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Laminations, October-November, 1983

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Title:
Laminations, October-November, 1983
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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VOLUME SIX NUMBER ONE
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING
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Do you want to be a successful architect - or at least give one and all the impression that you indeed have arrived? Then learn to speak the language - the architect's venacular! Become a member of this elite group of individuals in three easy steps:
1) Select a word or words from each of the following columns.
2) Combine with a few mundane connecting words or phrases.
3) Stump the nearest "layman" with your expertise and/or write a letter to your mother throwing in a lot of your new vocabulary.

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alvaro pisoni
IS THE AMERICAN CITY BECOMING MEDIEVAL?
[What is happening in the American city in lterms of urban form psychology? What is the historical meaning of the "Mall’' and other spaces for the people, in this context?
Every city has its own phases of maturation. The whole of these images, signs and meanings create the historic periods, (which have the tendency to repeat them-|selves in one spiral-ascending develop-lent. In this context, the European colonization of the American continent and the creation of new cities, is comparable (to the Greek colonization of the Mediter-Irean, before the Roman empire. From those (places of anchorage and opportunities,
(new civilization can revive and expand themselves into the hinterland, by the frontier advancing. This happened for the old Rome and this for USA.
(At the beginning, this process is rapid, [for the influx of experiences and enthusiastic forces from the old world are (uncontainable. The cities are designed l-for a sense of equality- most rationally that is possible and as basis to begin (the new "adventure." They can expand [themselves on a virgin land by a grid (system where only some symbolic and idealistic functions are exalted: the politi-(cal/administrative center, the cultural (ones, the court house, the stadium, the transportation centers... the military one. (The city has no limits in its block by (block expansion. The enthusiasm and the (opportunities of growth give the strength [to look only toward the future. Culture [is understood as the ability to solve ’practical" problems. The "abstract" |culture -of expressions and sentiments-(belongs only to a past which is respected, (but separated from present intentions: the (old Greek world for the Romans or the (European one for the Americans.
(The living as a continuation of that past (means a weakness sign for who have arrived in a virgin land to start all over (again. (And for whom the expression of the "abstract" culture is enough, such (as the "importation" of a Greek philosopher to Rome, or an European to lAmerican.)
Therefore, also the American city repeats fits own first development phase toward the
■future—or better, it seemed so to me ■while I was in Europe. Then, arriving in (USA, I have understood that this first (phase is close to finishing, and also the ("new world" citv is becoming old and (passing into its second phase.
At this point, when the city fininishes its first age, it begins the manipulation, arrangement and "adulteration" moment of its parts. The enthusiasm and ideals of its birth and first expansion are going to be replaced by the criticism, considerations and research of new images.
Too late: these images are not possible to create ex-novo anymore, but only integrate them in the previous structure. In other words, men realize that during the expansion "mania," the actions, the physical structure and the opportunity creations were more important for them... and they have forgotten to consider also the human personalities and weaknesses.
This also happened when Plato imagined his colonial city which belonged only to his utopian ideal, not human in its behavior but only a symbolic image of extreme specializations.
Now they feel the necessity to create spaces for the people in the American city, and they begin to restore it and renew it, so as the 16th St. Mall in Denver. Now the American city is looking for its center; it centralizes itself and becomes more European. This is what I call the second phase for a new city.
They begin to manipulate its parts; they put its moments in relation and they feel the necessity of a structure among the functions. The starting rational and geometric grid design is not enough anymore. Therefore, the meaning of the functions become more important than numbers or schematic matrixes... and the city begins to stratify itself!
Is this a moment of reflection, a pause? No, it is only a natural growth process of a living organism.
Finding another historical parallelism, the American city is entering into its maturation period so as the former Roman center European colonies -become independent- started a wonderful age of settlement and new more human values: the Gothic or Middle Age. The Age of human spaces, markets and merchants, jugglers and minstrels, fairs, banks and shows on piazzas and streets. For me, the American Mall means this "hope," so as the Quincy Market in Boston, the Embarcadero and Ghirardeili Square in San Francisco are good examples. They are important moments even if, for now, they are more an economic than social, answer.
tfy interpretation is perhaps provocative, but certainly courageous, about what is hanging in the American city environment, t is interesting to observe that this
passage from one to another phase, could happen also without lost wars or revolt utions (unless the Vietnam war or the 'hippies" have been so important for the American society!).
But Denver is still too young, aggressive and full of enthusiasm to feel the necessity of introspection. For it, this process is only at the beginning and the "hope" (as said above) not clearly definitive. The 16th St. Mall wants to be one example in this context: a combination of distinctive old and new buildings; a space for the people; a 16 block system of patterned grey and red granite with other interior design components, organized with the will to be also a spine which ties downtown together. This "modern" design -produced by a team headed by I.M. Pei & Partners- for me has old meanings in a new environment. In the interpretation of this Mall, I observe that it has only changed its image. Denver wanted to change the copy without being ready; without feeling the necessity to interpret the wish and meaning of pause, exchanges, conversations, discussions and games. Is it a compromise?
Now 16th St. Mall is still a street which crosses a totally economic citadel, from gate to gate, from terminal to terminal, and where the meaning of these two land-narks is perhaps more important than the city image itself. There is no widening, nor a piazza, nor a core. One has only to 'travel" on this street, designed more for mechanical craft patterns than for the flowing and stop of people. In a comical and cinematic sense, it has more the meaning of one American Old West street, where two rival cowboys faced each other at opposite ends for a shoot out. The D & F Tower could be your rival seen from the Capitol (or vice-versa)!
In conclusion, Denver's Mall is not yet the Gothic decomposition of one straight line into softer and more organic curves where people movement creates spaces. But Denver's Mall still means the beginning of a Medievalization process for the American city, as it is already in action for Boston, San Francisco or also New Orleans. It is the symbolic passage from a phase of idealism and enthusiasm, to a phase of more practical commercial trades and existential crisis; in other words, towards more autonomy, characterization and distinction of images and feelings.
The city is continually moving away from the rural world. It becomes specialized, creating inside a new structure of relationships among original functional and symbolic landmarks, and creating more spaces for merchants and people conversations. Therefore, the city no longer enews itself in a military and extroverted sense, but in a more human and intimate one...and it becomes "a theatre. The city recognizes the human weaknesses and becomes more mature.
Let us wait for another "Boccaccio's Decameron" which will describe the XXI Century American city!
Denver, Sept. 9, 1983 Alvaro Pisoni, Italy


