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Laminations, May, 1982

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Title:
Laminations, May, 1982
Series Title:
Laminations
Creator:
University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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1X1 MCW CMUMkHCC
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
LAMIIMOCnONS
EDITORS:
Peter Levar Christopher Gallagher
STAFF:
Melanie Ancin Nicholas Antonopoulos Dave Evans Dick Hansen Nils Hjerman Dan Jansenson Siulina Mega
Cover Illustration:
Christopher G. Gallagher
Special thanks to:
Dolores Hasseman
Funding:
The Deezine Club
American Institute of Architects College of Design and Planning
Mailing Address:
Laminations
c/o College of Design and Planning 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
FoRTUM-
COVER:
A highlight of this year’s graduation ceremonies will be the awarding of an Honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree to I.M. Pel.
See pages 6-8 for more about Pei and his work.


Here is a sample of the results of the Architecture Division Survey Spring 82, Of those responding to the survey, 29 are from 500 Design, 27 from 600, 17 from 700, 4 are graduates of the program, and 4 are faculty
9 Do you feel it is important for an instructor to communicate his/her individual background,
experiences and preferences in architecture? 70 yes 7 unsure ________________3_ _no
0 In what way, if any, would you want the level
of communication between students and faculty
to improve? (Check as many as apply) 32 more frequent all-school meetings
46 greater availability of faculty
outside of class
57 greater availability of faculty
within class
11 greater availability of students
outside of class
13 greater availability of students
within class
43 more written statements
regarding events, criteria, expectations, etc. from faculty
7 other
3 none, things are okay as is
• Are knowledge and discussion of design theory and issues important in the studio How important is it that design criteria be clearly stated for each project? 65 ves 5 unsure 9 no
• 60 8 7
very somewhat unsure not very
• How important are knowledge and discussion of design theory and issues in studio? 61 7 7 1 2
very moderately unimportant
• Should written and/or oral individual evaluations of design projects be required of design instructors? 75 yes 4 no
If yes, which do you prefer? 14 Do you feel your design grades reflect fairly your efforts and product? written 19.oral 16 either 29 both 34 ~3T 2
always often sometimes never
• Are the issues of actual professional practice covered in the curriculum sufficiently broad and thoroughly covered to help graduates in the future? 17 yes 43 no
0 How well informed are you of the process and possibilities in choosing a thesis project? 4
very
46 no
5 14
adequately unsure
32
in-
adequately
23
not at all
Is the present course evaluation system adequate?
28___yes


4,________
the
sausage
in the bun yur
44 »
The other day we walked over to the Brown Palace Hotel to observe the Awards Ceremony of the UCD School of Design and Plan ning, and to lend encouragement to a friend or two, who were receiving awards that evening.
Outside the banquet room, in a kind of lobby, stood approximately three hundred persons crowding about the cash bar, preparing, evidently, for the evening’s events. Slowly, the banquet room filled up, and before long food was served, in an extensive, lavish array of silverware. This is what we ate: fruit salad, green salad, bread-and-butter, fish (salmon, apparently) with potatoes, dessert, and coffee.
Then someone blew into the microphone to launch the ceremonies, and the award-giving began, department by department, prize-winning students (some from the Boulder campus) and award-winning faculty.
Actually, that part of the evening seemed to go by in a blur, although we do remember a friend’s face whitening as her name was called, then bravely standing up to redeive her award.
Mr. Paul Goldberger, the critic, was there as guest speaker, to discuss recent developments in Denver. It is the mountains, he said, that give Denver its character. Were it not for the mountains the city might well be Houston, and this precious landscape is "going fast" because of short-sighted, destructive urban sprawl.
Nothing, said Mr. Goldberger, should cut off a vista to the mountains, but the city is being ruined and its resources sapped. What is needed, he said, besides the vistas, is a sense of urbanity and permanence, a focus and character to mark this place in a special way. Symbols are desperately needed here, he said, to remind us of spaces outside the city, elements of continuity and local refinement.
Mr. Goldberger also made the following comments:
"A monument of gross insensitivity"—Philip Johnson's new building in Denver (loud applause was he&rd here).
"Dull, bland, boring"—Prudential Plaza (more loud applause).
"as many locations as Burger King"—H.O.K. firm (shocked laughter).
A friend from the 500 studio commented recently:
"So reticent have some individuals been about discussing the various -isms, that some students have come up with their own, encoded, versions, called ’Left-sock Architecture,* and ’Right-shoe Architecture.* Left-sock architecture is contextual, ambiguous, ironic, makes references to the past. Right-shoe architecture is sleek, smooth, straight, ultra-efficient. Left-sock architecture is inclusivist, it fits into an urban setting. Right-shoe architecture is exclusivist, monumental. What we need is to put the left sock in the right shoe, and we’ll be OK."
spfcsvaes w irn
NOTES
STUDENTS: Mike Martin, Resident Dean in Boulder reported there are 10 TA positions needed in Boulder for Fall Graphic Problem Solving, meeting on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Please submit a statement on why you would like to be a TA, and a portfolio of your work. Send these to Mike Martin in Boulder. You may bring them to the office and we will mail through the shuttle to Boulder for you.
STUDENTS: If you are planning to graduate this Spring 1982, please obtain your diploma card from the office and return directly to the office - Dolores or Donna. Also, please check with your respective division to be sure you have fulfilled all requirements .
The evening was not unpleasant.


AWARDS
ARCHITECTURE Gary Long, AIA, Director
125th Anniversary of AIA 90lh Anniversary of C'SA
Honor Awards for excellence in Architectural Design
Deborah Andrews Marilyn Harvey Mark Fraucnglass
Honor Award for Excellence in Architectural Technology
Wendy Irving
Faculty Award for Distinguished Service.....Emmy Jenson
Alpha Rho Chi Award for leadership Wm. Michael Phillips
AIA Certificate....................................Brad Walker
AIA Medal.........................................Brian Larson
AIA EDUCATIONAL FUND AWARDS Colorado Society of Architects Kenneth R. Fuller, AIA
Monarch Tile Manufacturing. Inc.Scholarship
Paul Vaivoda
Construction Products Manufacturers Council Scholarship
Mark Klicc
Colorado Masonry Institute Scholarship....Dan Sullivan
C. Gordon Sweet Scholarship.......Christopher Gallagher
Rober t K. Fuller Scholarship............Janice Wellon
Temple Hoyne Buell Scholarship.........Robert McHugh
Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G. Fisher
Traveling Scholarship II..............Peter Kalotay
PROFESSIONAL AWARDS Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G. Fisher
Traveling Scholarship I.................Francine Haber
Honor Award for Distinguished Service....Jerome Seracuse
Honor Award for Professional Excellence in Architectural Design........Everett, Zeigel, Timtpc*& Hand
INTERIOR DESIGN Atlila Lawrence, ASID, Director Award for Excellence in Environmental.
Psychological Research.............Melinda Goodwin
Honor Awards in Design Excellence
Nicholas Antonopoulos An Yang Geoffry Johnson
The Lowell Batchelder Research Scholarship
Melinda Goodwin
Faculty Award for Scholastic Excellence
Belle Van Gytenbeek
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS
Robert Caudle, FASI1) Nora Dimitrov. ASID Hal Lipstein, ASID
*
*
PLANNING AND COMMIINI’I’Y DEVEMH’MENT
David Hill. APA. Director Honor Awards
Excellence in Scholarship....................Clilf Ellis
Excellence in Research.................. Ricardo Bravo
John llinklcman Marcus Kemper
Distinguished Service to the Division....Seth Goldstein
Kristan Pritz
Excellence in Participatory Community Development
Ray Kinoshita Kee Warner
Outstanding First Year Student.........Marjorie Upfal
Scholarships
The Colorado Chapter of the American
Planning Association Scholarship.......Suzanne Bolt
The Trafton Bean Scholarship...........Marjorie Upfal
Faculty Member Award for Distinguished
Service to the Division..............Herbert II. Smith
PROFESSIONAL AWARDS
Distinguished Service to the Division.. Robert Giltner
Distinguished Service to Planning in Colorado
Roy Honler, Slate Treasurer
URBAN DESIGN John M. Prosser, AIA, Director Excellence in Urban Design .... Nobpadol Suvachnnanonda PROFESSIONAL AWARDS
Distinguished Service Award ..........Rich VonLuhrte
Excellence in Urban Design .....Barker Rinker-Seacat
and Partners, Architects, P.C.
AWARDS GIVEN IN MEMORY OF ORIGINAL FOUNDERS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
AIA Educational Fund,
Colorado Society of Architects 1%I James E. Kocntopp
William E. Fisher Memorial Scholarship 1062 Dwayne C. Nuzum
George H. Williamson Memorial Scholarship 1963 Clifford R. Miercort
William N. Bowman Memorial Scholarship (964 Luther G. Marshall
Fred E. Mountjoy Memorial Scholarship 1966 Robert Gage Davis
Robert K. Fuller Memorial Scholarship
Dati Young. ASLA, AIA, Director Honor Awards for Excellecne in landscape Architecture Design
1st Year...........................Richard Hansen
2nd Year..............................Carrie Risley
Faculty Award for Distinguished Service by Student
Mary McGown
ASLA National Honor Award ............Sandra Wyngaard
ASLA National Award.....................Mary McGown
PROFESSIONAL DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD Harman O’Donnell and llenningcr Associates, Inc.
David R. Jenson. Principal
Community Service Division
CENTER FOn COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN T. Michael Smith, Director Community Development Honor Awards
Architecture.......................Debra Kaufmann
Planning/Community Development.......:. Kristan I’rilz
Environmental Design.................Mark Carvalho
Mark Murphy Memorial Scholarship Award
Chris D. Penny


