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Laminations, December, 1983

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Title:
Laminations, December, 1983
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
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Denver, CO
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University of Colorado Denver
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English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
THINGS IN GENERAL
Anon
Anderson
Hill
Hogan
Kahn
Left Side Story Dutch Treat Observable Frustration Strange Bedfellows The Erection Of History


Editorial
Letters
IACQUIE ANDERSON AVY AVIRAM RON BOUDREAUX STEPHEN CASH GREG COMSTOCK MICHAEL DARNER VICTOR GARCIA PENELOPE GREGORY MARK HOGAN JENNIFER ISBILL NATE KAHN MARA GAI KATZ PEGGY KINSEY PATTY KREMER BOB LUNDELL WILLIAM NELSON ALVARO PISONI ANNIE RULE MARGO SCHULTZ TIM SHEA STEVEN WALSH SUSAN WALSH BRIAN WALTER ANNEY WRIGHT
A retired sixties era revolutionary recently accused college students of unsupportable apathy and reminded them that democracy,like chicken soup, needs to be stirred up now and then, or risk developing an unwholesome film. In-tellectural growth in the academic arena faces an equally distressing fate when the pot is not agitated frequently. One would imagine a graduate school boiling with intellectual ferver, fueled by hotheaded students defending ideas wise or foolish, encouraged by the faculty to challenge the sanctity of reigning holy cows. This atmosphere, traditional at universities of note throughout history, sadly does not exist at UCD, at least not in the College of Design and Planning. Instead, technocratic, apolitical, and unopinion--ated faculty and student body meet daily to impart or absorb "knowledge" or to sharpen skills directly translatable into marketable talents.
Special lectures are poorly attended; and why not?, nothing practical to learn. Letters don’t raise issues, but merely announce an event or broadcast a mild grievance. Faculty are allowed, in some cases, to stifle the academic and constitutional liberty of free expression by basing grading on "attitude" (read opinion), not on an agreed set of standards. A malaise exists -in this institution one which should be diagnosed post haste, for the soup is skimming up.
Editors Note
Due to circumstances beyond our control, the majority of articles concerning women in design will be published in the first Spring issue of Laminations. Instead, we offer a potpourri of sentiment and reflection, indicating that the art of thinking is not totally moribund over here. Once again, we request of our readers a challenge or acknowledgment.
The entire staff of Laminations (I speak for them all) wish our readers a pleasant holiday and urge you to consider submitting an article which outlines your pet theory or peeve.
Effective this Spring 1984, the College of Design and Planning has instituted a system of grading in which plusses and minuses will figure in the computation of final grades as follows:
A = 4.0 points
A- = 3.7 it
B+ = 3.3 ii
B = 3.0 ii
B- = 2.7 p
C+ = 2.3 ii
C = 2.0 ii
C- = 1.7 ii
D+ = 1.3 ti
D = 1.0 ii
D- = .7 ii
p = 0.0 it
REPORT FROM THE CSA TO THE EDITOR
The Colorado Society of Architects offers a vast array of services and programs to both its members and to architecture students.
The education committee, chaired by Jerry Seracuse (S.L.P.) has been meeting with UCD students to organize a drive to get outside design professionals involved in the architecture program at UCD. Three levels of member involvement have been established:
1) Design critics for problems after they are completed
2) To become involved with a specific problem and work with a group of students during the course of that problem
3) To become an advisor for thesis students
If you are aware of a design professional who would like to get involved with our school, please have them call Trudy McDermott at the CSA office.
The CSA holds annual meetings which consist of speakers, meetings, slide shows, product displays, etc.
This years meeting was held at the Hilton Harvest House in Boulder.
Speakers such as Richard Fleming, executive officer of the Denver Partnership, Inc. The Cambridge Seven and Ron Straka helped to make the event a resounding success.
Next year’s annual meeting will be held at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs in December 1984.
CSA presents a Design Awards Program to honor members judged by their peers to have produced the most outstanding designs in the state. The winners are honored at a banquet held at each annual meeting The CSA also co-sponsors the student design awards with UC and UCD.
A government affairs committee has been formed to affect legislation related to the architectural field. Professional lobbyists have been acquired who are sure to make a positive impact on our state legislature. Any students who are interested in working with this group should contact the CSA office or your student rep.
The CSA office offers a documents/book sales service to the public. They will even special order books or documents that aren’t in their stock.
On the subject of books, "City Spirit," a bookstore with an emphasis on architecture has just opened in Denver at 1434 Blake Street. They feature new and used booksjmagazines, and fine art.
This store is worth checking out!
The Educational Fund is the CSA’s foundation for grants and scholarships. Information concerning any new available monies will be posted in February.
Within the depths of the CSA office, a job listings file can be found which lists positions CSA members have open in their firms. A must for those starving (but talented) architecture students.
The CSA newsletter "The Field Report" is also available to students. To get on the mailing list, either call the office or see me, your friendly CSA rep
Those hard-working CSA office personnel are developing a calendar of events.
The calendar will be delivered to UCD in late January.
There’s a lot going on. If you’re interested in getting involved or just stopping in (a real congenial atmosphere) the office is located at 1459 Pennsylvania, Carriage House and the phone is 831-6183.
Marc Sternick
CSA Student Representative
TO THE EDITOR
New periodicals and annuals ordered for the library are listed below; subscriptions will begin as of January, 1984.
Chicago Architectural Journal Via
Garden Design Space and Society Passive Solar Journal Art + Architecture Western Planner Small Town Fine Woodworking Landscape Planning International Architect Stores of the Year Threshold: the Journal of the
University of Illinois School of Architecture Precis
Annual Review of New American Arch. Annual of American Architecture
TO THE EDITOR
It appears that Thesis Prep, and Architectural Design will not be offered in the 1984 Summer Session. The decision, which was made behind closed doors, does not seem to consider the sentiments of the student body. Particularily disturbing is the intimation that courses such as "Apples and Architecture" merit greater status than do design related courses.
Many students who hoped to accelerate their course of study were assured by their advisors that these courses would be offered. We feel discouraged by the policies of the present administrator and request not only these courses be offered, but that students be consulted about decisions of this type in the future.
- Concerned Students
TO THE EDITOR
What or Where is the State of Architecture today? I don’t know. I don’t CARE! I just want an ’A* in Design!
-Needs it Badly
TO THE EDITOR
Amazing developments have already begun for this year’s ball. The location will be One Civic Center Plaza (only the anchor and terminus of the 16th Street Mall!), on March 30th, 1984. Fundraising efforts are well underway and we are pursuing a "name" band of regional/national recognition.
However... the Student Library Committee planning the Ball is presently composed solely of Architecture students. This is an allschool event - actually an elaborated version of the student spring dance. Therefore, not only would we greatly appreciate, but also desperatively need, input from Interiors, Landscape Architecture, Planning, and Urban Design students on the Committee.
If you thought last year’s ball made a big splash...this year is going to be a tidal wave! So catch the wave and be part of this incredible event. Look for signs on all floors for the next Student Library Committee meeting as soon as you read this copy of Laminations. Please join in.
Dan Dalziel
Chairman of the Ball


