Citation
Laminations, March, 1981

Material Information

Title:
Laminations, March, 1981
Series Title:
Laminations
Creator:
University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
UNI VERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
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AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION
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MARCH,1981


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
LAMIIMOCnONS
FUNDING: Colorado Society of Architects
STAFF: John David Powers, editor
Randy Williamson Tim Leong Mohammad MoWlavi Said Mahboubi Richard Bernstein Kristan Pritz Gary Devin Mark Jacobs Peter Levar Kunle Taiwo Willie Chiang David Friedman Uavid Wager
Special thanks to:
Dev Carlson Dolores Hasseman
Sarah Bransom
Liz Bravo
Mr.
Bromley’s
Neighborhood
Howdy, boys and girls. Can you say "en-vi-ron-men—tal dee—zine?" We can* If you notice, our slightly new format encourages a multi-disciplinary approach. In fact, the only group we haven’t heard from are the "interiors" people.
Boys and girls, can you say "energy crisis?" How about "nuclear poliferation?" We’ll use these and other naughty words in our next issue. Watch for it.
Women in Design
Women in Design International is sponsoring a competition to recognize outstanding women in graphic design. Categories include sculpture environmental design, architecture, furniture, interior design, landscape design and fashion. Deadline for submitting slides, entry fees and entry forms is April 30. For further information, write to Women in Design International, Box 7468, San Francisco, California 94119
Mailing address:
Laminations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
IS THERE SOLAR AFTER REAGAN ?
FIND ANSWERS TO THIS & OTHER / BURNING QUESTIONS IN LAMINATIONS’ SIZZLING SUPER
Cover photo: by Mark Jacobs
Articles and letters must be signed and accompanied by a mailing address. Materials are subject to group editing for reasons of clarity and space.
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer.
i / / "
SOLAR ISSUE!
ARRIVING IMMINENTLY


HENRY
MOORE
ant
Critics share a tendency for detailed, subjective, and frequently laborious critiques. Often these analysis are prejudiced by the critics own in-terruptive abilities. Consequently, little substantive material is offered to the recipient. In this presentation the author has elected to offer a series of quotations from the sculptor, taken over a period of years, to the reader. This will I feel, enable the reader to establish his/her own analysis. I have selected quotations that are indeed relevant and contributory toward an understanding of the artist, his work, and ultimately relating to the design process itself.
Sculpture should always at first sight have some obscurities, and further meanings. People should want to go on looking and thinking; it should never tell all about itself immediately. Initially both sculpture and painting must need effort to be fully appreciated, or else it is just an empty immediacy like a poster, which is designed to be read by people on top of a bus in half a second. In fact all art should have some more mystery and meaning to it than is apparent to a quick observer. In my sculpture, explanations often come afterwards. I do not make a sculpture to a programme or because I have a particular idea I am trying to express. While working, I change parts because I do not like them in such a way that I hope I am going to like them better.The kind of alteration I make is not thought out; I do not say to my-self-this is too big or to small. I just do it and, if I do not like it, I change it. I work from likes and dislikes, and not by literary logic. Not by words, but by being satisfied with form. Afterwards I can explain or find reasons for it, but that is rationalisation after the event. I can even look at old sculp-ures and find meanings in them and explanations which at the time were not in my mind at a 11-not consciously anyway.
Whilst touching some sculpture can give pleasure, touch itself is certainly not a criterion of good sculpture. A particular pebble or a marble egg may be delightful to feel or hold because it is very simple in shape and very smooth, whereas if it were the same shape but with a prickly or cold surface you would not like touching it. Of course you can tell the shape of something if you can put your hands around it. But it is impossible for a blind person to tell you the shape of a building. The same applies to a large sculpture, in fact, although the sense of touch is fundamentally important and implied, it is not physically necessary to touch a sculpture in order to understand its form.
Also, I think a simple symmetrical shape eventually loses its interest because it is understood to quickly. A sculpture should have things you can go on discovering.


4
Right from the beginning I have been more interested in the female form than in the male. Nearly all my sculptures are based on the female form. "Woman" has that startling fullness of the stomach and the breasts. The smallness of the head is necessary to emphasise the massiveness of the body. If the head had been any larger it would have ruined the whole idea of the sculpture. Instead the face and particularly the neck are more like a hard column than a soft goitred fema-ale neck.
From very early on I have had an obsession with the Mother and Child theme. It has been a universal theme from the beginning of time and some of the earliest sculptures we've found from the Neolithic Age are of a Mother and Child. I discovered, when drawing, I could turn every little scribble, blot or smuge into a Mother and Child. (Later on, I did the same with the Reclining Figure theme!) So that I was conditioned, as it were, to see it in everything. I suppose it could be explained as a "Mother" complex.
Besides the human form, I am tremendously excited by all the natural forms, such as cloud formations, birds, trees and their roots, and mountains, which are to me the wrinkling of the earth's surface, like drapery. It is extraordinary how closely ripples in the sand on the shore resemble the gouge marks in wood carving.
Landscape has been for me one of the sources of my energy. It is generally thought that no sculptor is much interested in landscape, but is only concerned with the solid, immediate form of the human figure or animals. For myself I have always been very interested in landscape.(I can never read on a train-I have to look out of the window in case I miss something.) As well as landscape views and cloud formations, I find that all natural forms are a source of unending interest- tree trunks, the growth of branches from the trunk each finding its individual airspace, the texture and variety of grasses, the shape of shells, of pebbles, ect. The whole of Nature is an endless demonstration of shapes and form, and it suprises me when artists try to escape from this.
The asymmetrical growth of trees responding to their environment has always interested me. If a branch starts to go one way and there isn't enough sunlight or space that way it will change direction and find its own area to live in.
Shapes that stand out against the sky are something I have always liked.


The whole of my development as a sculptor is an attempt to understand and realise more completely what form and shape are about, and to react to form in life, in the human figure, and in past sculpture. This is something that can't be learnt in a day, for sculpture is a never-ending discovery.
As a house is the home of the family, so is a city the home of its inhabitants, and should be furnished with works of art, just as you would furnish your own home. I think London could easily have three times as many monuments, sculptures and fountains than it has at present. It would make it a much happier place in which to live.
There is a big arm, nearly eleven feet long, in the British Museum, which impressed me. It's Egyptian. It has a kind of squarness about it which I found interesting. It is not that I imit imitated it consciously, it's just that, if something impresses you, you can't help being influenced by it. This happens to every artist. It is only the great artists who can emerge from these influences and create their own individual style.
When Michelangelo said that sculpture could express everthing, he did not mean that sculpture could replace the functions of all other arts, or that sculpture could play a banjo! He meant that it can express so much that you don't need to worry about what it can't do. In that sense it was enough for him....it is enough for twenty lifetimes-.
The theory that the work of an artist or a novelist is directly attributable to his personality is a romantic one. An artist's gift is that he can project his imagination. Balzac, for example, carried away on his imagination could write continuously for days and nights on end, living in his mind the lives of his characters. It doesn't mean that if you write about sorrowful things you are in reality miserable. And, yet, of course an artist uses experiences he's had in life. Such an experience in my life was the birth of my daughter Mary, which reinvoked in my sculpture my Mother and Child theme. A new experience can bring to the surface something deep in one's mind.
One day you see things which the day before you had never noticed. Life is like that, and certainly many of my ideas happen that way.
David Wager


GREAT EXPECTATIONS....
Randy Williamson
This article is based on a survey of University of Colorado architectural students that parallels a survey done by Architectural Record recently. Record's survey was distributed to every accredited school of architecture in the U.S., and was cross-referenced against the attitudes of practicing architects. It gives an interesting cross sectional^-view of 1981 graduates. The Laminations survey wasn't limited to graduates, but was available to students at different levels in both programs. Approximately 31% of the students responded to the survey. The conclusions drawn here can in no way be construed to positively depict or pin down student Sentiments, but it does provide an insight into where the CU student's head is at.
A picture of a group committed to architecture emerges as 56% related they always wanted to or decided in high school to study architecture, and only 14% decided after college. Virtually no one has regretted their decision bo study architecture. Fifty-six percent say their GPA is 3.5-4.0, and 60% maintain they are getting respectable B's in design. However, a resounding 86% believe grades are no predictor of future success. Nonetheless, 82% of practitioners (from Record's survey) look at scholastic performance when hiring. But, 94% said it was "very" or fairly important to have a good design portfolio.
OR, ON THE BRINK OF IDEOLOGICAL REVOLUTION?
In 3 to 6 years, 28% feel they will be ready to open their own firm, while another 28% felt it would take 6 to 9 years. Record's survey noted a more cautious response, as 36% felt it would take 9 to 12 years. Record's states that 31% of the practitioners set up shop within 3 to 6 years after graduation.
The procedure for becoming licensed is understood by 77%, and the same percentage has heard of NCARB, leaving about 23% in the dark about registration and NCARB.
A majority of students, 93%, are interested in joining the AIA for reasons not asked by the survey.
Almost 79% of the students worked during their summer vacations for architects, and 21% did unrelated work. Yet only 40% felt it contributed to their progress as an architectural student.
Most students seem intent on becoming licensed. Only .3% denied an interest in registration. An overwhelming 93% of students want their own firm, comparing closely with Record's survey of 69%. Clearly, the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well.
In the area of training, surprisingly only 65% versus Record's 92% felt they had good training in schematic design. Likewise, in site/environ-mental analysis and design development, 77% versus Record's 84% felt they had good training. Less than 40% feel they had good training in programming, client contact, construction documents, and code research. Inadequate training in specifications and materials scored 51%. In document checking and building cost analysis, over 40% felt they had no training in these
areas.