Back, Gi el, Back:
THE MANY SPLENDORtfD MALL
annie wright
The mall is a many splendpred thing, multifaceted to the point of being unnameable. Simple, but not simplistic, it gathers activities, concepts and emotions like an extraordinarily long and elegant strip of flypaper. The 16th Street Mall has created new life in a formerly cow (down) town. A point of departure for Denver*s aborning urban identity, it waits only to be developed, played on like a virgin Steinway.
Hoo! Back, girl, back. Remember, your first impressions of the mall were not so kindly. First thoughts a year ago were that it did very little indeed with the possibilities, creating elegance at the expense of interest. There is not enough seating; not enough variety in plan or part; planters on which it is impossible to sit; fountains which wash the feet of unsuspecting tourists; paving which though beautiful is too subtly colored and too easily (permanently?) dirtied; little, in fact, but lights, and rows of lights which only look lonely at night when everyone had gone home (except architecture students) and leaves the mall to its unvaried emptiness.
Shucks, its true: the mall is not perfect the mall has problems. Compared to that Place Extraordinaire of Denver’s people-watchingluncheaters, Skyline Park, and the Boulder Mall, a veritable People’s Park of informal activity, the RTD’s Path of Glory leads but from one end to the other. How boring. The mall is a glorified Street.
Well, that’s the worst of it, but the mall also increasingly appears to be a success. Why be a total curmudgeon on the subject. (Curmudgeoness?) Every project has its problems but the mall also has parades, gatherings for speeches from the May D & F Tower, sculpture shows and lots of supporters. Sometimes it seems the better or more creative the project, the more tempting it is to nit-pick. (Who nitpicks Larimer Place?)
When I crawled out of my Slough of Cur-mudgeonry, I realized there are more generous, objective and helpful ways to view the project. Doing this viewing from the Mall Exchange’s new outdoor cafe soaking up Denver’s climatological advantages helped. So did the sign across the street (oops, mall) advertising 60 shops, 6 cafes for the new Tabor Center; so did knowing I could hop a shuttle to the other end any old time; so did my tour of the Market Street Station exuding its own cartoony bran^of^ransportatioi^imager^an^sur-
rounSec^Ey^Ktfs^l^greer^spac^presidec^^ over by the contemporarily correct atrium of the RTD Administration Building, etc. etc. You get the picture. The Federal Reserve Building across from Park Central looks terrific when viewed across both the Mall and its own front lawn.
Where the mall begins to disappoint are jj
those areas along its sides where the |
city itself becomes dull and uninteresting. I begin to see the mall in a new way as backdrop for activities generated on its edges and even beyond. It serves a larger and more subtle function than placemaking and while it is a pedestrian space, it is quintessentially an American one, a place for pedestrians to meet not only each other but their wheels, a place to go iji as well as on. The mall is an organizing force, not a playground; it offers opportunities. The mall is a challenge and a beginning.
It has improved a great deal in the first year and has done so from being used. AH' architecture is subject to change and the vagaries of use. While we like to crit buildings on the process which led to their form, we too often ignore the continuation of that process in their daily use. Buildings are living elements of a society. The mall cannot really be approached truthfully and realistically in any other way. It is a living part of Denver now. The organism of the city l
has been given a spine and we expect it to evolve in new ways. As it does, the mall too will grow and change. So the mall is not a finished product, it is a piece of the action and the main question to ask is how best one could interpret this role. The question implies notions of scale, unity, clarity and perhaps the ability to be self-effacing, the willingness to help a city discover itself. At least this appears to have been the interpretation of I.M. Pei and Partners.
In the June *83 AIA Journal, Harry Cobb FAIA, partner in charge of the design for Pei’s firm, explains the decision to simplify the mall design. "The distinctive character of 16th Street is established by the extraordinary diversity
of the street wall...We wanted the mall design to be complementary to that diversity. Therefore, we were looking for a few very simple components which could be seen as integrated and unfying elements." Sounds like the Marines: "A Few Good Elements," a definitely classy approach and the mall is definitely a classy mall. The basic concept of a few simple elements is similar to the one_____.
developed by Lawrence Halprin in his design of the Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis in the 60’s. Where the attempt is to simplify and clarify transportation paths in the city, where the attempt is to revive the city’s sense of its downtown as coherent and attractive; a understated solution seems naturally to present itself. The question raised here then, is not the concept but the interpretation. In Minneapolis, Halprin used just a few simplifying elements, but he approached the plan differently, deemphasizing the long boring street vistas (8 blocks) by gently undulating the paths of the buses. Pei and Company have done just the opposite here in Denver. They have emphasized the view down the length of the mall (12 blocks) by the use of lights and trees and unwavering bus lanes. This difference is at the heart of the most commonly heard criticism of the mall: namely, that it jls boring, a dull straight shot without imagination in its allocation of space. But this is Denver, not Minneapolis, and the long vista is a typically Western experience. The mall can perhaps be seen as a metaphor of that Western experience. The oasis in the desert. (There could be bluegrass stations as well as phones and kiosks)
Cobb is also quoted in the AIA Journal article as comparing the granite patterns to "the unfolding of a snake’s skin in which the design is very pronounced in the center without patterns on the edges.’ A stylized snake in a stylized desert: the mall reflects Denver’s conservative Western personality. The patterning works well in allowing the paving to meet the buildings in a neutral way without color or patterning conflicts.
The overall beauty of the granite and the multipurposed lights is undeniable, but the overall feeling of the mall is extremely understated in a grant sort of way. Quite apart from the simplicity of the design, there is a sense of sameness from block to block. There are both symmetrical sections in the middle blocks and assymetrical sections at either end, but the difference is scarcely noticeable The mall is an exercise in subtly. But it is the subtlty of the desert and of the mountain flowers, so very tiny and scattered. The desert is quite blatant in terms of size, the sheer stretch of empty land to the far horizon, but with in the desert, experience is quite different. You have to know what you are looking for; but if you do, it is there in abundance. Thus with the mall: the , long vista hits you over the head with jits straightness, its flatness and its length, but once traversing its length, you are slowly seduced by the beauty of its finely crafted details. Perhaps we should view the shuttle buses as modern day stagecoaches, hurtling passengers from one commercial outpost to the other.
Whether the mall is seen as brilliantly subtle, unimaginatively boring or some mixture in between, it is nonetheless true that the mall is young. It is growing and in the process of change.
More seating bike racks, possibly vendors are being planned in the near future.
The trees are also an element of change and growth, not only from year to year but from season to seaspn. This summer their leafing did a lot to curb the long vista; this winter, they will frame it. Perhaps they will acquire lights such as i those on the trees in Larimer Square or in front of Terracentre. Denver has many choices to make. Feeding on changes it helped to create, the mall stands ready to be expanded into the fabric of Denver* new century urban life..
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Margo Schultz
There are certain times during the week when the three year old Sixteenth Street Mall is fairly inactive. To stroll the mall during one of these periods and casually remark to one's companion that the mall is empty and is therefore a failure, is complete nonsense.
What we have unfolding before our eyes on the Sixteenth Street Mall is multi-faceted transformation and change. The mall is "becoming" and its good overall design and continuing management are the keys to its assured "success".
We are beginning to see the surr rounding plaza areas play off and accent through contrast, the formal linearity of the mall with its straight line of trees and lights. Writer's Square for example, with its diagonal lines and liberal use of brick, offers a repast from the hard materials of the city with its warm and colorful shrub beds. Providing change in texture and overall character, these surrounding plazas become alluring offshoots of the main promenade.
Though the gray, granite paving of the mall has sometimes been perceived as cold, it dan also be argued that it functions as a backdrop, encouraging merchants to come forward and participate in the mall tableau without running the risk of clashing with it. New opportunities have recently been created for developers to provide creative and lively spaces at the ground level with the use of the phrase "need not be enclosed" in the zoning regulations. We are .witnessing the development of new constituencies as places like Marlowe's and the Mall Exchange with their outdoor dining areas, stimulate people into new habits. Recent zoning revisions have also provided major incentives for private developers to integrate more retail shops, further historic preservation and supply ample light exposure by setting building towers back off the mall corridor. In this way, richness of detail and light are assured.
There are certain times of the day when the mall is very crowded, and it seems that what attracts people most on the mall is other people. "People like to sit in the mainstream," reports William Holly Whyte, noted pedestrian expert. Whyte and Fred Kent of the Project for Public Spaces have both been integrally involved in the development of the downtown management strategy for Denver. According to Whyte, people in any successful urban plaza have a ten-r . dency to station themselves near objects such as telephones, kiosks, fountains, flowerbeds, etc. All of these things,
including grouped seating, are supplied on the mall and are well used. The hordes of people seen using the central seating areas of the mall during the business hours don't seem to mind the noise or sight of the transportation buses on either side of them. They have been provided with ring side seats and have plenty of everything to look at.
Variety is another important feature in seating. Informal choices of seating to the side, up front, in back, in groups, or alone are unfortunately lacking on the mall. Although ideally seating provided should be physically comfortable, it is also important that it be socially comfortable. This means flexibility and choice. Merchants are coming to realize that people seated informally on walls, around landscaped areas or on stairs near their businesses are actually good for business. Merchants and mall management people need to be encouraged to continue to provide more flexible kinds of seating - thereby increasing the richness of experience on the mall.
Additionally, transportation and transportation systems management are large factors in the creation of a lively downtown marketplace. Other cities, such as Portland, Oregon which have instituted ride sharing, bicycles, public transportation and flextime, have had success in spreading the peak hour crunch of travel and have increased success in retail revitalization. In his presentation at the 1982 Pedestrian Conference in Boulder; Richard Fleming, President of the Denver Partnership ( a public/private partnership overseeing urgent mall issues) reported, "If you stretch work hours on a systematic basis and get stores to be open those hours, it opens a whole new set of markets for the department stores, shops and restaurants downtown because people are there from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
We are also trying to introduce into downtown, a sense of management where a retailer, a prospective retailer, an investor or a developer will be able to enter a secure downtown context with the confidence that he or she will find services that resemble the types of functions or services found in a well-run shopping center," This means scheduled events as well - something the mall needs terribly.
The terrific thing about the Sixteenth Street Mall is that everyone is contributing. We see new uses and things changing everyday at many levels. Only in time though, as we see more and more of these exciting ideas come into fruition, will we have a mall that is a showcase both day and night.

