Citation
Laminations, October, 1982

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Title:
Laminations, October, 1982
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING
UNIVERSITY Oi COLORADO AT DENVER
inside:
page..........3
GARY LONG RESIGNS
DON WOOLARD, NEW ARCHITECTURE DIRECTOR
page..................4
INTERVIEW:
WILLIAM CAUDILL
page..................5
DISCUSSION WITH MICHAEL GRAVES
page..................6
NIMS ON INTERIORS
LAMINATIONS TALKS TO DAVE HILL
U.D. PROGRAM GETS NEW EMPHASIS
page...................7
DAVID LEWIS
MICHAEL WILDE
MICHAEL GRAVES.
It was like a mob scene from "Battleship Potemkin." The room was packed with shining, sweaty faces, some with expressions of expectation and excitement, others with sullen, combative looks. The room was hot—the doorways blocked by people standing, pushing to see. Bromley 202, which normally holds forty or fifty people, had over two-hundred individuals, sitting on chairs, tables, the floor, standing along the walls and in the doorway, all waiting for the guest to speak. It was a day of some excitement at the School: Michael Graves had come.
In a recent controversial article in New York times Magazine, the critic Paul Goldberger said this about Graves:
Graves's popularity...has led him to be praised in some circles as the greatest architect of his time, and denounced in others as a mere creature of fashion. But the fact of the matter is that Grave if he is not an epoch-making figure, is the most truly original voice that Ameri can architecture has produced in some
(continued on page 5)


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LAMINATIONS begins this year with a new look, and a new outlook. The new look should be obvious; werve adapted a tabloid format and we have, believe it or not, spent a little money and a great deal of time on design. Our hope is that LAMINATIONS looks and reads better.
The new outlook is an attempt to make the College of Design and Planning a more open forum for criticism and debate. In this issue we talk with students, faculty, CDP division directors, professionals and lecturers. The purpose is to foster dialogue. By discussing the ideas and work of the professionals and educators, we make them more accessible.
In the architectural education process, students are held accountable for design and planning decisions. Learning evolves from continual critique and discussion. LAMINATIONS seeks to become a vehicle for this critical testing of ideas, philosophy and concepts.
Another goal of LAMINATIONS 1982-83 is to involve the entire college in the publication. We solicit the support of the students and faculty of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interiors, Plan-9 ning and Community Development and Urban Design.
y
/
• • • •
staff:
STAFF WRITERS
Julie Bowers ARCH
Nathan Good ARCH
Toby Guggenheimer ARCH
Nils Hjerman ARCH
Dan Jansenson ARCH
Nicholas K. Matz pgp
Auguste Mousalli ppj*
Frank Ooms ARCH
Leslie Read
Annie Wright ARCH
EDITOR
Chris G. Gallagher ARCH
dolores’
notes:
Students who plan to graduate at the end of the Fall semester need to complete a diploma card ASAP. Diploma cards are avail able from Design and Planning office.
New Graduate Students are asked to pick up their application portfolios from the Design and Planning Office.
Important Dates;
November 5, 1982 Last day to drop courses and withdraw from Fall Semester.
Final Tuition Payment Due
competition:
School of Architecture T-shirt Competition
The Student ’Board is sponsoring a design competition for a school t-shirt. Logos incorporating "UCD College of Design and Planning1' are welcome, as are more thematic designs or phrases suggesting architecture. See posters for details. If you are interested in working on the T-shirt Design Committee see Bruna Pedrelli in the 700 section on the third floor of Bromley.
GRAPHICS
Nils Hjerman ARCH
Lila Rioth ALUM
Kai Tarum ARCH
PHOTOGRAPHY
Frank Ooms ARCH
portrait:
Due to an unreasonable cross section of students and faculty making a prompt showing for the school portrait, the photograph does not appear on this issue's cover. An attempt to reshoot the portrait for the next issue will be announced in the near future.
November 12, 1985 Spring Schedules mailed
November 25-26, 1982 Thanksgiving . No classes. All offices closed.
December 15, 1982 Fall Semester Ends SPRING SEMESTER DATES
January 17-21 January 24 March 21-25 May 13
Registration week First Day of Classes Spring Vacation End of Semester
BUILDING KEY REQUEST CARDS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE OFFICE.
IF YOU ARE IN THE BUILDING AFTER HOURS, YOU MUST HAVE AN ID IN YOUR POSESSION.TO OBTAIN AN ID CARD GO TO THE GAME ROOM IN THE STUDENT CENTER DURING WORKING HOURS.
BECAUSE OF A HIGH INCIDENCE OF THEFT, BE SURE TO KEEP YOUR VALUABLES LOCKED UP IN YOUR LOCKERS.
commitee:
This committee has been created recently among others to widen the cultural and social horizons of the students within the divisions of design and planning. With the input of the foreign students, the committee is planning to organize such activities as slide shows and photography exhibitions related to their vernacular architecture and design as well as culinary activities. We need the foreign and local students' ideas and concerns. Any suggestions would be appreciated £ just drop a note by one of the committee's co-chairpersons, Bruna Pedrelli or Gene Benda, who are on the third floor of Bromley. Guy Moussalli


GARY LONG.............present architecture director
GL: Do You know I am leaving the School?
LAM: No.
GL: I am not leaving before January. And I am planning to still be teaching. Let me tell you how it works; The Director serves at the pleasure of both the Faculty and the Dean. The Director can be proposed by the Faculty to the Dean or Dean to Faculty. When I leave this job in January I've been at it for 4% years.
LAM: Why are you leaving?
GL: I'm quitting while I'm ahead - if I stayed another year I might get fired!
LAM: Like an old baseball player?
GL: Exactly.
There are-a lot of advantages and there should be a lot of prestige that goes with the job; I get to make the schedule - I can't stand to teach after 2 o'clock!
But for that prestige and for that money you get to work your tail off, and I've simply run out of energy.
In many ways it is a service job; my job is to support the faculty and to see to it that students get what they pay for. It is time for someone with more energy. I'm getting defensive — it is time to leave the job when you're getting defensive about what you're doing.
LAM: Will the next Director come from the Faculty?
GL: Yes, it will - and that is the Faculty's choice.
I'm resigning with a letter to the Faculty, and I'd like to repeat it here:r,This is to each of you individually: each of you have my respect, each of you have my affection, each of you have my support. I'm not going anywhere — if you need my support, I'm still here".
The reason I got into Administration was not Kingdom-building, which is a useful occupation for some people -for me it was almost as the old Southern ministers put it - "They were called"...
I started the Curriculum Study Committee in 1977. I got involved because I didn't like where we were going, and out of that Curriculum study came thesis procedure, team teaching and a lot of smaller things with regard to courses.
There are many things yet to be done and many things to get started, and that is what that Curriculum Study is doing right now - and I knew it was the time for me to do something.
I said I didn't want any part in that Committee.
LAM: What is going on down there - we've heard a lot of rumbling from that Committee.
GL: I'm also defensive because there is a lot of people down there that do not know enough about architecture. But that is an aside — there are plenty of people on the Committee that do know about architecture, and in fairness to those who are not that advanced, they have the wisdom of past experience — which is applicable. So I soften my comment.
But as far as I'm concerned, any school's quality is dependent first on the students, then on the Faculty and only finally on the Curriculum anyway.
So - you can't make Bodunk into a great School with a Curriculum, and I don't care whether^Harvard has a curriculum - it is going to be a great School because it has good people and a great library.
The thing that I see that gives me great pride is the ever-improving quality of design-work; That is the strength of the Program and that is my pride in the Program - and the pride in what I've contributed along with other people - especially the 3-year Program in presenting Architecture as an artform in the first 2 semesters.
So when people go into the profession they are well respected because they have a discipline many other schools do not give them — so ask some questions!
LAM: What about the NAAB Acredidation Report?
GL: Have you seen it? It is a beautiful report. I was blown away by it.
I'd like to say for the record I was very angry with that crew when it came — not for what they said, but how they said it. I find in the written report they've said it the way we would have said it.
We were criticized for looking too closely at Denver. That has never been my concern because people come from elsewhere and go back elsewhere.
Most of our projects have a sloping site!
LAM: What about Theory?
GL: There are many ideas about Theory -and what it means; I think personally what is meant...well...I think people come to architecture to design beautiful buildings. I don't think we address that directly enough; if we did we wouldn't have this problem among us. It isn't that the faculty doesn't have the desire to make things beautiful; it's just our concern to make the s stairs work as well, etc. The students have the idea that faculty aren't interested whether it is beautiful or not.
LAM: What about Francine Haber's Theory courses?
GL: I feel it has more to do with studio
work ----not so much with Theory.
Although the number of offerings is an issue, it is rather the intellectual, theoretical and aesthetical content of studio coursework that is the issue.
LAM: What is done to address that issue then?
GL: Well - a lot of that stimuli has to come from the revolving part-time Faculty.
Bob Davis was no accident - and the selection of outside Faculty is a job for the new Director. I think rather than choosing those highly qualified practitioners this tfime we should pick as part-time Faculty those who are designers first.
LAM: Why are you taking the job?
DW: First of all, let me say that when I found out that Gary was leaving it nearly broke my heart because I have so much respect and affection for Gary...I was interested in the position because I saw it as another step in a career that is very important to me. I am very interested ed in architectural education and it seemed to be a good opportunity to s step step forward and further the goals that I have, not only personally, but for architecture. Before I was selected I did enunciate these goals. LAM: And those goals were?
DW: I feel that at this point in time,
computers and energy are very important. And research, I'm not saying that this will be the case for all t time. A graduate should have a good understanding of computers as tools, not as studies in themselves, but as tools to be used in design. A graduate should have a good knowledge of ^5*. energy, so that they can place that vT within their own philosophy as they
LAM: The survey that was done last Spring — is anything being done to address the result that came out of that?
GL: Yes -. The Committee Outline addresses many of those issues.
LAM: One of the concepts of this newspaper is that we provide an open forum for criticism and discussion; There is a lot of rumbling about Leslie Ullmann being assigned to the Graphics position; How is it that she was assigned t-o the job when there was such a strong student voice last Spring saying we wanted one of the alternative candidates?
GL: The first two people refused!
The student opinion was carefully listened to - and the first choice of the students was not the first choice of the Faculty - and I'm very pleased that he didn't come; That guy would have been a disaster here!
LAM: Why do you say that?
GL: He was presenting work as his own that wasn't. I could see it; Ask him where he has been. He came out of a 3-year Program; I know 3-year Programs at MIT - they are just like ours -. He just graduated, went immediately to a recognized Graduate School beyond that -. I'm not saying he hasn't got a superb education - I'm not saying he isn't a superb designer; I'm just saying his presentation was fraudulant. And that every Faculty-member that saw it said the same thing -. The students weren't wise enough to see it. And instead of saying 'what is your participation' they said 'oh wow - you worked for so-and-so?'
I was so angry after that meeting -and the Faculty still offered him the job first.
The other guy - was a fine architect and would have made a great Faculty-member. Down to the wire I tried to get him. At that point we had a Graphics-program in limbo - Leslie Ullmann was a third choice; She was also well respected by any and all that taught with her.
LAM: So she has got a 3-year position now
GL: She has a 3-year position of which the last year is a leave of absence, if she's approved for reappointment the 2nd year.
LAM: Why is it that Gail was replaced?
(continued on page 8)
wish. Of course, all of this should not detract from design and architecture as a whole, and anything I do I see myself first and foremost as an architect. I have interests in special areas, only because I can see its importance in architecture as a whole.
LAM: Any specific plans for the program?
DW: No...no, I don't see any dramatic changes in the direction of the school. As you know I'm a new boy, and one of the main reasons I came back is that I like the place. I'm interested in the environment here, the atmosphere between the students, the faculty, the staff, and it's really high as one of my priorities to keep that going.
LAM: How long will you hold the position?
DW: It's a three year appointment.
LAM: Any ideas about why we didn't make it in Knoxville?
DW: Not at all; I was disappointed.
Ed Mazria is upset.
LAM: Did you catch Michael Graves?
(continued on page 8)
DON WOOLARD
new architecture director