Destination,
elaine anderson
De Stijl
DO WE STILL...
TRAVEL THE SAME ROAD AS DE STIJL?
The Journey:
The trip began in 1917, originating from Leiden, a small town in the Netherlands, where the man-made landscape of rectangular fields, straight road and canals can be transposed into the language of De Stijl. The movement rose out of the chaos and horror of World War I, and the revolutionary upheavals of the middle and working classes which brought about a social reform, leading to the reform of the bourgeouis capitalist society that had been in power up to that time. The De Stijl group, via their own expertise in the arts, journeyed forth to bring some sense of harmonious order to the new developing society.
The Map:
Used as a form of orientation and direction was a monthly magazine, "De Stijl", from where the movement got its name. "De: being an assertive prefix stating that this was the only style appropriate to modern art and culture of that time. "Stijl" being the idea of style as an absolute concept. Within its pages can be found the idealistic philosophies of a loose collaboration of artists who set off to purify the formal vocabulary of the arts. Referring to all forms of art such as painting, architecture, furniture and graphic design, in order to help reintegrate these in to the new life style of their vision.
During its 15 years of publication, (the documented duration of the movement) the articles and essays strove to fuse ethics and aesthetics toward a total cultural program.
The Driver and Passengers:
The collective group of artists were banded together by the editor and publisher of the periodical, De Stijl;
Theo van Doesenburg, who became the movement's primary spokesman. A painter by profession, a protagonist by nature with a fundamental idea that "architecture was a synthesis for all the arts". He experimented by projecting his paintings into space beyond their two-dimensional confines, in order to try and "resolve architecture in color". Some of van Doesenburg's "fellow travelers" included the following:
Gerrit Rietveldt - whose designs in furniture became a mascot for the De Stijl movement. The most famous, the Red/Blue chair of 1918 of which he states, "The construction is attuned to the parts to insure that no part dominates or is subordinate to the others. In this way, the whole stands freely and clearly in space, and the form stands out from the material."
His later achievements in architecture such as the Rietveldt/Schroder House of 1923, working with the dimensionality of space and color created what could be distinguished as a group of freely related planes and lines that appear to hover in space. The importance of each element within the whole had been achieved once again.
Piet Mondrian - the great prophet of De Stijls utopian dream, brought not only his paintings of straight edge clarity and color but also a form of jazz music to be synthesized from three tones and three non-tones.
Of his art he states, "My painting is an abstract surrogate of whole..."
He offered his paintings and ideas to the public as a temporary substitute for that ominous universal harmony that was not yet a reality in the daily lives of Europeans. As can be seen with each man; (not to forget the many other De Stijl artists) their commitment to the new Socialist lifestyle was so strong that it became the dominate element with each art piece created.
The Vehicle:
The craft these men piloted consisted of the most elemental components...
* the primary colors •the straight line •the rectangle
in which each became its own subject matter. Absolute abstraction replaced any representation of a natural object, which was held by the De Stijl artists as a distortion of the divine purity of the laws of creation. Based on geometry, as is nature, only this "art of pure relationships" could render a visual image of these harmonious laws and thus provide for man a means towards the realization of that harmony.


Strange Bedfellows
Critical
Concerns
by Mark Hogan
Abandoned rail cars sit silently Eighteen wheelers echo the crossing of potholes and steel off concrete viaducts bridging a wasteland of absol-esence. Steel wheels shriek as diesel engines push their loads bound for points beyond. As I sit in the growing light of another day, I listen. "Is this the sound of opportunity knocking?"
No question, this great plane of oil slicks and broken glass has been fertilized. The offspring of past and future has been concieved in the Central Platte Valley.
Statistically the largest undeveloped tract of urban land in the United States, This unborn child is already growing.
The nurturing of it’s growth however, is perilously still in doubt. In the chambers of city hall, custody of this child is debated yet it!s growth continues. Can a marriage of strange bedfellows, private enterprise and public concern, bear the task of developing "the best possible use"? Can these distinct entities even establish a common goal? Is it possible that together they might seek a higher objective than they might pursue independently? Can this marriage sustain the objections of the central business district which lashes out at any threat of competition?
Still, this embryo grows. The Central Platte Valley (C.P.V.) will be born into troubled times. Just as young children today must grow to face the task of protecting the resources threatened by their fathers'hindsight so must the C.P.V. Face from it’s birth the responsibility of securing an environment suitable for growth. To supply it’s needs the C.P.V. must create it’s own umbilical cord(s).
The need for new transportation i-nfra-strucutres in the Platte Valley is one critical concern ana several alternatives exist. One possibility of a limited scope is based on the immediate needs of the developers. Such a plan would provide ample access and egress to new development with connectors to existing infrastructure. This system maximizes land available for development and minimizes the adverse effects of vehicular traffic. Land values are maintained at higher increments and consequently profit is increased.
The other alternative establishes Denver Master Planning as the greatest priority. Depending on the relative foresight of the final master plan, Denvers' greater transportation needs are addressed over developers profit.
As current growth patterns in the metropolitan area are examined the import of sound transportation planning becomes more evident.
At present the influx of new development into suburban centers is creating ,a serious threat to the prosperity of the urban core. However, transportation improvements could reverse this trend. Effective commuter service would present an alternative to the traffic nightmares that now confront downtown office workers. Outlying parking facilities connecting to people movement systems such as the 16th Street Mall, would ease the burden of making downtown visits for shopping, business and entertainment. Pressure on the central Platte Valley to provide such transportation facilities exist due to itfs proximity to rail corridors and major highways. In fact the C.P.V. is itself the biggest barrior between
downtown and auto access. The C.P.V. is also the only access point yet to be developedJ to superimpose access from the North, East or South would require massive demolition projects and create expense to both the public and private sector.
Only those unfamiliar with Denver’s recent growth are unaware of the imbalance between urban working environments and urban living environments.
If Denver has been unable to shake it’s image as a Western cow town, the reasoning is likely due to it’s lack of city life. Purging Denver of this affliction is more than lower downtown can accomplish single-handedly. The nigh percentage of newly completed residential units still unoccupied is testament to the cities internal lack of vitality.
The lungs.of the inner city are absent altogether. Park space of even minor proportion does not presently exist within walking distance of lower downtown. Again the Central Platte Valley offers the possibility of solution. Because Cherry Creek and the Platte River offer park space this area could provide a valuable center for high density residential development.
"Eyes" on the park allow residents greater security and comfort and this in turn establishes activity, even at night. In addition if residential development was to occur in this area, a multiple of other needs could be served.
A balance to office environments could be established, better entertainment would have a good customer base and existing downtown retail stores would gain the means to compete with suburban shopping malls. A barren wasteland turned urban center, but that might not happen.
Unlike the issues concerning the Central Platte Valley, this page has an end in sight. But without great vision it is apparent the future holds the possibility of two extremes, mutually exclusive.
This infant of huge proportion can be born of care, sensitivity and higher purpose or as the bastard of self interest and shortsight, the promise of Denver’s future or the suffocation of a cities last great opportunity.
Can we imagine a great city while missing the sound of opportunity knocking?
TOWARDS A MORE JUST DESIGN CRITIC by Glenn E. Hill
The purpose of this article is to provoke thought about the critical evaluation process in architectural design studios. There is an observable frustration among architectural students that hinders their learning during the critical evaluation of design problems. This frustration stems from the lack of a clear understanding of what is expected to be learned from the design problem, as well as the lack of concise criteria for the evaluation. A closer look at these two issues may give us some direction as to why they exist.
When students are given a design problem, it is often ambiguous as to what specific principles and concepts are suppose to be developed. These educational goals are not clearly defined, instead are replaced with instructions to create "a good design". Most instructors reasoning behind this teaching method may be that architecture is so multifaceted and complex that one cannot define what is to be learned*that concisely with each design problem. Yet, in many business schools "case studies" are used to present students concepts and principles pertaining to very complex business decisions. The instructor narrows the case study down to a point where there are only certain principles and concepts to be experienced at one time so they can be more effectively understood and not confused. The student must still come up with a solution to the problem, but the issues he or she is to experience are clear. The same thought and precision can be applied to the development of a design problem. If this basic methodology were applied, educational goals would be established and could be related to the students.
The student would then know what he or she is supposed to learn from the particular assignment.
This raises the issue of established criteria for the evaluation of design problems. All to often, the evaluation
by critics seem very unjust and irrelevant to the student, because students do not clearly understand how the comments relate to what they have designed. The issues covered by the critic often are not the same issues that the student originally understood as primary to the design solution. Thus, the student-should not be evaluated on issues he did not even know existed, but on those that were primary in his or her solution. To do otherwise would be like an art critic judging a students landscape painting by saying, "It would be better if it was a portrait".
This confusion could be eliminated if the educational goals (issues) were appropriately defined in writing before the beginning of the design process and were standardized for all the students dealing with that specific problem.
This could then be the basis for an evaluation criteria that both the student and the critic would use to evaluate whether or not the student developed an appropriate solution.