What makes an urban space habitable for the pedestrian? Last month in Boulder, the hosting of the annual pedestrian conference addressed just this question. In more [detailed discussions headed by local 'architects and planners, Jan Gehl, noteable 'urban designer from Copenhagen posed test questions like, "Would you like to raise your children there?" and "Would you like to grow old there?"
These two questions mark sufficient guidelines for discussing the necessary spectrum of urban experiences. Issues ranging from the safety and patrolability of a city to the variety of textures, colours and spatial definitions and most importantly, the role of the Automobile were primary in the debate.
!The automobile is a primary function of the modern city but is not function itself . Has the modern city- forfeited the rights or rather the 'right-o* ly1 e‘ the pedestrian? The reality uiiat L:;e automot^Lle has undermined the pedestrian to such an extent that the sidewalk and adjacent street level functions have dimi- jj nished in some cases, to the point of providing at most, an inconspicuous entrance.
Denver with the recent development of the 16th St. Mall has made a significant step towards establishing a renewed dialogue between the pedestrian and the street scape. Multifunctional and cross referenced urban systems are key in giving the city back to the guy on the street.
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ARCHITECTURE & CRITICAL IMAGINATION by wayne attoe wiley 1978
188p.
Mara Gai Katz
In 1978, when Wayne Attoe's book "Architecture and Critical Imagination" ' was published, it may well have eluded an audience that would find it/most beneficial; the student of architecture: to whom the understanding of architectural criticism is of primary importance.
In his work, Attoe contends that architecture criticism has received only Iminor attention as a discipline, and maintains that critics have made few contributions to the understanding or improvement of the built environment.
What Attoe then seeks to illustrate is that criticism will be most effective and useful when it informs the future.
Initially, the various forms of criticism are broken out, and described [ by the premise upon which they are based. Criticism can then be viewed as a process guided by a certain logic and consistency. Attoe employs both graphic and literary means to substantiate his assertions. He draws upon published critiques by noted critics with enough regularity that we become familiar with applied critical methods. He remains careful throughout to expose the entire range of possible orientations and biases, so that we gain as comprehensive a view as possible as to the boundaries, or lack of, in the critical imagination.
Beyond methodology, Attoe explores t the relationship between the critic and the work under scrutiny. He sees simply that all criticism is comprised of both the works of interest, and the critic himself. The biases of that critic, and the role he sees himself as playing will affect and inform his criticism, and may in fact, be a major factor in the critics' assessment and response. What becomes clear to us, then, is that once we can recognize those biases, we are free to drop a defensive stance, and to learn from the critical encounter.
Where Attoe may fall short of the mark is in his apparent unwillingness to set forth a concrete method by which architectural criticism could, in fact, inform our future decisions. What he is^ able to do, however, is to de-mystify the critical process for us. In doing this he provides tools of remarkable value: it is with those tools that we are able to develop analytical and perceptive skills, and ultimately pass judgement on , our own work as designers.
In recognizing the importance of each individual's critical abilities,
Attoe also alerts us to the significant role that criticism plays in our education. He is aware that attitudes developed in the academic environment we know as students, very often travel with us and affect our vision in later years. Attoe hopes that "for every student leaving school there is a memory of at least one notable critic-teacher whose wisdom, sensitivity, enthusiasm or moral outrage was sufficiently compelling to provide a reference point in years of designing to come. I
Attoe's concern for the effect of criticism is timely: more and more the nublic sector takes part in decisions about their built-environment. Increasingly, design criticism must reach beyond the boundaries of insular academic and professional circles, and attempt to inform, and necessarily, influence the public as well.
It is because architectural criticism is so fundamental to architectural education, in any form, that Attoe's book is important, for few other sources can offer such a thorough interpretation of the critical process to help the
student arrive at their own.
-
guy auguste moussalli
URBAN PLANNING AND POLITICS IN FRANCE
In France, the State (in terms of national government) played a larger role in housing policies and urban planning since the reconstruction period.
At the end of World War II, deficits in terms of dwelling units were caused by the heavy destruction and dilapidation of old housing stock, non-renewed over the years. Moreover, demographic book between 1946 and 1950 with rural migration to urban areas prompted the development of public housing construction programs answering the needs of working and middle classes. Located on the outskirts of cities, public housing buildings, known as "Grands Ensembles" were conceived in a standardized way, following the functionalist architects' concepts of the "Charte d' Athenes." Quantity took over quality and human scale at that time, due to large gaps between dwelling units and housing needs.
During the sixties when economic expansion occurred, costly urban renewal programs arose in older parts of the cities, particularly in Paris. President de Gaulle and Pompidou wanted it to be Europe's financial metropolis. Thus, to "clean" the center of the city from the working class and to adapt it to the new international economic conditions were the goals of these operations. The State provided the private sector with the infrastructures of projects such as the business district of La Defense. The big market of Les Halles Centrales built by Baltard in 1853, roofed in glass on an iron framework, were demolished to be replaced by a financial district, not implemented. Thus, the district was known as the Hole of the Halles; it was only recently that the huge underground commercial center was developed, not far from the "Centre Pompidou." Another project which was proposed and fortunately not implemented was the construction of an express highway along the banks of the Seine river. Similar operations were conducted in big cities as Lyon and Marseille. Those operations opened the old core of cities to traffic and international style towers, thus breaking the scale of the urban fabric. The Montparnasse tower is a striking example. The diversity of the old heighborhoods disappeared too, when their inhabitants were relocated in the suburbs ending a network of social relations and ties. The importance of old housing stock in France, estimated at more than 4 million dwelling units built
before 1948 and lacking most of the comfort and sanitation, was rediscovered with the economic crisis of 1973/74. On the other hand, and as in Amsterdam and Brussels, the urban struggles organized for the preservation of the old neighborhoods were in most cases led by the middle classes who, as a consequence, were becoming more and more part of Mitterand's socialist constituency. In such a sit-utation of political and economic crisis, a new urban policy was developed in 1974, with the election of President Giscard Estaing. This new urban policy focused on the rehabilitation of the deterioating i housing stock, the development of pedestrian streets and the provision of recre- ! ational amenities at the neighborhood's scale. That policy doesn't involve heavy spending since the work is done piecemeal, by local, small construction companies.
Actually, the socialist government is trying* to implement a social housing policy to make affordable housing for low income people and elderly in the heart of cities. This policy is made difficult because housing and land values are determined by the real estate market.
Hence, discussion on urban policy in France focuses on socio-economic questions rather than aesthetic ones, because the language of architecture tends to be abstract and the elite's privilege. The relationships between work and housing places, between housewife and habitat, between child and the city, the development of small activities generating jobs and integrated to the dwelling place, are among some of these socio-economic, and political questions that France among countries such as Holland and Belgium seeks to address when implementing social welfare oriented policies.
CONSULTATION INTERNATIONALE
pour l’aHenagement
DU QUARTIEjfpES HALLES, PARIS


Xu yu i in the Cun
Editors Ncte
Once again, the mall is a central issue in ithese pages. Perhaps this reflects its centrality and position as Denvers new naval; the nucleus about which life and development revolve and collide. By focusing a series of articles from the point of view of Planners, Architects and Landscape Architects, we hope to contribute to the dialogue and controversy surrounding the mall, and hope to hear from readers on this, (and other) questions .
This year heralds a new service to the university and the community by Laminations; a bi-weekly lecture series featuring lectures and discussions by faculty and professionals in all design disciplines. The first lecture, entitled 'Process in Design," was given by Dan Young, Chairman of the Department of Landscape Architecture. Lectures are held every other Wednesday at noon and feature lecture-discussion format. Bills posted throughout the College of Design and Planning will advise.
The next issue of Laminations will explore issues associated with the concerns of Women in the Design Professions.
We would welcome abstracts of proposed articles on this and other subjects which may interest our readers. Place sub-ission in the Laminations mailbox, second floor Bromley, include self addressed tamped^
our summer sojourn than we heard of a terrible brewing scandal developing in our hallowed halls. A 700—level student had signed up for a design course in summer school and later retracted her enrollment when she got a job. The university retained her on record however, even as she was jetting away to a faraway state, with nary an academic thought in mind. Imagine her surprise when she returned to find that she had attained a grade of B in a course she never attended.
It just goes to show, doesn’t it, what dedication and hard work can do.
* * *
We strolled by the Bromley hallways the other day in our usual condition of stupefaction only to hear bizarre noises emanating from the stairwell. Upon minute Investigation we discovered that the hissing, whezzing sounds were made by persons attempting to climb the stairs, and that the Bromley elevator, abused for so long, had finally expired.
The sight of wheezing, staggering design students is one we had become accustomed to long since, but not in such quantities. We resolved to avoid the entire distasteful issue by continuing to use the EC elevators (besides, they are closer to the snack bar).
* * *
Several of those wheezing, hyperventilating persons were on a desperate search for the CCDD offices. Imagine their states of mind when told that, instead of a short hop to the first floor, they would have to ascend eight stories to find the "new" CCDD. Thankfully, the EC elevators were functioning and these rsons could be wheeled next door.
Jtaee
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Laminations is a publication of the students in the College of Design and Planning at the University of Colorado, Denver. 1100 14th St.
80202. It is published four times a year; generally in October, December, March, and May. The opinions expressed in Laminations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of any official of the College of Design and Planning or of the University of Colorado. Letters to the editor and other communications are encouraged and may be submitted to the Laminations mailbox on the second floor of Bromley.
FACULTY ADVISOR
ROBERT KINDIG
EDITOR
TOBIAS E. GUGGENHEIMER
TACQUIE ‘ANDERSON AVY AVIRAM RON BOUDREAUX STEPHEN CASH GREG COMSTOCK MICHAEL DARNER VICTOR GARCIA PENELOPE GREGORY MARK HOGAN JENNIFER ISBILL NATE KAHN MARA GAI KATZ PEGGY KINSEY PATTY KREMER BOB LUNDELL WILLIAM NELSON ALVARO PISONI ANNIE RULE MARGO SCHULTZ TIM SHEA STEVEN WALSH SUSAN WALSH BRIAN WALTER ANNEY WRIGHT
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We have it on good authority that the thin air at that height will not affect the Center's operations.
* * *
Amidst all this we have seen Planning students, pale and blinking in the light of day, appearing from their subterranean abode to investigate their new HQ on the first floor, Bromley, where CCDD had been previously located. We asked one student how he liked the new quarters, light-filled as they are. He stared through diluted pupils, and said: very spacious, very spacious.
Speaking design pupils we have ever dirt. Not a almost none). up is an affa goodness, er, Shiver city, or stories of were PARTIES!
of diluted pupils, the this year are the dilutest seen them. Not a trace of hint of scandal! (Well,
The most we have dredged ir or two, honest-to-love. Sickening, isn't it We remember years past, years past, when parties
With this issue, we begin restaurant reviews. A typical UCD-CDP student lament is how to begin Sundays with a GOOD breakfast or brunch. A leisurely stroll through Capitol Hill revealed the existence of the Mercury Cafe, 13th and Pearl. Sunday brunch with Champagne, eggs, salmon, etc.etc. at more than reasonable prices. We recommend Leiza's Tofu, where sauteed tofu replaces eggs, with excellent potatoes, onions, terrific home-made bread, and coffee. We recommend this course of action: walk to Together Books, 13th and Sherman (open at noon), get Sunday New York Times. Stroll up 13th Ave. to Mercury Cafe; penetrate to interior, dark, converted garage. Wait to be seated. Order great breakfast. Read Magazine section. Eat slowly, listening to fabulous jazz band which is there on Sundays, and other times, too. Pack up the paper, walk on down to Azar's Big Boy (13th and Broadway) for an authentic, All-American Jumbo Hamburger Sandwich with all the trimmings. Read the Arts & Leisure section. Scoot on over to the Chapultepee (on 20th) for drinks and great jazz, then home to bed. Do your homework Monday norn.