7
The practitioners agree that graduates are best prepared in areas of schematic design, site/en-vironmental analysis and design development.
The practitioner's perceptions of the student's abilities lies anywhere from 10 to 20% lower than the student's perception of his or her abilities. It is clear that the practitioners have a more critical view of the training of architectural students than the students do of their own training.
Students have high expectations for starting salaries, and are in for a disappointment.
The median starting wage expected was approximately $7.35 per hour, while Record's survey shows $7.25. However, the median salary paid by practitioners was a paltry $5.50. Some 30% of our survey expected to start at about $8.50 an hour.
After registration, the expectations of salary are more closely aligned with the concept of reality of the practitioner. The students expect to earn about $1,830 per month, while the median actually paid was in the $1,800 range. However, nearly 40% expect to be earning $25,000 yearly by then. It is interesting to note that third-year students expect to make $8.00 per hour while first-year students have expectations for only $6.50.
A desire to work in the city was expressed by 53% of students surveyed, while 16% preferred suburban or rural areas. The remainder are taking work wherever they can. This closely parallels Record's results. Practitioners report that 70% of their offices are in the city. Also, a majority, 63%, desire to work in a medium sized office. Less than 12% of the students expressed a desire to work for a large firm.
Colorado is a popular state to work in with 46% electing to stay here. Students seem to favor working in their home state (or country) by a small margin of 43% to 33%. The remainder apparently are unsure or don't care. Other states that were mentioned as possible destinations were Texas, California, Massachusetts$ Hawaii, Maine, Washington, Florida, and New York.
The most fascinating question was the favorite architects of the students. It should be mentioned that no conclusion can be drawn from this as to school philosphy. In fact, one student wrote a comprehensive essay chastising the survey for picking architects as if they were colors* and implied that if such a question could determine the direction of the school, it would confirm his or her worst fears about the school. Putting these fears to rest, we can only speculate with interest on the selections by the students.
Surprisingly, yet closely aligned with Record's results, the architects which were most popular were Frank Lloyd Wright (an astounding 56% put Wright on their list), Alvar Aalto (33%), I. M.
Pei (30%), Gaudi (26%), Charles Moore (23%),
Eero Saarinen (21%), Louis Kahn (19%), Arthur Erickson (16%) (Erickson didn't make the top 20 in either the students or practitioner's lists in the Record survey), H. H. Richardson (11%),
Luis Barragon and Bruce Goff (each 9%). Among others getting three votes or less, were Thomas Jefferson, Palo Soleri, Meis, Greene Brothers, Sullivan. Numerous others were mentioned once, with the list too long to print. Interestingly, some which made Record's survey weren't mentioned or received only one vote.
They were Richard Meier, Robert Venturi, Philip Johnson, Michael Graves, Paul Rudolph, and James Stirling. Eight out of the top ten of Record's survey were within our top ten, leaving this up to your conjecture and conclusions as to the conservatism of the design philosophy nation wide.
Favorite buildings were interesting in their wide variation of student architectural appreciation. No single building captured more than 14% of the vote on favorite U.S. buildings, the most mentioned being Wright's Falling Water.
Other noticeable mentions were Hugh Stubbins' Citicorp Building, Pei's East Wing of the National Gallery, Pei's NCAR, and Portman's San Francisco Hyatt Regency. Falling Water narrowly beat out Le Corbusier's Ronchamp for favorite building in the world. Other interesting choices were Monticello, Taj Mahal, the Kremlin, St. Peter's, Dulles Airport, Taos Pueblo, Trinity Church, Pompidou Center, Chrysler building, and others too numerous to mention.
What emerges from this survey is a very conservative picture. The questions presented were perhaps too structured or contrived to evoke meaningful responses, and some criticism is expected and probably justified. Essay questions would have provided more insight into student philosophies, however, predictably, the percentage of returned surveys would have nosedived.
The results here can only be viewed with caution (and perhaps amusement?).


ON SOUND ARCHITECTURE
Tim Leong
The evolution of the concert hall has been a slow and arduous process having many calculated successes as well as failures. The performing arts that have been presented in the concert hall has historically been the shaping force in hall design. Acoustical and visual demands of each performing vernacular have brought about the movement toward more specialized hall design.
While much new music is divorced from traditional forms of tonality, texture, organization and interpetation there are still the same acoustical properties needed within the concert hall. Acoustical nartowness, appro-^ priate reverberent time and energy (depending on the nature and intensity of sound to be rendered), acoustical imaging, acoustical intimacy and visual intimacy are all required within every hall regardless of the nature of the music to be presented.
With every new hall that is erected there is the inevitable comparison made with the great halls of the past. The Symphony Hall in Boston, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and the Grosser Musikvereinssaal in Vienna are by musical concensus, the three best representatives of what a good hall should be. While the acoustics of these halls are ideal for the majority of traditional music many modern designers feel that the format and design criteria of these traditional halls to be limiting and architecturally jaded.
There has been a recent movement toward theater in the round. This departure from
the traditional proscenium arrangement seems to be of a social rather than an artistic nature. The "in the round" format, while being architecturally unifying and spac-ially intimate involves much acoustical reworking and presents staging problems.
It is difficult to evaluate this new format in concert hall design as many of the great halls rely on many years of use and criticism on which to build a reputation.
^The modern approach of "off axis/assymetrical" concert hall design is still in its infancy.
The success or failure of designs which have departed from the proscenium arrangement will be apparent with the passage of time. However, there are tell-tale signs of a hall’s success within both the audience's and performer's domain. The preferred seats (also the most expensive) still are those with the best view of the stage. The least desired seats are still those at the far sides of the stage, not to mention any seats behind the stage. The performers, especially in an "in the round" format must be more judicious in their behavior on stage (especially the brass who on occaission must empty their spit valves during a performance!). The most apt remark in defense of the proscenium theater is by theater designer/consultant George C. Izenour: "But when all is said and done-it is more natural and it has therefore become customary that for visual and aural communication in an auditorium, as everywhere else, the face-to-face on-axis approach is prefereable for the very practical reason that it works best that way."


LA’s DO IT AT...
Liz Bravo
And if you're wondering where the birdies is, they have been out in the towns. A lot of harbingers of an era of new strength in the UCD Environmental Design College have begun appearing lately. Last year, messengers of environmental design were linked with three Colorado communities by the Center for Community Development and Design. This union has produced a trio of informative studies that reveal UCD EnDes students as capable consultants, not just young chickadees.
Upper St.Vrain Valley
Chronologically the oldest, "The Recreation Resource Study of the Upper St. Vrain Valley" has reached publication form. A study area, approximately 54 square miles, was determined by the watershed of the Upper St. Vrain Creek.
Maps and text illustrate one unified recreation system which was divided into the context of three scales, regional, vicinity and local.
The team of Grey, Horgan, Kaehny, Pritz and Rice, suggested a system within each scale which would provide a unified plan of activity centers linked by paths or roads. The linkage system provided the connection between the three scales. This will be a useful reference for planners as well as LA's - but for some great insights, ask one of the study team members about the process used to develop this monumental effort.
Morrison
Plan-of-action suggestions were made to insure that future adjacent development would be consistent with the town's goals. Proposals for regulation of development ranged from the physical and legal considerations of land use to visual enhancement of the town center and measures for stimulating the local economy. There is a good chance Morrison will implement some of the programs conceived to solve its problems. If so, there will be an opportunity for evaluation of the study's recommendations. That could be an excellent educational tool for all the environmental design disciplines. To share the Morrison study's design process with the college, there will be a presentation of the project on March 13 at 4 pm in East Classroom Bldg. #163.
and The Springs
"Design Guidelines for West Colorado Avenue" is a hot-off-the-press CCDD study produced by the architecture, planning, LA team of Williams, Nardin, Ellis, Burton, and Mitchell. Although specific to the 20 block area of West Colorado Avenue in Colorado Springs, its recommendations could be used on any scale of urban analysis.
The guidelines cover topics such as signage, streetscape, architecture and mixed-use development. Judging by the number of street-scape thesis projects in the LA department, this graphics-filled study might end up being like Gideon's Bible to a motel room for some students around here.
Last summer, a community survey was undertaken in Morrison. From these indications of need, rose the "Morrison Design Study". This interdisciplinary effort (three architects, two planners, two LA's and our illustrious resident dean) broadened the scope of perception for analysis and resulted in design guidelines on the regional, vicinity and local levels for the beleaguered foothills town. They wished to see their rural character preserved and the economic base bolstered. The Design Study came up with some interesting solutions to these classic challenges.
All these studies can be found in the UCD library and will be valuable as reference for similar future undertakings. These kinds of experiential learning programs are the budding new strength of our college and could blossom into a full-blown reputation for UCD EnDes attracting legislative attention and resultant bucks. There is no doubt of the value of these practical, real-world studios for design students. Our encouragement to CCDD for its invaluable services, as well as to the faculty advisors and communities for their confidence in us.


tecl/moQogy
no__
ARCHI-
Peter A. Levar
Not too long ago S.O.M. held a presentation at the Fairmont Hotel on Computers in Architecture. The Multi-media presentation stirred my interest to further explore the various applications of computers in Architecture, and to examine the impact of this science as a valuable asset to the Architectural profession.
Today's architect practices in a very complex world. He deals with more complicated buildings and has to complete a design in a minimum period of time. There is an enormous amount of data with little time to analyze it; with these jobs the computer is a unique and extremely useful tool. The computer is flexible and can contribute in a variety of ways to the design process. The ability the computer has to organize and display information gives aid to the architect in a way which no mere mechanical devices or book of standards can provide. The amount of information that can be stored in the computer is phenomenal. The technology seenvs to be ever improving in computer capability. What were once rooms filled with massive machinery are now offices equipped with smaller and more portable computers.
The computer's graphic capacity has greatly improved
since its first uses in graphics and design. The design process has been streamlined as the project data is accumulated and organized in the computer. Computer graphics enhance design flexibility. The graphic application aids designers in visualizing an entire city, site, building project, or individual components. The computer has the capability to generate views which the architect may not conceptualize. Geometric images can be manipulated to produce floor plans, sections, axonometrics, or perspectives.
Project architects work with computer specialists to determine each projects needs for computer desigi assistance and the ultimate goals for using the computer. In design they are used to analyze desig problems, verify data and develop new solutions.
The purpose of using the computer is not only to produce better design and services for the clients but also to improve productivity. The computer was not designed to replace man, it was invented to relieve man from wasting valuable time. The us of a computer cannot change the quality, but can change the depth in which the project can be comprehended.