Phallus & Freudotypes
By Nate Walden Kahn
The majority of people in our society who believe themselves to be sophisticated, would probably, deny, that myth or mythological symbolism has had any controlling effect on thier behavior or beliefs. The fact is that mythological symbolism has a profound effect on our individual behavior and our society as a whole. The symbols of Christian and pre-Christian patriarchy permeate Western culture and are actively promoted by Western technocracy.
As architects, designers and planners, we must examine our own beliefs, for symbolism is basic to the design process Phallocentric thinking and the images of patriarchy pervade the field of architecture whether consciously or subconsciously. This article is far too short to exhaustively examine all the examples of phallocentric doublethink in the field of architecture. Let us merely call our attention to the problem by looking at the sumbolic associations of a few basic concepts and images.
One of the major concepts designers are asked to address is the idea of "procession." "Approach and arrival" and "experience of arrival," the "progression of spaces," "the colonade" and "the promonade" are all images of procession. This concept, so basic to design, is one of the most fundamental symbols of patriarchal society.
The mythic symbolism linked to the concept of procession is complex, encompassing a wide spectrum of social models. Patriarchal society revolves around myths of processions. Ritual and ceremonial processions may be seen in military routines and parades, government functions, social gatherings, and religious services. All these processions are modelled after a paradigmatic myth. These earthly processions attempt to recreate the "divine" procession from, and return to, god-the-father. In the celestial myth, all creatures proceed from this god, and 'all return unto him.'
To take this one step further, in Christian theology, processions also occur within the godhead. Of particular significance is the fact that this is a procession of a divine son from a divine father. In this symbol-system, the father is the origin who thinks forth the son, who is the perfect image of
himself---that is, identical in essence.
Their union is so total that "brotherhood," or "brotherly love" proceeds from them. This all-male trinity, the ultimate symbol of procession, is the model for all varieties of male monogender systems.. The basic concept of procession is thus inextricably linked to phallocentric rationale.
It is no coincidence that the colonade and the classical Greek temple can be ultimately connected to patriarchal processions. The classical temple-form, which has been copied, studied, and lauded for centuries, was the sanctuary of Greek deities, most often that of Zeus and Apollo. The mythic-symbolism of these two gods is very enlightening.
Apollo was the personification of anti-matriarchy, the opponent of earth deities. His name is said to have been derived from appollunai, meaning "destroy." Apollo's real enemy was a female creature, a dragoness named
"Delphyne"--- a name connected with an
old word for "womb." Apollo killed her immediately after his birth; he also encouraged matricide. With perverse appropriateness, his first temple was built at a place named "Delphi." Upon this temple was engraved the maxim: "Keep women under the rule."
Further significance is found in the myth of Zeus and Dionysus. Dionysus is commonly seen as the mythic compliment of Apollo. The word "Dionysus" means "Zeus-young man," ie; Zeus in his young form. Dionysus was, in fact of myth, his own father. The parallel with Christian myth is inescapable.
Historically, there is evidence that the development of the classical temple-form is linked to the same influx of people into southern Greece who brought with them the prototype of patriarchy, Apollo. Apollo was almost certainly an intruder, arriving at the end of the Bronze Age and displacing the more ancient earth deities. By the seventh century B.C., the oracle at Delphi (the temple to Apollo) was consulted on a wide range of matters, by many states. The oracle of Delphi had become a kind of clearinghouse of ideas. By the sixth century B.C., the temple to Apollo played a key role in the political fortunes of the Greek states; major powers, such as Athens and Sparta, struggled to control, or at least dominate, the sanctuary. These powers embraced a strongly patriarchal society. The symolic representatives of this society were Apollo and Zeus, and their temples.
These symbolic images have been reaffirmed and reinforced through history. Rome, the ultimate representative of the military procession, continued the use of classical Greek architecture, with the temples being regarded as the height of Greek architectural achievement. And when, in the eighteenth century A.D., interest in the antiquities of classical Greece was revived, it was the temples which attracted the attention of architects. Thomas Jefferson, and others chose classical temple images to represent the new American nation. Again and again the use of classical temple images requires us to look into the significance of this form, and its basic meaning. Why is the classic temple-form, the colonade, so much a part of our basic aesthetic background? If we believe the influence of myth and symbolism, then the meaning is clear: it is the processional (sic) reinforcement of a phallocentric system.
Many other basic design concepts may be interpreted in the light of patriarchal symbolism. The basic design concepts of "entry," "boundaries" and "gateways" have an ominous side to them: boundary-violation is the most favorite game of patriarchy. The propensity to erect artificial boundaries and then violate these as "enemy" territory is characteristic of phallocentric society. Wars among nations, corporations, and administrations belong to this category of invasion and defense. Boundary violation is symbolic of the ritual of
quite easily invoke this system of phallocentric symbolism.
These issues strike at the fundamentals of Architecture as we know it. And while images or concepts in isolation have a socially recognized beauty, they nevertheless retain and convey their symbolic meanings. Perhaps such systems are perceived as "beautiful" because we are taught to believe so; it is a taught aesthetic. Yet, to discard these fundamental, basic design concepts such as procession, boundaries, and entry leaves empty what we know as "Architecture." Obviously a new architecture is called for; it must come as a new society, a new mythos. As women enter the field of architecture, we must hope they will bring a new way of thinking, a new society, a new aesthetics, and a new Architecture.
Design issues of Functionalism, and the Machine aesthetic must be scrutinized for their roles in phallocentric society. Modern techonology and science allows our society the power to invade the boundaries of "hitherto unknown worlds." Scientists can play the role of singleparent, creating artificial life and manipulating existing life.
It is possible to interpret the contemporary concern for contextualism as a further procession: patriarchal architecture respects/creates itself in n'ew forms; its essence is the same. The examples could clearly go on.