College Notes
NOTES FROM dolores
THEFT
Please keep your personal belongings with you or locked in your locker.
Students must have ID*s. If you are in the building late at night and do not have an ID, Public Safety may ask you to leave.
SAFETY
If you are walking to your car alone at night, please call Public Safety, 629-3271, and have them accompany you to the parking lot.
Graduation for Fall 1983 - Please check with your advisor.
PORTFOLIOS
New students for the Fall 1983 semester need to pick up their portfolios from the office.
For its efforts in staging the First An-nual Designers* Ball last April, the College of Design and Planning Student Library Committee has won the Colorado Library Associations *s annual Library Benefactor Award. The Designers* Ball was planned by the students as a fundraiser for the Design and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library; the Ball raised $4,000.00 in proceeds and drew 500 attendees.
It also established a school tradition. The Second Annual Designers* Ball will be held March 30, 1984.
The Award will be made on October 18 during the Colorado Library Association’s annual conference in Colorado Springs. Accepting the award will be Connie Brace, Chairman, Martha Carlson, Marti Hamlen, and Mary Ellen Kemp, Librarian. Proceeds from the Ball have been used to purchase ■ ^^securiLj^^^sten^oi^the^Librar^^^^^^l
MAIL-IN REGISTRATION
To assist students with Mail-In Registration, Advising times will be scheduled a week before the deadline. Please signup in the College office at the information counter.
WINTER TERM COURSES
January 2 - 27, 1984
ARCH 665-3 POTENTIALS IN GROWTH PROFESSIONAL
INTD 690-3 EXPERIENCES IN THE FINE ARTS FOR DESIGN AND PLANNING STUDENTS
L A 512-3 SPECIAL GRAPHICS
PCD 570-3 DEVELOPMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL FORM
PCD 666-3 PLANNING AND FLICT; THEORY OF COMMUNITY AGEMENT COMMUNITY C0N-AND TECHNIQUES CONFLICT MAN-
Please contact the office course descriptions. for times and
ASC NEWS__________________________________
November 22-26
ASC National Architecture Student Convention in Atlanta
Money is available for transportation of a student representative.
If interested contact Cathy McNally.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING Graduate Divisions 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2755
October 17, 1983
Dear Colleague,
Our forthcoming accreditation review is for the full accreditation of our Masters degree in Landscape Architecture. As you might suspect it is very important to us and to the college.
We feel we are in great shape and ready to meet this review. This certainly is in large measure due to the longstanding effort and support of our allied colleagues
I especially wanted to make sure you knew the accrediting team would be here from October 23 through October 27, 1983, and you had our personal invitation to come to the reception on Monday, October 24, between 5:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Street Center next door. Please come if you can.
Again thank you for your continued support in our behalf.
Sincerely yours.
/iMs
Daniel B. Young, Director
Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture
DBY/kal

AIA Annual Convention May 6-19,1984
Phoenix,Arizona
TEN DESIGN LECTURES College of Design and Planning University of Colorado at Boulder Thursdays at 8:00 P.M. N141 Fine Arts
October 27 DANA CUFF
"Prolems of Architectural Practice”
November 3 FRANCIS VENTRE
"Policy Environment for Environmental Design" November 10 ANTOINE PREDOC
" Faces of New Mexico"
AT THE DENVER ART MUSEUM
October 26 "Captains Red-Hot Blues Band'
DRAMA
October 20-22 "Moonchildren" a comedy Auraria Arts Building____8:00 P.M._______
CONTEST
Colorado Shakespeare Festival poster contest
Deadline October 31,1983
For Specifications call: 492-7355
DENVER CENTER CINEMA
October 21-30 United Bank Denver Int'l Film Festival
October 24-28 CANEXUS, Canadian Contract Furniture Exhibition Toronto
October 25-27 "High-Tech Exchange" National Architecture in Industry with IBM San Jose
November 2-6 Society of American Regis. Architects Annual Convention
New Orleans
November 9-10 CONTRACT/Facilities Design and Management Conference "Computer-Aided Space Design and Management" New York
INTERIOR DESIGN - CHANGES AHEAD
Starting next semester, the present Interior Design curriculum will be updated to create a more "design responsive program." Tentatively planned are the addition of five - week programs including interior construction details, color lighting, elements of structure and office furniture systems. This addition comes in light of the success of such programs as the Furniture Design class offered this Fall. It is hoped, in addition, that the new program will have greater interdisi-plinary appeal among architecture students. Many of the business oriented classes will be phased out to accommodate the changes.
Good news for people interested in the Environmental Signage and Graphic class:
It will be offered this Spring despite its cancellation this Fall semester. The class which is taught -by John Gaudreau currently with Ginsler and associates will also be important for those interested in presentation methods.
As yet unscheduled, guest, lectures and seminars are being lined up for the coming months. However, the Boettcher Foundation is planning an auction - dinner (probably in March or April) to raise money for a lighting lab. More information will come as the organization of the event continues.
LAMINATIONS LECTURES Bi-weekly, generally held on Wed. at noon in Bromley, Room 202. Features faculty and professionals expounding on issues relevent to the design student. Dan Young,
Ken Fuller, Paul Saporito, Chester Nagel, Virginia De Brucq and others promise a provocative series this semester. See bills posted about the College for specific details.


Full Text

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• I VOLUME S I X NU!1BER ONE UNIVERSITY OF COlORADO AT DENVER COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING

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COLUMN "'1 Do you want to be a successful architect -or at least give one and all the impression that you indeed have arrived? Then learn to speak the language -the architect's venacular! Become a member of this elite group of individuals in three easy steps: 1) Select a word or words from each of the following columns. 2) Combine with a few mundane connecting words or phrases. 3) Stump the nearest "layman" with your expertise and/or write a letter to your mother throwing in a lot of your new vocabulary. plastic legible •tion .d .. 1 eolog ical composit .f 1on I rdglllent dti.on appropriat e primitive Positive transparent postulate extruded arcade urbane volumetri c narcissistic spontaneous contrast stress v..\.t''b \.Oc. I -}_t' 2 fragm entation barrier-free soci a l reality Pret ent l.ous fenetrat. 1on esoteric eut.t:'i b a n a l COLUMN 3 isolationism respond dated urban . ication exy enuous Lchael-Graves rationalism struct ure . dsciplina!. 1. " wants t o be" varigated symbolic implications post-modern c lassicism accept contextualisrn construct define cantilever multi-disciplinary tll.l ,k__ I \rP J" ._. I -\ ,JJ -. "-./ ..........