G
Pei and Ms work
By.Melanie Ancin Graphics by Nils Hjermann
Dave Evans
Edited by Dave Evans Melanie Ancin
HIS LIFE
I.M.Pei was born in southern China in 1917. He spent his youth there and later moved to Hong Kong when his father went to head the Bank of China. Just prior to coming to the United States in 1935 he was residing in Shanghai.
He was accepted in the Architecture program at the University of Pennsylvania but deciding to change directions he entered Massachusetts Institute of Technology in engineering. Dean William Emerson at MIT encouraged him towards architecture and in 1940 he obtained the Bachelors degree. He was the recipient of a traveling scholarship but with Europe at war he stayed in Cambridge as a research assistant for the Bemis Foundation. After six months he joined Stone and Webster and was there until 1942. He went on to work for the National Defense Research Committee in Princeton, N.J. and Washington, D.C.for two and a half years until he entered the Graduate School of Design at Harvard in 1944.
He studied under Gropius and Breuer, working side by side with fellow students, Johnson, Barnes, and Rudolph. The ptedominant design philosophy of "form follows function" prevailed along with other classical modernist dogma that was to shape Pei’s early design directions. In 1946 he graduated with a Masters degree.
His break came in 1948 when he accepted an. offer from visionary, real estate developer, William Zeckendorff to head the architecture department of the New York firm of Webb and Knapp. He was given almost unlimited opportunities in project design and planning.
In Zeckendorff*s words, "it was a matter of a de Medici looking for a Michaelangelo."
And in I.M.Pei’s words, "Real estate developers are responsible for the built environment that we see. Rather than hold them in contempt I thought there was great potential in trying to work from within."
Pei worked for Zeckendorff for ten years doing some very impressive projects. These included such projects as Denver's Mile High Center, Montreal's Place Ville Marie, and the master plan for Boston's Government Center.
In 1958, Pei, upon an amicable separation from Zeckendorff, formed his own firm.
HIS FIRM
Pei and Partners is composed of a tight group of architects who have formed a "true" partnership through the years. Many of the original group are still with him.
This office is unique for many reasons; the most important is Pei himself. He is described as a " superlative team player,"
In his own words,"It (the office) really consists of a number of small firms. We have different project teams and each is independent.
My role, because of my seniority - and presumably I bring with that seniority a certain amount of experience - is to oversee a number of teams and make my contributions when I think they are needed. I withdraw myself when I think they are not needed."
The stability of this close and long term staff is due to Pei's willingness to share responsibility, giving his staff a share of the work and not denying them their share of the credit.
Due partially to their unique organization, the firm has received honor awards for ten of their buildings and two awards of merit* As if this weren't acheivement enough, the group received the 1968 Architectural Firm Award, "for a firm which had produced distinguished architecture for a period of at least ten years."
In 1979 I.M.Pei received the AIA Gold Medal, the most esteemed award in the architectural field.
Many clients recognizing these attributes, hire the firm and are rewarded with structures "bursting with intelligence and energy, revealing formal and metaphorical delights every step of the way." I.M.Pei, as an individual, is "an architect totally attuned to his clients problems and aspirations within the constraints of the real world."
The firm is composed of "lively, independent, minded partners," not afraid to try something new. The inventive staff have developed many- new and and unique details which separate the firm's work from work of others. They have made great strides in the use of glass and metal curtain walls, and have incredible knowledge in the use of concrete.
HIS WORK
A brief synopsis of a few of the firm's projects of note follows. They point up the variety of work and scope of projects the firm enjoys, along with the uniformity and quality of the designer's responses.


JOHNSON ART CENTER Cornell University Ithaca, N.Y.
"The spectaculer form is spectacularly sited: it emphatically terminates a long open space sloping up to it through the campus from the south, and its north face overlooks Fall Creek Gorge and Lake Cayuga."
Constructed of tan concrete, the monolithic effect of the building is acheived by having pours up to 60 feet long and 20 feet high.
The sculpture terrace forms the open void in the center of the building. Here sculpture is displayed beyond the reach of vandals. Around this void, three elements form the building. The lowest level consists of public galleries with generous exhibit space below grade. The second element, the tower that forms the side of the building contains offices, a meeting room, and a small library. The third element, the projection that forms a roof over the sculpture court, houses the museum's Asian Collection.
AVAVAV
DENVER TRANSIT MALL
The mall, twelve blocks long, is anchored at each end by a bus terminal. Special purpose buses will run the length of it to connect the two terminals. The pavement of red, gray, and white granite is laid out in a diagonal motif. Fountains and seats are provided along the central promenade. Two rows of indigenous trees will run parallel along the length of the mall, alternating with the trees will be special street lamps that contain three types of lighting. Lighting will also be recessed in the streets to indicate traffic lanes.
â–¡ â–¡â–¡â–¡ â–¡
DALLAS MUNICIPAL CENTER
Designed in 1978 by Pei and Partners in conjunction with the Dallas firm of Harper and Kemp, the structure is "a block long cantilever that interlocks urban space with civic structure." Built in a rundown district, this building along with the neighboring convention center has helped to revitalize the adjacent commercial area. As a result of it, a new central public library has been constructed across from the plaza.
The building, 600 feet long, with levels up to 65 feet in depth, is divided into six open loft areas. Fourteen monolithic walls support
the cantilevered floor which projects 70 feet over the five acre plaza. The plaza is formed in plan by the definition of geometric shapes.
A diagonal slash across the plaza separates the eight foot change in grade. The lower level directs pedestrians up semi-circular stairs towards the entrance of the building. The upper level contains an 180 foot round pool which floats a visible red sculpture by Marta Pan.


»
NATIONAL CENTER FOR ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH Boulder, Colorado
The building is described as "a contradictory juxtaposition of bush-hammered, reddish-brown concrete; silhouetted against the Rocky Mountains." In order to get some inspiration, Pei slept on the site to get "the full force of the elements and the atmosphere and the spirit of the place" and realized "all over again how intensely personal the process of design is."
He traveled around the state and found his inspiration in the principles of Mesa Verde architecture constructed by the Anasazi Indians.
The building sits atop a 6200 foot high mesa rising from Boulder, Colorado. The building is formed by a number of towers rising a-round a central courtyard. Three of the original, most dramatic towers were never built. Although the program requirements were fulfilled, the building has been expected to accomodate a much larger staff. But even with some crowding the employees would rather work here than be moved to another location.
ooooo
EAST WING, NATIONAL GALLERY Washing ton, D.C.
Perhaps Pei’s highest acheivement, the National Gallery was "devised from a scheme that would relate to both the intersecting coordinates of L'Enfant's Plan and the perpendicular axess of the original National Gallery itself."
"A unique commission, the National Gallery addition shows to what length these architects can press technical and material resources -given client support - to meet a pre-determined design solution."
The trapezoidal site is cut by an inspired stroke to form a larger isosceles triangle and a smaller right triangle. The right triangle houses the offices and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. The isosceles triangle contains a series of galleries and extends upward into three diamond shape towers - one at each point of the triangle. These two triangles are connected by an immense triangular atrium, 80 feet high and' 16000 square feet in area. This large triangle is the ceremonial and celebratory space-its scale modified by sculpture, mobiles, and participants.
In an effort to respect the original building and draw some parallels, the new wing is specially sheathed in rose colored marble matching that on the old building. The same graduation of color, dark on the bottom to light on the top, was also matched.