n
The tent system is developed by the computer into component parts.
RUN ISONS STRUCT 10 HAJNEW
PGS
PATCH 1 LIST 1
CjR^24 CEN 0 0 12 START 5. S. 12 END 5. 5. 12 IN X Y CIR 24 CEN 0 O'B START 11 11 8 ENO 11 11 8 IN X Y
SPLINE 6
37.5 37.5 0 0 37.5 8 -37.5 37.5 0 SPLINE 6 -37.5 37.5 0 -37.5 0 8 -37.5 -37.5 0 SPLINE 6 -37.5 -37.5 0 0 -37.5 8
37.5 -37.5 0 SPLINE 6
37.5 -37.5 0
37.5 0 8
37.5 37.5 0
PATTERN 1 SURFACE PATCH 1
GENERATE LOFT 7 1 PLANES
ADO
NODE X 37.5 Y 37.5 Z -12 NODE X -37.5 Y 37.5 Z -12 NODE X -37.5 Y -37.5 Z -12 NODE X 37.5 Y -37.5 Z -12 BEAMS FROM NODE 7 TO 169 BEAMS FROM NODE 49 TO 170 91 TO 171 133 TO 172
ENO PATTERN COPY
PATT 1 TRANSLATE X START 0 10X75 Y START 0 4X75
Areas of Application
Feasibility Study Architectural Programming Space Planning Two-Dimensional Graphics Three-Dimensional Graphics Cost Control Circulation Analysis Text Manipulation Project Control Office Management Evaluation Site Planning
The computer graphics system adapts to large scales to draw the overall project site and surroundings. Environmental impacts of the building on the skyline, increased traffic patterns and solar intensity on the building and its neighbours.
The flexibility provided by the computer as a tool in design is complemented by its drafting ability.
This capability evolved from the computer graphics system which could perform such tasks as perspectives, floor plans, elevations and sections. The image
Radically different types of structures are analyzed with the computer.
produced by the computer is finely detailed and precise. The most attractive feature is the speed of production, which would relieve the tedious work of hand drawing repetative floor plans, brick facades and other time consuming practice. The drafting capability has been further developed to act as a base for working drawings.
In conclusion, the architect of today is functioning in a society which is constantly growing more and more complex. He must respond quickly to the high demands of his client. There is far too much knowledge to be absorbed on large projects by the architect using traditional means.
The computer has already become an integral component of the twentieth century; if the architect is to continue to play an important role in shaping the environment of the world of today, he must keep pace with modern technology.


PLANNERS
EXXON
STUDIO 2 TAKE ON
by Sarah Bransom
Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company’s Experimental Operation
Question: What will require over 256 square
miles of land, four 48" pipelines, 3,000 miles of new roads, 1.1 million acre feet of water per year and add over a million and a half new people to the Western Slope of Colorado? Answer: The Exxon company's proposed 8 million
barrel per day (BPD) oil shale industry slated for the northwest corner of this State. Exxon's proposal was the subject matter for 9 Studio 2 planners who were given the task of defining what the creation of another Denver on the West Slope might look like. The assignment seemed simple enough: design a scheme by which a region of 120,000 people might plan and provide services for a growth projection of one and a half million while maintaining the existing Western Slope "quality of life." Simple it was not.
Last summer, Exxon presented to Governor Lamm a "white paper" which outlined the company's proposal for massive oil shale development in the Piceance Creek Basin of northwest Colorado. The paper called for six open pits (each by 2 miles wide), numerous underground mines and retort facilities all to be created by a construction force of 92,000 and operated by a permanent workforce of 220,000. This is to take place within the next thirty years and last between 75-150 years.
The Piceance Creek Basin, located northeast of Grand Junction, contains some of the richest oil shale deposits in the world and is the site of prototype operations of Exxon, Union and Superior oil companies, to name a few. The transition from the current experimental phase of oil shale development to full scale commercial operations will obviously have a multitude of planning and design implications for the region. However, before the extremely skeptical team of planners accepted these implications, the feasibility of Exxon's proposal was examined.
The first phase of the project involved a field-trip to oil shale country. Here it was learned that for every barrel of oil produced, 2-5 barrels of water was consumed and over 4 tons of rock would be mined. The fieldtrip also included a stop at the Colorado West Council of Governments where one representative explained that the majority of community officials and residents in the area do not believe that massive oil shale development will ever
occur, therefore, little planning was taking place to prepare for the projected growth.
In fact, current public opinion, he explained, is to ignore Exxon's proposal or to proclaim it as a bad joke.
After the tour and several weeks of discussion, the team concluded that Exxon's proposal was conceivable, but only if certain "givens were accepted. These included the elimination of present air quality standards, increased government incentives for industry, and development of extensive interstate water systems. (Exxon proposes to transfer needed water from South Dakota to Colorado.) Finally, enormous amounts of front-end money would be required to prepare for the 1% million new people.
The next phase of the project was to identify potential solutions for the region in dealing with the impacts of intense development.
A "conceptual plan" was developed which identified settlement areas for the project growth. Towns like Rifle and Parachute would have to accomodate over 400,000 people by the year 2010. (Rifle's current population is around 3,200.) The area surrounding Rangely might see over 900,000 people if Exxon's proposal became a reality.
In order to move this projected volume of people throughout the region, a major public rail transportation system was designed by the team. Such a system would be required to avoid major air pollution problems and keep traffic to and from settlement areas manageable.
Another major recommendation by the team was to create a two tiered form of government which would involve a regional government as well as strong local governments. It was felt that this type of arrangement would be necessary if a Denver-sized region on the West Slope were to function with any amount of stability.
All of these recommendations plus others made during the course of this project may never come to be in northwest Colorado. However, it is clear that oil shale development is here and is fast becomming the "boom" which, for years, many predicted. Still to be seen is the impact of the Reagan administration on the oil shale industry and whether or not the "bust" is inevitable.


CITIES
AND
POLITICS
Mohammad Mowlavi
Urbanization has had different trends in developed and undeveloped or developing countries; in other words, the problmes the various countries have faced during the process are different. 1 am going to define briefly these differences and make some suggestions in terms of planning.
In developed countries, the population growth has happened in accordance with the technological progress, while in developing countries, this growth has been much faster than the progress.
The characteristics of the cities in developed and developing countries in terms of population, social, economic, and political aspects are as follows:
Developed Countries
In developed countries, there is a homogeneous established population with a slow rate.
Socially, they are very organized and there is a logical trend among the different parts of the cities. Also, community services are well-developed.
In terms of industry, marketing and services, there is a balanced growth. Also industrial growth happens along with the growth of the services. Because of the balance between urbanization and industrialization, there is an increased economic growth.
Developing Countries
In terms of history, the cities in developing countries are divided into two groups. The first group includes tue ancient cities which are mostly in Asia and North Africa. The second group consists of fairly new cities in Africa and South America. The new cities have been built by colonizer countries which have not considered their cultural, social, economic, and political realities. The developmental planning for those cities nas never met the real needs of the people, but were developed for the colonizer's benefit.
These cities have even changed the economic situation of the world. I should point out that the ancient cities have not been immune from the influence of colonizers. These cities have gradually lost their original character and functional form, and have become like new cities as mentioned.
When industrialized countries were in the developing process, the population growth was 0.5/. At the same time, this growth was 2.5% in developing countries. Therefore, in terms of the same economic development, the population growtn in developing countries has been five times as much as industrialized countries in the nineteenth century. This situation has brought many problems in the areas of education, health, food, employment, and housing.
when industrialized countries were undergoing urbanization, it was accompanied with industrial development*, housing, and other urban needs. However, in developing countries., urbanization occured without the industrial development and other urban services required.
In developing countries, there is a high rate of immigration from the rural areas to the cities and a nigh growth rate.
In terms of social and political characteristics, community services are limited and unorganized and urban services and facilities are particularly inadequate in low income areas. There is a big conflict between the high income and low income areas. The primary source of conflict in these countries tends to be between the generations rather than between social groups.
As far as economic characteristics, these cities a are mostly based on services rather than basic industry. There is also a high growth rate without a resultant growth in agriculture and industry. While there is a high growth rate of services, productivity experiences a low rate of growth.
Because of a high rate of demand and the low standards of living, there is a very high rate of inflation.
I would also like to make some suggestions for planning in cities and rural areas in developing countries. Although the cities of the developing countries, more or less have the same problems, thei;e is no general pattern for solving these problems. I suggest:
-development of the rural areas along with the cities -small centers for agricultural production among the cities and the rural areas
-an organized system of transportation among the cities dnd the rural areas.
- in terms of general planning in scale of the country, a large amount of investment should be devoted for the rural areas.


MAIN
by Kristan Pritz
Main Street, Manitou Springs
Main streets reflect much of a town's identity through architecture and community activities.
An increasing interest in re-establishing the economic viability and "vernacular architecture" of small town main streets has resulted in the development of the Main Streets Program. Students from the programs at the College of Environmental Design will have an opportunity to provide technical assistance to the five Colorado towns designated as project sites: Durango, Delta,
Grand Junction, Sterling, and Manitou Springs.
The projects will emphasize economic revitalization, local support among the downtown merchants, and historic preservation. Community participation will play an important role in encouraging the town to see future alternatives for development. The following projects are in the process of being developed by the tovms:
MANITOU SPRINGS
1. A "reusable" landscaping scheme for the gravel roof of a building that sits one story below Main Street


Manitou Springs Project Site: A landscape scheme is needed for the gravel roof of this building
2. The development of a riverwalk along Fountain Creek which runs through downtown
3. The development of a design strategy for the commercial strip, especially the entrance into Manitou Springs from Old Colorado City
DURANGO
1. An Improvement Plan for Narrow Gauge Avenue
2. The project would convert an old power plant to a community cultural center An arts needs assessment and facility evaluation and planning would be aspects of the project
3. An analysis of the city's administrative space needs for the next five years
DELTA
1. Main Street Mini-Park: a feasibility study and if appropriate a design concept for a lot adjacent to City Hall
2. A landscaping concept for a small triangle of land at the south end of Main Street
3. Old elementary school conversion for office and community use—a feasibility study done on potential uses for the building and a design concept for adapting the building
STERLING
1. A landscaping concept for eight different downtown intersections
2. A landscaping concept for off--street parking lots
3. Interior and exterior renovation plans for two vacant downtown buildings
Harriet Moyer, Director for the Main Streets Program will work with the local project directors and communities to further define the projects. Her job will be to maintain continuity in the program and keep the projects moving despite the university's schedule of semesters. She has had previous experience in downtown revitalization as Director of the Assembly of Community Arts Council of Oklahoma. One of her many projects was creating "Oklahoma Townscape".
The project involved organizing three teams of designers who worked with the community to study urban design issues and to develop interest in downtown revitalizaion.
Funding for the program comes from local and state monies such as the State Department of Energy Assistance. The Center for Community Development and Design is also providing funds. The projects are well suited to C.C.D.D.'s concern for rural design and planning problems which encourage community participation.
The Main Streets Program is just beginning. Students who would like to work on one of the projects may contact Harriet Moyer: office 477-4774. Also, the local project director position for Sterling, Colorado has not been filled at this time. Interested applicants should call Harriet Moyer for further information.