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,./''•)' } ' TtiiJ I alvar o pisoni I S T H E AMERICAN CITY BECOMING MEDIEVAL? What is h appening in the America n cit y in terms of u rban form psychology? What is the historical m eanin g of the "Mall" and othe r s paces for the people, in this con text ? Ever y city has its own phases of matura tion. Th e who l e of these images, signs and meanings c r eate the hist o ric p eriods, w hich have the t endency t o repeat the m selves in o n e spira l -ascending develop In this context, the European c o l onizati o n of the American continent and the c reatio n of new cities, is c omp arable t o the G reek colonization of the M editer rean, befor e the Roman empire. From those places of a n c h orage and opportunities, n ew c i v ilization c a n revive and expand the mselves into the hinterland, b y the frontier adva n cing . This happened for the old Rom e and this for USA. the beginning , this process is r apid, for the influx o f experiences and enthusiastic forces f r o m the old world a r e Th e citie s a r e desi g n e d -for a sense of equality most ratio n ally that is possible and a s basis to begin the ne1v " a dventure." They c a n expa n d themselves o n a virgin l and by a grid system w here o nly som e symbolic and idea listic f unction s a r e e x alte d : the political/administrative c enter, the cultura l o nes, the court house, the stadium, the tra n s port a tion cente r s . . . the milita r y o n e . T h e city has n o limits in its b lock by b lock expan s i o n . Th e enthusia sm and the opportunities of g r owth g ive the stre n g t h to look o nly t oward the future . Culture is u nder s tood as the ability t o solve "practical" p robl e m s . Th e " a b stract" cultur e -of expressi o n s and sentiments belongs onl y t o a past whic h i s respected, but separated f r o m present intentions: the old Greek world f o r the Roma n s o r the European o n e for the A m ericans. The livin g as a continuation o f that past mea n s a weakness s i g n for who have arr ived i n a virgin land t o start all o v e r again. (And for who m the expressi o n of the "abstract" culture i s e n o u g h , s u c h as the "import ation" of a G reek philo sopher t o Rome , or a n European t o American. ) Therefore, also the A m erican city repeat s its own first devel opment p h a s e toward the f utur e . . . or better, it seem e d so t o me while I was i n Eurooe . Then, arriving i n USA. I have unde r s tood tha t this firs t o hase i s c lose t o finishing , and a lso the "ne w w orld" citv is becomin g old and passing into its second phase. medieval milan ...:..............:.:..:..:...:...:.....:.:.:...:......:..•:.•:..:.•.•:....:.•,•,•,•,•,•,•,•:..:.•.•,•,•:..:.. t this point, when the city fininishes its first age, it begins the m anipulation, arrangement and " adulteration" m oment of its parts. The enthusiasm and ideals of its birth and first expansion are goin g t o be replaced b y the criticis m, considerati o n s and research of n ew images. Too late: these images are not possibie t o create ex-novo a n ymo r e , but onl y integrate them i n the previous structure. In other words , men realize tha t during the expansion "mania," the actions, the phy s ical structure and the opportunity cre a tions we r e more important for them ... and they have forgotten t o consider also the human personalitites and weaknesses. This also happened when Plato imagined his colonial cit y which belonged only t o his utopian ideal, not human in i t s behavior but only a symbolic image of extreme specializations. Now they feel the necessity to creat e spaces for the people in the A m erican city, and they begin to rest o r e it and renew it, so as the 1 6th St. Mal l in Denver. Now the American city is looking for its center; it centra lizes itself and becomes more European. This is what I c a l l the second p hase for a new city. They begin t o manipulate its parts; the y put its moments in relation and the y feel the n ecessity o f a structur e amo n g the functions. Th e starting rational and geometric grid design is not enough anymore. Therefo r e , the meaning of the functio n s become more important than num ber s o r s chematic matrixes ... and the city begins t o stratify itself! Is this a m o m ent of refle ction, a p a use? No, it i s only a natural growth process of a living o r ganism. Finding a n othe r historical parallelism, the A m erican city is entering into its m aturatio n p eriod so as the former Roma n cente r European colonies -become independ ent-starte d a wonderful age of s ettlem ent and n e w more human values: the Gothic o r Middle Age . The Age of human spaces, m arke t s and m e r chants, jugg lers and minstre l s , b anks and shows on pia zzas a n d streets. For me, the American M all ean s this " h o p e," so a s the Quincy in Bost on, the E mbarcadero and Ghirardelli Squa r e in S a n Fra n cisco are goo d e x a mples. hey a r e important moments even if, f o r o w, they a r e more an economic than soci a l nswer. y interpre t ation is perhaps provocative , ut certainly courageous, about what i s h a n ging in the American city environment. t i s interesting t o observe tha t this e f rom o n e t o another phase, c o uld en als o without lost wars o r revel ions (unless the V i etna m wa r or the ippies" have been so important for the ican society!). t D enver is still too young , aggressive full of enthus iasm t o feel the necesity of introspection. For it, this proess is only a t the beginning and the 'hope" (as sai d above) not clearly defitive. The 16th St. Mall wants to be example in this context: a combination distinctive old and new buildings; a pace for the people; a 16 block s ystem o f atterned g r e y and red granite with other terior design components, o r ganized th the will t o b e a lso a spine which ies downtown together. This "modern" esign -produced b y a team headed b y I . M . e i & Partners-for me has old meaning s a n ew envir onment. In the interpreation of this Mall, I observe that it as only changed its image. De nver wanted c h a nge the copy without being ready ; thout feeling the necessity to interpre t wish and meaning of pause, exchanges, onversations, discussions and games. I s t a compro mise? a street which ses a totally economic citadel, from t o gate, from terminal t o t erminal, where the meaning of these two landrks is perhaps more import ant tha n the ty imag e itself. There is n o widening , r a piazza , n o r a cor e . One has only t o 'travel" o n this street, designed m ore for h anical craft p atterns than for the n g and sto p of p e o p l e . I n a comical inematic s ense , it h a s m o r e the o f o n e A m erica n Old Wes t street, e r e two rival cowboys f aced each other t o pposite ends for a shoot out. The & F Tow e r could b e your rival seen f rom e C apito l ( o r viceversa)! In conclusion, D e nver's Mall i s n o t yet the Gothic decomposition of one stra i ght line into softe r and more o rganic curves re people m o v e m e n t creates s paces. But D enver's Mall still means the b e ginning o f a M edievalizatio n proces s f o r the rican city , as it is alread y in actio n B oston, San F r ancisco o r a lso New eans. It i s the s y mboli c passage from phase of idealis m and enthus iasm, t o a se of m o r e practical commercial tra des exi s t entia l crisis; in othe r word s , s m o r e auto n omy , c h a r acte rizatio n distinctio n of images and feeling s . city is continually m oving a way f r o m rura l world. It become s speci alized, reating inside a new structure o f rela ionships a mong ori ginal functional and ic landmarks, and creating m o r e ces f o r merchants and people convertions. The r efore, the cit y no longer itself in a military and extroted sense, but in a more human and ultimate phase timate one . . . and it becomes " a theatre.' city recognizes the human weaknesses becomes more mature. us wait for anothe r "Boccaccio' s will describe the XXI city! Denver, Sept. 9, 1983 Alvaro Pisoni, Italy