view From The Left
anon
ARCHITECTURE IN SOCIETY - FIX IT OR FORGET IT!
Architecture is a reflection of society. Unfortunately, society today is in a state of utter disarray. The world is caught in the midst of a struggle bet-^ ween two imperialist giants: the United States and the Soviet Union. They perpetuate wars because they have to.
Either they expand to maintain their investments, profits, markets, raw materials and cheap labor supply, or they go under. Today, there are at least 44 wars going on around the world. These wars involve tens of millions of people. Consequently, the casualities are staggering - hundreds of thousands in the last few years in Central America alone.
Sooner rather than later, these wars will develop into World War III especially as the Soviets and the U.S. sharpen their struggle for world domination. World War III makes nuclear war inevitable.
Is this the sign of a healty, booming society? Hardly! Is our built environment affected by any of this? Yes it is, but not to its credit.
Architecture in two of its most frequently occuring forms, skyscrapers and urban housing, has come to be sterile and ignorant of human scale only too often. Attention to scale is tremendously important, as a human being experiences buildings as they relate to the human body. Buildings which ignore the human being in terms of detail and proportion cause lack of interest and alienation.
When turning its back on the user, architecture fails in its most important functions (to serve the user by being a comfortable, inhabitable space in which to life, work or sleep.)
Fascist Italian and German buildings made a point of relegating the user to a position of infintesimal significance. Is this lack of recognition what we are coming to or, indeed, what we have arrived at? Is this the image we wish to project? The ruling class, whose members finance our mighty edifices, is not shy about its intentions. Uninhabitable buildings erected in the name of efficiency and profit are unacceptable. They reflect a society, which is unacceptable. Therefore, we must change
capitalist society and architecture, too will change.
To change society, that is to fight for revolution, is a very bold and difficult path to choose. It is ultimately necessary, but in the meantime, what is to be done? Architecture must raise their consciousness about the working class and its needs. We must change the educational system to incorporate training for both manual and mental labor. The special oppression of woman workers, or sexism, must be eliminated. Minority participation in the profession must be greatly increased. We must establish wage parity with all construction industry workers by raising architects1 wages, not by lowering the wages of others. We must also fight against racism by refusing to incorporate racist "artwork" or sculture in our architectural projects. We must strive for these goals. Only with concerted effort will we achieve them.
It is fair to say that architects serve the moneyed ruling class. Whether this be in the private or public sector. If a socially conscientious architect considers that the majority of the working class people have little or no say in architectural matters, but yet must live with the results, he or she would conclude that someone has shirked his responsibility to a great number of people (read users.) In the not so recent past, the architect (usually male) took it upon himself to rescue the working class by changing architecture. Working class consciousness was manifested only in the form of housing in which enforced discomfort in the name of uniformity was the norm. Diversity among workers was not accepted nor understood as a healthy actuality, even in the context of unified worker sentiment. Total uniformity is an idea which the ruling class would have liked to encourage, thus making their subjugation of the masses much easier. Certain ideas perpetrated by Bauhaus architects sych as "the intellectually underdeveloped worker" and his lack of architectural perspicacity show us just how sympathetic these architects were to the needs of the worker. These were elitist ideas of uninterested architects who felt workers didn’t matter. Well, they do matter.
It is time for the architect to extend his or her concern for aesthetics to a wider range of building types, such as to quality worker housing and decent factories. We must recognize that the common person needs and deserves places of quality in which to live, sleep and work. This is not a difficult or abstract conclusion to reach.
It is reasonable and necessary.
In order to break down the class divisions between people, we should implement work which combines mental as well as manual labor. This would be particularly beneficial in the field of architecture. A complete understanding of the art of building design requires a great deal of practical experience, which is not always so easy to gain these days. The struggles of the apprentice architect could be greatly lessened due to mandatory fieldwork. Physical work of a benefit to both mind and body.
Woman experience great difficulty in gaining field experience at the present time. Many contractors just won’t hire women. I have tried. The sexism which woman encounter if they do obtain a position for which they are qualified is deplorable. Sexism extends right into the architectual office, where woman have had to and still do have to work harder than their male counterparts in order to obtain increased responsibility and equal pay. Men and woman must fight together to change these injustices Minority men and woman experience the same problems of discrimination. We must strive for a multiricial, antisexist architectural community.
On the subject of wages, why shouldn’t architects earn wages comparable to those of other construction industry workers? The proposal here is to achieve wage parity not by depriving or freezing wages of others, but to raise the wages of architects. Construction workers, engineers and architects all go through extensive training and thus should be paid eauallv to compensate them for their education and ability to perform involved tasks.
The above stated demands are revolutionary working class demands. They are, when employed as a whole, a step toward achieving an egalitarian society, without racism, sexism or imperialism. Making individual changes in one profession is a respectable accomplishment. However, creating a society that encourages and enables all working people to lead decent, healthy qualitatively fine lives is the greater goal to keep in mind. Only by changing society from its decadent, decrepit present state to a wholesome egalitarian state in the future can we hope to pro-docue those reflections of society which we may be proud and justified in saying, "Yes, THAT IS ARCHITECTURE!"


Design+Energy
The architecture division recently announced the names of students who won a preliminary phase of the Design and Energy competition sponsored by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.
Glen Hill, Victor Garcia and either alternate Rob Rogers, or a student from the Boulder campus will have their designs sent to Washington D.C. to compete nationally for a prize of $2000.
Runners up were Steven Walsh, Nick Antonopoulis and Michael Shen.
According to Gary Long, the jury considered whether the building succeeded contexturally, whether the public spaced could enhance the experience of travel, whether the design considered bioclimactic implications, and whether utility was addressed.
GLENN E. HILL
MICHAEL SHEN
VICTOR L. GARCIA
STEVEN B. WALSH
NICK I. ANTONOPOULOS


Calendar
EVENTS CALENDAR
LECTURES/TOURS/SPECIAL EVENTS
DEC. 4-5 Colorado Historical Society: Denvet Mansion Tour including the McAllister, Zang, Mallo, and Grant-Humphries Homes. Purchase tickets at the Grant-Humphries. $2.00/person. Sunday, Dec. 4 from 12-4; Monday, Dec. 5 from 10-4.
DEC. 7 Colorado Historical Society:
Pierce McAllister Home.
Open house; "A 1920*s Christmas" 1800 Gaylord. 5:30-7:30 P.M. Non-members: $2.00 Members: Free. Reservations requested, 866-3682.
DEC. 10 Colorado Historical Society
Holoday celebration at the Heritage Center. Seasonal events for parents and children. 1-4 P.M. For info, call 866-3682.
DEC. 10 Denver Chapter AIA: 5th
Annual Meeting. Stanley Abercrombie, Editor of Interior Design Magazine,. Keynote Speaker. 1983 Interior Design Awards Presentation. Community Achievement Awards Presentation. At the Denver Athletic Club. Cocktails and dinner, beginning at 6:30 P. M. Prices: AIA Members.$25.00, Students $20.00, Non-Members $30.00 Reservations required 831-6185.
JAN. 23 or 30 Denver Chapter AIA:
Mayor Federico Pena and Bill Lamott. Date to be confirmed. $5.00 for s-udents, $8.00 for members, $10.00 for mon-members. Reservations requested. 831-6185.
COMPETITIONS
JAN. 25 Registration deadline. A New American House. Contact Harvey Sherman, Minneapolis Minn. 55404 (612)870-3238.
JAN. 31 Entry deadline, Innova
student design competition sponsered jointly by 4^ilson-art and the Interior Design Educators Council. Contact Innova: A Design Challenge Competition, McKone & Co. 2700 Stemmons Tower East, Suite 800, Dallas, Texas 75207 or call toll-free 1-800-792-6000.
JAN. 31 Application deadline,
National Institute for Architectural Education Traveling Fellowship in Architecture Contact NIAE, 30 W. 22 St.
New York, N. Y. 10010.
C0NFERENCES/WORKSHOP S
DEC. 6-8 Mid-Atlantic Energy Conference and exhibition. Baltimore Convention Center, Contact Elliot Boardmen (301) 251-9250
College Notes
NOTES FROM DOLORES
The University will be officially closed from December 23 - January 2, 1984.
HOLIDAY PARTY - Students Staff, * Faculty, Monday, December 12,
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
2nd Floor, Bromley Building.
Please bring your favorite Holiday speciality and enjoy a snack and sandwich with all of us. See you at the snack table.
Walk in registration - Week of January 23, 1984.
Spring Semester classes begin -January 30, 1984.
Spring Break - March 19 - 23, 1984. Spring Semester classes end May- 18.
CALENDAR REMINDERS Designer’s Ball - - March 30, 1984 Awards Banquet - - April 20, 1984 Commencement - - May 19, 1984
JAN. 18-24 Bau 84, Trade Exhibition of building materials, systems, and renovation, Munich, West Germany Contact Gerald G. Kallman Associates (201) 652-7070
EXHIBITS
DEC. 1 - APRIL 1
Colorado Historical Society: Stobie Paintings, Portraits and Landscapes.
DEC. 1 - APRIL 1
Colorado Historical Society: 19th and 20th Century Western Indian Basketry
DEC. 10 - FEB. 5
Denver Art Museum:
Colorado Artists Biennial
NOV. - JAN. 8
Denver Art Museum:
Planuwa Prehistoric Arts From The Southwest
NOV. - JAN. 5
Herbert Bayer:
Early Works on Paper
NOV. - DEC. 31
Denver Art Museum:
Intimate Fashions, Then and Now
NOV. - FEB 1
Denver Art Museum:
Phillippe Hallsman Photographs
JAN. 3 - FEB. 20
American Institute of Architects Building 1735 New York Ave. N.W. Washington, D. C. Exhibition: "The Art of Designed Environments in the Netherlands."
SPRING 1984 LECTURE SERIES:
COLLEGE OF DESIGN & PLANNING
FEB. 3, FAYE JONES, ARCH. DIVISION
FEB. 17, JOHN COLLINS, LANDSCAPE ARCH.
FEB. 29, MEYER WOLFE, PLANNING DIV.
MARCH 14, STEVE PETERSON, ARCH. DIV. BARBARA LITTENBERG
MARCH 26, KEN WALKER, INTERIOR DIV.
APRIL 6, ROBERT FRASCA, URBAN DESIGN GREG BALDWIN
APRIL 11, ROGER AHLBRENDT, PLANNING
All lectures will begin at 5:30 P. M. Locations will be announced.
Lecturers will also spend time in respective division studios with students prior to lecture.
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING
ARCHITECTURE DIVISION PRESENTATION SCHEDULE-DESIGN REVIEW WEEK
December 5-9, 1983
Final FIRST YEAR Presentations (500 Level)
Project: A Vistors Center on the South Platte.
Mon., Dec. 5th 9-12 A.M.
Wed., Dec. 7th 9-12 A.M.
Fri., Dec. 9th 9-12 A.M.
Final SECOND YEAR Presentations (600 Level)
Project: Auraria Campus Art Museum
Mon., Dec. 5th 1-5 P.M.
Wed., Dec. 7th 1-5 P.M.
Fri., Dec., 9th 1-5 P.M.
Final Presentations (700 Level)
Professors:
Kindig Tues., Dec. 6th 1-5 P.M.
Orleans Wed., Dec. 7th 1-5 P.M.
Rm. 813 Tower Bldg.
Kindig Thurs. Dec. 8th 1-5 P.M.
Heath Thurs. Dec. 8th 7-11 P.M Thurs. Dec. 8th 9-12 A.M Fri., Dec. 9th 5-9 P.M.
Davis Fri.* Dec. 9th 1-5 P.M. 660 Glenarm
Master of Architecture
THESIS PRESENTATIONS
Monday Morning - December 5th
8:30 Pat Johnson Ghost Art Colony
9:30 Kelly Moon Buddhist Retreat
10:30 Susan Gracey Mixed-Use Bldg. W FLA
11:30 Mark Fitzwilliam UCD Performing Arts Ctr
Tuesday Morning - December 6th
8:30 Susan Long Suburban Hotel
9:30 Tony Fort Florida Shopping Center
10:30 Kathy Noble Art Academy
11:30 Linde Weller Boulder Hotel
Wednesday Morning - December 7th
8:30 Dan Dalziel Club Sheraton
9:30 Chuck Steckley Roxborough Town Center
10:30 Yazid Al-Sulaiman Heddah Shopping Center
11:30 Kim Saporit Artist Co-op
Thursday Morning - December 8th
8:30 Les Nelkep ., Denver
9:30 Barbara Szantho Spruce St. Plaza
10:30 Beth Greenberg Omaha Mixed Use
11:30 Mark Williams Concert Hall
Friday Morning - December 9th
8:30 C. Foster Community Housing
9:30 Laura Greenfield Uni Hill Research Center
10:30 Alvaro Pisoni Santa Fe Dr. Development
FINAL CRITS - LANDSCAPE ARCH.
LA 510 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION 12/13/83 9-10:30 A.M. EC 214
Display of final design project which is also final graphic project. All faculty invited for informal discussions and to pick your three favorite graphics. Faculty votes will be revealed during session.
LA 510 FORMAL PRESENTATION OF FINAL DESIGN 12/9/83 1:30- 5:30 P.M.
Dravo Building, Room 720 *Your Retreat Home'
Faculty and outside professionals are invited for jury.