In early October, 1982, I had the opportunity to interview Bill Caudill, Chairman of the Board of Caudill Rowlett Scott, Architects Planners and Engineers in Houston, Texas. Mr. Caudill has authored eleven books on architecture, energy, and design, lectured extensively throughout the U.S., is a member of the A1A Board of Directors, and is a director for Herman Miller, Inc.
LAM: As you might know, Michael Graves will he speaking in Denver next week on the topic of 99Figurative Architecture".
Do you shave my concern about a sector of the profession98 opiated attraction to the Post Modem Classical movement, especially in lieu of the need for an energy conscious architecture?
CAUDILL: Well, you’re crying in the dark because Michael Graves is hero number one all over the country, and in our firm with the young people. See, he was a hero before he even got any buildings up. It's his drawings that have made him a hero.
LAM: What do you attribute Michael Graves 9 present popularity to?
CAUDILL: I’ve gone through eight recessions since World War II, My firm, CRS, has gone through five or six, and your attitudes change during each of these. During the Great Depression when I was in school, they came out with these great big movies about the fantasy of the rich, their chauffeurs, plantations, and great movie stars. Well, Michael Graves is coming in and people just love his things, the fantasy buildings, and then he comes up with wonderful portraits of these buildings. You see, these guys are heroes, not just Michael Graves but Bob Stern, Philip Johnson, Peter Eisenman, and a number of others.
LAM: As a cornerstone member of the status quo, do you view Graves and the other camp Post Modernists as a personal or professional threat?
CAUDILL: I haven’t ever said anything bad about Michael Graves because he is
a fine, fine person, and you just don't fight heroes. He's been in our office and I’ve been on a number of panels with him, probably too many. Peter Eisenman has been in our office, too. He got himself a little school job and didn't know how to get it out so he came to our office because that’s one building type we know how to do real well. We spent a hell of a lot of research time on this Post Modernism, not because it is a threat, but because it's an adjustment. We can’t fight it and you guya shouldn't be fighting it, but you’ve got to go along with it and look at its roots and its meaning.
LAM: Has your research revealed to you how these 99heroes99 have made their climb to the top of the popularity ladder? CAUDILL: The thing is, these guys are really intelligent, and they write, though abstractly, very intelligently. Their heroes were not architects, but were linguists. I gave my daughter some things to read that Eisenman and Stern had written and she said to me, "Daddy, you get your inspiration from your clients and their site, where they live, the climate they have, and their idiosyncracies. These people don’t have clients all over the country like you do. They're all in academia and so they go to their literary sources for inspection." Our research revealed that our present day heroes, their heroes, and their heroes' heroes said the same things that they're saying now. Once we understand who they are, what they are, and what they're saying, we’re not frightened of them, we can understand and appreciate what they're trying to achieve. In fact, we admire them all the more. They're not satisfied with banality.
LAM: Their work seems to be a reaction against or a response to the architecture of the last several decades. Whether they9re a fad or not they are bound to have some impact upon the next generation of architects and designers. What form do you think that their influence will take, if at all?
CAUDILL: I think the reason Michae] Graves and those guys are going to lose
out is that they are not looking at the total program. They are only looking at the aesthetic problem. Philip Johnson is credited with saying, "There is only one problem in architecture, that of the aesthetic-*" And Mies was close to that kind of thing with his complete disregard for regionalism and functional exactitude. Some architects choose aspects they can handle best like problems in form, function, economy, structure, construction, or energy.
Some of the worst buildings I have seen in all my life are very energy conscious. There are damn few really good looking energy conscious buildings. The form of energy is a very serious consideration. It can give us a new kind of aesthetics. We know that Michael Graves and Chuck Moore have systems of aesthetics but we need a system of aesthetics for energy.
LAM: A couple of years ago at a SERI conference you were quoted as saying that, "Processes don9t create good design, good designers create good design". How do you envision a system of aesthetics evolving through a good designer to create a good design?
CAUDILL: All of the schools are trying their best to find some sort of a design methodology that will take the place of good design and you can't do it. I have a theory that it is the medium that the designer uses that affects what the building will look like. When I was
teaching at Rice several years ago, chipboard came along, people stopped drawing and they started working with chipboard, and their buildings started to look like chipboard, absolutely. And I know some architects that actually took a sample of chipboard to their concrete consultant and said, "We want the same color and texture as this chipboard." That's the absolute truth. And there's a building on Harvard's campus that Yamasaki did that looks like a blown up chipboard model! All these new ice cream colors we have now, well, we started getting into these when magic markers came in. At CRS we were doing the most beautiful pen and ink sketches you ever saw, and then a fella from Bill Blurock's office in Southern California, Frank Lawler, comes along with four shades of light grey. His color schemes were always the color of the season. There again the medium affected the design and what it was going to look like.
LAM: That reminds me of a book that came out in 1967 or 1968, "The Medium is the Massage" by Marshall McLuhan.
CAUDILL: Marshall McLuhan was one of the heroes of architects back then. This one fellow in our firm, Herb, used to say that, "The process is the product," and that was when process meant everything. We would get in these in-house arguments over this issue, my point being that I don't give a damn whether the process is the product or not. If the product stinks then so too must the process. Today, drawings have more of an influence on architects than actual buildings. Buildings are beginning to look like Michael Graves' sketches. It is a time of paper architecture^
LAM: What do you anticipate architect9s next medium will be?
CAUDILL: It’s going to be real interesting to see what happens to our buildings when we start playing around with the computer a little more. We’ve only gotten involved with them a little bit, but I want to get involved with them to the point I lose my desire to touch a pencil. What a potential! My clue came after we had a computer consultant come into our firm to develop renderings from some of our sketches. After reviewing the computer's drawings, one of the fellas in our firm remarked how the computer consultant had taken such liberties. You see, that's really interesting because if we could get someone on that computer that was capable of drawing the initial sketch, that someone would be taking the initiative, not the liberties. And I know that it’s going to happen, and I don't want to miss out on it.
NATHAN GOOD


GRAVES:
time. ...His work is dazzling to look at, and yet it deals in issues more profound than simply the decoration of construction.
Michael Graves sat on a low chair behind a desk at the front of the classroom and calmly smiled at the crowd. He is a thin man, meticulously dressed in fashionable clothes. He has gray-white hair, and a delicate reddish complexion. He wears wire-rim glasses that give him an aura of contemplation and intellect. He answered questions in a quiet, calm voice.
Here is one question and Michael
Graves's response.
Question: your buildings are so different, how do you deal with the controversy they arouse?
Graves: The Time Magazine article of a couple of weeks ago, 1 have never read anything like that in a popular, public journal, about art, architecture and literature.•.there usually, if someone doesn't like something they describe it, with a little blast at the end, there is some equity of opinion, but this magazine article was crucial in that 1 lost two commissions because of it, so it has had an effect...
At the end of the Portland Project, when it was heating up, becoming controversial...I got a call from Phillip Johnson and he said, "well, Michael, you've made it, you're now controversial, you'll have no problem getting work for the rest of your life"... I don't understand that, I don't understand that, I don't believe that...
I didn't want it and I don't want it,
I very much want to do an architecture of the general language, and when you say the word "different"...It's certainly different than what I just saw coming from the parking lot here... (loud laughter from audience).
I think that's the stuff that's dirferent and that is, I suppose, why 1 become controversial...I can say to you, straight-faced, no—those are the guys that are not practicing architecture in the way that this society, this culture always wanted...
If you look at the fragmented tower on the mall, if you look at a lot of other things that pre-dated...the war, there
was a language of architecture that, for good or for evil was standard and continuous, and understood, and accessible, etcetera, and the new stuff is an inversion of that language.
...I'm trying to not be historicist, but to restore our language...and simply see modern architecture, its good parts and its bad parts as an appendage to architectural development. Certainly in literature and in music, and in oth-other art forms, in painting especially, there are abstract modes, there are moments in the history of those various art forms which are appendages to continuous language; and it's terribly important that every society do that— test the sense of continuous language by virtue of these diversions.
Qthis question of controversy! it's so much now a part of this kind of dumb baggage that I carry around. In the paper yesterday, in Lincoln ^Nebraska] there was a little announcement of my lecture to the AIA there: "controversial East-coast architect Michael Graves gives keynote..." (loud laughter from audience) and then it went through the whole thing and it said things like, "he's had many honors...and many boos."
In Portland, if they stopped a dozen people people on the streets and said, what do you think of the Portland Building, a-and eleven of them said, "I love it, it's a change, it's got color, it's a little far out and we're not used to it, but perhaps we will get used to it, after all the mayor has said it is like the Eiffel tower when it was built, it will be a kind of symbol for Portland for some time to come;" but if the twelfth person had said, "I hate it, it looks like a turkey, it looks like a dog, it looks like a jukebox," that all gets written down, that's the headline, "that's the meat of the article.
You can understand when people in public life, actors and politicians and other people, get stung with that kind of stuff all the time...your skin does get much thicker.
DJ
STEVEN TERNOEY COMMENTS:
Steven Ternoey is this year's energy design studio instructor. He is also an author of the Solar Energy Research Institute's newly released draft, The Design of Energy-Responsive Commercial Buildings. * *
* Graves is^ putting the people first, but the Portland building is not an energy-efficient building.
* Talk about a guy who could jump on daylighting — it's the language of old buildings.
* Daylighting is a language of form — he totally neglects this.
* He could have reached the core with daylight at $51/sq.ft. ...we could show him how.•.
* Graves designs surface treatment language instead of form language. Form language can be read throughout a building instead of just on the exterior .
* He is trying to reinvent architecture with facades instead of form.
* If he wants to capture the language of thirty years ago, he is going to have to attack form as part of the language. The Portland building is still the cube.
* His windows are not good — there are no squares in the language of historic buildings. Those tall windows of historic buildings are like that to let light in.
* If you're going back to language, admit that there are some functional, on top of psychological, effects.
When asked to be quoted, Ternoey said:
"I like his stuff a lot...better than
out there" (pointing out to downtown
Denver).