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L L L THE MANY SPLENDORgD MALL annie wright The mall is a many splendored thing, multifaceted to the po int of being unnameable. Simple, but not s implistic, it gathers activities, concepts and emotions like an extraordinarily lon g and elegant strip of flypaper. The 16th Street Mall has created ne w life i n a formerly cow ( d own) town. A point of departure for Denver's aborning urban identity , i t waits only to be devel o p ed, played on like a virgin S teinway. R oo! Back, girl, back. Remember , your first impressions of the mal l were n o t so kindly. First thoughts a year ago were that it did very l i ttle indeed with the possibilit ies, creating e legance a t the expense of i nterest. There is n o t enough seating ; not enough variety i n pla n or part; planter s on which i t is impossibl e to sit; fountains whi c h wash the feet of unsuspecting tou r i s t s ; paving which thoug h beautiful is too subtly colored and t oo easily (permanently?) dirtied; little , in fact , but lights, a nd rows of lights which only look lonely a t night when everyone had gone home (except architecture students) a n d leaves the m all to its unvaried emptiness. Shucks, its true: the mal l is not perfect t he mall has problems. Compared to t hat Place Extraordinair e of Denver's peopl e watchinglun c heaters, Skyline Park, a nd the Boulder Mall, a veritable Peopl e ' s Park of informal activity, the RTD' s Path of G l o r y leads but from o n e end to the other. How boring. The mall i s a g l orified Street. Well, that' s the worst of it, b u t the m all a lso increasingly appears to be a success. Why be a total curmudgeon o n the subject. (Curmudgeoness?) Eve r y project has its problems b u t t he mal l also has parades, gathering s for speeches from the May D & F Tower, sculpture shows a nd lots of supporters. Some t i mes i t seems the better o r more creative the project, the mor e tempting i t is t o n i t pick. (Who nitpicks Larimer Place?) When I crawled out of m y Sloug h of C u r mudgeonry, I realized there are mor e generous, ob jective and helpful ways to v iew the project. Doing this viewing f rom the Mall Exchange' s n e w outdoor cafe soaking up Denver' s clim atological a dv antages helped . So did the sign the street (oops, mall) advertising 60 shops, 6 cafes for the new Tabor Center; so did knowing I could hop a shuttle t o the other e nd any old time ; so did m y tour of the Market Street Station exuding its own cartoon y brand o f transportation imagery a nd sur-, , , ... . ... ' ::.:::... .. .' ............ . . roundeCTl:l y T o t s oT g reen s pace pres1de d over by the contemp o r arily correct atrium of the R T D Adm inistr atio n Building . e t c . e t c . You get the picture . T h e Fe d eral Reserve B u i l ding across from Park Cen tra l l oo k s t errific whe n viewed across both the Mall and i t s own front l a wn. Wher e the mall begins t o disappoint are those areas along its sides where the c ity i tself becomes dull a nd uninterest i ng. I begin t o see the m all in a new way as back d r op for activities gene r a t e d o n i t s edges a nd even beyond. It serves a larger a n d more subtle function than placemakin g a nd while it is a p e d estrian space, it is quintessentia lly a n Ame rican o n e , a place for p e destrians to meet n o t onl y each oth e r but the i r whee l s , a place t o go in as w ell a s on. T h e m all i s a n o rganizin g force, n o t a p laygr ound; it offer s op p ortunities. T h e m all is a c h allenge a nd a b e ginning . It has improved a g reat deal in t h e first year a n d has d one s o f r o m b eing used. All architecture i s subject t o change a nd the vagaries of use. While we like t o crit b u ildi ngs on the process w hich l e d t o their form, we t oo oft e n i g n o r e the c ontinua tion of that process in their daily use. B uildings are livi ng e l e m ents of a society. T h e mal l can no t really b e approach ed truthfully and realistically in a n y othe r way . It i s a living part o f Denver now. The o rganis m of the city has been g iven a spine a n d we expect it t o evolve in new ways . As i t does, the mall t oo will grow and c h a nge. So the mall is not a finished p r o du c t , it is a p iece of the action a n d the m ain questio n t o ask is how best o n e could interpre t this rol e . The questio n implies n otio n s of scale, u n i t y , c l arity a n d perhaps the ability to be self-effacing, the willing ness to help a cit y d iscover i tsel f . A t least thi s appears to have been the interpret ation o . I.M. Pei a nd Partners. In the June ' 83 AlA Journal, Harry Cobb FAI A , partner in c h a rge of the desi g n for Pei's firm, explains the decisi o n t o s implify the mall design. " The distinctive c haract e r of 1 6th Street i s est a blished by the extraor dina r y diver sity of the s treet wall ... We wanted the m all design t o be complem enta r y to tha t diversity. The refore, we were l ooking for a few ver y simple co m po n ents whic h could be seen as integr a t e d a n d unfyin g e l e ments." So unds lik e the Mar ines: " A Few Good Elements," a definite l y classy approach and the m a l l i s definite l y a classy mall. T h e basi c concept of a few s imole elements is simila r t o the o n e developed b y L a wr e nce Halprin in his desig n o f the N i collet Mall in Minne a polis in the 60's. Where the attempt i s to simplify and c l arify transportation p aths in the city, where the attempt is to revive the city's sense of its d o wn t own as coherent and attractive ; a understated solution seems n aturally to pres ent itself. The questio n raise d h e r e then, is not the c o n cept but the interp r e t ation. In Minne a p olis, Halprin use d jus t a f e w simplifying elements, but h e a p p roached the pla n differently , d e emphasizing the long boring street v i stas (8 blocks) by gently undu lating the p aths o f the buses . Pei and Compa ny h ave don e just the o p p osite here in Denver. They have emphasized the view down the length o f the mall (12 blocks) b y the use o f lights a nd trees a nd unwavering bu s l a n e s This differ e nce i s a t the heart o f the most c ommonl y heard criticism of the m all namely , that it is boring, a dull straig h shot without imaginatio n in its allocation o f space. But this is Denv er, n o t Minn eapolis , a nd the lon g vista is a t ypically West ern e xp erience. The m a l l c a n p erhaps b e seen a s a metapho r of tha t West ern exp erie nce. The oasis in the desert. (Th e r e could b e bluegras s statio n s as well a s ph o nes a n d kiosks) Cobb is a lso qu o t e d in the AlA J ourna l artic l e as c omparing the g r anite patterns t o "the unfolding o f a sna k e ' s skin i n whic h the d esig n i s v e r y pronounced i n the center without p atterns o n the e dges. A stylized sna k e in a stylize d desert : t h e m all reflect s D e nver's conse rvative W estern p e r s on ality. Th e p atterning works well in allowing the paving t o meet the buildings i n a n eutra l way wit h out col o r or p atterning conflicts. The over all beauty of the granite a nd the multipurposed lights i s undeniabl e , b u t the overall feel i n g of the m all i s extre mely und ersta t e d i n a g r ant sort of way. Quite apart f r o m the s im plicity of the d esign, the r e i s a s e nse o f same ness f r o m block to block. The r e a r e both symmetrical s e ctio n s in the middle blocks and sections a t eithe r e n d , but the differ e nce i s scarcely noticeable The m a l l i s a n exercise in subtly . B u t it i s the subtl t y of the d e s ert a nd of the m ountain f l o w e r s , s o ver y tiny a n d scattered. The desert i s quite bla t a n t in t erms of size, the sheer stre t c h of e m p t y l a nd t o the far h o rizon, but with in the desert, exp e rience i s quite dif ferent. You h ave to kn o w wha t y ou a r e looking for; but if y o u d o , it is there in a bund a n ce. Thus with the mall: the l o n g vis t a hits y ou o v e r the head with its stra i ghtness , its f l atness.and its length, but o nce traversing its length, y ou are slowly seduce d b y the beauty of its fine l y crafted details. Perhaps w e s h ould v i e w the shuttle buses as modern day s tagecoaches, hurtling passengers fro m on e commercia l outpost to the other. Whether the mall i s see n as brilliantly subtle , unimaginatively b oring or some mi xture in between, it is nonetheless true that the is young. It is growing and in the process of change. More seating bike r acks, possibly vendors a r e being planne d in the near future. The tree s are also an element of change and growth, n o t only from year to year but from season to s eason. This summer their leafing did a lot to curb the long vista; this winter, they will frame it. P erhaps they will acquire lights such as those on the trees in Larimer Square or in front of Terracentre. Denver has many choices to make. Feeding on changes it helped to create, the mall stands ready to be expanded into the fabric of Denver' new century urban life ..

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Margo Schultz The r e are certain times during the week when the three yea r old Sixteenth Street Mall is fairl y inactive. To stroll the mall during one of these periods and casu ally r emark t o one's compan ion that the mall is empty and is therefore a failure, is complete nonsense. What w e h ave unfolding before our eyes on the Sixteenth Street Mall is multi-facete d transformation and change. The mall i s "becoming" a nd its good overall design a nd continuing management a r e the keys to its assured "success". W e are beginning to see the r ounding plaza a reas play off and accent through contrast, the formal linearity of the mall with its straight line of trees and l i ghts. Wri ter' s S quare for example, with its diagonal lines a nd liberal use of brick, offers a repast from the hard mat erials of the city with its warm a nd colorful shrub beds . Providing change in texture and overall c haract er, these surroundin g plazas b ecome alluring offshoots of the main promenade. Thou g h the gray, granite paving of the mall has sometimes been perceived as co ld, it can a lso be a r g ued that it functions as a backdrop, encouraging merchants to come forward a nd participat e in the mall tableau with out running the risk of clash i n g with it. New opportunities have recently been for develo pers t o provide creative a nd lively space s at the g r ound l e v e l with the use of the phrase "need n o t be e n closed" in the zoning regulations. We are .witnessing the development of new con stitue ncies as places like Marlowe ' s and the Mall Exch a nge with their outdoo r dining areas, stimulat e people into new habits. Recent zoning r evisions have also provided major incentives for private developers t o integrate mor e r e tail shops, further his t oric preservation and s upply ample light exposure by setting building towers back off the mall corridor. In this way , ric hness of detail a nd light are assured. The r e are certain times of the day when t h e mal l is very c rowded, a nd it seems that what attracts people most o n the mall is other people. "People like to sit in the mainstream," reports William Holl y Whyte, noted pedestrian expert . Whyte and Fre d Kent of the Projec t for Public Spaces h ave both been integrally involved in the development of the downtown man agement strategy for Denver. According t o Whyte, people in any successful urban plaza have a dency t o station themselves near ob jects such as telephones, kiosks, fountains, flowerbeds, etc. All of these things, ..................................... t•••••••••tttttttttttttttttttttttttttl including grouped seating, are supplied on the mall and are well used. The hordes of people seen using the central seating areas of the mall during the business hours don't seem to mind the noise or sight of the transportation buses o n either side of them. They have been provided with ring side seats a nd have plenty of everything to look at. Variety is another important feature in seating. Informal choices of seating to the side, up front, in back, in groups, o r alone are unfortunately on the mall. Although ideally seatin g provided should be phy s ically comfortable, it i s also important that it be socially comfortable. This means flexibility a nd c hoice. Merch ants are coming t o realize that people seated informally o n walls, around landscaped areas or on stairs near their businesses are actually good for bu siness. Merchants a nd mall management people need to be encouraged t o continue to provide m ore flexible kinds of seating -thereby increasing the richness of experie nce o n the mall. Additionalli , transportation and tra nsportation systems manag ement a r e large factors in the c reati on of a lively Other cities , suc h as Portland, Oregon which have institute d ride sharing, bicycles, public tra nsportation and flextime, h a v e had s uccess in spreading the peak h our crunc h of travel and have inc reased s uccess in r e t ail revitalization. In his presentation at the 19 82 P e destrian Conference in Boulder. Richard Fleming , President of the D e nver Partnership ( a public/private partnership overseeing urgent mall issues) report ed , "If yo u stre t c h work hours on a systematic basis a nd get s tores to be open those hours, it opens a whole new set of markets for the department stores, shops and restaurants downtown because people are the r e from 7 a .m. to 7 p . m . We are also trying to introduce into downtown, a sense of m anagement where a r etailer, a prospective r e tailer, a n investor or a developer will b e able to enter a secure downtown context with the confidence that he or she will find s ervices that r esemble the types of functions or services found in a well-run s h opping center." This means scheduled events as well -something the mall needs terribly. The terrific thing about the Six teenth Street Mall is tha t ever yone is contributing. We see new uses a nd things changing everyday a t many levels. Only in time though, as we see mor e and more of these exciting ideas come into fruition, will w e have a mall that is a showcase both day and night. What makes an urban space habitable for t h pedestrian? Last month in Boulder, the hosting of the annu a l pedestrian conference addressed just this question. In m o r e •detailed discussions heade d by local :architects and planners, Jan Gehl, n o teabl 'urban desi gner from Copenhagen posed test questions like , "Would yo u like to raise your children there?" and "Would you like to g row old the re?" These tw o questions mark sufficient guidelines for discussing the necessar y of urban experiences. Issues r anging f ron the safety and patrolability of a city t o ithe varie t y of textures, colours and spatial definitions a nd most imp ortantly the role of the Automobile were prim a r y in the debate. aut o m obile i s a primary function oi 1the m o d ern city but is n o t fun ction i t self. Has t h e f or"rited t h e r i ghts or raLner t h e 'r,,•ht-o lV' , the ped.lstria n? !'he reality """t L e has u ndermined the pedestria n to such a n extent tha t the sidewalk a n d adjacent street level f un ctio n s have dimi nishe d in some cases, t o the p oint of providing a t most, a n inconspicuous entrance. D enve r with the recent development of the 16th St. Mall has m a d e a significant s tep t owards establishing a renewed dialogu e bet wee n the p e destria n and the street scape. Multifunctional and cross refer e nced urban systems are key in giving the city back to the g u y on the street. isbill '8