16—bixmktus
SECURITY. Various items have been stolen recently, please do not leave valuables unsecured. Also, be sure your locker is locked and that you have a good lock on it. Anyone who sees something suspicious should report it to the office.
(Master locks have been inadequate protection.)
COMPLAINTS: Students complain from time to time
about the uncleanliness of the building. We wish that our custodial service would be better, but if each one does his or her part in keeping their area clean, or not leaving junk in the classroom, we could have a better-looking building - at least inside.
Also, the "hot and cold" rooms and floors seem to be a continual problem. We wish that there was an easy solution. We have asked Auraria to recheck rm. 23. They will bring in an outside mechanical consultant to look at the system.
COPIES: Copies from the Saxon Copier on the decond floor are now .10 a copy. If you have several copies to make, we suggest you check the Dravo Building or Tower Building Lobby where copies are only .05 each.
BROMLEY BUILDING HOURS: The Vice-Chancellor for Student and Administrative Services has sent a letter changing Bromley Building hours.
STANDARD SEMESTER HOURS
Sunday - closed
Saturday - 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Mon.-Fri. - 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
If you need a key to get into the building after hours, please obtain a key card from the office and a key will be ordered for you. It takes about a week and you will have to pick it up at the Physical Plant and pay $3.00 which will be refunded after you turn the key back to them.
DIPLOMA CARDS. If you plan to graduate this Spring semester, please turn a diploma card into the office by March 23, 1981. Check with your advisor or director to be sure you have everything completed by the end of the Spring semester (i.e. IF's, IW's, etc.)
ID's If you have not gotten an ID, please do so immediately. You cannot check-out equipment with-one. Also security will ask you to leave the building if you are in after hours. You may pet your photo ID at the Student Center, in room 210, Mondays through Fridays, 9:00 a.m. to 11 a.m., and 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN APPROVED Gary
The Auraria Higher Education Center, looking to grow and improve has adopted a new 'Master Plan With increasing enrollments and a desire to improve campus services and its physical environment the Auraria Board has adopted a plan that calls for new facilities and traffic routes.
The new facilities will be a 'UCD Replacement Facility and a 'Auxiliary Building'. The replacement facility,currently awaiting legislative act for funding,contains 250,000 square feet of office, classroom and laboratory space. The building program allots 50,000 square feet of science laboratory space to be attached to the north side of the existing Science Building. The remaining 200,000 square feet will contain office and classroom space to be located on the present parking lot directly east of the HPER building. The Auxiliary building,a future project, will house federal agencies that have expressed an interest in having an on-campus facility to conduct their research activities utilizing the-campus faculty,stu-
dents and resources. This building will be leased to the agencies,allowing, if enrollment increases require, expansion space for the campus institutions. The auxiliary building has been allocated space on the block also currently a parking lot bordered by Speer Blvd. on the east and the UCD replacement facility' on the west.
The new master plan also calls for the construction of a new highway that will detour motor vehicle traffic around the campus. This will allow the conversion of Lawrence Street into a pedestrian mall. Plans for the highway alternatives are currently being jointly studied by officials of Auraria and the State Highway Department.
With the movement of UCD to the 'Core Campus' and the elimination of traffic that currently dissects the campus Auraria will become a more cohesive campus. The changes will improve the functioning and accessibility of campus services and provide a more enjoyable outdoor atmosphere.


THE VIEW FROM BROMLEY
Richard Bernstein
Almost simultaneously, groundbreaking for two downtown projects has occured within the immediate vicinity of our own Bromley Building.
An office, residential and parking complex is being built behind Bromley by Lawrence Street Ventures. The project, designed by McOg Architects includes a 14 story, 190,000 square foot office building, a 41 unit one, two and three bedroom residential block and a 15,000 square foot landscaped plaza which has a connecting bridge to Dravo. The plaza, which is actually a two-leveled affair, has a lower street level area which will provide access to the office building lobby and commercial space on the first floor of the residential tower. A stair will connect the lower and upper plazas with the latter being developed as a sculpture garden. Panelized tiles, dove-gray and red in color will be used for the exterior.
Further down Lawrence Street and immediately behind Larimer Square, a 7 story office building is being constructed for CGG, a French mineral and oil exploration company. This project, designed by Muchow and Associates will include approximately 100,000 square feet of office space as well as some retail which will relate to the Square. Pedestrians will be able to circulate diagonally through the building t;o an open plaza which will form a continuation of the space between the Granite Building and the Keep.
above: building to replace current mountain
view from Bromley Building.
below: building to adjoin Larimer Square
H i
â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– wBWBBiaBiBBHaaiiiiiiiiiiBMiBiiai


JONNIE JONES
INDIVIDUALIST IN TRANSITION
SAEED MAHBOUBli
No one has ever called Jonnie Jones a conformist. Her proponents call her an individual and her foes call her an extremist Whatever Jonnie is, individualist or extremist, she has provided UCD graduate architectural and planning students with a perspective not always found in traditional professional schools.
However, these divided opinions about Jonnie and her controversial viewpoints, plus the fact she does not have a Ph.D., prevented her from gaining tenure. Since having a Ph.D. is currently a big question for those educators in the practical and applied areas of knowlege, like architecture and urban planning, Jonnie is again a part of a controversy.
"For a person in a school that is primarily training practitioners like the Master Program in Urban Planning, there is a question as to whether faculty need Ph.D.'s, which are traditionally an area of high academic research and are a little bit more theoretical than practical," Jonnie explained.
"It is sort of understood that professors, before they receive tenure, get a Ph.D,"
Jonnie continued. "Because of academia's politics9 an departments, irrespective of the content, are requiring Ph.D.'s."
Jonnie, who is a graduate of City College of New York and M.I.T., questions this kind of adherence to fixed rules and criticizes higher education for this rigidity. As a result, the academic community has become homogeneous and sterile with little diversity in thought and attitude, she contends.
"Education is a socialization process to train young people to be good workers. Our society, which has become dominated by the corporate entity, needs, a particular kind of worker who has skills, who's a technician and who will, more or less, conform to
corporate rule—the desirable employee," Jonnie said. "The more adventuresome, creative individualist is now called the entrepreneur type. They're encouraged to go into their own business, be an artist, or work as a sole practicitioner."
Thus, Jonnie tries to apply an entrepreneurial prospective to her planning courses. She emphasizes people and their social aspects rather than physical environment. An examination of Jonnie's courses illustrate this "untraditional" social perspective.
For instance, Comparative World Planning with special focus on Third World countries, is Jonnie's favorite course, "it is a course which looks at planning issues of countries in the western world and eastern world," she explained. "It discusses the social, historical, and political background of the cultures and how they relate to the environmental problems today. It's quite ambitious and very interesting."
In her Neighborhood Planning course, techniques are examined in planning small areas as well as the needs of the people in neighborhoods. Ethnicity and the City discusses the history of ethnic groups in America and the resulting contemporary social issues found in a diverse society.
"My perspective is important because I'm going to look at the world in a non-traditional way because I'm a non-traditional person,"
Jonnie said, in answer to a question about the necessity of her perspective.
Jonnie plans to go back to school and get her Ph.D. Ph.D. in Environmental Psychology, after which she plans to teach again.
So, at the end of spring semester 1982,
Jonnie Jones will leave UCD, but hopefully her "non-traditional" ideas will remain a part of the school's .philosophy.


by randy williams
Architectural Mumble-Jumble
A CHALLENGE TO YOUR ANALYTICAL ABILITY
Unscramble these jumbles to form four architectural related words.
Willie Chiang
SALPN
A
SEDING
A
DOUIST
A
CATITCHER
ET1ZS3
Now arrange the triangled letters to form THE SECRET MUMBLE JUMBLE PASSWORD!
IAIAIA1/MAA
Clue to the PASSWORD:'THE FINAL OFFER OF A UCD STUDENT OF ARCHITECTURE:
P-8. You have 30 minutes to work out the
jumbles. The Lamination Committee has decided not to grant any extensions.
You may, however, withdraw from this excercise at the end of the 16th minute. Failure to withdraw may result an F in your permanent jumble record.