INTERIORS
CHRIS NIMS
PLANNING
NICHOLAS K. MATZ
We are faced with a Uf Lamin_
ning, now more than ± J Dr. David Hill, ations spoke recently wit rAnm,linitv Director of the Planning and Communi y
Development Program. Hill
"Within the College , say "planning serves as the link e * .
hardware design profession and political/ economic/community worlds. Our p V
mission is educational, within t a sion he feels there are two roles that the P/CD program has: P/CD provides the social coursework to back up a tec n ca skills education, and it has the role of sensitizing the design professionals to the issues of large-scale design, you consider design to be practiced at many different scales, then planners are designers who work at a larger scale...
P/CD, which has a strong, diverse faculty along with a national identity as an applied, people-centered studio program, is currently reinforcing its economic and quantitative planning areas.
This, says Dr. Hill, is not so much a shift in philosophy but one in emphasis. "We respect traditional planners in this school, but the curriculum also needs flexibility to be good."
When asked to discuss planning in the U.S. today, Dr. Hill said that a concerted effort at the national level to dismantle public planning programs is happening.
"Our national head is in the sand ; what may be viewed as temporary policy changes now are actually going to have serious long-term effects on environment, energy, and human services". On a state level, Professor Hill feels that Colorado is "a planning culture that, though it is improving slowly, is sadly in need of work. There exists a standoff between economic types and environmentalists. While the dialogue they create is good because it represents reality, it operates too slowly to do much good. Dr. Hill's strongest point is that as planners and people, "we cannot be intimidated by short-term political phenomena" and P/CD needs to educate people who do not lack the "moral vision" necessary for building a successful human environment.
URBAN DESIGN........C G GALLAGHER
John Prosser, in an interview with LAMINATIONS, was happy to announce a new facet of the Urban Design Division. It is called the Urban Design Degree Emphasis of Mainstreet Conservation. As the program literature describes it:
The two distinguishing features of this program are, first, that the urban design discipline for the first time is being given the interdisciplinary curriculum in the fields it actually covers in the professional world: public affairs, business, real estate development, community development, planning and design.
Second, the program and its curriculum are based on the evolving concept of service-learning education. Through the College of Design and Planning, outreach division requests for Mainstreet technical assistance and research studies are matched with faculty and student research and assistance teams through existing core and elective courses...
Prosser, who has been director of the Urban Design program since 1969, went on to answer numerous questions about the program, about Denver, and about urban design in general.
Of special note were his comments about the Sixteenth Street Mall. He gave credit to Pei for a terrific design, but warned that the success of the mall depended on the support of the retailers along the mall.
When asked about our new neighbours, the Lawrence Street Plaza, Prosser responded: "It's pretty damn good architecturally". Pressed to criticize it in the context of urban design, he graded it with a B+. Technically, a comprehensive urban design project must include retail, residential and office space.
The Lawrence Street Plaza has no retail space. He pointed to Writer Square as the best "urban design" development in this city.
Since its inception in 1978, the Graduate Interiors Program at UCD has gone from teaching 95 student credit-hours to over 500 student credit-hours per year. The present enrollment totals over 40 full time and part time students. The average student age is 29.9 years old. Its University setting affiliation with a multi-disciplined College of Design and Planning and its ability to tap the urban laboratory make the program unique in the Rocky Mountain Region and, in many ways, the country.
All these are evidence of the potential of the Interiors Program at UCD.
But they are mere indicators. What truly allows a program to achieve design and academic excellence is derived from 1.) the spirit of the students 2.) the commitment and professionalism of the faculty and 3.) the support and encouragement of the professional community.
As a graduate program it is mandated to produce design professionals capable of fulfilling leadership positions. The program must therefore constantly evaluate and upgrade its validity and contribution to the design profession. This requires dialogue between students, faculty and the profession as well as effective interface with allied professions such as business, psychology, fine arts and engineering.
In the next year the program will be undergoing many changes. A national search has already been initiated for a permanent director, and two full-time faculty. This will constitute an increase of one full-time faculty member beginning in 1983. The curriculum implications of this additional teaching strength will permit the expansion from a nucleus course-work to supplementary design subject matter. The enrichment potential will mean a great deal in terms of educational opportunity and choice for the student.
In the spring, an advisory board of faculty, students and professionals will be formed to discuss this potential.
Also planned for the 1983-1984 academic year is the application and review for FIDER (Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research) accreditation. This will be a benchmark, not a minimum standard, for the program. This means , simply, that the program must grow beyond accreditation.
Also for this academic year, a series of seminars are scheduled on Fridays at 1:00 p.m. The presentations will be by professionals from the Denver Area on a variety of subjects including portfolios and resumes, marketing interior services, interior design history and rendering to name a few. This program will allow students the opportunity to learn about specific aspects of the field and meet individuals from the design community.
The continued growth and success of the program is based upon many things: financial support, multi-disciplined interaction with the rest of the College and resources available to students and faculty. But the most important aspects of growth comes from the students themselves. They substantiate the existence of the program. Their initiative and motivation to learn is what gives it spirit. Their striving to acquire as many skills as possible during their academic career means that the program must always be measuring, upgrading and creatively adres-sing their educational needs.
Given the growth of the front range, the future of higher education in Colorado looks very promising. Concurrently, the need for interior design professionals will continue on the increase. These two factors, combined with conscious effort of students, faculty and professionals will insure the continued viability and vitality for the Interiors Program.