@OHUHUt€iectfCM& & Effective communication techniques for the landscape architect,planner,and designer was the focus of the sixth annual VailvConference, April 11-13. Sponsored by the Colorado Chapter of the A.S.L.A. , the event brought together professionals and students from the western states for a series of informative lectures and workshops.
Jot Carpenter,chairman,Department of Landscape Architecture, Ohio State Univ.,spoke on "Techniques for Effective Verbal Communication" . Establishing goals and making an audience analysis are important first steps, he noted. Good knowledge of the subject, a thorough but basic outline with flexible wording, and the ability to think on your feet will enable you to respond to the audience's mood and get your message across effectively.
"The process is the message" was a key point made by Bill Weidman, Synergy Consulting Services, Tahoe City, Calif., during his public meeting workshop. The process communicates the relationship you want to have with the public. If you really want people to give you information you must structure the meeting to encourage participation and eliminate barriers. His approach to meeting control was simple and refreshing- "Giving away control encourages responsibility".
Graphics are the catalyst in the design process for Bill Johnson, Dean, University of Michigan and partner, William Johnson and Assoc.
He views graphic skills as a vehicle to help people to see - not a product-oriented skill. His presentation on graphic communication was directed toward the design dynamics of graphics rather than the post-design renderings so common in the field. Bill listed the characteristics of strong graphics-quick/loose, purposeful, substantive/precise, and done with a simple medium. Getting others to join you in the design process is essential, according to Johnson. The designer is the conduit and graphics should not be used as simply a selling tool but as part of a shared, dynamic design process.
Sketching was Tom Wang's topic during the graphics communication workshop. Wang, author and teacher, sees the sketch as a "slice" of the
design process - a way of "idea-tracking". The more quick slices we draw, the better we will understand the forms, spaces, and visual images we are dealing with. By flashing slides on the screen for a split second and then asking the audience to draw what they saw, Tom was able to make a clear distinction between factual and formal perception. We waste our efforts on detailed factual information rather than.concentrating on the formal elements that will enable us to visualize and draw the forms and spaces that we see.
Technical writing was covered by Robert Tippets, Shipley Associates, Bountiful,Utah, His talk was dense with helpful advice. Here are some of his concise tips -â– 
1. Push critical words and ideas up and left on the page or paragraph when revising.
2. Rapid writing, brainstorming, and problem solving are essential first steps in the writing process.
3. Using bits and pieces from these first written notes, the first draft can be prepared with scissors and tape more than
by pen and blank paper.
4. Brevity comes from rewriting the rough first draft - eliminate the deadwood and rebuild the sentences.
Audio/visual communications was handled by Duffy White,president, Photosynthesis, Denver.
He pointed out the advantages of thirty-five mm. slides over film (more flexibility) and video (better resolution). He suggested the use of an outline and a treatment analysis (how much time/ how much emphasis) for the developement of slide shows. His presentation was completed with a series of his firm's multi-image shows - full of sophisticated visual ideas.
This is just a sampling of the information and energy that made up this year's conference.
A Beaver Creek Resort tour, banquet, gondola ride and mid-mountain lunch were also part of the event - not to mention some lively skiing and socializing.
- Dick Hansen


10________________________________
INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE IN ASPEN: ORIGINS
NICHOLAS ANTONOPOULOS
What has become one of the preeminent forums in the world concerning design and society, began in 1951 as an experimental conference in "Design as a Function of Management", whose roots can be traced to Bauhaus ideas and personalities as well as to Walter Paepcke, the founder of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. Two significant events had occured in Aspen before 1951 that would put the sleepy town back on the map, and that set the stage for what was to become the Design Conference.
In 1949, interested in turning Aspen into an "American Salzburg", Walter Paepcke, head of Container Corporation of America, organized the Goethe Bicentenary Celebration (that would spawn the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies) along with a music festival, inviting Albert Schweitzer to be principle speaker. It was the intention of Paepcke and Robert Hutchins, then president of the University of Chicago, to let this event serve both as a sign for the reintegration of Germany into the world intellectual community, and to help develop Aspen beyond its newly emergent role as a winter sports resort. (In fact, the World Ski Championships were held in Aspen the next year.) The Design Conference can also be dated one year after the Photographers Conference of 1950, whose afterglow convinced Paepcke that a design conference in Aspen would also succeed.
Paepcke*s own vision was marked by a real concern with serving public interest as well as his own, in what he viewed as a postwar period denial of concepts central to a "good society", concepts that were being distorted or eclipsed by the nation's preoccupation with material and physical security.
He made his own company, Container Corporation, based in Chicago, the innovator in the field by bringing good designers to the industrial fold, and was in fact instrumental in inviting members of the Bauhaus, after it had been clpsed down by the Nazis, not only to work for him, but also to start the new Bauhaus under the directorship of Moholy-Nagy in Chicago. He
subsequently rescued the school from bankruptcy, turning it into the Chicago Institute of Design, and keeping it alive until its takeover by the Illinois Institute of Technology.
Herbert Bayer, a distinguished Bauhaus veteran, typographer, painter, designer, and photographer, worked as a consultant for Container Corporation, before organizing the International Design Conference along wif.h Egbert Jacobsen, Container Corporation's design director. With Paepcke's blessing to hold it in Aspen, the Conference became a reality in the spring of 1950.
Originally conceived as a forum to benefit both design and business, progressive heads of major corporations were contacted for a response to the idea. Most needed convincing that good design is important, but Paepcke's example that good design was an essential part of good business and no less a part of a healthy public culture than the arts and music, won them over. Paepcke's and Jacobsen's idea that "getting designers and executives together for their mutual benefit:," was not far removed from the Bauhaus precept that the values of the artist and industry could not only be reconciled, but that the designer's social responsibility extended to the possibility of improving man by improving his environment.
As such, the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies can be viewed as the Design Conference's alter ego, since in its Executive Seminars the major question to be reckoned with is the social responsibility of business leaders. In fact, the Aspen Institute was to become the organisational backup for the Design Conference, along with Container Corporation as a power base, until the Conference was able to become incorporated in 1955. At that juncture in its history, it took on a more philosophical tenor as well. There was less interest in selling design to management as there was an emphasis on the management of design in a social context. The new focus centered around the interaction between design and a wide range of environmental forces: physical, social, economic and cultural.
The early roster of participants reads like a who's who of the design world:


Louis I. Kahn, Herbert Raver, Charles Eames, George Nelson, Josef Albers, R. Ruckminster Fuller...the list goes on.
Paepcke engaged Eero Saarinen to design a massive tented auditorium for the Goethe Bicentenary/ while Herbert Bayer became the designer and planner-in-chief for all of the A.spen Company's rehabilitation and development. In this capacity, Bayer set out to re-do the charred interior of the Wheeler Opera House, build the new Executive Seminar Building in collaboration with the architect Fritz Benedict, modernize eighteen Victorian houses without doing violence to their style, reconstruct twenty guest houses and dormitories, and develop all the Aspen Company's publicity materials. He was instrumental in barring all Neon signs in Aspen, and in developing a small area in the center of Aspen as a pedestrian access forbidding any vehicular traffic. His proposal to Paepcke to buy the core of Aspen and prevent real estate speculators from constructing an artificial town was unfortunately dismissed because of lack of funds.
In Nikolaus Pevsner's marvelous account
of the 1953 Conference, he remarks that the informal nature of the discussions made for a, "humanly more enjoyable but factually less profitable" conference, but vvas alternately amazed by the outspokenness of Americans: "something that must be experienced to be believed." Conducting the student forum, he found American students to be, in form "certainly less literate than they would be in a good English architectural school, where students without doubt would have read more, but in content they were exactly the same: all very earnest, not a bit lighthearted, and all about society and responsibilities. One got the feeling that somewhere under a table Senator '’cCarthy was getting restless."
The effects of the Conference have been felt ever since, in graphic design, industrial design, engineering and architecture, in the curricula taught in design schools and in the creation of counterpart conferences on design.
Though time changes many things, the chain of ideas, people and contributions from the International design Conference in Aspen, remains unbroken.