EVENTS
MARCH
10 5:15-6:30 Curt Fentress, L.W. Fentress & Associates. EC 38
AIA 10 7:00pm William Morgan, auditorium, Science Building. $3.00 students, $5.00 general public.
13 4:00pm Morrison Study Presentation, EC 163
ALA 27 5:00-7:00 Denver Chapter AIA Architectural Firm Open House, Intergroup, 1450 Dravo Plaza.
30-4/10 nArt by Architects” First of Denver Plaza.
31 5:15-6:30 Abo & Gude Architects, EC 38
APRIL
7 5:15-6:30 Walter Hunt, Gensler & Associates, Architects EC 38
25-29 American Planning Association, National Planning
Conference, Boston. For additional information call Kristan Pritz. 629-2816
FILMS
MSC Film Series S.C. 330 75c For additional information
call 629-2595
MARCH
10 Boys in the Band
11 The Stuntman
12 Tin Drum
17 La Cage aux Folles
19 Assignment
20 A very Natural Thing
31 Private Benjamin


Full Text

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• II AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN PUBLICATION MARCH,1981

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER . FUNDING: Colorado Society of Architects STAFF: John David Powers, editor Randy Williamson Tim Leong Mohammad Mowlavi Said Mahboubi Richard Bernstein Kristan Pritz Gary Devin Mark Jacobs Peter Levar Kunle Taiwo Willie Chiang David Friedman 6avid Wager Special thanks to: Dev Carlson Dolores Hasseman Sarah Bransom Liz Bravo Hailing address: La,minations c/o College of Environmental Design 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 Cover photo: by Mark Jacobs IS THERE \ SOLAR ... .... ..... AFTER REAGAN?/_,.. \ ,/ FIND ANSWERS TO /, THIS & OTHER BURNING QUESTIONS IN LAMINATIONS' SIZZLING SUPER SOLAR ISSUE! ARRIVING IMMINENTLY I \ c ,,, ' ' Mr. Bromley's Neighborhood Howdy, boys and girls. Can you say "en-vi-ronmen-tal dee-zine?" We can. If you notice, our slightly new format encourages a multi-disciplinary approach. In fact, the only group we haven't heard from are the "interiors" people. Boys and girls, can you say "energy crisis?" How about "nuclear poliferation?" We'll use these and other naughty words in our next issue. Watch for it. Women in Design Women Design International is sponsoring a competition to recognize outstanding women in graphic design. Categories include sculpture environmental design, architecture, furniture, interior design, landscape design and fashion. Deadline for submitting slides, entry fees and entry forms is April 30. For further information, write to Women in Design International Box 7468, San Francisco, California 94119 ' Articles ied by a to group t ' must be signed and accompan a717ng address. Materials are subject ed1t1ng for reasons of clarity and space. those of , ' .. , \ ' ' , .,

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HENRY MOORE Critics share a tendency for detailed, subjective, and frequently laborious critiques. Often these analysis are prejudiced by the critics own interruptive abilities. Consequently, little substantive material is offered to the recipient. In this presentation the author has elected to offer a series of quotations from tte sculptor, taken over a period of years, to the reader. This will I feel, enable the reader to establish his/her own analysis. I have selected quotations that are indeed relevant and contributory toward an understanding of the artist, his work, and ultimately relating to the design process itself. Sculpture should always at first sight have some obscurities, and further meanings. People should want to go on looking and thinking; it should never tell all about itself immediately. Initially both sculpture and painting must need effort to be fully appreciated, or else it is just an empty immediacy like a poster, which is designed to be read by people on top of a bus in half a second. In fact all art should have some more mystery and meaning to it than is apparent to a quick observer. In my sculpture, explanations often come afterwards. I do not make a sculpture to a programme or because I have a particular idea I am trying to express. While working, I change parts because I do not like them in such a way that I hope I am going to like them better.The kind of alteration I make is not thought out; I do not say to myself-this is too big or to small. I just do it and, if I do not like it, I change it. I work from likes and dislikes, and not by literary logic. Not by words, but by being satisfied with form. Afterwards I can explain or find reasons for it, but that is rationalisation after the event. I can even look at old sculpures and find meanings in them and explanations which at the time were not in my mind at allnot consciously anyway. Whilst touching some sculpture can give pleasure, touch itself is certainly not a criterion of good sculpture. A particular pebble or a marble egg may be delightful to feel or hold because it is very simple in shape and very smo0th, whereas if it were the same shape but with a prickly or cold surface you would not like touching it. Of course you can tell the shape of something if you can put your hands around it. But it is impossible for a blind person to tell you the shape of a building. The same applies to a large sculpture, in fact, although the sense of touch is fundamentally important and implied, it is not physically necessary to touch a sculpture in order to understand its form. Also, I think a simple symmetrical shape eventually loses its interest because it is understood to quickly. A sculpture should have things you can go on discovering.

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Right from the beginning I have been more interested in the female form than in the male. Nearly all my sculptures are based on the female form. "Woman" has that startling fullness of the stomach and the breasts. The smallness of the head is necessary to emphasise the massiveness of the body. If the head had been any larger it would have ruined the whole idea of the sculpture. Instead the face and particularly the neck are more like a hard column than a soft goitred femaale neck. From very early on I have had an obsession with the Mother and Child theme. It has been a universal theme from the beginning of time and some of the earliest sculptures we've found from the Neolithic Age are of a Mother and Child. I discovered, when drawing, I could turn every little scribble, blot or smuge into a Mother and Child. (Later on, I did the same with the Reclining Figure theme!) So that I was conditioned, as it were, to see it in everything. I suppose it could be explained as a "Hother" complex. Besides the human form, I am tremendously excited by all the natural forms, such as cloud formations, birds, trees and their roots, and mountains, which are to me the wrinkling of the earth's surface, like drapery. It is extraordinary how closely ripples in the sand on the shore resemble the gouge marks in wood carving. Landscape has been for me one of the sources of my energy. It is generally thought that no sculptor is much interested in landscape, but is only concerned with the solid, immediate form of the human figure or animals. For myself I have always been very interested in landscape.(! can never read on a train-I have to look out of the window in case I miss something.) As well as landscape views and cloud formations, I find that all natural forms are a source of unending interest-tree trunks, the growth of branches from the trunk each finding its individual airspace, the texture and variety of grasses, the shape of shells, of pebbles, ect. The whole of Nature is an endless demonstration of shapes and form, and it suprises me when artists try to escape from this. The asymmetrical growth of trees responding to their environment has always interested me. If a branch starts to go one way and there isn't enough sunlight or space that way it will change direction and find its own area to live in. Shapes that stand out against the sky are something I have always liked.

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There is a big arm, nearly eleven feet long, in the British Museum, which impressed me. It's Egyptian. It has a kind o f squarness about it which I found interesting. It is not that I imit imitated it consciously, it' s just that, if some thing impresses you, you can't help being influenced by it. This happens to every artist. It is only the great artists who can emerge fro m these influences and create their own individual style. When Michelangelo said that sculpture could express everthing, he did not mean that s culpture could replace the functions of all other arts, or that sculpture could play a banjo! He meant that it can express so much that you don't need to worry about what it can't do. In that sense it was enough for him .... it is enough for twcnt y 1 i f e t i me s The theory that the work of an artist or a novelist is directly attributable to his personality is a romantic one. An artist's gift is that he can project his imagination. Balzac, for example, carried away on his imagination could write continuously for days and nights on end, living in his mind the lives of his characters. It doesn't mean that if you write about sorrowful things you are in reality miserable. And, yet, of course an artist uses experiences he's had in life. Such an experience in my life was the birth of my daughter Mary, which reinvoked in my sculpture my Mother and Child theme. A new experience can bring to the surface something deep in one's mind. --------------------The whole of my developwent as a sculptor is an attempt to understand and realise more completely what form and shape are about, and to react to form in life, in the l1uman figure, and in past sculpture. This is something that can't be learnt in a day, for sculpture is a never-ending discovery. As a house is the home of the family, so is a city the home of its inhabitants, and should be furnishe d with works of art, just as you would furnish your own home. I think London could easily have three times ns mnny monuments, sculptures and fountains than it has at present. It would make it a much happier place in which to live. One day you see things whic h the dny before you had never noticed. Life is like that, and certainly many of my ideas happen that way. !5 David Wager

PAGE 6

GREAT EXPECTATIONS .... WINDON ?C.HEDULE5, DOOR. Ei:.HE.Dt.JLE.SJ T11"LE. ... OR, ON THE BRINK OF IDEOLOGICAL REVOLUTION? Randy Williamson This article is based on a survey of University of Colorado architectural students that parallels a survey done by Architectural Record recently. Record's survey was distributed to every accredited school of architecture in the U.S., and was cross-referenced against the attitudes of practicing architects. It gives an interesting cross sectional-view of 1981 graduates. The Laminations survey wasn't limited to graduates, but was available to students at different levels in both programs. Approximately 31% of the students responded to the survey. The conclusions drawn here can in no way be construed to positively depict or pin down student sentiments, but it does provide an insight into where the CU student's head is at. A picture of a group committed to architecture emerges as 56% related they always wanted to or decided in high school to study architecture, and only 14% decided after college. Virtually no one has regretted their decision to study architecture. Fifty-six percent say their GPA is 3.5-4.0, and 60% maintain they are getting respectable B's in design. However, a resounding 86% believe grades are no predictor of future success. Nonetheless, 82% of practitioners (from Record's survey) look at scholastic performance when hiring. But, 94% said it was "very" or fairly important to have a good design portfolio. Almost 79% of the students worked during their summer vacations for architects, and 21% did unrelated work. Yet only 40% felt it contributed to their progress as an architectural student. Host students seem intent on becoming licensed. Only .3% denied an interest in registration. An overwhelming 93% of students want their own firm, comparing closely with Record's survey of 69%. Clearly, the entrepreneurial spirit is alive ;1nd well. In 3 to 6 years, 28% feel they will be ready to open their own firm, while another 28% felt it would take 6 to 9 years. Record's survey noted a more cautious response, as 36% felt it would take 9 to 12 years. Record's states that 31% of the practitioners set up shop within 3 to 6 years after graduation. 1he procedure for becoming licensed is understood by 77%, and the same percentage has heard of NCARB, leaving about 23% in the dark about registration and NCARB. A majority of students, 93%, are interested in joining the AlA for reasons not asked by the survey. In the area of training, surprisingly only 65% versus Record's 92% felt they had good training in schematic design. Likewise, site/environmental analysis and design development, 77% versus Record's 84% felt they had good training. Less than 40% feel they had good training in programming, client contact, construction documents, and code research. Inadequate training in specifications and materials scored 51%. In document checking and building cost analysis, over 40% felt they had no training in these areas.