DAVID MICHAEL
LEWIS
WILDE
1 ...NTPHDTA*; K MAT7 1
I j FRANK OOMS |
"Defining urban design is like defining an apple." With these words,
David Lewis, architect and proponent of community participation design, opened a lecture on "The Heritage and Future of U.S. Cities" at Auraria on October 8.
Lewis and his firm, Urban Design Associates of Pittsburgh, advocate an urban context where "patching and stitching" the urban fabric happens, a process of getting people to educate themselves to repair the city.
Lewis spoke first about the heritage of American cities. He said that although we trace our culture to Europe, our cities are distinctly American. The English ideal, a gentle rhythmic man/ nature relationship, is not, says Lewis, an actual source of American city form. Rather, the basis of that form can be traced to such men as John Gwynn, whose plan for London in 1760 put great emphasis on the repetitive nature of the grid, and Nicholas Barbon, an Englishman whom Lewis called "the ancestor of standardized building." Barbon was a man of great precision who standardized nearly every detail of his housing.
The American grid embodies geometric and use/density aspects, says Lewis, the latter the greatest vehicle of change.
The American building form, with its clearly interpreted ornamentation, can be taken together with the grid to create a unique progression of privacy and space from the facade to the street.
It is in this progression area that UDA has worked. The community process as Lewis outlined it uses flowcharting to work in three steps: programming, design alternatives, and preferred alt-ernatives/implementation. UDA walks neighborhood clients through these steps on order to arrive at a solution which is oriented towards physical and historical literacy. The power of this process, says Lewis, stems not from the contemporary traditionalism of architects like Rob and Leon Krier, but from the "people power" of Thomas Jefferson.
If the people do not know how to decide, educate them in decision-making.
A particular example of the community design process is UDA's work in the York, PA thirty-six block historic district. UDA created a typology of the district’s buildings, noting great diversity in basic building form but with the underlying grid clearly evident. Restoration could then proceed, with the historic literacy intact. Lewis’ firm is now developing pattern books of restoration based on this and other community design projects in Pittsburgh.
Charles Moore and others have demonstrated the effectiveness of client participation in the architectural process, and David Lewis and UDA have brought a continuing hopefulness to the future of U.S. cities.
On Friday, September 24th the U.C.D. College of Design and Planning presented the first of its guest lecture series, premiering with Michael Wilde’s "China Building", which also included a ten day photographic exhibit by the lecturer. Although the title alluded to a presentation on Chinese Architecture, the act*-ual theme was based more along the lines of its subtitle - Social and Environmental Relationships. Thus both the lecture and photographs were oriented more towards the Chinese people than their architecture and therefore somewhat of a letdown for the majority who had had expectations of the latter.
Wilde was part of a three person team invited to China, after several requests to the Chinese government, to do a series of lectures on photography in the U.S.A. The other two members were the photographic professionals on the team, while Mr. Wilde was relied upon for his journalistic skills. Photographic techniques and their use as a communication tool were related to the Chinese Photographers* Association in four main Chinese population centers. Widespread travel during the one month trip enabled each member to photograph different aspects of Chinese culture, Wilde choosing his personal interest in environmental social behavior.
The socio behavioral theme is a familiar one to Michael Wilde, who, as well as being a journalist and architectural scientist, holds a Master of Arts in Architecture and Urban Planning from U.C.L.A., having specialized in Environmental Social Behavior. Dealing more with the China of today and its future direction, Wilde feels that an understanding of the people within their own environment, "the urban mosaic", is necessary so that it can be applied to understanding their architecture and its direction. Mainly images of the Chinese within their more native environment were presented and provided a stong contrast with those areas displaying Russian and other European influences, which totally ignored an appreciation for Chinese Culture in their designs. Examples such as this stressed the importance of understanding environmental social behavior before applying one’s own regional design values to architecture in another area.
In stressing the need for better understanding people and their specific environments, Wilde noted that "to survive as architects in the future, we are going to have to know more about how people really live and work, and design for people and their needs, not design for design sake." He felt the study of antiquity was an important aspect of this, and that "by embracing antiquity, a more thoughtful continuity in design results and gives people a peace and sense of continuation." Noting that this was the direction China strived lor and that they look to the western world more for advancements in architectural technology than for design direction. Wilde concluded that the Chinese approach of architecture for the people by the people, was something we could learn as much from as do the Chinese expect to learn from our technology.
The Wilde lecture stressed the socio behavioral aspect of architecture -everyday people, the ones so often for gotten in designing for the everyday world, our world. Although the lecture may have lacked the punch in driving this home, the point is well taken. Yet on the other hand individualism or creative expression have their place, especially in China and therefore the concluding slides were a welcome sight!
-^calendar
DESIGN COMPETITION DEADLINES 11-1 Interstate brick solar design 11-8 Ceramic Tile-AIA showroom
URBAN LECTURES UCBOULDER
10- 27 Henry Beer (Communication Arts)
11- 3 Jim Urbonas (C. Worthington Partnership) 11-10 Ron Henson (Transplan)
11-17 Curt Fentress
11- 24 Gary Meredith(RNL)
12- 1 Art Everett (EZTH)
Above lectures Wed. 4-5 p.m.Env.Des. 134
K.Soldan, R.Holmes (SOM DENVER)
Retrospective on Recent Projects; The Design Process 10-14
D.Paulson(UCB) Hinata=Sunshine, The Use of Sunlight in Japanese Houses. 10-28 Ralph Knowles (USC) The Kings choices and the Peoples Choices; How Does Your City Grow? 11-4
William Mitchell (UCLA) The future of
Computer Aided Design. 11-18
Above Lectures Thurs. 8 p.m. FA N141 UCB
Richard Sennet (NYU) Urban Form and Democratic Theory. 12-3
Above Lecture Fri 8 p.m. FA N141 UCB FRIDAY EVENING PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES 11-5 Ralph Knowles
11-12 Dolores Hayden. Dream House or deal Ideal City? (UCLA)
11- 19 William Mitchell. The Future of Computer Aided Design. (UCLA)
12- 3 T. Allen Comp. Preservation, Architecture and Appropriate Technology; A Talismanic Trio. (Seattle)
12-10 Carl Johnson. Recent work of Johnson-Johnson and Roy, Landscape Architects.
(U of Michigan)
Above lectures Fri. 5:15 p.m. Sci Bldg.119 Auraria
INTERIM SEMESTER COURSES TO BE OFFERED THIS YEAR BY THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING*
Arch 512 3cr Graphic Technique, Color Theory and Design 1300-1700 M-F Ullman-McMiIlian
Arch 669 3cr Architecture, Apples &
Energy:Computers in the Office. 9-1200 M-F Woolard
Arch 679 3cr Restoration of Valuable Buildings: Material Analysis and Conservation. 9-1200 M-F Snell


the sausage 11? in the bun „yD J
With this issue we open a new phase of "The Sausage in the Bun." More informative than in the past, more accurate, too. We welcome your comments.
A late flash from our expert on Mall matters:
"When the mall was finally inaugurated a few days ago, second-year architectural student C.Z.(name changed) decided to do some inaugurating of his own at midnight and proceeded to parade about the mall AL FRESCO, in the rain! Fortunately the mall police were engaging in their usual custom (never being present), and the now thoroughly damp C.Z. merely succeeded in frightening an old drunkard, who tripped over a bench."
Our normally reticent informant in matters discreet has informed us of rumors of, er, liaisons between certain students and, er, not-students (let's not rock the boat, boys). IS this TRUE?? If so this matter must be EXPOSED!
We are told that any rumors of cheating during a certain exam recently are COMPLETELY,TOTALLY, CATEGORICALLY, DEFINITIVELY, SUBSTANTIALLY FALSE. Well.
Usually reliable, though unnamed sources tell us of a near-mass-revolt among students in a certain 500-level class. A less-reliable source adds that the surly mob got so unruly it had to be corralled into a corner by the TAs and pistol-whipped into submission. BREAK OUT THE MUSKETS, LADS!! Although the savages appear to have calmed down somewhat, we understand that renewed agitation has commenced• STAY TUNED.
NEWS FROM THE COLD BEYOND Department:
Lila Rioth (May '82) sends her WARM REGARDS!!! She is currently working at Larimer Square Associates, and is just HAVING A BLAST!!!! Keep up the good work, Lila.
We have been told by on-the-spot witnesses of an incident that occurred during a recent 600-studio field trip to Mesa Verde. It seems that in one of the mini-buses there suddenly appeared a supply of, er, cigarettes (WHOAA THERE, FELLA!!!) The driver, a teacher, insisted that the, er, no-smoking rule be strictly observed. Whereupon a supply of BEER INSTANTLY APPEARED!!! There's just controllin' 'em, is there.
Our Landscape Architecture spy communicated recently:
"At the reception following Mr. Wang's lecture a few days ago, I noticed people staggering about drunkenly, so I walked up to the goodies table to see. And WHAT did I SEE?? Milk and cookies, that's what!! Hardcore stuff, this. THIS SCANDALOUS BEHAVIOUR CANNOT BE ALLOWED TO CONTINUE IN THIS SCHOOL IF WE WANT TO MAINTAIN OUR SELF-RESPECT.
We have heard that the lavender Art-Deco toll-booth on the third floor was scheduled for demolition recently, but was saved at the last moment. Instantly, another one appeared in the opposite corner. WHAT IS THIS, RABBITS? Will we see toll-booths appearing all over the school? Stay tuned for more developments.
We understand that the new Architecture Director is a SOLAR ENTHUSIAST!!! We support him wholeheartedly. We have long maintained that what the studios need is a little PASSIVE HEAT!!!
That's it, folks, for now. We're out of space. But there's LOTS,LOTS MORE!!! Just wait for the next issue, heh, heh.
The College of Design and Planning was fortunate to have two professional graphics oriented lectures, in the persons of Michael Doyle and Thomas Wang.
Both lecturers are professional architectural illustrators and authors of related books, while Wang is also a Landscape Architect and professor at the University of Michigan. Their lectures, very illustrative and different in approach, were a welcome relief to the school, which has been having major problems in getting the all important graphics department rolling. Wang's talk focused on quick, quality design sketches, while Doyle dealt more with final presentation techniques. Both lectures were very informative and well attended, and it is hoped that this practice will continue in the future.
For graphics is the language of all designers and as students we need as much good professional exposure as possible.
...............................FRANK OOMS
LONG
________(continued from page 3)
GL: That is not the Architects' problem but the Landscape Architects' problem; Gail was fired by the Landscape Architecture students. The Faculty wanted to hire him as an architectural Faculty.
LAM: Do you have any idea why they wanted him out?
GL: Sure - he was dictatorial in his grading procedures in studio. So maybe he deserved firing - I don't know. They are the ones who did it.
LAM: The Energy Program -; That's something you initiated; You feel happy with the way it's going?
GL: Yes and no; We've got good people, we don't have enough money or resources to make a big splash. We are all ambivalent about its place in the program. We don't want any specialization — but on the other hand we found it doesn't matter. We have to make sure it isn't a numbers course•
Don is the person I'm looking tc to make it — and fie will.
We do feel very strongly that the special expertise of this particular Energy Faculty that we can draw of -
is finer than anything in the US.
LAM: One final thing Gary - Is there anything you'd like to say to the School?
GL: Let me put it this way: The kind of students we have here, the kind of students we want - should be here because they're proud of the place they're going to school. We don't have people at Colorado who are going to school here because they couldn't afford to go elsewhere;
We don't. I want students to be here as their first choice — if they don't, they'll never feel comfortable with the education they receive. People shouldn't work someplace unless they are proud of that place.
I came here 6 years ago - and I have not regretted it. And I think it is a fine School - like any institution or school it could be better.
I feel that the University of Colorado - in-State or out-of-State - is a damn good value; I'm extremely proud of the graduates, extremely proud of the thesis projects coming out of here. All I can say to the students - if it means anything to them - is that I'm awful proud of teaching here. And I've seen a lot of good schools.
LAM: What do you think about the rain today?
GL: Oh that's OK - it rains so seldom in Colorado anyway...
INTERVIEW BY NILS HJERMAN AND C G GALLAGHER
WOOLARD
(continued from page 3)
DW: Yes.
LAM: Recognizing your special interest in energy, do you have any comments about Graves' work, especially his Portland building?
DW: I know the Portland building through
a few photos...I haven't studied it. But I was most interested in hearing his comments because I had taken it as a bit of a joke; it's very serious and his beliefs are deep-rooted and well established. I disagreed with probably most of the things that he said, but that doesn't mean that my approach is any more valid than his, and I respect the man a great deal more now than I did before I heard him speak. He was asked at one of the meetings why his buildings didn't show the theories he was espousing. I would ask the same thing. When I heard him speak he was saying good things; when I look at his buildings I don't see them.
LAM: I've heard that criticism a number of times now; can you give me a specific example?
DW: Well, the example he-gave that hit me most - and it wasn't the only one by any means - was that he used dark glass in the Portland building; I still don't know why he had dark glass. He's complaining that the insides are dim - dark glass only makes that worse. He wanted to use daylighting - dark glass only makes that worse. Why did he use dark glass - I have no idea. He seemed to argue against it and as far as I know, clear glass is cheaper than dark.
LAM: Thanks, Don.
DW: OK.
INTERVIEW BY C G GALLAGHER
(Ed. note: Four Division of Architecture students (Scott Grady, Madison Graham, Frank Ooms and David Thruston) were selected, along with instructor Don Woolard and professional rep Ed Mazria, to represent UCD at a Knoxville, Tennessee Energy Fair design charette. The UCD team competed with architecture schools across the country for a place at the charette. They were not chosen as one of the participating teams.)