12
THESIS
PRE SENTAXIONS
arch. / u.d
(Room locations to be posted on third floor bulletin board, Bromley Building.)
MONDAY , MAY 3
9:00 Susan Kandelin Highland Ct. Mixed Use
10:00 Saeed Mahboubi Aurora Library
11:00 Steve Gregory Holistic Education Center
1:00 John Yonushewski Seaside Restaurant
2:00 Frank Kaiser Mixed Use, Ft. Collins
3:00 Bob Perkins Aurora Library
4:00 Pat Soran UCCS Engr. Building
TUESDAY, MAY 4
9:00 Greg Gidez YMCA
10:00 Peter Levar Cultural/Rec. Center
11:00 Steve Risley Solar Townhouses
1:00 Sam Miller Sports Complex
2:00 Diane Thomas Exec. Elderly Housing
3:00 Alima Silverman Boulder Housing/Retail
4:00 Anne Bain Blind Re-hab Center
WEDNESDAY, MAY 5
9:00 Mark Boulette Highland Place Urban In-fill
10:00 Henry Daniel Energy/Info Research Center
11:00 Mike Phillips Design Ranch
1:00 Lila Rioth Children's Museum
2:00 Chris Nielson Rifle City Hall
3:00 Brian Larson Steamboat Hotel
4:00 Bob Hagerty High Density Housing
THURSDAY, MAY 6
9:00 Richard Haas Corporate Headquarters
10:00 John Spitzer Boulder Offices/Housing
11:00 Shannon Morris Yacht Club
1:00 Rob Davidson Emergency Med. Center
2:00 Debra Kaufman Hospice
3:00 Mark Tasker Middle School
4:00 Emmy Jenson Resort Hotel
FRIDAY, MAY 7
9:00 Joe Doyle Medical Center
10:00 Mark Frauenglass High-rise Housing Dev.
11:00 Jill Hewitt Highland Housing
1:00 Fran Mishler D.U. Performing Arts Center
•:00v
i:00\
:00
2:00
3
4
5:00
Urban Design Presentations
Location:
l.a.
The Denver Partnership
Kittridge Building
511 16th Street, Suite 200
MONDAY, MAY 3 8:30 - 11:30 AM
Mary Me Gowen (response)
Catherine Schweige (response)
Suzanne McMahon (response)
Gina Lee (response)
"Implications for Watershed Management in an Urbanizing Mountain Area?
r"Recreation Facilities on Water Supply Reservoirs in Semi Arid Climates
"Campus Planning in an Arid Mountain Environment.” "Imageability of Rural Towns on the West Slope of the Colorado Rockies."
WEDNESDAY, MAY 5 8:30 - 11:30 AM
Barbara Figliuolo "Earth Sheltered Communities (response) in High Plains Environment,"
Sara Jane Steward "The Function of the Theatre
Within the Central Urban Fabric." "The Urban Natural Corridors Its Potential for Social Int 'act ’n" "Front Range Stream Corridors As Potential Greenway."
(response)
Bob Evans (response) Sandra Wyngaard (response)
FRIDAY, MAY 7 8:30 - 11:30 AM
Mike Tupa
Tom Sullivan
"Habitat Restoration in a Semi Arid Mountain Environment."
"A Model for Land Reclamation Based on the Visual and Functional Attributes of Landform Types." Colleen Bruce "A Framework Plan and Design
Guidelines for Pedestrians Network." Bob Flack "Resource and Energy Efficient Passive Solar P.IT.D."
i.a.
Location to be posted. THURSDAY, MAY 13 1:00 - 5:00 PM
Ann Gross Toshika Yoshida B.J. Young Irit Waldbaum
"Children's Surgical Unit" "Children's Museum"
"Ski Base Facility" "Religious Complex"
p.c.d.
Location and Dates to be posted.


Computers, computers, computers, they’re everywhere, or so it seems; but in the futute, the very short term future, they*11 be even more places. And one of the biggest places you and I will see them is in architectural offices. They’re coming, so we might as well face 'em. We as students of architecture can get a big jump on the profession, make ourselves more valuable to existing firms, and direct the push of technology in this new tool to perform as we want by learning and developing programming here in the University. We have an excellent start with our computer lab.
The state of the art is such that we now have the unique and enviable position of being able to develop our own skills in a tool which in the next few years will be as prevalent in an architectural office as pens and paper are now. In the process of developing our individual skills we could bolster the University's status in the community as a leader, a resource of information, direction, assistance. We, by developing a useful system for architects, could gain academic prestige and recognition -by leading other Universities in the work being done on computers. More acclaim for our degree University would help us all.
Presently, computing in the small office is most successful at "work processing".
Typing done at a computer terminal not only will result in a finished page of type, but also will have that page "stored" within the system for later retrieval, revision, duplication.
Imagine not having to retype ever again, it's all in the computer. Want to change a word in the middle of a page, have the computer find the letter, the page, the word, you type in the new word, the computer replaces it, adjusts the page accordingly, and types out a new page; and does it more quickly than any human. Newspapers have been doing this for years, they even set their type by computer.
That system would be nice for specification writing, and rewriting. Nice for writing your thesis, we'll we have such a system, on the Apple Computer in our second floor library.
Next, architectural offices, selling their professional time, use computers to keep track of their time, accumulate bills, keep financial records. Profit and loss statements are available at any time throughout a day, not just quarterly as with an accounting firm; daily an office could know if they are making or losing money on a job, base decisions on up to date and accurate data. These systems now exist.
So with the two above tasks available, many architectural firms are automating. They’re freeing up clerical time; boring, repetitive lengthy tasks are given to the computer. More time for the fun jobs, and better control of the business. Count on it, lots of architectural firms are automating. Be ready, be trained.
Skidmore, Owens and Merrill have been in computers for ten years, they feel that their computer is often their competitive edge. They
feel their competitors will all be automated within three to five years. They use their computers to do their drawings, make changes to them later, just as easily as the word processor does a letter.
Graphics on the computer is still in the development stages. But soon, within the few years mentioned by SOM you could sit at a time screen and draw plans, elevations, etc...then as if watching television, produce perspectives, color, shade and shadow, at different times of day, different times of year, you could study sun angles, watch the sun on a window, change the window, reorient the house, select plantings, etc...and have the computer do the drawing, over and over if necessary; quickly and without the usual human response to such "over and over".
SOM did a study of the shadow to be cast by a building on the lakefront in Chicago; there was concern that the building not cast a shadow across the beach during the summer season*, with the computer to calculate and draw the shade line throughout the year, their client could see that the shadow would not be a problem. They also have all of downtown Denver on their computer; want to see a sketch of the scene standing on the corner of 14th and Lawrence, just ask the computer to draw it, it will!
Think of the possibilities: you sit down to design and you can see your facade with any combination of types and positions of windows imaginalbe, the computer could draw up as many as you like, and then estimate how much each would cost; you’d impress a client. Then plot your working drawings right onto mylar.
Hewlett Packard has a graphics terminal with over 4,000 colors available for you to draw with; right now, today; think of what will be in a few years.
How about this? Set the square footage for a room, move a wall in, all the other walls are adjusted by the computer so as to keep the square footage as set. How about doing structures with a computer that can draw out the shear and moment diagrams, in color if you like. 1 Solar, heating and ventilating, water run-off from a sudden summer storm. Think about sitting down with a client and on a television that client can watch as he is driven up to the building you are designing for them, they walk up to the front door, walk through the interior, notice every detail of wallpaper, carpet, doorknobs, into the elevator, up, out and into any office, and out the windows for the view, from any window, any height! That’s some tough to beat competition, that’s what SOM is working on now.
Computers for under $10,000, under $3,000, and getting cheaper. If you were an architect in business, would you hire another secretary, or another architect, or would you buy a computer?
Many firms are facing this choice, more and more will face the decision in the next few years. We, as a University, must address this growing need. We, as students must recognize the need for us to increase our proficiency with this new tool; it may be our best advantage in the job marketplace.
-by Carol Farino.