Full Text

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DEC 1883 . PUBLISHED .BY THE STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER THINGS IN GENERAL ANON ANDERSON HILL HOGAN KAHN Vict o r garcia LEFT SIDE STORY DUTCH TREAT OBSERVABLE FRUSTRATION STRANGE BEDFELLOWS THE ERECTION . OF HISTORY

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EDITORIAL A r etired sixties era revolutio nary recently accused college students of unsupportable apathy and reminded the m that democracy,like chicken soup, needs to be stirre d up now and then, or risk developin g a n unwholesome film. Intellectural g r owth in the academi c aren a faces a n e qu ally distressin g fat e when the pot is not agitat e d frequ ently. One would imagin e a graduate school boiling with intellectual ferver, fuel ed b y hotheaded students defending ideas wise or foolish, e n couraged by the faculty to challenge the san ctity of r e i gning holy cows . This atmosphere, t r aditional at universities of note thro ugh out history, sadly does not exist a t UCD, a t least not in the College of Design and Planning. Instead, technocratic, apolitical, and unopinionated facult y a nd student body meet daily t o impart o r absorb "know l e dge" or t o sharpen skills directly translatable into marketable t a l ents. Special lectures a r e p oorly atte nd ed; and w h y not?, nothing practical t o learn. Letters d on't r aise issues, but merely a nnounce a n event or broadcast a mild grievance. Faculty are allo w ed, in som e cases, to stifle the academi c and constitutional of free expression b y basing grading o n " attitude " (rea d opinion), not on a n agreed set of s t a nd ards . A malaise exists in this institution one whi c h s hould b e diagnosed post hast e , for the sou p is skimming up. Editors Note Due to circumstances beyond our control, the majority of articles concerning women in design will be published in the first Spring issue of Laminations. Instead, we offer a potpourri of sentiment and reflection, indicating that the art of thinking is not totally moribund over here . Once again, we request of our readers a challenge or acknowledgment. The entire staff of Laminations (I speak for them all) wish our readers a pleasant holiday and urge you to conside r submitting an article which outlines your pet theory or peeve. Effective this Spring 1984, the College of Design and Planning has institute d a system of g rading in which plusses a nd minuses w ill figure in the computation of final g rades as follows: A 4.0 points A-3.7 B+ 3.3 B 3.0 B -2.7 C+ 2.3 c 2.0 c -1.7 D + 1.3 D 1.0 D -. 7 F 0.0 dea r santa I have been a very good student this year and I don't want very much. Just talent, brains, looks, an electric eraser, sleep and a two week vacation in sunny Greneda LETTERS REPORT FROM THE CSA TO THE EDITOR The Colorado Society of Architects offers a vast array of services and prog rams to both its members and to architecture students. The education committee, chaired by Jerry Seracuse (S.L.P.) has been meeting with UCD students to organize a drive to get outside design professionals invoived in the architecture program at UCD. Three levels of member involvement have been established: !)Design critics for problems after they are completed 2)To become involved with a specific problem and work with a group of students during the course of that problem 3)To become an advisor for thesis students If you are aware of a design professional who would like to get involved with our school, please have them call Trudy McDermott at the CSA office. The CSA holds annual meetings which consist of speakers, meetings, slide shows, product displays, etc. This years meeting was held at the Hilton Harvest House in Boulder. Speakers such as Richard Fleming, executive officer of the Denver Partnership, Inc. The Cambridge Seven and Ron Stra k a helped to make the event a resounding success. Next year's annual meeting will be held at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colora do Spring s in December 1984. CSA presents a Design Awards Program to honor members judged by their peers to h ave produced the most outstanding designs in the state. The winners are honorerl at a banquet h eld at each annual meeting The CSA also co-sponsors the student design awards with UC a nd UCD. A government affairs committee has been formed t o affect legisl atio n rela t e d t o the architectural field. Professional l o bb yists have been acquired who are sure to make a positive impact on our state legislature. Any students who are interested in working with this group should contact the CSA office or your student rep. The CSA office offers a do c ument s/book s a les service to the public. They will even special order books o r documents tha t a r en't in their stock. On the subject of books, "City Spirit," a bookstore with a n emphasis on architecture has just opened in Denver at 1434 Blake Street. They feature new and used books,magazines, and fine art. This store is worth checking out! The Educational Fund is the CSA's foundation for grants and scholarships. Information concerning any new available monies will be posted in February. Within the depths of the CSA office, a job listings file can found which lists positions CSA members have open in their firms. A must for those starving (but talented) architecture students. The CSA newsletter "The Ffeld Report" is also available to students. To get on the mailing list, either call the office or see me, your friendly CSA rep Those hard-working CSA office personnel are developing a calendar of events. The calendar will be delivered to UCD in late January. There's a lot going on. If you're interested in getting involved or just stopping in (a real congenial atmosphere) the office is located at 1459 Pennsylvania, Carriage House and the phone is 831-6183. Mar c Sternick CSA Student Representative TOBIAS E. CUGGENHEIMER IACQUIE "ANiJERSON AVY AVIRAM RON BOUDP.EAUX STEPHEN CASH GREG COMSTOCK VICTOR GARCI A PENELOPE GREGORY MARK HOGAN JENNIFER ISBILL NATE KAHN MARA GA I KATZ PEGGY KINSEY PATTY KREMER BOB LUNDELL WILLIAN NELSON ALVARO PISONI ANNI E RULE MARGO SCHULTZ TII1 SHEA STEVEN WALSH SUSAN I'ALSH BRIAN WALTER ANNEY WRIGHT TO THE EDITOI< , New periodical s and annuals ordered for the library are listed below; subscriptions will begin as of J anua r y , 198 4 . Chicago Architectural Journal Vi a Garden Design Space and Society Passive Solar Journal Art + Architecture Wes tern Planner Small Town Fine Woodworking L andscape Planning International Ar chitect Stores o f the Year Threshold: the Journa l of the University of Illinois S chool of Architecture Precis Annual Review of New America n Arch. Annual of American Architecture TO THE EDITOR It appears tha t Thesis Prep. a nd Ar chitectural Design wjll n o t b e offered in the 1984 Summer Session. The decision, whi c h was made b ehind c losed doors, does not seem t o consider the of the student b o dy. Particularily disturbing is the intimation that courses such as "Apples and Architecture" merit g reat e r status than do desig n r e l a t e d courses. Many students who hoped t o accel erate their course of study were assured b y their advisor s that these courses would b e offered. We feel discouraged by the policies of the present administrator and r equest not only these courses be offered, but that students b e consu l t ed about decisions of this type in the future. Concerned Students TO THE EDITOR What o r Where is the Stat e of Arc h i tecture today? I don't 1 don't CARE! I j u s ! : want an 'A' in Design! -Needs it Badly TO THE EDITOR Amazing d evelopments have already begun for this year' s ball. The location will b e One Civi c Center Plaza (only the anchor and t erminus of the 16th Street M all!l on M arch 30th, 1984. Fundraising eff orts are w ell underway and w e are pursuing a "na m e " band of regional/natio nal recognition. H oweve r ... the Student Libra r y Committee planning the Ball is presently c o mpos e d solely of Architecture students. This is an allscho o l event -actually an elaborated v e rsion of the student spring d a nce. Therefore, not only would we greatly appreciate, but also desperatively need, input from Interiors, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design students on the Committee. If you thought last year's ball made a big splash ... this year is going t o b e a tidal wave! So catch the wav e and be part of this incredible event. Look for signs on all floors for the next Student Library Committee meeting as soon as you read this copy of Laminations. Please join in. Dan Dalziel Chairman of the Ball