Full Text

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e I e COLLEGE OF DE SIGN AND PLANNING ............. ... UNIVERSITY • . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . 'J ::NRYwLONG OOLARD ARCHITECTURE 'NEW DIRECTOR INTE RV ... . .. .......... . .. .'i WILLIAM CAUDILL ..... . ... ............ DISCUS ........• , ...... NIMS ON ....... 6 LAMINATIONS T TO DAVE ALKS HILL U.D. PROGRAM NEW GETS EMPHASIS .... DAVID ........... .... 7 MICHAEL WILDE MICHAEL GRAVES: s . It was like a hl.p Potemkin " mob scene fr ' with shinin . The r oom was om 'Battle -expre . g , sweat y f packed ssJ.ons f aces others witt o expectation' some with 1 sulle and ex . roo m was h t n, combatl." Cl. tement 0 --the d ve look ' standing p t . oorways bl s The wh. ' us nng oc ked b h,:oh oo
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staff: STAFF WRITERS Julie Bowers Nathan Good Toby Guggenheimer Nils Hjerman Dan Jansenson Nicholas K. Matz Auguste Mousalli Frank Ooms Leslie Read Annie Wright EDITOR Chris G. Gallagher GRAPHICS Nils Hj erman Lila Rioth Kai Tarum PHOTOGRAPHY Frank Ooms portrait: ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH PCD PCD ARCH INT ARCH ARCH ARCH ALUM ARCH ARCH Due to an unreasonable cross section of students and faculty making a prompt showing for the school portrait, the photograph does not appear on this issue's cover. An attempt to reshoot the portrait for the next issue will be announced in the near future. dolores' notes: LAMINATIONS a new look begins this look should a new outlook Yea r With tabloid f e obvious. ' . The new n ormat and , we ve ada ot, spent . we have b . Pted a dear of . a t tle mo ' it ney and or LAMINATIONs on design. 0 a great looks ur hope The new and reads b that make the C outlook is an etter. a more ope:l;ege of Design to bate. In th"orum for crit< _d Planning f i acuity, CDP . ssue we talk . and deSionals and 1 direct students foster dialo ecturers. The ors, Profes-, and work of gue. By is to tors, we Profe5sionar:ng the ideas In the em more acces ?bnd educa-archit le ess, stud ecturar d . ents e ucat design and are held acco Proc-evolves f Planning decis untable for rom co . L cussion. LAM crit. . earning Vehicle fo INATIONS seek and dis-. r thi . s to b Ph"l s t . ecome a An osophy and es of is _other goal o concepts. to t f LAMINATIONS Publication. he entire Colle the Student We solicit th ge the Landscape A; faculty of ning and C Int ommu ' • Design. Developm rs, Planen t and Urban I I competition: Students who plan to graduate at the end of the Fall semester need to complete a diploma card ASAP. Diploma cards are avail able from Design and Planning office. School of Architecture T-shirt Competition The Student Board is sponsoring a design competition for a school t-shirt. Logos incorporating "UCD College of Design and Planning " are welcome , as are more thematic designs or phrases suggesting architecture. See posters for details. If you are interested in working on the T-shirt Design Committee see Bruna Pedrelli in the 700 section on the third floor of Bromley. New Graduate Students are asked to pick up their application portfolios from the Design and Planning Office. Important Dates; November 5, 1982 Last day to drop courses and withdraw from Fall Semester. Final Tuition Payment Due 12, 1985 Spring Schedules mailed November 25-26, 1982 Thanksgiving . No classes. All offices closed. December 15, 1982 Fall Semester Ends SPRING SEMESTER DATES January 17-21 January 24 March 21-25 May 13 Registration week First Day of Classes Spring Vacation End of Semester BUILDING KEY REQUEST CARDS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE OFFICE. IF YOU ARE IN THE BUILDING AFTER HOURS, YOU MUST HAVE AN ID IN YOUR POSESSION.TO OBTAIN AN ID CARD GO TO THE GAME ROOM IN THE STUDENT CENTER DURING WORKING HOURS. BECAUSE OF A HIGH INCIDENCE OF THEFT, BE SURE TO KEEP YOUR VALUABLES LOCKED UP IN YOUR LOCKERS. commitee: This committee has been created recently among others to widen the cultural and social h orizons of the students within the divisions of design and planning. With the input of the foreign students, the committee is planning to organize such activities as slide shows a nd photography exhibitions relate d to their vernacular architecture and design as well as culinary activities. We need the foreign and local students' ideas and concerns. Any suggestions would be appreciated; just drop a note by one of the committee's co chairpersons, Bruna Pedrelli o r Gene Benda, who a r e o n the third floor of Bromley. Guy Moussalli