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Full Text

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MAY 1982

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO -AT DENVER LAMINIU I INS EDITORS: . Peter Levar Christopher Gallagher STAFF: Melanie Ancin Nicholas Antonopoulos Dave Evans Dick Hansen Nils Hjerman Dan Jansenson Siulina Mega Cover Illustration: Christopher G. Gallagher Special thanks to: Dolores Hasseman Funding: The Deezine Club American Institute of Architects College of Design and Planning Mailing Address: Laminations c/o College of Design and Planning 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202 FIRE Cl EXIT D . • COVER: sYMeout.eS LDP1V s 0 •• ea..."' S....l-4 ) " • '"' ..... A highlight of this year's graduation ceremonies will be the awarding of an Honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree to I.M. Pei. See pages 6-8 for more about Pei and his work.

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Here is a sample of the results of the Architecture Division Survey Spring 82. Of those responding to the survey, 29 are from 500 Design, 27 from 600, 17 from 700, 4 are graduates of the program, and 4 are faculty. • • • Do you feel it is important for an instructor to communicate his/her i ndi vidua 1 background, experiences and preferences in architecture? In what way, if any, would you want the level of communication between students and faculty to improve? (Check as many as apply) Are knowledge and discussion of design theory and issues important in the studio How important is it that design criteria be clearly stated for each project? How important are knowledge and discussion of design theory and issues in studio? tt Should written and/or oral individual evaluations of design projects be required of design instructors? • If yes, vJhich do you prefer? you fee 1 your design grades reflect fairly your efforts and product? 14 Are the issues of actual professional practice covered in the curriculum sufficiently broad and thoroughly covered to help graduates in the future? How we 11 informed are you of the process and possibilities in choosing a thesis project? 4 5 70 yes 7 unsure 3 no 32 more frequent all-school meetings 46 greater availability of faculty outside of class 57 greater availability of faculty within class 11 greater availability of students outside of class 13 greater availability of students within class 43 more written statements regarding events, criteria, expectations, etc. from faculty 7 other -----------------------3 none, things are okay as is 65 yes 5 9 no unsure -60 8 7 very somewhat unsure not very 61 very 75 7 yes 7 1 2 moderate 1 y unimportant 4 00 written 19.oral 16 either 29 both 3J 2 always often some-never times 17 yes 43 no 14 32 very adequately unsure in-23 not at all Is the present course evaluation system a de qua te? _2_8_ yes ade qua te ly 46 no

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'' '' The other day we walked over to the Brown Palace Hotel to observe the Awards Ceremony of the UCD School of Design and Plan ning, and to lend encouragement to a friend or two, who were receiving awards that evening. Outside the banquet room, in a kind of lobby, stood approximately three hundred persons crowding about the cash bar, preparing, evidently, for the evening's events. Slowly, the banquet room filled up, and before long food was served, in an extensive, lavish array of silverware. This is what we ate: fruit salad, green salad, bread-and-butter, fish (salmon, apparently) with potatoes, dessert, and coffee. Then someone blaw into the microphone to launch the ceremonies, and the award-giving began, department by department, prize-winning students (some from the Boulder campus) and award-winning faculty. Actually, that part of the evening seemed to go by in a blur, although we do remember a friend's face whitening as her name was called, then bravely standing up to reteive her award. Mr. Paul Goldberger, the critic, was there as guest speaker, to discuss recent developments in Denver. It is the mountains, he said, that give Denver its character. Were it not for the mountains the city might well be Houston, and this precious landscape is "going fast" because of short-sighted, destructive urban sprawl. Nothing, said Mr. Goldberger, should cut off a vista to the mountains, but the city is being ruined and its resources sapped. What is needed, he said, besides the vistas, is a sense of urbanity and permanence, a focus and character to mark this place in a special way. Symbols are desperately needed here, he said, to remind us of spaces outside the city, elements of continuity and local refinement. Mr. Goldberger also made the following comments: "A monument of gross insensitivity"--Philip Johnson' s new building in Denver (loud applause was heard here). "Dull, bland, boring"--Prudential Plaza (more loud applaus:e) • "as many locations as Burger King''--H.O.K. firm (shocked laughter). The evening was not unpleasant. '' A friend from the 500 studio commented recently: "So reticent have some individuals been about discussing the various -isms, that some students have come up with their own, encoded, versions, called 'Left-sock Architecture,' and 'Right-shoe Architecture.' Left-sock architecture is contextual, ambiguous, ironic, makes references to the past. Right-shoe architecture is sleek, smooth, straight, ultra-efficient. Left-sock architecture is inclusivist, it fits into an urban setting, Right-shoe architecture is exclusivist, monumental. What we need is to put the left sock in the right shoe, and we'll be OK." NOTES STUDENTS: Mike Martin, Resident Dean in Boulder reported there are 10 TA positions needed in Boulder for Fall Graphic Problem Solving, meeting on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Please submit a statement on why you would like to be a TA, and a portfolio of your work. Send these to Mike Martin in Boulder. You may bring them to the office and we will mail through the shuttle to Boulder for you. STUDENTS: If you are planning to graduate this Spring 1982, please obtain your diploma card from the office and return directly to the office -Dolores or Donna. Also, please check with your respective division to be sure you have fulfilled all requirements.

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., AllCIIITECTlJitE Gary Long, AlA, l>in•clor l25th Anniv(•rsary of AlA 90lh Anniversary of CSA llonor Awards for cxcclh•nct.• in Ardtit.-dural Design llchorah Andrews Marilyn Harvey Mark F'rauenglass IIClnor Aw:.1rd fur F:xeellence in Architectur llal Lipst . cin, ASID * Ill e e e * l'l.t\NNIN(; ANU COI\11\IIINITY Oavitlllill. AI'/\, flin•dor Jlonor Awards in Sdtobrship ......... . . . ......... ( :lilf t•:llis in Ht.st :u-eh ............... ... Hkanlu Br;l\'o .John llinklt.•man Marcus St•rdte In thl' Uidsinn ...... Sl'lh Gulcl.;tl'in Kristan I 'ril7. F:xeellcnce in l'artidpatory ( 'ummunily DevdopnH'nl Hay Kinoshita Kt•t.• Warner Outstanding l''irsl \'('ar .......... llpfal Scholarships Colurado Chapter of the 1\nlt'rifo:m Planning Association Sdtnlan:hip ........ Suzartll<' Out! Tht.• Trafton Be;llt ............ Marjnrit.• IJpfal fo'aculty Mt•mhn Aw 'anl ft1r Dislinguisht'd Servict• to the Division .......... ....... lhrhC"rt II. Smith I'IHWF:SSIONAL AWAHI>S J>istinguishecf Senic't.' to I he Division ..... Boht•rt l;iltrwt Dislinguishecl Ser\'i<'e In l'lamting in CnloraPsign .... Nohpadol Suvach;m;monda PROF'JO:SSIONAL AWAIWS llonor Awnrd (or Proressional Exf'l'llt•nce in ------------------------Distinguisht•d Service Award ........... Hich VonLuhrtc F:xcellence in IJrhan llcsign ...... Barker Ardtilel'lural Design ..... Evcnll. Zeigcl . & Hand AWAHDS (;IVEN IN l\tf:I\HH1Y OF UHIGINAL LANDSCAPE t\RCIIITECTUilE AlA J:o:duC'ational fund, Colorado Society of 1961 James K I ...................... .... Debra Planning/Community .... . . :. Krist;m J'rit1. F.nvironmental Design ..... ..... ... ...... M<1rk Carvalhc• Mark Murphy Memorial Scholarship Award Chris ll. Pt•nlly