PAGE 7

The practitioners agree that graduates are best prepared in areas of schematic design, site/environmental analysis and design development. The practitioner's perceptions of the student's abilities lies anywhere from 10 to 20% lower than the student's perception of his or her abilities. It is clear that the practitioners have a more critical view of the training of architectural students than the students do of their own training. Students have high expectations for starting salaries, and are in for a disappointment. The median starting expected was approximately $7.35 per hour, while Record's survey shows $7.25. However, the median salary paid by practitioners was a paltry $5.50. Some 30% of our survey expected to start at about $8.50 an hour. After registration, the expectations of salary are more closely aligned with the concept of reality of the practitioner. The students expect to earn about $1,830 per month, while the median actually paid was in the $1,800 range. However, nearly 40% expect to be earning $25,000 yearly by then. It is interesting to note that third-year students expect to make $8.00 per hour while first-year students have expectations for only $6.50. A desire to work in the city was expressed by 53% of students surveyed, while 16% preferred suburban or rural areas. The remainder are taking work wherever they can. This closely parallels Record's results. Practitioners report that 70% of their offices are in the city. Aiso, a majority, -63%, desire to work in a medium sized office. Less than 12% of the students expressed a desire to work for a large firm. Colorado is a popular state to work in with 46% electing to stay here. Students seem to favor working in their home state (or country) by a small margin of 43% to 33%. The remainder apparently are unsure or don't care. Other states that were mentioned as possible destinations were Texas, California, Massachusetts, Hawaii, Maine, Washington, Florida, and New York. L.eARNINb F!?..OM DeNVeR! The most fascinating question was the favorite architects of the students. It should be mentioned that no conclusion can be drawn from this as to school philosphy. In fact, one student wrote a comprehensive essay chastising the survey for picking architecis as if they were colors; and implied that if such a question could determine the direction of the school, it would confirm his or her worst fears about the Putting these fears to rest, we can only speculate with interest on the selections by the students. Surprisingly, yet closely aligned with Record's results, the architects which were most popular were Frank Lloyd Wright (an astounding 56%-put Wright on their list), Alvar Aalto (33%), I. M. Pei (30%), Gaudi (26%), Charles Moore (23%), Eero Saarinen (21%), Louis Kahn (19%), Arthur Erickson (16%) (Erickson didn't make the top 20 in either the students or practitioner's lists in the Record survey), H. H. Richardson (11%), Luis Barragon and Bruce Goff (each 9%). Among others getting three votes or less, were Thomas Jefferson, Palo Soleri, Meis, Greene Brothers, Sullivan. Numerous others were mentioned once, with the list too long to print. Interestingly, some which made Record's survey weren't mentioned or received only one vote. They were Richard Meier, Robert Venturi, Philip Johnson, Michael Graves, Paul Rudolph, and James Stirling. Eight out of the top ten of Record's survey were within our top ten, leaving this up to your conjecture and conclusions as to the conservatism of the design philosophy nation wide. Favorite buildings were interesting in their wide variation of student architectural appreciation. No single building captured more than 14% of the vote on favorite U.S. buildings, the most mentioned being Wright's Falling Water. Other noticeable mentions were Hugh Stubbins' Citicorp Building, Pei's East Wing of the National Gallery, Pei's NCAR, and Portman's San Francisco Hyatt Regency. Falling Water narrowly beat out Le Corbusier's Ronchamp for favorite building in the world. Other interesting choices were Monticello, Taj Mahal, the Kremlin, St. Peter's, Dulles Airport, Taos Pueblo, Trinity Church, Pompidou Center, Chrysler building, and others too numerous to mention. What emerges from this survey is a very conservative picture. The questions presented were perhaps too structured to evoke meaningful and some criticism is expected and probably justified. Essay questions would have provided more insight into student philosophies, however, predictably, the percentage of returned surveys would have nosedived. The results here can only be viewed with caution (and perhaps amusement?).

PAGE 8

,. . " .• . . . "; ' : . \ . ' ' '\.. \ ... '. ' . . \ .-\ . ' ,. " . ' . .\ ., . '. , . . '. . . . ' / / /"'"' / . , . . ---., ......... _ . , .,. I ... , \ \ " ON SOUND ARCHITECTURE Tim Leong The evolution of the concert hall has been a slow and arduous process having many calculated successes as well as failures. The performing arts that have been presented in the concert hall has historically been the shaping force in hall design. Acoustical and visual demands of each performing vernacular have brought about the movement toward more specialized hall design. While much new music is divorced from traditional forms of tonality, texture, organization and interpetation there are still the same acoustical properties needed within the concert hall. Acoustical narrowness, appro• priate reverberent time and energy (depending on the nature and intensity of sound to be rendered), acoustical imaging, acoustical intimacy and visual intimacy are all required within every hall regardless of the nature of the music to be presented. With every new hall that is erected there is .the inevitable comparison made with the great halls of the past. The Symphony Hall in Boston, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and the Grosser Musikvereinssaal in Vienna are by musical concensus, the three best representatives of what a good hall should be. While the acoustics of these halls are ideal for the majority. of traditional music modern designers feel that the format and design criteria of these traditional halls to be limiting and architectural-ly jaded. There has been a recent movement toward theater in the round. This departure from the traditional proscenium arrangement seems to be of a social rather than an artistic nature. The "in the round" format, while being architecturally unifying and spacially intimate involves much acoustical reworking and presents staging problems. It is difficult to evaluate this new format in concert hall design as many of the great halls rely on many years of use and criticism on which to build a reputation. \{'he modern approach of "off axis/assymetrical" concert hall design is still in its infancy. The success or failure of designs which have departed from the proscenium arrangement will be apparent with the passage of time. However, there are tell-tale signs of a hall's success withinboth the audience's and performer's domain. The preferred seats (also the most expensive) still are those with the best view of the stage. The least desired seats are still those at the far sides of the stage, not to mention any seats behind the stage. The performers, especially in an "in the round" format must be more judicious in their behavior on stage (especially the brass who on occaission must empty their spit valves during a performance!). The most apt remark in defense of the proscenium theater is by theater designer/consultant George C. Izenour: "But when all is said and is more natural and it has therefore become customary that for visual and aural . communication in an auditorium, as everywhere else, the face-to-face on-axis approach is prefereable for the very practical reason that it works best that way."

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I J I . I I l I ' t : I ! I I . l • t 1lz Bravo LA's DO IT AT. •• And if you're wondering where the birdies is, they have been out in the towns. A lot of harbingers of an era of new strength in the UCD Environmental Design College have begun appearing lately. Last year, messengers of environmental design were linked with three Colorado communities by the Center for Community Development and Design. This union has produced a trio of informative studies that reveal UCD EnDes students as capable consultants, not just young chickadees. Upper St. Vrain Valley Chronologically the oldest, "The Recreation Resource Study of the Upper St. Vrain Valley" has reached publication form. A study area, approximately 54 square miles, was determined by the watershed of the Upper St. Vrain Creek. Maps and text illustrate one unified recreation system which was divided into the context of three scales, regional, vicinity and local. The team of Grey, Horgan, Kaehny, Pritz and Rice, suggested a system within each scale which would provide a unified plan of activity centers linked by paths or roads. The linkage system provided the connection between the three scales. This will be a useful reference for planners as well as LA's -but for some great insights, ask one of the study team members about the process used to develop this monumental effort. Morrison Last summer, a community survey was undertaken in Morrison. From these indications of need, rose the "Morrison Design Study". This interdisciplinary effort (three architects, two planners, two LA's and our illustrious resident dean) broadened the scope of perception for analysis and resulted in design guidelines on the regional, vicinity and local levels for the beleaguered foothills town. They wished to see their rural character preserved and the economic base bolstered. The Design Study came up with some interesting solutions to these classic challenges. Plan-of-action suggestions were made to insure that future adjacent development would be consistent with the town's goals. Proposals for regulation of development ranged from the physical and legal considerations of land use to visual enhancement of the town center and measures for stimulating the local economy. There is a good chance Morrison will implement some of the programs conceived to solve its problems. If so, there will be an opportunity for evaluation of the study's recommendations. That could be an excellent educational tool for all the environmental design disciplines. To share the Morrison study's design process with the college, there will be a presentation of the project on March 13 at 4 pm in East Class room Bldg. #163. and The Springs "Design Guidelines for West Colorado Avenue" is a hot-off-the-press CCDD study produced by the architecture, planning, LA team of Williams, Nardin, Ellis, Burton, and Mitchell. Although specific to the 20 block area of West Colorado Avenue in Colorado Springs, its recommendations could be used on any scale of urban analysis. The guidelines cover topics such as signage, streetscape, architecture and mixed-use development. Judging by the number of streetscape thesis projects in the LA this graphics-filled study might end up being like Gideon's Bible to a motel room for some students around here. All these studies can be found in the UCD library and will be valuable as reference for similar future undertakings. These kinds of experiential learning programs are the budding new strength of our college and could blossom into a full-blown reputation for UCD EnDes attracting legislative attention and resultant bucks. There is no doubt of the value of these practical, real-world studios for design students. Our encouragement to CCDD for its invaluable services, as well as to the faculty advisors and communities for their confidence in us.

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ARCH I-BYTES Peter A. Levar Not too long ago S.O.M. held a presentation at the Fairmont Hotel on Computers in Architecture. The Multi-media presentation stirred my interest to further explore the various applications of computers in Architecture, and to examine the impact of this science as a valuable asset to .the Architectural profession. Today's architect practices in a very complex worlu. He deals with more complicated buildings and has to complete a design in a minimum period of time. There is an enormous amount of data with little time to analyze it; with these jobs the computer is a unique and extremely useful tool. The computer is flexible and can contribute in a variety of ways to the design process. The ability the computer has to organize and display intormation gives aid to the architect in a way which no mere mechanical devices or book of standards can provide. The amount of information that can be stored in the computer is phenomenal. The technology seemp to be ever improving in computer capability. What were once rooms filled with massive machinery are now offices equipped with smaller and more portable computers. The computer's graphic capacity has greatly improved since its first uses in graphics and design. The design process has been streamlined as the project data is accumulated and organized in the computer. Computer graphics enhance design flexibility. The graphic application aids designers in visualizing an entire city, site, building project, or individual components. The computer has the capability to generate views which the architect may not conceptualize. Geometric images can be manipulated to produce floor plans, sections, axonometrics, or perspectives. Project architects work with computer specialists to determine each projects needs for computer design assistance and the ultimate goals for using the computer. In design they are to analyze design problems, verify data and develop new solutions. The purpose of using the computer is not only to produce better design and services for the clients but also to improve productivity. The computer was not designed to replace man, it was invented to relieve man from wasting valuable time. The use of a computer cannot change the quality, but can change the-depth in which the project can be comprehended.