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GARY LONG ........ present architecture director GL: Do You k now I a m leavin g the School ? LAM: No. GL: I am not leaving befor e Janua r y . And I am planning t o s till b e teaching . Let me tell you how i t works; Th e Director serves at the pleasure of both t h e Faculty and the Dean . Th e Director can b e propos e d b y the Faculty to t h e Dean or Dean t o Faculty. H hen I leave t h i s job in J anua r y I 've been a t it for years. LAM: Hhy are you leaving? G L: I'm q u itting while I ' m a h ead -i f I s tayed a n othe r year I might get fired! LAM: Like a n old baseball player ? GL: Exactly. There are' a lot of advan tages and there s hould be a lot of prestige that goes with the job; I get to m a k e t h e sch edule I can' t stand t o teach after 2 o 'clock! But for t hat p restige and for that money you get to wor k your tail off, a n d I've simply r u n out of energy. In many ways i t i s a service job; m y job is to support the facu l t y and t o see to it tha t students get w hat they pay for. I t is time for someon e with mor e energy. I'm gettin g defen s ive --i t i s time to leave t h e job when you're getting defensive a b out w h a t you're doing. LAM: Hill t h e next Director come from the Faculty? GL: Yes, it wil l -and t h a t is the Fac ulty's choice. I ' m resigning with a lett e r t o the Faculty, and I ' d lik e to repeat it here:"This is t o each o f you indiv idually: each of you have m y re s pect, each of you have my affection, each of you have m y support. I ' m not goi n g anywh e r e -if you need my support, I ' m still h e r e " . T h e reason I got into Administratio n was n o t Kingdom -building , whic h is a usefu l occupa tion for som e people f o r m e i t w a s almos t a s the old Southern ministe r s put it "They we r e called" . . . I s t a rted the Curriculum Study C om mittee i n 1 977 . I got i n volv e d b e cause I didn't like whe r e we w e r e goin g , and out o f tha t Curriculum study cam e thesis procedure, tea m teaching and a l o t o f s m alle r thing s with regard t o courses. T h e r e a r e m a n y things yet t o be d o n e a n d m a n y things t o get s t arted, and tha t is w h a t tha t Curriculum Study is d oing Tight n o w and I knew it w a s the time f o r m e t o d o something. I s aid I didn't w ant a n y p art in tha t Commi t tee. LAM: Hha t i s going o n d own the r e w e ' v e hear d a l o t of rumbling f r o m that C ommittee. GL: I'm also defensive because there is a lot o f p eople down there that d o not kno w e n o u g h a b out architecture . But that is a n aside -there are plenty o f people o n the Committee that d o kno w about architecture , and in fairness to tho s e who are not that advanced, they have the wisdo m o f past experie nce --whic h is applicable. So I s often m y comment. But as far as I'm concerned, any s c h ool's quality is dependent first o n the students, the n o n the Faculty and only fin ally o n the Curriculum anyway. So -you can't make B odunk into a g reat S choo l with a turriculum, and I don't care wh ethe r . H a rvard h a s a curriculum -it is goin g t o b e a g reat S c hool because it h a s geod people and a great l ibra r y . Th e thing tha t I see tha t gives me great pride i s the e v er-improving quality o f d esign-work; Th a t is the strength of the Program and that is m y pride in the Prngr a m and the pride in what I've contributed a l o n g with othe r people -espec i ally the 3 year Progr a m in presenting Architecture as an artform in the first 2 semesters. S o whe n people go into the professi o n they a r e well r espect e d because t hey have a d iscipline m a n y other s choo l s do n o t g ive the m s o ask some questions! LAM: Hhat a b out the NAAB A credidatio n Report? GL: Have you seen it? It i s a beautiful r e p ort. I was blow n away b y it. I ' d l i k e t o say for the record I was ver y ang r y with tha t c r ew whe n i t came -n o t f o r what they said, but h o w they sai d it. I find in the w r itte n r e port they've said it the way we would have said it. He we r e criticized for looking too closel y at Denver. T h a t has never been m y concern because people come from elsewhere and go back e lse w h e r e . Mos t of our projects have a s l oping site! LAH: \,'ha t about T heory? GL: Ther e a r e m a n y idea s about Theor y -and w hat it means; I think personally w h a t is mean t ... well . . . I thi n k people come t o a r chitecture t o design beautiful building s . I d on't think we address that directly enough; if we did we w o uldn't have thi s problem amo n g u s . I t i sn't that the faculty doesn't h ave the desire to make things beautiful; it' s just our concern t o mak e the s stairs wor k as w ell, e t c . T h e student s have t h e idea that faculty aren't interested whethe r it is beauti f u l o r not. LAM: a bout Francin e Haber ' s T h eory courses? G L: I feel i t has mor e t o do with studio work --no t so muc h with Theor y . Altho u g h the numbe r o f o fferings is a n issu e , it is r athe r the intellec tua l , theor etical and aes t hetical content of stud i o cours ework that i s the issue. LAM: Hhat i s don e t o address tha t i ssue the n ? GL: Hell -a l o t o f that stimuli h a s to com e from the r e v o l ving p art-time Faculty . Bob Davis was n o accident and the s e l ection o f outside Faculty is a job for the n ew Direc t or. I think rather than choosing tho s e highly qualified practitione r s this rime we s h ould pick as part-time Faculty those w h o a r e desi g n ers first. LAM: Th e survey tha t was don e last Spring i s a n ythi n g being done to address the resul t tha t came out of that? GL: Y e s -. Th e C o mmittee Outline addres s e s m a n y of those issues. LAM: On e of the concept s of this newspape r i s tha t we p rovide a n open f orum for criticism and d iscussion; Th ere i s a l o t of rumbling a bout Leslie Ullmann b e ing assigned to the Graphic s position; How i s it that she wa s a s s i g n e d to the job when ther e was suc h a stro n g student voice las t Spri n g saying we wa nted o n e of the alternative candidates? GL: Th e firs t t wo people refused! Th e student opinion was carefully l i s t e ned t o a n d the first choice of the s t u d ents was not the f irst c h o ice of the Faculty -and I ' m very pleased tha t h e didn't come; That g u y would have been a disaster here! LAM: Hhy do you say t h at? GL: H e was presenting work as his own tha t wasn't. I coul d see it; Ask him w h e r e he has been. He came out of a 3 -year P rogram; I know 3 -year P rogr a m s a t MIT -they a r e just like ours . H e jus t g radu a ted, went im mediately t o a recognized Graduate School beyond tha t . I'm not saying h e hasn't got a superb education LAM: GL: LAM: -I'm not saying h e isn' t a superb desi g n er; I'm just saying his pres e ntation w a s fraudulant. A n d that e v e r y Faculty membe r t h a t saw it sai d t h e same thing -. The students w e r en't w ise e n o ugh to see it. And ins tead of saying 'what is your par ticipation' they said 'oh wow-you worked for so-and-so?' I was s o a n g r y aft e r tha t meeting and the Faculty still offered him the job first. Th e oth e r g u y -was a f ine a rchitect and would have made a great Fac ulty me mber . Down t o t h e wire I t ried to get h i m. At tha t point we had a G r aphics-prog ram i n limbo -Leslie Ullmann w a s a thi r d c h o ice; S h e was a lso well respected by any and all tha t t a u ght with her. So s h e has got a 3 -year position n ow? S h e has a 3 -year positio n of w hich the last year is a leave of absence, if s h e ' s approved for reapp ointme n t the 2nd year. 1-'hy is it tha t Gail was r e p laced ? (continued on page 8) I DON WOOLARD d new architecture director LAM: Hhy are you t aking the job ? DW: Firs t o f all, l e t m e say tha t when I found out tha t Ga r y was leaving it nearly broke m y heart because I have so muc h respect and affection f o r Gary ... I was inte rested in the p ositio n because I s a w it a s a n other ste p in a career that is very important t o m e . I a m very intereste d e d in architectura l education and it seemed to be a good opportunity to s s tep step forward and furthe r the goals tha t I h a v e , not only personally , but for a r chitecture. Before I was selected I did enunciate these goals. LAM: And those goals were? DH: I fee l that a t this p oint i n time, computers and energy are v e r y important. And r e sear ch, I ' m n o t say i n g tha t this will be the c ase f o r all t time. A g r adua t e should hav e a good unders t a n ding o f computers as tools, n o t as studies in themselves, but as tools t o be used in design. A gradu ate should h a v e a g o o d knowledge o f s o tha t they can plac e that thei r own philo s ophy a s they v LAM: DW: LAM: DW: LAM: DW: LAM: wish. Of course, all o f this should n o t d etract f r o m design and architecture as a w h o l e , and a n y thing I do I see m yself firs t a n d foremost as an a r chitec t . I have inte rest s in speci a l areas, o nly because I can see its importance in a r chitecture as a wh ole. Any specific plans for the p rogram? No . . . no, I don't see a n y dram atic changes in the directio n of the s c hool. As you know I'm a new boy, and one o f the m ain reas o n s I came back is tha t I like the place. I ' m interested in the e n viro n men t h e re, the atmosphere b e tween the stude nts, the faculty , the staff, a n d it's really hig h as one of m y priorities to kee p that going . H o w l o n g will you h o l d the position? It's a three year appointme n t . Any i deas about wh y w e didn't make it in KnoxvillP? * Not a t all; I w a s d i sappointed. Ed M azria is upset. Did you cat c h Mi c hael G raves ? (continued o n page 8 )

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In early October, 1982, I had the opportunity to interview Bill Caudill, Chairman of the Board of Caudill Rowlett Scott, Architects Planners and Engineers in Houston, Texas. Mr. Caudill has authored eleven books on architecture, energy, and design, lectured extensively throughout the U.S., is a member of the AlA Board of Directors, and is a director for Herman Miller, Inc. LAM: As you might know, Michael Graves will be speaking in Denver next week on the topie of "Figurative Architecture". Do you share my concern about a sector of the profession's opiated attraction to the Post Modern Classical movement, especially in lieu of need for an energy conscious architecture? CAUDILL: Well, you're crying in the dark because Michael Graves is hero number one all over the country, and in our firm with the young people. See, he was a hero before he even got any buildings up. It's his drawings that have made him a hero. LAM: What do you attribute Michael Graves' present popularity to? CAUDILL: I've gone through eight recessions since World War II. My firm, CRS, has gone through five or six, and your attitudes change during each of these. During the Great Depression when I was in school, they came out with these great big movies about the fantasy of the rich, their chauffeurs, plantations, and great movie stars. Well, Michael Graves is coming in and people just love his things, the fantasy buildings, and then he comes up with wonderful portraits of these buildings. You see, these guys are heroes, not just Michael Graves but Bob Stern, Philip Johnson, Peter Eisenman, and a number of others. LAM: As a cornerstone member of the status quo, do you view Graves and the other camp Post Modernists as a personal or professional threat? CAUDILL: I haven't ever said anything bad about Michael Graves because he is a fine, fine person, and you just don't fight heroes. He's been in our office and I've been on a number of panels with him, probably too many. Peter Eisenman has been in our office, too. He got himself a little school job and didn't know how to get it out so he came to our office because that's one building type we know how to do real well. We spent a hell of a lot of research time on this Post Modernism, not because it is a threat, but because it's an adjustment. We can't fight it and you guys shouldn't be fighting it, but you've got to go along with it and look at its roots and its meaning. LAM: Has your research revealed to you how these "heroes" have made their c Zimb to the top o f the popularity ladder? CAUDILL: The thing is, these guys are really intelligent, and they write, though abstractly, very intelligently. Their heroes were not architects, but were linguists. I gave my daughter some things to read that Eisenman and Stern had written and she said to me, "Daddy, you get your inspiration from your clients and their site, where they live, the climate they have, and their idiosyncracies. These people don't have clients all over the country like you do. They're all in academia and so they go to their literary sources for inspection." Our research revealed that our present day heroes, their heroes, and their heroes' heroes said the same things that they're saying now. Once we understand who they are, what they are, and what they're saying, we1re not frightened of them, we can understand and appreciate what they're trying to achieve. In fact, we admire them all the more. They're not with banality. LAM: Their work seems to be a reaction against or a response to the architecture of the last several decades. Whether they're a fad or not they are bound to have some impact upon the next generation of architects and designers. What form do you think that their influence will take, if at aU? CAUDILL: I think the reason Michael Graves and those guys are going to lose out is that they are not looking at the total program. They are only looking at the aesthetic problem. Philip Johnson is credited with saying, "There is only one problem in architecture, that of the And Mies was close to that kind of thing with his complete disregard for regionalism and functional exactitude. Some architects choose aspects they can handle best like problems in form, function, economy, structure, construction, or energy. Some of the worst buildings I have seen in all my life are very energy conscious. There are damn few really good looking energy conscious buildings. The form of energy is a very serious consideration. It can give us a new kind of aesthetics. We know that Mtchael Graves and Chuck Moore have systems of aesthetics but we need a system of aesthetics for energy. LAM: A couple of years ago at a SERI conference you were quoted as saying that, "Processes don't create good design, good designers create good design". How do you envision a s y stem of aesthetics evolving through a good designer to create a good design? CAUDILL: All of the schools are trying their best to find some sort of a design methodology that will take the place of good design and you can't do it. I have a theory that it is the medium that the designer uses that affects what the building will look like. When I was teaching at Rice several years ago, chipboard came along, people stopped drawing and they started working with chipboard, and their buildings started to look like chipboard, absolutely. And I know some architects that actually took a sample of chipboard to their concrete consultant and said, "We want the same color and texture as this chipboard." That's the absolute truth. And there's a building on Harvard's campus that Yamasaki did that looks like a blown up chipboard model! All these new ice cream colors we have now, well, we started getting into these when magic markers came in. At CRS we were doing the most beautiful pen and ink sketches you ever saw, and then a fella from Bill Blurock's office in Southern California, Frank Lawler, comes along with four shades of light grey. His color schemes were always the color of the season. There again the medium affected the design and what it was going to look like. LAM: That reminds me of a book that came out in 1967 or 1968, "The Medium is the Massage" by Marshall McLuhan. CAUDILL: Marshall McLuhan was one of the heroes of architects back then. This one fellow in our firm, Herb, used to say that, "The process is the product," and that was when process meant everything. We would get in these in-house arguments over this issue, my point being that I don't give a damn whether the process is the product or not. If the product stinks then so too must the process. Today, drawings have more of an influence on architects than actual buildings. Buildings are beginning to look like Michael Graves' sketches. It is a time of paper architecture. LAM: What do you anticipate architect's next medium will be? CAUDILL: It's going to be real interesting to see what happens to our buildings when we start playing around with the computer a little more. We've only gotten involved with them a little bit, but I want to get involved with them to the point I lose my desire to touch a pencil. What a potential! My clue came after we had a computer consultant come into our firm to develop renderings from some of our sketches. After reviewing the computer's drawings, one of the fellas in our firm remarked how the computer consultant had taken such liberties. You see, that's really interesting, because if we could get someone on that computer that was capable of drawing the initial sketch, that someone would be taking the initiative, not the liberties. And I know that it1s going to happen, and I don't want to miss out on it. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NATHAN GOOD