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By .Melanie Ancin Edited by Dave Evans HIS LIFE I.M.Pei was born in southern China in 1917. He spent his youth there and later moved to Hong Kong when his father went to head the Bank of China. Just prior to coming to the United States in 1935 he was residing in Shanghai. He was accepted in the Architecture program at the University of Pennsylvania but deciding to change directions he entered Institute of Technology in engineering. Dean William Emerson at MIT encouraged him towards architecture and in 1940 he obtained the Bachelors degree. He was the recipient of a traveling scholarship but with Europe at war he stayed in Cambridge as a research assistant for the Bemis Foundation. After six months he joined Stone and Webster and was there until 1942. He v.lent on to work for the National Defense Research Committee in Princeton, N.J. and Washington, D.C.for two and a half years until he entered the Graduate of Design at Harvard in 1944. He studied under Gropius and Breuer, working side by side with fellow students, Johnson, Barnes, and Rudolph. The ptedominant design philosophy of •form follows function" prevailed along with other classical modernist dogma that was to shape Pei's early design directions. In 1946 he graduated with a Masters degree. His break came in 1948 when he accepted an. offer from visionary, real estate developer, William Zeckendorff to head the architecture department of the New York firm of Webb and Knapp. He was given almost unlimited opportunities in project design and planning. In Zeckendorff's words, "it was a matter of a de Hedici looking for a Michaelangelo." And in I.M.Pei's words, "Real estate developers are responsible for the built environment that we see. Rather than hold them in contempt I thought there was great potential in trying to work from within." Pei worked for Zeckendorff for ten years doing some very impressive projects. These included such projects as Denver's Mile High Center, Montreal's Place Ville Harie, and the master plan for Boston's Government Center. In 1958, Pei, upon an amicable separation from Zeckendorff, formed his own firm. Graphics by Nils Hjermann Dave Evans Melanie Ancin HIS FIRM Pei and Partners is composed of a tight group of architects who have formed a "true" partnership through the years. Many of the original group are still with him. This office is unique for many reasons; the most important is Pei himself. He is described as a " superlative team player_" In his own words,"It (the office) really consists of a number of small firms. We have different project teams and each is independentMy role, because of my seniority -and presumably I bring with that seniority a certain amount of -is to oversee a number of teams and make my contributions when I think they are needed. I withdraw myself .,when I think they are not needed." The stability of this close and long term staff is due to Pei's willingness to share responsibility, giving his staff a share of the work and not denying them their share of the credit. Due partially to their unique organization, the firm has received honor awards for ten of their buildings and two awards of merit. As if this weren't enough, the group received the 1968 Architectural Finn Award, "for a firm which had produced distinguished architecture for a period of at least ten years." In 1979 I.M.Pei received the AlA Gold Medal, the most esteemed award in the architectural field. Many clients recognizing these attributes, hire the firm and are rewarded with structures "bursting with intelligence and energy, revealing formal and metaphorical delights every step of the way." I.M.Pei, as an individual, is "an architect totally attuned to ilis client"s problems and aspirations within the constraints of the real world." The firm is composed of "lively, independent, minded partners," not afraid to try something new. The inventive staff have developed many. new and and unique details which separate the. firm's work from work of others. They have made great strides in the use of glass and metal curtain walls, and have incredible knowledge in the use of concrete. HIS WORK A brief synopsis of a few of the firm's projects of note follows. They point up the variety of work and scope of projects the firm enjoys, along with the uniformity and quality of the designer's responses.

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DEi;JVER MALL The mall, twelve blocks long, is anchored at each end by a bus terminal. Special purpose buses will run the length of it to connect the two terminals. The pavement of red, gray, and white granite is laid out in a diagonal motif. Fountains and seats are provided along the central promenade. Two rows of indigenous trees will run parallel along the length of the mall. alternating with the trees will be special street lamps that contain three types of lighting. Lighting will also be recessed in the streets to indicate traffic lanes. JOHNSON ART Cornell University Ithaca, N.Y. "The spectaculer form is spectacularly sited: it emphatically terminates a long open space sloping up to it through the campus from the south, and its north face overlooks Fall Creek Gorge and Lake Cayuga." Constructed of tan concrete, the monolithic effect of the building is acheived by having pours up to 60 feet long and 20 feet high. The sculpture terrace forms the open void in the center of the building. Here sculpture is displayed beyond the reach of vandals. Around this void, three elements form the building. The lowest level consists of public galleries with generous exhibit space below grade. Tne second element, the tower that forms the side of the building contains offices, a meeting room, and a small library. The third element, the projection that forms a roof over the sculpture court, houses the museum's Asian Collection. : ; i ' 1 ' DOD DO DALLAS l1UNICIPAL CENTER Designed in 1978 by Pei and Partners in conjunction with the Dallas firm of clarper and Kemp, the structure is "a block long cantilever that interlocks urban space with civic structure." Built in a rundown district, this building along with the neighboring convention center has helped to revitalize the adjacent commercial area. As a result of it, a new central public library has been constructed across from the plaza. The building, 600 feet long, with levels up to 65 feet in is divided into six open loft areas. Fourteen monolithic walls support the cantilevered floor which projects 70 feet over the five acre plaza. The plaza is formed in plan by the definition of geometric shapes. A diagonal slash across the plaza separates the eight foot change in grade. The lower level directs pedestrians up semi-circular stairs towards the entrance of the building. The upper level contains an 180 foot round pool which floats a visible red sculpture by Marta Pan.

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( NATIONAL CENTER FOR ATI10SPHERIC RESEARCH Boulder, Colorado The building is described as "a contradictory juxtaposition of bush-hammered, reddishbrown concrete; silhouetted against the Rocky Mountains." In order to get some inspiration, Pei slept on the site to get "the full force of the elements and the atmosphere and the spirit of the place" and realized "all over again how intensely personal the process of design is." He traveled around the state and found his inspiration in the principles of Mesa Verde architecture constructed by the Anasazi Indians. f The building sits atop a 6200 foot high mesa rising from Boulder, Colorado. The building is formed by a number of towers r1s1ng around a central courtyard. Three of the original, most dramatic towers were never built. Although the program requirements were fulfilled, the building has been to accomodate a much staff. But even with some crowding_ the employees would rather work here than be to another location. 00000 EAST WING, NATIONAL GALLERY Washington, D.C. Perhaps Pei's highest acheivement, the National Gallery was "devised from a scheme would relate to both the intersecting coordinates of L'Enfant's Plan and the perpendicular of the original National Gallery itself.ti The trapezoidal site is cut by an inspired stroke to form a larger isosceles triangle and a smaller right triangle. The right triangle houses the offices and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. The isosceles triangle contains a series of galleries and extends upward into three diamond shape towers -one at each point of the triangle. These two triangles are connected by an immense triangular atrium, 80 feet high and' 16000 square feet in area. This large triangle is the ceremonial and celebratory spaceits scale modified by sculpture, mobiles, and participants. In an effort to respect the original building and draw some parallels, the new wing is specially sheathed in rose colored marble matching that on the old building. The same graduation of color, dark on the bottom to light on the top, was also matched. "A unique commission, the National Gallery addition shows to what length these architects can press technical and material resources -given client support -to meet a ore-determined design solution."