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ARCHITECTURE & CRITICAL IMAGINATION by wayne attoe Mara Gai Katz wiley 1978 188p. In when Wayne Attoe's book "Architecture and Critical Imagination" was published, it may well have eluded an audience that would find it most b eneficial; the student of architecture: t o w hom the understanding of architectural criticism is of primary importance. In his work, Attoe contends that architecture criticism has received only minor attentio n as a discipline, and maintains tha t critics have made few contributions t o the understanding or improvement of the built e nvironment . What Attoe then seeks to illustrate is that criticism will be most effective and useful when it informs the future. Initially, the various forms of criticism are broken out, and described by the premise upon which they are based. Criticism can then be viewed as a process guided by a certain logic and consistency Attoe employs both graphic and literary means t o substantiate his assertions. He draws upon published critiques by noted critics with enough regularity tha t we become familiar with applied critica l methods. He remains careful throughout to expose the entire range of possible orient ations and biases, so that we gain as comprehensive a view as possible as to the boundaries, or lac k of, in the critical imagination. Beyond methodology, Attoe explores the relationship between the critic and the work under s crutiny. He sees simply that all criticism is comprised of both the works of interest, and the critic himself. The biases of that critic, and the role he sees himself as playing will affect and inform his criticism, and may in fact, b e a major factor in the critics' assessment and response. What becomes clear t o us, then, is that once we can recogn1ze those biases, we a r e free t o drop a defensive stance , and to learn from the critica l encounter. Where Attoe ma y fall short of the mark is in his apparent unwillingness to set forth a concret e method b y whic h architectural criticism could, in fact, info rm our future decisions. What he is able to do, however, is t o de-mystify the critical process for u s . In doing this he provides tools of remarkable value: it is with those tools that w e are able t o develo p analytical and perceptive skills, and ultimately p ass judgement on our own work as d esig n ers. In recognizing the importance of each individual's critical abilities, Attoe also alerts us to the significant role that criticism plays in our educa tion. He is aware that attitudes developed in the academic environment we know as students, very often travel with us and affect our vision in later years. Attoe hopes that "for every student leaving school there is a memory of at least one notable critic-teacher whose wisdom, sensitivity, enthusiasm or moral outrage was sufficiently compelling to provide a reference point in years o f designing to come. Attoe' s concern for the effect of criticism is timely: more and more the ryublic sector takes part in decisions about their built-environment. Increasingly, design criticism must reach beyond the boundaries of insular academic and Jrofessional circles, and attempt to inform, and necessarily, influence the public as well. It is because architectural criti is so fundamental to a rchitectural education, in any form, that Attoe's book is important, for few other sources can offer such a thorou g h interpretation of the critical process to help the student arrive at their own . ---..._ _ _ guy auguste moussalli ........... .., .'l;.. .. ---: ;.URBAN PLANNING AND POLITICS IN FRANCE In F r ance, the Stat e (in terms of n atio nal government) played a larger role in housing policies and urban planning since the reconstructio n period. At the end of World War II, deficits in t erms of dwellin g units were caused by the heavy destruction and dilapidation of old housing stock, nonr enewed over the years. Moreover, demographic book between 1946 and 1950 with rura l migration t o urban areas prompte d the devel opment of public housing construction progr ams answering the needs of working and middle classes. Located on the outskirts of cities, public housing buildings, known as "Grands Ensembles" were conceived in a s tandardize d way, following the functionalist architects' concepts of the "Charted' Athenes." Quantity took over quality and human scale a t that time, due to large gaps between dwelling units and housing needs. During the sixties when economic expansion occurred, costly urban renewal p rograms arose in olde r parts of the cities, p articularly in Paris. President de Gaulle and Pompidou wanted it to be Europe' s financial metropolis. Thus, to "clean" the center of the city from the working class and t o adapt it to the n ew intern atio n a l economic conditions were the goal s of these operations. The State provided the private sector with the inf rastructures of projects such as the business distric t of La Defense. Th e b i g marke t of Les Halles Centrales built by Baltard in 1853, roofed in glass on an iron framework, were demolished to be replaced by a financial district, not implemented. Thus, the distric t was known a s the Hole of the Halles; it was only recently that the huge underg r ound commercia l center was developed, n o t far from the " Centre Pompidou . " A n othe r pro ject which was p roposed and fortuna tely n o t implemented was the construction of an express highway along the banks of the Seine river. Similar operations were conducted in big cities as Lyon and Marseille. Those operations open e d the old core of cities to traffic and international styl e t o w ers, thus breaking the scal e of the urban fabric . The Montparnasse towe r i s a striking example. The diversity of the old h e ighborhoods disappeared too, when their inhabit ants were relocated in the suburbs ending a n etwork of social r e l ations and ties. The importance of old housing stock in France, estima ted at more than 4 millio n dwelling units built centre pompidou before 19 48 and lacking most o fort and sanitation, was r ediscovered with the economic crisis of 1973/74. O n the other hand, and as in Amsterdam a n d Brussels, the urban struggles o rganized for the preservation of the old n e ighbor hoods were in mos t cases led by the middl classes who, as a consequence, were becoming more and more part of Mitterand's socialist constituency. In such a s itutatio n of political and economi c crisis, a new urban policy was develop e d i n 1974, with the election of P resident Giscard Est aing . This n ew urban policy focused on the rehabilitation of the d e terioating housing stock, the development of pedestria n streets and the p rovi sion of recre ational a menities a t the n e i ghborhood' s scale. That policy doesn't invo lve heavy spending since the work is done piecemeal, by local, small construction companies. Actually, the socialist government is tryin g-to implement a soci a l housing policy to m a k e affordable housing for low income peopl e and elderly in the heart of cities. This policy is made difficult because housing and land values are deter mined by the real est ate market. Hence, discussion on urban policy in F r ance focuses on socio-economic question r ather tha n aesthetic ones , because the l a nguage of architect u r e tends to be abstract and the elite ' s privilege. The r e l ationships between work and housin g places, between housewife and habitat, between child and the city , the develop ment of small activities generating jobs and integrated t o the dwelling place, are a m o n g som e of these socio-economic , and political question s that F r ance amo n g countries such as Holland and Belgium seeks to address whe n implementing socia l welfare oriented licies. CONSULTATIO P OUR L' DU QUARTIE E RNAT I ONALE AGEMENT HALLES, PARIS