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time .... His work is dazzling to look at, and yet it deals in issues more profound than simply the decoration of construction. Michael Graves sat on a low chair behind a desk at the front of the classroom and calmly smiled at the crowd. He is a thin man, meticulously dressed in fashionable clothes. He has gray-white hair, and a delicate reddish complexion. He wears wire-rim glasses that give him an aura of contemplation and intellect. He answered questions in a quiet, calm voice. Here is one question and Michael Graves's response. Question: your buildings are so different, how do you deal with the controversy they arouse? Graves: The Time Magazine article of a couple of weeks ago, I have never read anything like that in a popular, public journal, about art, architecture and literature ... there usually, if someone doesn't like something they describe it, with a little blast at the end, there is some equity of opinion, but this magazine article was crucial in that I lost two commissions because of it, so it has had an effect ... At the end of the Portland Project, when it was heating up, becoming controversial ... ! got a call from Phillip Johnson and he said, "well, Michael, you've made it, you're now controversial, you'll have no problem getting work for the rest of your life" •.• I don't understand that, I don't understand that, I don't believe that ... I didn't want it and I don't want it, I very much want to do an architecture of the general language, and when you say the word "different" ... It's certainly different than what I just saw coming from the parking lot here ... (loud laughter from audience). I think that's the stuff that's dirferent and that is, I suppose, why I become controversial ... ! can say to you, straight-faced, no--those are the guys that are not practicing architecture in the way that this society, this culture always wanted ... If you look at the fragmented tower on the mall, if you look at a lot of other things that pre-dated ... the war, there MICHAEL GRAVES • • was a language of architecture that, for good or for evil was standard and continuous, and understood, and accessible, etcetera, and the new stuff is an inversion of that language. .•. I'm trying to not be historicist, but to restore our language .•• and simply see modern architecture, its good parts and its bad parts as an appendage to architectural development. Certainly in literature and in music, and in othother art forms, in painting especially, there are abstract modes, there are moments in the history of those various art forms which are appendages to continuous language; and it's terribly important that every society do that-test the sense of continuous language by virtue of these diversions. [this question of controversy] it's so much now a part of this kind of dumb baggage that I carry around. In the paper yesterday, in Lincoln there was a little announcement of my lecture to the AlA there: "controversial East-coast architect Michael Graves gives keynote ... " (loud laughter from audience) and then it went through the whole thing and it said things like, "he's had many honors ... and many boos." In Portland, if they stopped a dozen people people on the streets and said, what do you think of the Portland Building, a-and eleven of them said, "I love it, it's a change, it's got color, it's a little far out and we're not used to it, but perhaps we will get used to it, after all the mayor has said it is like the Eiffel tower when it was built, it will be a kind of symbol for Portland for some time to come;" but if the twelfth person had said, "I hate it, it looks like a turkey, it looks like a dog, it looks like a jukebox," that all gets written down, that's the headline,-that's the meat of the article. You can understand when people in public life, actors and politicians and other people, get stung with that kind of stuff all the time .•• your skin does get much thicker. •....... •. •. • • ••......•...•..•....... • .DJ STEVEN TERNOEY COMMENTS: Steven Ternoey is this year's energy design studio instructor. He is also an author of the Solar Energy Research Institute's newly released draft, The Design of Energy-Responsive Buildings. * Graves is putting the people first, but thelPortland building is not an energy-efficient building. * Talk about a guy who could jump on daylighting --it's the language of old buildings. * Daylighting is a language of form -he totally neglects this. * He could have reached the core with daylight at $51/sq.ft .... we could show him how ... * Graves designs surface treatment language instead of form language. Form language can be read throughout a building instead of just on the rior. * He is trying to reinvent architecture with facades instead of form. * If he wants to capture the language of thirty years ago, he is going to have to attack form as part of the The Portland building is still the cube. * His windows are not good --there are no squares in the language of historic buildings. Those tall windows of historic buildings are like that to let light in. * If you're going back to language, admit that there are some functional, on top of psychological, effects. When asked to be quoted, Ternoey said: "I like his stuff a lot ... better than out there" (pointing out to downtown Denver).

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PLANNING ••••••••• NICHOLAS K. MATZ We are faced with a need for planning, now more than ever before. Laminations spoke recently with Dr. David Hill, Director of the Planning and Community Development Program. "Within the College", says Dr. Hill, "planning serves as the link between the hardware design profession and political/ economic/community worlds." Our primary mission is educational, within that mission he feels there are two roles that the P/CD program has: P/CD provides the social coursework to back up a technical skills education, and it has the role of sensitizing the design professionals to the issues of large-scale design. "If you consider design to be practiced at many different scales, then planners are designers who work at a larger scale ... " P/CD, which has a strong, diverse f aculty along with a national identity as an applied, people-centered studio program, is currently reinforcing its economic and quantitative planning areas. This, says Dr. Hill, is not so much a shift in philosophy but one in emphasis. "We respect traditional planners in this school, but the curriculum also needs flexibility to be good." When asked to discuss planning in the U.S. today, Dr. Hill said that a concerted effort at the national level to dismantle public planning programs is happening. "Our national head is in the sand ; what may be viewed as temporary policy changes now are actually going to have serious long-term effects on environment, energy, and human services". On a state level, Professor Hill feels that Colorado is "a planning culture that, though it is improving slowly, is sadly in need of work. There exists a standoff between economic types and environmentalists. While the dialogue they create is good because it r epresents reality, it operates too slowly to do much good. Dr. Hill's strongest point is that as planners and people, "we cannot be intimidated by short-term political phenomena", and P/CD needs to educate people who do not lack the "moral vision" neces-sary for building a successful human environment. URBAN DESIGN •••••••• C G GALLAGHER John Prosser, in an interview LAMINATIONS, was happy to announce a new facet of the Urban Design Division. It is called the Urban Design Degree Emphasis of Mainstreet Conservation. As the program literature describes it: The two distinguishing features of this program are, first, that the urban design discipline for the first time is being given the interdisciplinary curriculum in the fields it actually covers in the professional world: public affairs, business, estate development, community development, planning and design. Second, the program and its curriculum are based on the evolving concept of service-learning education. Through the College of Design and Planning, outreach division requests for Mainstreet technical assistance and research studies are matched with faculty and student research and assistance teams through existing core and elective courses ..• Prosser, who has been director of the Urban Design program since 1969, went on to answer numerous questions about the program, about Denver, and about urban design in general. Of special note were his comments about the Sixteenth Street Mall. He gave credit to Pei for a terrific design, but warned that the success of the mall depended on the support of the retailers along the mall. When asked about our new neighbours, the Lawrence Street Plaza, Prosser responded: "It's pretty damn good architecturally". Pressed to criticize it in the context of urban design, he graded it with a B+. Technically, a comprehensive urban design project must include retail, residential and office space. The Lawrence Street Plaza has retail space. He pointed to Writer Square as the best "urban design" development in this city. INTERIORS ••••••••••••••• CHRIS NIMS Since its inception in 1978, the Graduate Interiors Program at UCD has gone from teaching 95 student credit-hours to over 500 student credit-hours per year. The present enrollment totals over 40 full time and part time students. The average student age is 29.9 years old. Its University setting affiliation with a multidisciplined College of Design and Plan ning and its ability to tap the urban laboratory make the program unique in the Rocky Mountain Region and, in many ways, the country. All these are evidence of the potential of the Interiors Program at UCD. But they are mere indicators. What truly allows a program to achieve design and academic excellence is derived from 1.) the spirit of the students 2.) the commitment and professionalism of the faculty and 3.) the support and encouragement of the professional community. As a graduate program it is mandated to design professionals capable of fulfilling leadership positions. The program must the,refore constantly evaluate and upgrade its validity and contribution to the design profession. This requires dialogue between students, faculty and the profession as well as effective interface with allied professions such as business, psychology, fine arts and engineering. In the next year the program will be undergoing many changes. A national search has already been initiated for a permanent director, and two full-time facul-ty. This will constitute an increase of one full-time faculty member beginning in 1983. The curriculum implications of this additional teaching strength will permit the expansion from a nucleus coursework to supplementary design subject matter. The enrichment potential will mean a great deal in terms of educational opportunity and choice for the student. In the spring, an advisory board of faculty, students and professionals will be formed to discuss this potential. Also planned for the 1983-1984 academic year is the application and review for FIDER (Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research) accreditation. This will be a benchmark, not a minimum standard, for the program. This means , simply, that the program must grow beyond accreditation. Also for this academic year, a series of seminars are scheduled on Fridays at 1:00 p.m. The presentations will be by professionals from the Denver Area on a variety of subjects including portfolios and resumes, marketing interior services, interior design history and rendering to name a few. This program will allow students the opportunity to learn about specific aspects of the field and meet individuals from the design community. The continued growth and success of the program is based upon many things: financial support, multi-disciplined inter action with the rest of the College and resources available to students and faculty. But the most important aspects of growth comes from the students themselves. They substantiate the existence of the program. Their initiative and motivation to learn is what gives it spirit. Their striving to acquire as many skills as possible during their academic career means that the program must always be measuring, upgrading and creatively adressing their educational needs. Given the growth of the front range, the future of higher education in Colorado looks very promising. Concurrently, the need for interior design professionals will continue on the increase. These two factors, combined with conscious effort of students, faculty and professionals will insure the continued viability and vitality for the Interiors Program.