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Effective communication techniques for the landscape architect,planner,and designer was the focus of the sixth annual Vail,Conference,April 11-13. Sponsored by the Colo rado Chapter of the A.S.L.A. , the event brought together professionals and students from the western states for a series of informative lectures and workshops. Jo t Carpenter,chairman,Department of Landscape Architecture, Ohio State Univ.,spoke on "Techniques for Effective Verbal Communication". Establishing goals and making an audience analysis are important first steps, he noted. Good knowledge of the subject, a thorough but basic outline with flexible wording, and the ability to think on your feet will enable you to respond to the audience's mood and get your message across effectively. "The process is the message" was a key point made by Bill Weidman, Synergy Consulting Services, Tahoe City, Calif., during his public meeting workshop. The process communicates the relationship you want to have with the public. If you really want people to give you information you must structure the meeting to encourage participation and eliminate barriers. His approach to meeting control was simple and refreshing"Giving away control encourages responsibility". Graphics are the catalyst in the design process for Bill Johnson, Dean, University of Michigan and partner, William Johnson and Assoc. He views graphic as a vehicle to help people to see-not a product-oriented skill. His presentation on graphic communication was directed toward the design dynamics of graphics rather than the post-design so common in the field. Bill listed the characteristics of strong graphicsquick/loose, purposeful, substantive/precise, and done with a simple medium. Getting others to join you in the process is essential, according to Johnson. The designer is the. conduit and graphics should not be used as simply a selling tool but as part of a shared, dynamic design process. Sketching was Tom Wang's topic during the graphics communication workshop. Wang, author and teacher, sees _the sketch as a "slice" of the design process-a way of "idea-tracking". The more quick slices we draw, the better we will understand the forms, spaces, and visual images we are dealing with. By flashing slides on the screen for a split second and then asking the audience to draw what they saw, Tom was able to make a clear distinction between factual and formal perception. We waste our efforts on detailed factual information rather than-concentrating on the formal elements that will enable us to visualize and draw the forms and spaces that we see. Technical writing was covered by Robert Tippets, Shipley Associates, Bountiful,Utah, His talk was dense with helpful advice. Here are some of his concise tips 1. Push critical words and ideas up and left on the page or paragraph when revising. 2. Rapid writing, brainstorming, and problem solving are essential first steps in the writing process. 3. Using bits and pieces from these first written notes, the first draft can be prepared with scissors and tape more than by pen and blank paper. 4. Brevity comes from rewriting the rough first draft -eliminate the . deadwood and rebuild the sentences. Audio/visual communications was handled by Duffy White,president, Photosynthesis, Denver. He pointed out the advantages of thirty-five mm. sliees over film (more flexibility) and video (better resolution). He suggested the use of an outline and a treatment analysis (how much time/ how much emphasis) for the developement of slide shows. His presentation was completed with a series of his firm's multi-image shows -full of sophisticated visual ideas. This is just a sampling of the information and energy that made up this year's conference. A Beaver Creek Resort tour-, banquet, gondola ride and mid-mountain lunch were also part of the event -not to mention some lively skiing and socializing. Dick Hansen

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INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE ORIGINS NICHOLAS ANTONOPOTJLOS What has become one of the forums in the world concerning design and society, began in 1951 as an experimental conference in "Design as a Function of whose roots can be traced to ideas and personalities as well as to Walter Paepcke, the founder of the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. Two significant events had occured in Aspen before 1951 that would put the sleepy town back on the map, and that set the stage for what was to become the Design Conference. In 1949, interested in turning Aspen into an "American Salzburg", ter Paepcke, head of Container Corporation of America, organized the Goethe Bicentenary Celebration (that would spawn the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies) along with a music festival, inviting Albert Schweitzer to be principle speaker. It was the intention of Paepcke and Robert Hutchins, then president of the University of Chicago, to let this event serve botn as a sign for the reintegration of Germany into the world intellectual community, and to help develop Aspen beyond its newly emergent role as a winter sports resort. (In fact, the World Ski Championships were held in Aspen the next year.) The Design Conference can also be aated one year after the Photographers Conference of 1950, whose afterglow convinced Paepcke that a design conference in Aspen would also succeed. Paepcke's own vision was marked by a real concern with serving public interest as well as his own, in what he viewed as a postwar period denial of concepts central to a "good society", concepts that were being distorted or eclipsed by the nation's preoccupation with material and physical security. He made his own company, Container Corporation, based in Chicago, the innovator in the field by bringing good designers to the . fold, and was in fact 1nstrumental 1n inviting members of the Bauhaus, after it had been closed down by the Nazis, not onlv to work -for him, but also to start the new Bauhaus under the directorship of Moholy-itagy in-Chicago. He IN ASPEN • • subsequently rescued the school from bankruptcy , turning it into the Chicago Institute of Design, and keeping it alive until its takeover by the Illinois Institute of Technology. Herbert Bayer, a distinguished Bauhaus_ veteran, typographer, painter, designer, and photographer, worked as a for Container Corporation, before organizing the International Design Conference along Egbert Jacobsen, Container Corporation's design director. With Paepcke's blessing to hold it in Aspen, the Conference became a reality in the spring of 1950. Originally conceived as a forum to benefit both design and business, progressive heads of major corporations were contacted for a response to the idea. l\,_ost needed convincing that good design is important, but Paepcke's example that good design was an essential part of good business and no less a part of a healthy public culture than the arts and music, won them over. Paepcke's and Jacobsen's idea that "getting designers and together for their mutual -benefi-t,'' not far removed from the Bauhaus precept that the values of the artist and industry could not only be reconciled, but that the designer's social responsibility extended to the possibility of improving man by his environment. As such, the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies can be viewed as the Design Conference's alter ego, since in its Executive Seminars the major question to be reckoned with is the social responsibility of business leaders. In fact, the Aspen Institute was to become the organizational backup for the Design Conference, along with Container Corporation as a power base, until the Conference was able to become incorporated in 1955. At that juncture in its history, it took on a more philosophical tenor as-well. There was less interest in selling design to management as was an emphasis on the management of design in a social context. The new focus centered around the interaction between design and a wide range of environmental forces: physical, social, economic and cultural. The early roster of participants reads like a who's who of the design world:

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Louis I. Kahn, Herbert Bayer, Charles Eames, George Nelson, Josef Albers, R. Ruckminster Fuller ... the list goes on. Paepcke engaged Eero Saarinen to design a massive tented auditorium for the Goethe Bicentenary, while Herbert Rayer the designer and planner-in-chief for all of the Aspen Company's rehabilitation and o .evelopment. In this capacity, Bayer out to re-do the charred interior of the Wheeler Opera House, build the new Executive Seminar Building in collaboration with the architect Fritz Benedict, modernize eighteen Victorian without doing violence to their reconstruct t\enty guest houses and dormitories, and develop all the Aspen Company's publicity materials. He was instrumental in barring all Neon signs in Aspen, and in developing a small area in the center of Aspen as a pedestrian access forbidding any vehicular traffic. His proposal to Paepcke to buy the core of Aspen anct prevent real estatP speculators from constructing an artificial tovTn ras unfortunately dismissetl. because of lack of funns. In Nikolaus Pevsner's marvelous account .,.. / of the 1953 Conference, he remarks that the informal nature of the discussions made for a, "humanly more enjoyable but factually less profitable" conference, but was alternately amazed by the outspokenness of Americans: "something II that must be experienced to be believed." the student forum, he found American stuoents to be, in form "certainly less literate than they be in a good English architectural school, where students 'YTi thou t doubt 'YTOuld have read more, but in content they were exactlv the same: all very earnest, not a bitlighthearted, and all about society and responsibilities. One got the feeling that somewhere under a table Senator ... was getting restless." The effects of the Conference have been felt ever since, in graphic design, industrial design, engineering and architecture, in the curricula taught in design schools and in the creation of counterpart conferences on design. Though time changes many things, the chain of ideas, people and contributions from the International desiqn Conference in , Aspen, remains unbroken.