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II II I! I I 1 I I II I ! Once again, t h e mall i s a central issue in these pages. Perhaps this reflects its centrality and position as Denvers new the nuc l e u s about whic h life and developm ent r evolve and collide. By focu sing a s eries of artic les f rom the p oint of v i e w o f Planners, Architects and L andscape A r chitects. we hope t o contr i bute t o the dialogue and controversy surrounding the mall, and hope to hear f r o m read e r s o n this, (and other) questio n s . This year h e r alds a new ser v ice t o the univer sity and the community by Laminatio n s ; a biweekly lecture series featuring lectures and discussion s by faculty and profession als in all desig n disciplines. Th e fir s t lecture, entitled "Process in Desi gn," was give n by Dan Young , Chairma n of the Department of L andscap e A r chitecture. Lectures are held ever y othe r Wednesday at noon and feature a lecture-discussi o n format. Bills posted throughout the College of Design and P l a n ning will a d vise. The next issue o f Laminations will explore issues associated with the concerns o f Women in the Desi g n Professions. We would w elco me abstracts of proposed artic l e s o n this and other subjects whic h may inte r est our readers. Place submissio n in the L aminations mailbox, sec o n d f loor Bro m l e y , include self addressed stamoe d enve l o o e . Laminations is a publication of the students in the College of Desi g n a n d P l anning a t the University o f Co l o rado, D enver. 1100 14th St. 8 0 2 0 2 . It i s published four times a year; gener a lly in Octobe r , December, Mar c h , and May . T h e opinions e xpresse d in L aminations a r e those of the authors and d o n o t necessarily reflect the views of a n y offi c i a l of the College of Desig n and Planning o r o f the University of C o l o r a d o . L etters t o the edito r and othe r communi cation s are encouraged and may b e submitted t o t h e Lamina-tions m ailbox o n the second floor of B romley . No sooner had w e r eturned rom our summer sojourn than we heard o f a terrible brewing s candal developing in our hallowed halls. A 700-level student had signed up for a desig n course in summer school and later retracted her enrollm ent when she got a job . The universit y retained her on record however, even as she was jetting awa y t o a faraway state, with nary a n academic thought in mind. Imagine her surprise when she returned t o find that she had attained a grade o f Bin a course she never attended. It just goes to show, doesn't it, what dedication and h ard work can do. * * * We strolled b y the Bromley hallways the other day i n our usual condition of stupefaction only to hea r bizarre noises emanating f r o m the stairwell. Upon minute investigation we discovered that the hissing, whezzing s ounds were made b y persons attempting to climb the stairs, and that the Bromley elevator, abused for so long, had finally expired. The sight of wheezing, staggering design students is one we had become accustomed t o long since, but not in such quantities. We resolved to avoid the entire distasteful issue b y continuing to use the EC elevators (besides, they are closer to the snack b ar). * * * Several of those wheezing, hyperventilating persons were on a desperate search for the CCDD offices. Imagine their states of mind when told that, instead o f a short hop to the first floor, they would have to ascend eight stories to find the "new" CCDD. Thankfully, the EC elevators were functioning and these ons could b door FACULTY A D VISOR ! ROBERT KINDIG ' EDITOR TOBIAS E . GUGGENHEIMER J A CQUIE "ANDERSON AVY AVIRAM RON BOUDREAUX STEPHEN CASH GREG COMSTOCK HICHAEL DARNER VICTOR GARCIA PENELOPE GREGORY MARK HOGAN JENNIFER ISBILL NATE KAHN MARA GAl KATZ PEGGY KINSEY PATTY KREMER BOB LUNDELL WILLIAN NELSON ALVARO PISONI ANNIE RULE MARGO SCHULTZ TIH SHEA STEVEN WALSH SUSAN 1-JALSH BRIAN WALTER ANNEY WRI GHT ttl wJ..o p t?A'J.di.U.. .. w . "' ::> {/) ro ::> {/) o ::> We have it o n good authority tha t the thin air a t that height will not affect the Center' s oper ations. * * * Amidst all this we have seen Planning students, pal e and blinking in the light of day, appearing from their subterranean abode t o investigate their new H Q o n the first floor, B romley , where CCDD had been p reviously locate d . We asked o n e student h o w he liked the new quarters, light-filled as they a re. He stared throu g h d ilute d pupils, and said: v ery spacious, ver y spac i ous. * * * Speaking of diluted pupils , the d e s i g n pupil s this year a r e the dilutest we have ever seen t hem. Not a tra c e of dirt. Not a hint of scandal: (Well, a l mos t none). The most we have d redged up i s an affair o r two, honest-to goodness, er, love. S i c kening, isn' t it. Shiver city. We remember years past, or s t ories of years past, when parties w e r e * * * With this issue, we begin restaurant revie ws . A t ypical UCD-CDP student lament is how t o b e gin Sunday s with a GOOD breakfast o r brunch. A leisurely stroll through Capitol Hill revealed the existenc e o f the Mer cury Cafe, 13th and Pearl. Sunday brunch with C hampagn e , eggs, salmo n , e tc.et c . a t more than reasonable prices. We recommend Leiza' s Tofu , where sauteed tofu replaces eggs, with excellent potatoes, oni ons, terrific h ome-made bread, and coffee. We recommend this course o f action: walk to Together Books, 13th and Sherman (open at noon), get Sunday New York Times. Stroll up 1 3th Ave. t o Mer cury Cafe; penetrate to interior, dark, converted garage. Wait t o De seated. Order g reat breakfast. R ead Magazine section. Eat slowly, t o fabulous jazz band whic h is there o n Sundays, and other times, too. Pack up the paper, walk o n down t o Azar's Big Boy ( 1 3th and B roadway) f o r a n authentic , Jumbo H amburger Sandwich with all the trimmings. Read the Art s & L e i sure sectio n . Scoot o n over to the Chapultep0c ( o n 20th) f o r drinks and g r e a t jazz, the n h ome to bed. D o your h o me w ork Monday norn.

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NOTES FROM dolores THEFT Please keep your personal belongings with yo u or locked in your locker. Students must have ID's. If you are in the building late a t night and do not have an ID, Public Safety may ask yo u to leave. SAFETY I f you are walking to your car alone at night, please call Public Safety, 629 -3271, a n d have them accompany y ou t o the parking lot. Graduation for Fall 1983 -Please check with your advisor. PORTFOLIOS New student s for the F all 1983 semester need to pick up their portfolios from the office. MAIL-IN REGISTRATION To assist students with Mail-In Registra tion, A dvising times will be scheduled a week before the deadline. Please sign up in the College office a t the informa tio n counter. WINTER TERM COURSES January 2 27, 19 84 ARCH 665-3 POTENTIALS IN PROFESSIONAL GROWTH INTD 690 3 EXPERIENCES IN THE FINE ARTS FOR DESIGN AND PLANNING STU-DENTS L A 5 1 2-3 SPECIAL GRAPHICS PCD 570 3 DEVELOPMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL FORM PCD 666 3 P LANNING AND COMMUNITY CONF LICT; THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF COMMUNITY CONFLICT MANAGEME N T Please contact the office for times and course descriptions. ASC NEWS November 2226 ASC National Architecture Student Conven tion in Atlanta Money is available for transportation of a student representative. If interested contact Cathy McNally. , , GALA ACCOLADES, For its efforts in staging the First An nual Designers' Ball last April, the Col lege of Design and Planning Student Lib rary Committee has won the Colorado Lib rary Associations's annual Library Benefactor Award. The Designers' Ball was planned by the students as a fundraiser for the Design and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library; the Ball raised $4,000.00 in proceeds and drew 500 attendees. It also established a school tradition. The Second Annual Designers' B all will be held March 30, 1984. The Award will be made on October 18 during the Colorado Library Association's annual conference in Colorado Springs. Accepting the award will be Connie Brace, Chairman, Martha Carlson, Marti Hamlen, a nd Mary Ellen Kemp, Librarian. Proceeds from the Ball have been used to purchase a security system for the Library. UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING Graduate Divisions 1100 Fourteenth Street Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 629-2755 October 17, 1983 Dear Colleague, Our forthcoming accreditation review is for the full accreditation of our Masters in L andscape A r chitecture. As you suspect it is very important t o us to the college. We feel w e are in grea t shape a nd ready to meet this review. This certainly is in large measure due to the longstanding effort and support of our allied colleagues. I especially wanted t o make sure yo u knew the accrediting team would be here from October 23 through October 27, 1983, a nd y ou had our personal invitation to come to the reception on Monday, October 24, be tween 5:00 p.m. a nd 6:30 p.m. a t the Lawrence Street Center next door. Please come if you can. Again thank you for your continued support in our behalf. ''"'J):U Daniel B. Young, Director Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture DBY/kal , , LAMINATIONS LECTURES Bi -weekly, generally held o n Wed. a t noon in Bromley , Room 202. Features faculty and professionals ex p ounding on issues relevent to the design student. Dan Young, Ken Fuller, Paul Saporito, Chester Nagel, Virginia De Brucq a nd others promise a provocative series this semester. See bills posted about the College for specific details. AlA Annual Convention Phoenix,Arizona May 6-19,1984 'l'EN DESIGN LECTURES College of Design and Planning University of Colorado at Boulder Thursdays at 8:00 P.M. Nl41 Fine Arts October 27 DANA CUFF "Prolems of Architectural Practice" November 3 FRANCIS VENTRE "Policy Environment for Environmental Design" November 10 ANTOINE PREDOC " Facej3 of New Mexico" AT THE DENVER ART October 26 "CaptaJ.ns Red-Hot Blues Band' DRAMA October 20-22 "Moonchildren" a comedy Auraria Arts Building 8:00 P.M. CONTEST Colorado Shakespeare Festival poster contest Deadline October 31,1983 For Specifications call: 492-73 55 DENVER CENTER CINEMA October 21-30 October 24 28 October 25 27 November 2 6 November 9-10 United Bank Denver Int'l Film Festival CANEXUS, Canadian Contract Furniture Exhibition Toronto "High-Tech Exchange" National Architecture in Industry with IBM San Jose Society of American Regis. Architects Annual Convention New Orleans CONTRACT /Facilities and Management Conference "Computer-Aided Space Design and Management" New York INTERIOR DESIGN -CHANGES AHEAD Starting next semester, the present Interior Design curriculum will be u p dated to creat e a more "desi g n respon s ive program." Tentatively planned are the additio n of five week programs including , interior co n struction details, color lighting, element s of structure a nd office furniture systems. This additio n comes in light of the success of such programs as the Furniture Design class offered this Fall. It is hoped, in addition, that the new program will have greater interdisiplinary appeal among a r chitecture students. Many of the business oriented classes will be phased ou t t o accommodat e the changes. Good news for people interested in the Environmental Signage a nd Graphic class : I t will be offered this Spring despite its cancellation this Fall semest er. The class which is t aught . b y John Gaudreau currently with Ginsler and associates will also be important for those intereste d in presentation m ethods. As yet unscheduled, g uest lectures and seminars are being lined up for the coming months. However, the Boettche r Foundation is planning an auction dinner (probably in March o r April) to raise money for a lighting l ab. More information will come as the organization of the event continues. '