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The tent system is deveiQPed by the computer ioJo component parts. RUN JSOMS STRUCT 10 HRJNEW PGS PATCH I LIST I CIR 24 CEN 0 0 12 START 5 . 5 . 12 ENO 5 . 5 . 12 IN X Y LIST 2 CIR 24 CEN 0 0'8 START II II 8 END 1 1 II 8 IN X Y LIST 3 SPLINE 6 37.5 37.5 0 0 37.5 8 -37 . 5 37. 5 0 SPLINE 6 -37.5 37.5 0 -37.5 0 8 -37 . 5 -37 . 5 0 SPLINE 6 -37 . 5 -37. 5 0 0 -37. 5 8 3 7.5 -37. 5 0 SPLINE 6 37. 5 -37. 5 0 37.5 0 8 3 7. 5 37.5 0 PATTERN I SURFACE PATCH I GENERATE LOFT 7 I PLANES ROO NODE X 3 7.5 Y 3 7. 5 Z -12 NODE X 3 7. 5 Y 3 7.5 Z 1 2 NODE X -37. 5 Y -37.5 Z 1 2 NODE X 37. 5 Y -37.5 Z -12 BEAMS FROM NODE 7 TO 1 6 9 BEAMS FROM NOOE 49 TO 170 91 T O 1 7 1 133 TO 1 72 END PATTEnN COPY PATT I TRANSLATE X START 0 10X75 Y START 0 4X75 fXIT f I Areas of Application Feasibility Study Architectural Programming Space Planning Two-Dimensional Graphics Three-Dimensional Graphics Cost Control Circulation Analysis Text Manipulation Project Control Office Management Evaluation Site Planning ' 'i-. ! ' The computer graphics system adapts to large scales to draw the overall project site and surroundings. Environmental impacts of the building on the skyline, increased traffic patterns and solar intensity on the building and its neighbours. The flexibility provided by the computer as a tool in design is complemented by its drafting ability. This capability evolved from the computer graphics system which could perform tasks as perspectives, floor plans, elevations and sections. The image Radically different types of structures are analyzed wlth the computer. produced by the computer is finely detailed and precise. The most attractive feature is the speed of production, which would relieve the tedious work of hand drawing repetative floor plans, brick facades and other time consuming practice. The drafting capability has been further developed to act as a base for working drawings. In conclusion, the architect of today is functioning in a society which is constantly growing more and more complex. He must respond quickly to the high demands of his client. There is far too much knowledge to be absorbed on large projects by the architect using traditional means. The computer has already become an integral component of the twentieth century; if the architect is to continue to play an important role in shaping the environment of the world of today, he must keep pace with modern technology.

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STUDIO 2 PLANNERS TAKE ON EXXON by Sarah Bransom What will require over 256 square miles of land, four 48" pipelines, 3,000 miles of new roads, 1.1 million acre feet of water per year and add over a million and a half new people to the Western Slope of Colorado? Answer: The Exxon company's proposed 8 million barrel per day (BPD) oil shale industry slated for the northwest corner of this State. Exxon's proposal was the subject matter for 9 Studio 2 planners who were given the task of defining what the creation of another Denver on the West Slope might look like. The assignment seemed simple enough: design a scheme by which a region of 120,000 people might plan and provide services for a growth projection of one and a half million while maintaining the existing Western Slope "quality of life." Simple it was not. Last summer, Exxon presented to Governor Lamm a "white paper" which outlined the company's proposal for massive oil shale development in the Piceance Creek Basin of northwest Colorado. The paper called for six open pits (each by 2 miles wide), numerous underground mines and retort facilities all to be created by a construction force of 92,000 and operated by a permanent workforce of 220,000. This is to take place within the next thirty years and last between 75-150 years. The Piceance Creek Basin, located northeast of Grand Junction, contains some of the richest oil shale deposits in the world and is the site of prototype operations of Exxon, Union and Superior oil companies, to name a few. The transition from the current experimental phase of oil shale development to full scale commercial operations will obviously have a multitude of planning and design implications for the region. However, before the extremely skeptical team of planners accepted these implications, the feasibility of Exxon's proposal was examined. The first phase of the project involved a fieldtrip to oil shale country. Here it was learned that for every barrel of oil produced, 2-5 barrels of water was consumed and over 4 tons of rock would be mined. The fieldtrip also incJ.uded a stop at the Colorado West Council of Governments where one representative explained that the majority of community officials and residents in the area do not believe that massive oil shale development will ever Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company's Experimental Operation occur, therefore, little planning was taking place to prepare for the projected growth. In fact, current public opinion, he explained, is to ignore Exxon's proposal or to proclaim it as a bad joke. After the tour and several weeks of discussion, the team concluded that Exxon's proposal was conceivable, but only if certain "givens" were accepted. These included the elimination of present air quality standards, increased government incentives for industry, and devel of extensive interstate water systems. (Exxon proposes to transfer needed water from South Dakota to Colorado.) Finally, enormous amounts of front-end money would be required to prepare for the million new people. The next phase of the project was to identify potential solutions for the region in dealing with the impacts of intense development. A "conceptual plan" was developed which identified settlement areas for the project growth. Towns like Rifle and Parachute would have to accomodate over 400,000 people by the year 2010. (Rifle's current population is around 3,200.) The area surrounding Rangely might see over 900,000 people if Exxon's proposal became a reality. In Drder to move this projected volume of people throughout the region, a major public rail transportation system was designed by the team. Such a system would be required to avoid major air pollution problems and keep traffic to and from settlement areas manageable. Another major recommendation by the team was to create a two tiered form of government which would involve a regional government as well as strong local governments. It was felt that this type of arrangement would be necessary if a Denver-sized region on the West Slope were to function with any amount of stability. All of these recommendations plus others made during the course of this project may never come to be in northwest Colorado. However, it is clear that oil shale development is here and is fast becomming the "boom" which, for years, many predicted. Still to be seen is the impact of the Reagan administration on the oil shale industry and whether or not the "bust" is inevitable.

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Urbanization has had different trends in developed and undeveloped or developing countries; in 0ther words, the problmes the various countries have faced during the process are different. 1 am going to define briefly these differences and make some sugges tions in terms of planning. In developed countries, the population growth has happened in accordance with the technological progress, while in developing countries, this growth has been much faster than the progress. The characteristics of the cities in developed and developing countries in terms of population, social, economic, anrl political aspects are as follows: Developed Countries In developed countries, there is a homogeneous established population with a slow rate. Socially, they are very organized and there is a logical trend among the different parts of the cities. Also, community services are well-developed. In terms of industry, marketing and services, there is a balanced growth. Also industrial growth happens along with the growth of the .services. Because of the balance between urbanization and industrialization, there is an increased economic growth. peveloping Countries In terms of story, the cities in developing countries are clivli .ded into two groups. The first group includes t11e a11cient cities which are mostly in Asia and Africa. The second group consists of fairly new cities in Africa and South America. The new cities have been built by colonizer countries which have not considered their social, economic, and political realities. The planning for those cities nas never met the real needs of the people, but were developed for the colonizer's benefit. These cities have even changed the economic situation of the world. I should point out that the ancient cities have not been immune from the influence of colonizers. These cities have gradually their original character and functional form, and have become like new cities as mentioned. ciTIES AND POLITICS Mohammad Howlavi When industrialized countries w<.•re in the devt.•loping 1 h 0. _ c .. '... At till' sam<.• process, the popu at 1on g rowt was .JJ .. time, this growth was 2.5% in devc.:>loping countries. Therefore, in terms of the same economic development, the population growtn in developing count r il•s has been five as e1uch as industrialized countri<.s in the ninetet.•nth century. This situation has brought many problems in the areas of education, health, food, employmen,t, and housing. When industrialized countries were undergoing urbanization, it was accompanied with industrial devt.•lopment•, housing, and other urban needs. llowever, in developing countries, urbanization occured without the industrial development and other urban services required. In developing countries, there is a high rate of immigration from the rural areas to tlw cities and a nigh growth rate. In terms of social and political characteristics, community services are limited and unorganized and urban services and facilities are particularily inadequate in low income areas. There is a big conflict between the high income and low income areas. The primary source of conflict in these countries tends to l>e between the generations rather than between social groups. As far as economic characteristics, these cities a are mostly based on services rather than basic industry. There is also a high growth rate without a resultant growth in agriculture and industry. While there is a high growth rate of services, productivity experiences a .low rate of growth. Because of a high rate of demand and the low stan dards of living, there is a very high rate of \ . fl . 1n at1on. I would also like to make some suggestions for planning in cities and rural areas in develop-ing countries. Although the cities of the developing countries, more or less have the same problems, is no general pattern for solving these problems. I suggest: -development of the rural areas along with the cities -small centers for agricultural production among the cities and. the rural areas -an organized system of among the cities and the rural areas. -in terms of general planning in scale of the country, a large amount of investment should be devoted for the rural areas.

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Main streets reflect much of a town's identity through and connnunity activities. An iuereasing interest in re-establishing the economic viability and "vernacular architecture" of small town main streets has resulted in the development of the Main Streets Program. Students from the programs at the College of Environmental Design will have an opportunity to provide technical assistance to the five Colorado towns designated as project sites: Durango, Delta, Grand Junction, Sterling, and Manitou Springs. KAIN STBBZTS PBOQBAM by Kristan Pritz Hain Street, Manitou Springs The projects will emphasj_ze economic revitalization, local support among the tow-n merchants, and historic preservation. Comruun5ty participation will play an important role in encouraging the town to see future alternatives for development. The following. projects are in the process of being developed by the t0\\'11S: ..ANlT OU SPRINGS ------------1. A "reusable" landscaping scheme for the gravel roof of a building that sits one story below Main Street

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--Manitou Springs Project Site: A landscape is needed for the gravel roof of this building 2. The development of a riverwalk along Fountain Creek which runs through 3. The development of a design strategy for the commercial strip, especially the entrance into Manitou Springs from Old Colorado City DURANGO 1. An Improvement Plan for Narrow Gauge Avenue 2. The project would convert an old power plant to a community cultural center An arts needs assessment and facility evaluation and planning would be aspects of the project 3. An analysis of tLe city's administrative space needs for the next five years DELTA 1. Main Street Mini-Park: a feasibility study and if appropriate a design concept for a lot adjacent to City Hall 2. A landscaping concept for a small triangle of land at the south end of Main Street 3. Old elementary school conversion for office and community use--a feasibility study done on potential uses for the building and a design concept for adapting the building STERLING 1. A landscapirg concept for eight di.fferent downtown intersections 2. A landscaping concept for off-street parking lots 3. Interior and exterior ren0vation plans for two vacant downtmv"Ti buildings Harriet Moyer, Director for the Main Streets Program will work with local project directors and communities to further define ti1e projects. Her job will be to maintain continuity in the program and keep the projects moving despite the university's schedule of semesters. She has had previous experience in downtown revitalization as Director of the Assembly of Community Arts Council of Oklahoma. One of her many projects was creating "Oklahoma Townscape". The project involved organizing three teams of designers who worked with the community to study urban design issues and to develop interest in downtown revitalizaion. Funding for the program comes from local and state monies such as the State Department of Energy Assistance. The Center for Community Development and Design is also providing funds. The projects are well suited to C.C.D.D.'s concern for rural design and planning problems which encourage community participation. The Main Streets Program is just beginning. Students who would like to work on one of the projects may contact Harriet Moyer: office 477-4774. Also, the local project director position for Sterling, Colorado has not been filled at this time. Interested applicants should call Harriet Moyer for further information.