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L------g \_\,\l DAVID LEWIS ...••••......•....... NICHOLAS K. MATZ "Defining urban desig n is like defining an apple." \>lith these words, David Lewis, architect and proponent of community participation design, opened a lectur e on " The H eritage a nd Future of U.S. Cities" a t Auraria on Oct ober 8. Lewis and his firm, Urban Design Associates of Pittsburgh, advocat e an urban context where "patching and stitc h ing" the urban fabric happens, a process of getting people to educat e themselves to repair the city . Lewis spoke first about the h eritage of American cities. H e said that although we trace our cultur e t o Europe, our cities a r e distinctly American. The English ideal, a gentle rhythmic man/ nature r elationship, is n ot, says Lewis, an actual source of American cit y form . Rather, the basis of that form can be trac ed t o s u c h men as John Gwynn, whose plan for L o nd on in 1760 put great empha s i s on the repetitive nature o f the grid, and Nic h o las Barbon, an Englishman whom Lewis call ed "the a ncestor of standard ized bui.)_ding." Barbo n was a man of g reat precision w h o standardized nearly every detail of his housing . The American grid embodies geometri c and use/density aspects, says Lewis, the l atte r the g reatest vehicle of change. T h e American building form, with its c learly interpre t e d o rnam entation, can be take n together with the grid t o c reate a unique prog ression of privacy and space from the facad e to the street. I t i s in this prog ressi o n area that U D A has worked. T h e communit y p rocess as Lewis outlined it uses flowcharting t o work in three steps: prog r a mming, desig n alternatives, and preferr e d altern atives/imple men t a tion. UDA walks n e i ghborhood clients throug h t h ese steps o n order to arrive a t a solution which is oriented t owards physical and his t orical lite racy. The power of this process, says Lewis, s t e m s not from the contemporar y traditionalism o f architect s like Rob a nd Leon Krier, but f rom the "people power" of Thomas Jefferson. I f t h e people d o n o t know how t o decide, e ducat e the m in decision-makin g . A particula r example o f the c o mmunity d esig n process is UDA' s work in the York , PA thirty-six block historic district. UDA crea t ed a t y p o logy of the district' s buildings, n oting g reat diversit y in basic building form but with the underlying grid clearly evid ent. Res toration could then proceed, with the his t oric literacy intact. Lewis' firm is now devel oping pattern books of restoration based on this a nd other community desig n projects in Pittsbur gh. Charles Moore a nd oth e r s have demon str ated the of client p articipatio n in the a r chitectura l process, a nd David LPwis a nd UDA have bro u ght a continuing hopefulness t o the future of U . S . cities. MICHAEL WILDE ••••••..••••••••••••••••••• FRANK OOMS O n Friday , September 24th the U . C.D. College of Design and Planning presented the first of its guest lecture series, premiering with Michael Wilde's "China Building", which also included a ten day ph o t ographic exhibit by the lecturer. Although the title allude d to a presentatio n on Chinese Architecture, the ual theme was based more along the lines of its subtitle Social and Environmenta l Relationships. Thus both the lecture a nd photographs were oriented more towards the Chinese people than their architecture and therefore somewhat of a letdown for the majority who had had expec t atio n s of the latter. Wilde was part of a three person tea m invited to China, after several requests to the Chinese government, to do a series of l ectures on photography in the U .S.A. The other two members were the photographic professionals on the team, while Mr. Wilde was relied upon for his journalistic skills. Photographic techniques a nd their use as a communication tool were r elated to the Chinese Photog r aphers' Association in four main Chinese populatio n centers. Widespread travel during the one month trip enabled each member t o ph otograph different aspects of Chinese culture, Wilde choosing his personal interest in environmental social behav i or. The socio behavioral theme is a familiar o n e to Michael Wilde, who, as well as b eing a j ournalist and architectural scientist, holds a Master of Arts in Architecture and Urban PlannLng from U.C.L.A., having specialized in Environmental Social Behavior. Dealing more with the China of today and its future direction, Wilde feels that an understanding of the people within their own environment, "the urban mosaic", is necessary so that it can be applied to understanding their architecture and its direction. Mainly images of the Chinese within their more native environment were presented a nd provided a stong contrast with those areas displaying Russi a n and other European influe nces, which t o tally ignored an appreciation for Chinese culture in their designs. Examples such as this stressed the importa nce of understanding environmental social behavior before applying one's own regional design values to architecture in another a rea. In stressing the need for better und erstanding people a nd their specific environments, Wilde n o t e d that "to survive as architects in the future, we are going t o have to know more about how p e op l e really live a n d work, and design for people and their needs, not desig n for desi g n sake." He felt the study of antiquity was an important aspect of this, a nd that "by embracing antiquity, a m o r e tho u ghtful continuity in desig n results a nd gives people a peace a nd sense of continuation." Noting that this was the direction China strived 1cr and that they look t o the western world mor e f o r advancements in a r chitectura l technology than for desig n direction. Wilde concluded that the Chinese approach of a rchitecture for the people by the people, was something we could learn as muc h f r o m as do the Chinese expec t to learn from our technology. The Wilde lecture stressed the socio behavioral aspect of architecture -every day people, the ones so often f o r gotten in designing for the everyday w orld, our world. Although the lecture may have lacked the punch in driving this home, the poinc is well taken. Y e t o n the othe r hand individualism o r creative expression have their place, especially in China and therefore the concluding slides were a welcome sight! DESIGN COMPETITION DEADLINES 11-1 Interstate brick sol a r design 11-8 Ceramic TileAlA show room URBAN LECTURES UCBOULDER 10-27 Henr y Beer (Communication Arts) 11-3 Jim Urbonas (C. Worthington Partnership) 11-10 R o n Henson (Transplan) 11-17 11-24 1 2-1 Above Curt F entress Gary Meredith(RNL) Art Eve r ett (EZTH) lectures Wed. 4 5 p.m.Env.Des. K.Soldan, R.Holmes (SOM DENVER) Retrospectiv e o n Recent Projects; The Design Process 1 0-14 1 34 D.Paulson(UCB) Hinata=S unshine , The Use of Sunlight in Japanese Houses. 10-28 Ralph Knowles (USC) The Kings c h o ices a nd the Peoples Choices; How Does Your City G row? 11-4 William Mitchell (UCLA) The futur e of C omputer Aided Design. 11-18 Above Lectures Thurs. 8 p .m. FA N 1 4 1 UCB Richard Sennet (NYU) Urb a n F orm a nd D e moc r atic The o r y . 12-3 Above Lecture Fri 8 p.m. FA N141 UCB FRIDAY EVENING PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES 115 Ralph Knowles 11-12 Dol o res Hayden. Dream H ouse o r . deal Ideal City? (UCLA) 11-19 Willia m Mitchell. T h e Future of Computer Aided Design. (UCLA) 1 2 3 T. Alle n Comp. Preservation, A r chitectur e and Appropriate Technology; A Talismanic Trio . (Seattle) 1 2-10 C arl Johnson. Recent work of JohnsonJohnson a n d Roy, LanHscape Architects. (U o f M i chigan) Above lectures Fri. 5:15p.m. Sci Bldg.119 Aura ria INTERIM S EMESTER COURSES TO BE OFFERED THIS YEAR BY THE COLLEGE OF D ESIGN AND PLANNING+ A r c h 51 2 3c r Graphi c Te chnique , Color Theory and Design 13 00 1 700 M F Ullma n McMillian Ar c h 669 3c r Architecture, & Energy;Computers in the Office. 9 1 200 M F Woolard Arch 679 3c r Restoratio n of Buildings; Hateria l Analysis -LQn. 9-1200 M F S nell Valuable and Conservat-

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the sausage in the bun By D.J. With this issue we open a new phase of "The Sausage in the Bun." More informative than in the past, more accurate, too. We welcome your comments. A late flash from our expert on Mall matters: "When the mall was finally inaugurated a few days ago, second-year architectural student C .Z.(name changed) decided to do some inaugurating of his own at midnight and proceeded to parade about the mall AL FRESCO, in the rain! Fortunately the mall police were engaging in their usual custom (never being present), and the now thoroughly damp C.Z. merely succeeded in frightening an old drunkard, who tripped over a bench." Our normally reticent informant in matters discreet has informed us of of, er, liaisons between certain students and, er, not-students (let's not rock the boat, boys). IS this TRUE?? If so this matter must be EXPOSED! We are told that any rumors of cheating during a certain exam recently are COMPLETELY,TOTALLY, CATEGORICALLY, DEFINITIVELY, SUBSTANTIALLY FALSE. Well. Usually reliable, though unnamed sources tell us of a near-mass-revolt among students in a certain 500-level class. A less-reliable source adds that the surly mob got so unruly it had to be corralled into a corner by the TAs and pistol-whipped into submission. BREAK OUT THE MUSKETS, LADS!! Although the savages appear to have calmed down somewhat, we understand that renewed agitation has commenced. STAY TUNED. NEWS FROM THE COLD BEYOND Department: Lila Rioth (May '82) sends her WARM REGARDS!!! She is currently working at Larimer Square Associates, and is just HAVING A BLAST!!!! Keep up the good work, Lila. We have been told by on-the-spot witnesses of an incident that occurred during a recent 600-studio field trip to Mesa Verde. It seems that in one of the mini-buses there suddenly appeared a supply of, er, cigarettes (WHOAA THERE, FELLA! !!) The driver, a teacher, insisted that the, er, no-smoking rule be strictly observed. Whereupon a supply of BEER INSTANTLY APPEARED!!! There's just controllin' 'em, is there. Our Landscape Architecture spy communicated recently: "At the reception following Mr. Wang's lecture a few days ago, I noticed people staggering about drunkenly, so I walked up to the goodies table to see. And WHAT did I SEE?? Milk and cookies, that's what!! Hardcore stuff, this. THIS SCANDALOUS BEHAVIOUR CANNOT BE ALLOWED TO CONTINUE IN THIS SCHOOL IF WE WANT TO MAINTAIN OUR SELF-RESPECT. We have heard that the lavender Art-Deco toll-booth on the third floor was scheduled for demolition recently, but was saved at the last n:cment. Instantly, another one appec:red in the opposite corner. WHAT IS TIUS, RABBITS? Will we see toll-booths appearing all over the school? Stay tuned for more developments. We understand that the new Architecture Director is a SOLAR ENTHUSIAST!!! We support him wholeheartedly. \