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DESTINATIDNI DE STIJL elaine anderson DO WE STIL L ... TRAVEL T H E SAME ROA D AS D E STIJL? The Journey: The t rip began in 1917, origin ating from L e iden, a s m all t own in the N etherlands , wher e the m an-ma d e landscap e of rect angular fields, straight road and canals can be transposed into t h e lang uage of D e Stij l . T h e movem ent rose out of the chaos a n d horror of W o r l d W a r I, and the revoluti6nary upheavals of the middle a n d working classes whic h brought a bout a social reform, leading t o the reform of the bourgeouis capitalist society tha t had been in pow e r up t o tha t time . Th e De Stijl g roup, via their own exp ertise i n the arts , journeyed forth to bring som e sense of h a rm onio u s orde r t o the new devel oping soci e t y . T h e Map : Used as a form of orientatio n and direction was a monthly magazine, "D e Stijl", fro m whe r e the movement got its n ame . "De: b eing a n ass ertive prefi x stat i n g tha t this was the only s t y l e appropr iate t o m o d ern art and culture of that time. "Stijl" being the idea of s t y l e as a n absolute concept. Within its pages can b e found the idealistic phi losophies of a loose collaboration of a r t ists who s e t off to purify the formal vocabul a r y of the arts. Referring t o all forms o f art s u c h as p ainting , architecture, furniture and graphic design, in ord e r t o h elp r eintegr a t e the s e in to the n e w life s t y l e of their vision. During i t s 1 5 year s of publication, (the documente d d uratio n o f the move m ent) the arti c les a n d essays stro v e to f use ethics and aesthe tics t o w ard a t o t a l cultural p rogram. T h e D river and Passenger s : The collective g r oup of artis t s w e r e banded together b y the editor and publisher of t h e periodical, De Stijl; Thea van Doesen b urg, w h o became t h e move ment' s primar y s p o kesm a n . A painte r by professi on, a protagonist by n ature with a fundamental idea t hat " a r chitecture was a synthesi s for all the arts". H e experimented by projecting his pai ntings into space beyon d their twodime n s ional confines, in o rder to t r y a n d "resolve architecture i n col or". Some of van Doesenburg' s "fellow trave l ers" included the following : ........... ' / k . Gerrit Rietveldt whose designs in furniture became a mascot for the De Stijl movement. The most famous, the Red/Blue chair of 1918 of which he states, "The construction is attuned t o the parts to insure that no part dominates or is subordinate to the others. In this way, the whole stands freely and clearly in space, and the form stands out from the material." His later achievements in architecture such as the Rietveldt/Schroder House of 1923, working with the dimensionality of space and color created wha t could be distinguished as a group of f r eely related planes and lines that appear to hover in space. The importance of each element within the who l e had been achieved once again. Piet Mondrian the great prophet of D e Stijls utopian dream, brought not only his paintings of straight edge c l arity and color but also a form of jazz music to be synthesized from three tones and three non-tones. O f his art he states, "My painting is an abstract surrogate of whole ... " H e offered his paintings and ideas t o the public as a temporary substitute for that ominous universal harmony that was not yet a reality in the daily live s of Europeans. As can be seen with each man; (not to forget the many other De Stijl artists) their commitment to the new Socialist lifestyle was so strong that it became the dominate element with each art piece created. Th e Vehicle: The craft these men piloted consisted of the most elemental components ... 'the primary colors the straight line the rectangle in which each became its own subject matte r . Absolute abstraction replaced any representation of a natural object, which was held by the De Stijl artists BS a distortion of the divine purity of the laws of creation. Based on geometry, as is nature, only this "art of pure re l ationships" could render a visual image of the s e harmonious l a ws and thus provide for m a n a m eans towards the realization o f tha t h armony. ( :;> . . . L... .. .. 1 ; . r-----@: f

