SCHEDULE OF COURSES: The Spring, Schedule of courses will be out in the next two weeks. One class that was omitted that will be offered is: PCD 750-3 PLANNERS IN THE REAL WORLD, 18:45-21:35 Tues. Bromley 202 Phil Milstein u N D E in Sheltered and Underground Construction". Local and national media atten-. ' tion will be sought and winners will be announced at the Conference. Cash Prizes ranging from $200 to $1000 will be awarded in of the four categories. Deadline for submissions will be February 15, 198 1, addressed to the AUA, care of TLH Asso ciate$, inc., Suite 900, Minnesota Building, St. Paul, MN 55101. Questions pertaining to . these be accepted up to December 1, 1980. Mail to the same address. Answers will be mailed to all participants by January 1, 1981.

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LAMINATIONS is I II he establishment of its first annual WRECKING-BALL AWARD. / / -----------ft',.,. ....._ -..,. ...... ......._ .........__ _ _ _ _ _ """-----,_______________ ---------------..___ ..-.....__ . . ----The award is to be given to the worst example of architecture, landscape architecture or planning project recently completed in Colorado. Decisions are to be made by the the students but LAMINATIONS will accept all responsibility. Look out for posters. :, -.... -----. . ---------.--:._. --.; . . . :I -< ....

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MONDAY )( Au.. )(. x 11e,Ll ( r) t Aet::xJ1 \ TUESDAY WEDNESDAY T._.UAS.DAY )( '/(. LL-) • C P) IH•? C.'--) FRIDAY SATURDAY l,...U..ft.Jtc..e-FSI . ')( f <:.PJ S DO f' H A v P•T• "'t-1 J<. WIL/'JW c.P.J f!,IAJ ....... fil&rtfT H {_ L-) )(THE ... TDe. tt:.t-)