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e . (Room locations to be posted on third floor bulletin board, Bromley Building.) MONDAY, MAY 3 9:00 10:00 11:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 Susan Kandelin Saeed Mahboubi Steve Gregory John Yonushewski Frank Kaiser Bob Perkins Pat Saran TUESDAY, MAY 4 9:00 10:00 11:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 Greg Gidez Peter Levar Steve Risley Sam Miller Diane Thomas Alima Silverman Anne Bain WEDNESDAY, MAY 5 9:00 10:00 11:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 Mark Boulette Henry Daniel Mike Phillips Lila Rioth Chris Nielson Brian Larson Bob Hagerty THURSDAY, MAY 6 9:00 10:00 11:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 Richard Haas John Spitzer Shannon Morris Rob Davidson Debra Kaufman Mark Tasker Emmy Jenson FRIDAY, MAY 7 9:00 Joe_ Doylt:: 10:00 Mark Frauenglass 11:00 Jill Hewitt 1:00 Fran Mishler Highland Ct. Mixed Use Aurora Library Holistic Education Center Seaside Restaurant Mixed Use, Ft. Collins Aurora Library UCCS Engr. Building YMCA Cultural/Rec. Center Solar Townhouses Sports Complex Exec. Elderly Housing Boulder Housing/Retail Blind Re-hab Center Highland Place Urban In-fill Energy/Info Research Center Design Ranch Children's Museum Rifle City Hall Steamboat Hotel High Density Housing Corporate Headquarters Boulder Offices/Housing Yacht Club Emergency t1ed. Center Hospice Middle School Resort Hotel Medical Center High-rise Housing Dev. Highland Housing D.U. Performing Arts Center 2:00> 3:00 Urban Design Presentations 4:00 5:00 l.a. Location: The Denver Partnership Kittridge Building 511 16th Street, Suite 200 MONDAY, MAY 3 8:30-11:30 AM Mary Me Gowen (response) "Implications for Management in an Urbanizing . A II Mounta1..n rea. Catherine Schweiger"Recreation Facilities on Water (response) Supply Reservoirs in Semi Arid Suzanne McMahon (response) Gina Lee (response) Climates." ./ "Campus Planning in an Arid Mountain Environment. . . , "Image.sbility of Rural Towns on the West Slope of the Colorado Rockies." WEDNESDAY, MAY 5 8:30-11:30 AM Barbara Figliuolo"Earth Sheltered Communities (response) in High Plains Environment .. " Sara Jane Steward"The Function of the Theatre (response) Within the Central Urban Fabric." Bob Evans "The Urban Natural Corridors (response) Its Potentis-1 for Social Int 'act' n" Sandra Wyngaard ".t .. ront Range Stream Corridors (response) As Potential Greenway." FRIDAY, MAY 7 8:30-11:30 AM Mike Tupa "Habitat Restoration in a Semi Arid Mountain Environment." Tom Sullivan "A Model for Land Reclamation Based on the Visual and Functional Attributes of Landform Types." Colleen Bruce "A Framework Plan and Design Guidelines for Pedestrians Network." Bob Flack "Resource and Energy Efficient Passive Solar P.ll.D." e 1.&. Location to be posted. THURSDAY, MAY 13 Ann Gross Toshika Yoshida B.J. Young Irit Waldbaum 1:00 5:00 PM "Children's Surgical Unit" "Children's Museum" "Ski Base Facility" "Religious Complex" Location and Dates to be posted.

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COMPUTERS Computers, computers, computers, they're everywhere, or so it Sems; but in the future, the very short term future, they'll be even more places. And one of the biggest places you and I will see them is in architectural offices. They're coming, so we might as well face 'em. We as students of architecture can get a big jump on the profession, make ourselves more valuable to existing firms, and direct the push of technology in this new tool to perform as we want by learning and developing programming here in the University. We have an excellent start with our computer lab. The state of the art is such that we now have the unique and enviable position of being able to develop our own skills in a tool which in the next few years will be as prevalent in an architectural office as pens and paper are nmv. In the process of developing our individual skills we could bolster the University's status in the community as a leader, a resource of information, direction, assistance. We, by developing a useful system for architects, could gain academic prestige and recognitionby leading other Universities in the work being done on computers. More acclaim for our degree University would help us all. Presently, computing in the small office is most successful at "work processing". Typing done at a computer terminal not only will result in a finished page of type, but also will have that page "stored" within the s ystem for later retrieval, revision, duplication. Imagine not having to retype ever again, it's all in the computer. Want to change a word in the middle of a page, have the computer find the letter, the page, the word, you type in the new word, the computer replaces it, adjusts the page accordingly, and types out a new page; and does it more quickly than any human. Newspapers have been doing this for years, they even set their type by computer. That system would be nice for specification writing, and rewriting. Nice for writing your thesis, well we have such a system, on the Apple Computer in our second floor library. Next, architectural offices, selling their professional time, use computers to keep track of their time, accumulate bills, keep financial records. Profit and loss statements are available at any time throughout a day, not just quarterly as with an accounting firm; daily an office could know if they are making or losing money on a job, base decisions on up to date and accurate data. These systems now exist. So with the two above tasks available, many architectural firms are automating. They're freeing up clerical time; boring, repetitive lengthy tasks are given to the computer. More time for the fun jobs, and better control of the business. Count on it, lots of architectural firms are automating. Be ready, be trained. Skidmore, Owens and Merrill have been in computers-for ten years, they feel that their computer is often their competitive edge. They feel their competitors will all be automated within three to five years. They use their computers to do their drawings, make changes to them later, just as easily as the word processor does a letter. Graphics on the computer is still in the development But soon, within the few years mentioned by SOM you could sit at a time screen and draw plans, elevations, etc ••• then as if watching television, produce perspectives, color, shade and shadow, at different times of day, different times of year, you could study sun angles, watch the sun on a window, change .the window, reorient the house, select plantings, etc •.• and have the computer do the drawing, over and over if necessary; quickly and without the . h " d " usual human response to sue over an over • SOM did a study of the shadow to be cast by a building on the lakefront in Chicago; there was concern that the building not cast a shadow across the beach during the summer with the computer to calculate and draw the shade line throughout the year, their client could see that the shadow would not be a problem. They also have all of downtown Denver on their computer; want to see a sketch of the scene standing on the corner of 14th and Lawrence, just ask the computer to draw it, it will! Think of the possibilities: you sit down to design and you can see your facade with any combination of types and positions of windows imaginalbe, the computer could draw up as many as you like, and then estimate how much each would cost; you'd impress a client. Then plot your working drawings right onto mylar. Hewlett Packard has a graphics terminal with over 4,000 colors available for you to draw with; right now, today; think of what will be in a few years. How about this? Set the square footage for a room, move a wall in, all the other walls are adjusted by the computer so as to keep the square footage as set. How about doing structures with a computer that can draw out the shear and moment diagrams, in color if you like. J Solar, heating and ventilating, water run-off from a sudden summer storm. Think about sitting down with a client and on a television that client can watch as he is driven up to the building you are designing for them, they walk up to the front door, walk through the interior, notice every detail of wallpaper, carpet, doorknobs, into the elevator, up, out and into any office, and out the windows for the view, from any window, any height! some tough to beat competition, thatts what SOMis working on now. Computers for under $10,000, under $3,000, and getting cheaper. If you were an architect in business, would you hire another secretary, or another architect, or would you buy a computer? Many firms are facing this choice, more and more will face the decision in the next few years. lve, as a University, must address this growing need. We, as students must recognize the need for us to increase our proficiency with this new tool; it may be our best advantage in the job marketplace. -by Carol Farino.

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_ ., ? iJel R.TI/ ( I It TD I MALL) :J f) I() MOM'S DAY 501 OE51qN HlL..TON I MAY D a.t-PRE.5E.NTATJON e,uNil1'Y 6o1 CcvDP ( PeNVI!Q.. CHAPyell Al-l) AL ?0 J() . . . . . . . .. : . . ........ . .. .... AND VOLLEYf?ALL PAR.K 2!J PfNIC. PAtiTI-leR. s TRJKe s Ae,AIN. OCPA 3() 5UNOAY 17 2Li :JI DAY MONOAY 27 .. 601 NA9Le DE.519N II Ill 9-' ile/t) TUe5PAY 211 Pf:.RIN (M. I. T) " : &'lMe>OL "t-ACT • () :J() _ .. 601 ( . . HWH 61:/'X) r.M., u2J 7 I --PRL.SE-NTATION CSTRANfte.LOve f :11() PM )vPA 12 501 DE.5k:fN .. 601 ( 5eCfiOH. ALSO If) 9(' ilel) WI!DNeSOAY 1:1 IN"fl:.RtOR A RO-ll rec TU Re 2() or PINK P.. 8:t?O PM DOPA 27 f'.M. DOPA. T'-JUR.SPAY 6 o l C cc t:'D src._. Df:..Sie,N fA TIOM 21 22 211 ?t) ile/t a/MINICK. A?50C. 0 PeN 5e. ( t(.J) . rq "'" sr. ) . FRIDAY f)AlUftOAY