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STRANGE BEDFELLOWS by Mar k Hogan Abandoned rail cars sit silently E i ghteen wheelers ech o the crossing of potholes a nd steel o ffconcre t e v i a d u c t s bridging a wast eland of absole s e nce. S teel whe els shriek a s diesel e n gines p u s h their loads b o und for points b e yond. As I sit in the growing l i ght of anothe r day, I listen. "Is t h i s the sound o f opportunity kn ocking? " No question, this g reat plane o f oil slicks and broken glass has b een fertilized. The offspring o f past and future h a s bee n concieved in the C entra l P l atte Valley. S t atistically the largest undevelope d tract of urba n land in the United States, T his unb orn child is already growing . T h e nurturing o f it's g r owth however, i s p e r i l ously still in doubt. In the c h ambe r s o f city hall, custody of this child is debat e d yet it' s growth continues. C a n a marriage o f stra nge bedfellows , private enterprise a nd public co ncern, bear the t ask of developi n g "the best possible use " ? Can these d i stinc t entities eve n establis h a common goal ? I s it possib l e that togethe r they mi ght seek a hig h e r ob jective than the y mi ght pursue inde pend ently ? C a n this marriage sus t ain t h e o bjections of the centra l bu siness district whic h l ashes out a t a n y t h reat of competitio n ? Still, this e mbr y o g r ows. T h e Central P l atte Valley (C.P.V.) will be b orn into tro u b l e d times. Just a s young childre n t o day must g r o w t o f ace the task of pro tecting the resources threatene d b y t h eir fathers'hindsight so must the C.P.V. Face f r o m it's birth the responsibility of securing a n e n vironment suitable for growt h . To s u pply it's needs the C.P.V . must c reat e it's own umbilical cord(s). The need for n e w transportatio n infra-strucutres in the Platte Valley i s o n e c r itical concern a n a sever a l alter n atives exist. One possibility of a limited scope i s based on the immedia t e needs of the develop ers. S u c h a pla n would p r ov ide a m p l e access a nd egr ess to new dev e l op m ent with connectors to exi s ting inf rastructure. T h i s syst e m maxi m izes land available for development a nd minimizes the adverse effect s of vehicular traff i c . L a nd v alues are maintaine d a t higher incre m ents a nd co nsequ e n t l y profit is inc reased. The othe r altern a tive est ablis hes Denve r Mast e r P l anning as the g reatest p rior i t y . D e p ending on the r e l ative foresight of the fina l m aste r plan, Venvers' g reat e r transportatio n n eeas a r e add ressed o v e r d evelopers profit. As c u r r ent g rowth p atterns i n the met ropolitan a rea a r e exam i n e d the import of sound transportation p l anning becomes mor e evid ent. At present the influx of n e w devel opment into s u burba n cente r s i s c reating a seriou s t hreat t o the pro sperity o f the u rban cor e . However, tra n s p ortatio n i m p rovem ents could reverse this tre nci. commute r service w ould pre s ent an alt erna tive t o the traffi c nightm a res that now co n f r ont d owntown o ffice w o r ke r s . Outlyi ng parking facilities connecting t o people movement syste m s s u c h as the 16th Street Mall, would ease the burde n of making d o wnt own visits for shopping , business a nd enterta inm ent. P ressure o n the cen t r a l Platte Valley to provide such tra n s p ortatio n facilities exis t du e to it's proximity t o r ail corrido r s a nd major h i ghways . In fact the C.P . V . is itself the biggest b arrior b e tween d o wnt own a nd autQ access. The C .P.V. is a lso the only access point yet to b e devel o p ed; t o superimpo s e access from the North, East o r South would require massive d emolitio n pro j ects a nd create e xpense t o b oth the public and private sector. Only those unfamiliar with Denver' s recent g r owth a r e una w a r e of the imbal ance b e tween urba n working environments a nd urba n living environments. If D e n ver h a s been to shake it' s imag e a s a Western cow town, the reasoning is likely du e to it' s lack of city life. Purging Denver of this afflictio n is m o r e tha n low e r downtown can accomplish sing l e-handedly. The n 1g h percentage ot newly completed residential un its still unoccupied is testament to the cities internal lack of vitality . T h e lungs_of the inne r city a r e absent altogether. Park space of even minor prop ortio n does n o t presently exist withi n walkin g dis t a nce of l o w e r d o wn town. Again the Centra l Platte Valle y offers the possibility of solutio n . Because C h erry C reek a nd the Platte R iver offer p ark s pace this area could provid e a valuable cente r f o r hig h d e n sity residentia l development. "Eyes" on the p ark allo w residents greater security a nd comfort a nd this in turn establishes a ctivity , even a t nigh t . In addition i f r esidential d evelopm ent was t o occur in this area, a multipl e of other need s could be served. A bal a nce t o offi c e environments could be est a b l i shed, bette r entertainment would have a goo d c u s t o mer b a s e and existing d owntown r e tail s t o res w ould gain the mea n s t o , comp e t e with suburban s h opping mall s . A barre n w asteland tur n e d urban center, but tha t mi ght not happen . Unlike the issu e s concerning the C entral Platte Valley, this page has an end in sight. But without g r eat vision it is a pp arent the future holds the possibility of two extremes, mutually e x clusive. This infant of huge proportion can be born o f care , sensitivity and higher purpose or as the bas t ard of self inte rest and shortsight, the promise of Denver's future o r the suffocation of a citie s last great opportunity. Can w e imagine a great city while missing the sound of opportunity knocking? ) CRITICAL CONCERNS TOWARDS A MORE JUST DESI G N CRITIC by Glenn E. Hill The p urpose of this article i s to provoke thought about the critical evaluation process in architectura l desig n studios. There is an observable frustration among architectura l students that hinders their learning during the critical evaluation o f d esig n problems. This frustration stems from the lack of a clear understanding o f w h a t is expected to be learned from the desig n problem, as well a s the lack o f c on cise criteria for the e v aluation. A closer look at the s e two issues may give us some direction as to why they exist. When students are give n a des i g n prob lem, it is often ambiguous as to wha t specific1principles and concepts a r e suppose to be developed. These educational goals are not clearly defined, instead are replaced with instructions to create " a good design". Most instructors reasoning b ehind this teaching method may b e that a r chitecture is so multifacet e d a nd co mplex tha t one c annot d efine wha t i s to b e learne d .that conci s e l y with e a c h d esig n problem. Y et, in m a n y bu siness sch ools "case studies" a r e use d t o present students concepts and principle s pertaining t o v e r y complex business decisions. The instructor n arrows the case study down to a point whe r e the r e are only certain principle s and concepts to be experienced a t on e time so they can b e m o r e effectivel y und erstood a nd not confused . The student must still com e up with a solutio n t o the problem, but the issu e s h e o r s h e is to experience are c lear. T h e same thought a nd precis i o n can b e applie d to the development of a desi g n p r o blem. If this basic methodology w e r e applied, educational goals w ould b e established a nd could b e rela t e d t o the students . The student would the n kn o w wha t h e o r she i s suppose d t o learn f rom the p articula r assignment. This r aises the issu e of establis h e d criteria for the evaluatio n of desi g n proble m s . All t o oft en, the evaluatio n b y c r itics seeQ v e r y un j u s t a n d irrelevant to the student, because students do not clearly und e r s t a n d h o w the comments rela t e to wha t they h a v e d esig n e d . The issues covere d b y the critic o f t e n are not the same i ssue s that the student originally understoo d a s prima r y to the desig n solution. Thus, the student should not be evaluated on issues h e did not even know existed, but o n those that w ere primary in his o r h e r solution. To do otherwise w ould b e like an art critic judging a students landscape painting by s aying , "It would b e better if it w a s a portrait". This confusion could b e elimina t e d i f the educational goals (issues ) were appropriately define d in writing befor e the beginning of the desig n process and were standardize d for all the students dealing with that specific problem. This could then be the basis for an evaluation criteria tha t both the student and the critic w ould use to evaluate whether or not the student developed an appropriate solution.