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---------------' __ .. ___ _ ... ____ • • • • • # .... DOLORES' CORNER SECURITY. Various items have been stolen recently, please do not leave valuables unsecured. Also, be sure your locker is locked and that you have a good lock on it . . Anyone who sees something suspicious should report it to the office. (Master locks have been inadequate protection.) COMPLAINTS: Students complain from time to time about the uncleanliness of the building. We wish that our custodial service would be better, but if each one does his or her part in keeping their area clean, or not leaving junk in the classroom, we could have a better-looking building -at least inside. Also, the "hot and cold" rooms and floors seem to be a continual problem. We wish that there was an easy solution. We have asked Auraria to recheck rm. 23. They will bring in an outside mechanical consultant to look at the system. COPIES: Copies from the Saxon Copier on the second floor are now .10 a copy. If you have several copies to make, we suggest you check the Dravo Building or Tower Building Lobby where copies are only .OS each. DIPLOMA CARDS. If you plan to this Spring semester, please turn a diploma card into the office by March 23, 1981. Check with your advisor or director to be sure you have everything completed by the end of the Spring semester (i.e. IF's, IW's, etc.) BROMLEY BUILDING HOURS: The Vice-Chancellor for Student and Administrative Services has sent a letter changing Bromley Building hours. STANDARD SEMESTER HOURS Sunday -closed Saturday 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. If you need a key to get into the building after hours, please obtain a key card from the office and a key will be ordered for you. It takes about a week and you will have to pick it up at the Physical Plant and pay $3.00 which will be refunded after you turn the key back to them. ID's If you have not gotten an ID, please do so immediately. You cannot check-out equipment withone. Also security will ask you to leave the building if you are in after hours. You may ret your photo ID at the Student Center, in room 210, Mondays through Fridays, 9:00a.m. to 11 a.m., and 1:00 p.m. to 3:00p.m. CAMPUS MASTER PLAN APPROVED Gary Devin The Auraria Higher Education Center, looking to grow and improve has adopted a new 'Master Plan With increasing enrollments and a desire to improve campus services and its physical environment the Auraria Board has adopted a plan that calls for new facilities and traffic routes. The new facilities will be a 'UCD Replacement Facility and a 'Auxiliary Building'. The replacement facility,currently awaiting legislative act for funding,contains 250,000 square feet of office, classroom and laboratory space. The building program allots 50,000 square feet of science laboratory space to be attached to the north side of the existing Science Building. The remaining 200,000 square feet will contain office and classroom space to be located on the present parking lot directly east of the HPER building. The Auxiliary building,a future project, will house federal agencies that have expressed an interest in having an on-campus facility to conduct their research activities utilizing tpe . . c . ampus faculty.,stu-dents and resources. This will be leased to the agencies,allowing, if enrollment increases require, expansion space for the campus institutions. The building has been allocated space on the block also currently a parking lot bordered by Blvd. on the east and the UCD replacement . facility' on the west. The new plan also calls for the of a new highway that will detour motor vehicle traffic around the campus . This will allow the eon version of Lawrence Street into a pedestrian mall. Plans for the highway alternatives are currently being jointly studied by officials of Auraria and the State Highway Department. With the movement of UCD to the 'Core Campus' and the elimination of traffic that currently dissects the campus Auraria will become a more cohesive campus. The changes will improve the functioning and accessibility of campus services and provide a more enjoyable outdoor

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above: building to replace current mountain view from Bromley Building. below: building to adjoin Larimer Square THE VIEW FROM BROMLEY Richard Bernstein Almost simultaneously, groundbreaking for two downtown projects has occured within the .immediate vicinity of our own Bromley Building. An office, residential and parking complex is being built behind Bromley by Lawrence Street Ventures. The project, designed by McOg Architects includes a 14 story, 190,000 square foot office a 41 unit one, two and three bedroom residential block and a square foot landscaped plaza which has a connecting bridge to Dravo. The plaza.which is actually a : two-leveled affair,has a lower street level area '"which will provide access to the office building .... lobby and commercial space on the first floor of residential tower. A stair will connect the lower and upper plazas with the latter being developed as a sculpture garden. Panelized tiles. dove-gray and red in color will be used for the exterior. Further down Lawrence Street and immediately behind Larimer Square, a 7 story office building is being constructed for CGG, a French mineral and oil exploration company. This project, designed by Muchow and Associates will include approximately 100,000 square feet of office space as well as some retail which will relate to the Square. Pedestrians will be able to circulate diagonally through the building an open plaza which will form a continuation of the space between the Granite Building and the Keep.

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JONNIE JONES INDIVIDUALIST I N TRANSITION SAEED MAHBOUBI1 No one has ever called Jonnie Jones a conformist. Her proponents call her an individual and her foes call her an extremist Whatever Jonnie is, individualist or extremist, she has provided UCD graduate architectural and planning students with a perspective not always found in traditional professional schools. However, these divided opinions about Jonnie and her controversial viewpoints, plus the fact she does not have a Ph.D., prevented her from gaining tenure. Since having a Ph.D. is currently a big question for those educators in the practical and applied areas of knowlege, like architecture and urban planning, Jonnie is again a part of a controversy. "For a person in a school that is primarily training practitioners like the Master Program in Urban Planning, there is a question as to whether faculty need Ph.D.'s, which are traditionally an area of high academic research and are a little bit more theoretical than practical," Jonnie explairled. "It is sort of understood that professors, before they receive tenure, get a Ph.D," Jonnie continued. "Because of academia's politics, all departments, irrespective of the content, are requiring Ph. D.'s." Jonnie, who is a graduate of City College of New York and M.I.T., questions this kind of adherence to fixed rules and criticizes higher education for this rigidity. As a result, the academic community has become homogeneous and sterile with little diversity in thought and attitude, she contends. "Education is a socialization process to train young people to be good workers. Our society, which has dominated by corporate entity, needa a particular kind of worker who has skills; who's a technician and who will, more or less, conform to corporate rule--the desirable employee," Jonnie said. "The more adventuresome, creative individualist.is now called the entrepreneur type. They're encouraged to go into their own business, be an artist, or work as a sole practicitioner." Thus, Jonnie tries to apply an entrepreneurial prospective to her planning courses. She emphasizes people and their social aspects rather than physical environment. An examination of Jonnie's courses illustrate this "untraditional" social perspective. For instance, Comparative World Planning with special focus on Third World countries, is Jonnie's favorite course. "It is a course which looks at planning issues of countries in the western world and eastern world," she explained. "It discusses the social, historical, and political background of the cultures and how they relate to the environmental problems today. It's quite ambitious and very interesting." In her Neighborhood Planning course, techniques are examined in planning small areas as well as the needs of the people in neighborhoods. Ethnicity and the City discusses the history of ethnic groups in America and the resulting contemporary social issues found in a diverse society. "My perspective is important because I'm going to look at the world in a non-traditional way because I'm a non-traditional person," Jonnie said, in answer to a question about the necessity of her perspective. Jonnie plans to go bac k to school and get her Ph.D. Ph.D. in Environmental Psychology, after which she plans to teach again. So, at the end of spring semester 1982 . , Jonnie Jones will leave UCD, but hopefully her "non-traditional" ideas will remain a part of the school's J>hilosophy.

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' REAL..\...'< UP rAf.:>T \>N11 li?. t:acfhf., I HA1E. De.N'If:.R! re.ndv \ i . . . . by randy Architectural MumbleJumble A CHALLENGE TO YOUR ANALYTICAL ABILITY Unscramble these jumbles to form four architectural related words. SA LPN I I I I k'1 SEDING I I V>J I I I DOUIST I I I I V"J CATITCHER IIIV'JMI Now arrange the triangled letters to form THE SECRET MUMBLE JUMBLE PASSWORD! ' Clue to the PASSWORD: THE FINAL OFFER OF A UCD STUDENT OF ARCHITECTURE: Willie Chiang p.s. You have 30 minutes to work out the jumbles. The Lamination Committee has decided not to grant any extensions. You may, however, withdraw from this excercise at the end of the 16th minute. Failure to withdraw may result an 'F' in your permanent jumble record.

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EVENTS MARCH 10 5:15-6:30 Curt Fentress, L.W. Fentress & Associates. EC 38 AlA 10 7:00pm William Morgan, auditorium, Science Building. $3.00 students, $5.00 general public. 13 4:00pm Morrison Study Presentation, EC 163 AlA 27 5:00-7:00 Denver Chapter AlA Architectural Firm Open House, Intergroup, 1450 Dravo Plaza. APRIL 30-4/10 "Art by Architects" First of Denver Plaza. 31 5:15-6:30 Abo & Gude Architects, EC 38 7 5:15-6:30 Walter Hunt, Gensler & Associates, Architects EC 38 25-29 American Planning Association, National Planning Conference, Boston. For additional information call Kristan Pritz. 629-2816 FILMS lviARCH MSC Film Series S.C. 330 75 For additional information call 629-2595 10 Boys in the Band 11 The Stuntrnan 12 Tin Drum 17 La Cage aux Folles 19 Assignment 20 A very Natural Thing 31 Private Benjam-in