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PHALLUS & FREUDDTYPES By Nat e \-ialden Kahn Th e majority of people in our societ y who believ e themse lves t o b e sophisticated, would deny t h a t myth o r mythological symbolism has had any controlling effect on thier behavior or beliefs. T h e fact is tha t mythological symbolism has a profound effect o n our individual beh avior and o u r society as a whole. T h e symbol s of Christian and pre-Chrlstian patria r c h y permeat e Western culture and are activel y promote d by Wes t ern technocracy. As a rchltects, designers and planners, w e must examine our own beliefs, Eor symbolism i s basic to the design process Ph allocentric thinking and the images of pervade the field of architecture wh ethe r consciously or subconsciously. This article is far too s hort to exhaustively examine all the examples of p h allocentric doublethink in tile f i e l d of a r chitecture . Let us merel y call our attention to the proble m by looking a t the sumbolic associatio n s of a few basi c concept s a n d images. O n e of tile major concepts designers are asked t o address is the luea of "procession." 11Approach and arrival11 and ''experi e nce of arrival,'' the ''progression of spaces," " t h e colonade" a nd "the promenade" are all images of procession. This concept , so basi c t o d esign, i s o n e of the most fundamental symbols of patriarchal society. Th e mythic symbolism linked to the con cept o f procession is complex, encompassing a wide spectrum of social mod els. Patriarchal society revolves around of processions. Ritual and ceremoni a l processions may b e seen i n military routines and p a rades, gcvernment functions, social gatherings, anu religious services. A l l these processions a r e modelled after a paradigmatic myth. These earthly procession s attempt to recreat e the "divinC11 procession from, and return to, god-the -father. In the celestial myth, all creatures p roceed from this god, and 'all return unto him.' To take this one step further, in C hristian theology, procession s also occu r within the godhead. Of particular significance is the fact tha t this is a procession of a divine son f r o m a divine father. I n t his symbol-system, the htiler i s the origin who thinks forth tl:e son, who is the perfect image of himselft hat is, identical i n essence. T h eir unio n is so tota l that "brother hood," o r "broth erly love" proceeds from them. T his all-male trinity , the ultimate sym b o l of procession, is the model for all varieties of male monogender system s . . T h e basic concept of procession i s thus inextricably linke d to phallocentric rationale. It is n o coincide nce tha t the colona d e and t h e c lassical Greek t emp l e can be ultima t e l y connect e d t o patri a r c hal procession s . T h e classical t emp l e -form, which has been copied, studied, and lauded for centuries, was the s a n ctuary of G reek deities, most often tha t of Zeus and Apollo. T h e m ythic -symbolism of these two gods is ver y enlightening . Apollo was the personification of anti-matriarchy, the opponent of earth d eities. His name is said to have been d erived from meaning "destroy." Apollo's real enemy was a female creature , a dragoness named "Delphyne"--a name connected with an old word for "womb." Apollo killed h e r immediately after his birth; he a lso encouraged matricide. With perverse appropriateness, his first temple was built at a place named "D elphi." Upon this temple was engrav e d the maxim: "Keep women under the rule." Further significance is found in the myth of Zeus and Dionysus. Dionysus is commonly seen as the mythic compliment of Apollo. The word "Dionysus" means "Zeus -young man," ie; Zeus in his young form. Dionysus was, in fact of m yth, his own father. The parallel with Christian myth is inescapable. Hi s t o rically, there is evidence tha t the development of the classical t emple-form i s linke d to the same influx of people into southern Greece who brought with the m the prototype of patriarchy, Apollo. Apollo was almost certainly an intruder, a,-riving at the end of the Bronze Age and displacing the more ancient earth d eities. By the seventh century B.C., the oracl e a t D elphi (the t emple to Apoll o ) was consulte d on a wide r ange of by m a n y states. The oracle o f Delphi had become a kind of c learinghouse of ideas. By the sixth century B . C., the temple to Apollo played a k e y role in the political fortunes of the Greek states; major pow e rs, s u c h as Athens and Sparta, struggl e d to control, or at least dominate, the san ctuary. These powers embraced a strongly patriarcha l society. Th e symolic representatives of this societ y were Apollo and Ze us, and their t emples. T hese symbolic images have been reaffirmed and r einforced thro u g h history. Rom e , the ultimate r e presentative o f the m ilitary procession, continue d the use of classical Greek architecture, with the temple s being regarded as the height of Greek architectural achievement. And when, in t h e e i ghteenth century A.D., inte rest in the antiquities of c lassical Greece was revived, it was the temple s whic h attract e d the attention of a r chitect s . Th o mas Jefferson, and others chose classical t emple images t o represent the new A merican n ation. Again and again the use of classical t emple images requires us to look into the significance of this form, and its basic meanin g . Why is the classic t emple form, the colonade, so much a p art of our basic aesthetic background? If we believ e the influence of myth and symbolism, the n the meaning is c lear : it i s the processional (sic) reinforcement of a phallocentric system. Many othe r basic design concepts may be interpreted in the light of p atriarchal symbolism. The basic design concepts of "entry," "boundaries" and "gateways" have a n ominous side to them: boundaryviolation is the most favorite game of patria r chy. The propensity to erect artificial boundaries and then violate these as "enemy" territory is charact eristic of phallocentric society. \ Iars a m o n g nations, corporations, and administrations belong to this category of invasio n and d efense. Boundary violatio n i s symbolic of the ritual of possession. The design of a gateway , a triumphal a r ch, o r a n entr y , can quite easily invoke this system of phallocentric sym bolism. These issues strike at the fundamentals of Architecture as we know it. And while images or concepts in isolation have a socially recognized beauty, they nevertheless retain and convey their symbolic meanings. Perhaps such systems are perceived as "beautiful" because we are taught to believe so; it is a taught aesthetic. Yet, to discard these fundamental. basic design concepts such as procession, boundaries, and entry leaves empty what we know as "Architecture. " Obviously a new architecture is called for; it must come as a new society, a new mythos. As women enter the field of architecture, we must hope they will bring a new way of thinking, a new society, a new aesthetics, and a new Architecture. Design issues of Functionalism, and the Machine aesthetic must be scrutinized for their roles in phallocentric society. Modern techonology and science allows our society the power to invade the boundaries of "hitherto unknown worlds." Scientists can play the role of singleparent, creating artificial life and manipulating existing life. It is possible to interpret the contemporary concern for contextualism as a further procession: patriarchal architecture respects/creates itself in forms; its essence is the same. The examples could clearly go on.

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VIEW FROM THE LEFT a non A RCHI TECTURE I N SOCIETY -FIX I T O R FORGET IT! A r c h i tecture i s a reflectio n of s o c i e t y . U nfor t u n a tely, societ y t o day i s in a s t a t e o f u t t e r disarray. Th e w orld i s c a u ght in t h e midst of a strug g l e between two imperialist g i ants : the U n i t e d States a nd t h e Soviet Unio n . They p erp etua t e w ars because they have t o . Eit h e r they expand t o m aintain their inv e s t m ents, p r o fits , m arkets, r a w mat e rial s a n d c heap labor supply , o r they go u nd er. Today, the r e a r e a t least 4 4 w a r s goin g on a roun d the w orld . Th e s e wa r s involve t e n s of m illions o f people. Consequ e ntly , the casualitie s a r e stag g erin g -hundre d s of tho usands in the l ast few year s in C entra l America alone . Soon e r r athe r than l a t er, these wars will deve lop into World War III especially as the Sov i e t s a n d the U .S. sharpe n their strug g l e for world d omination. World W a r III makes nucle a r war inevitable . I s this t h e sign of a h ealty , booming soc i e t y ? H ardly ! Is our built environm e n t affect e d by a n y of this? Y e s it is, but n o t to its c r edit. A rchite cture i n two o f its most frequently occurin g forms , skyscr a p e r s and urban h o u sing , has come t o b e s t erile and i g n o r ant of hum a n scale only too often. Attention t o scal e i s tre m endously important, as a human b eing exp erience s building s as they r e l a t e t o the human b o d y . Buildings w hich i g n o r e the human b eing in t e rm s of d e t ail and proportion cause lack of inte rest and alie n ation. Whe n turning its back on the user, architect u r e fails in its most important func tion s (to s e rve the user b y b eing a comfortable , inhabitable s pace in which t o lif e , work o r sleep.) Fasci s t I t alia n and German buildings m a d e a p oint o f r e legating the use r to a posi t i o n of infintesima l significance. I s this lack of recognitio n w h a t we a r e coming t o or, indeed, what we have arriv e d a t ? I s this the image we wish t o project? T h e ruling cla s s , whose m embe r s fina nce our mighty edific e s , is n o t shy about its intentio n s . Uninha bitable building s e rect e d in the n a m e o f effic i ency and profit a r e unaccept able . They reflect a societ y , whic h is unacceptabl e . T h e refor e , w e mus t c h a nge capitalis t soci e t y and a r chitecture , too, will c h a nge. T o c h a nge soci e t y , tha t i s t o f i ght for revolution, i s a ver y bold and diff icult path t o c hoose. I t i s ultima t e l y n eces sary , but in the m e antime , wha t i s t o b e done ? A r chitecture must r a ise t heir consci ousne s s about the working class and its W e mus t c h a nge the educ atio n a l system to i ncorpo r a t e traini n g for b oth manual and m enta l l a b or. Th e speci a l oppression o f woma n workers , o r sexi sm, mus t be elimina t ed. Min ority participatio n in the p r o fessi o n mus t b e greatly inc r eased. W e mus t est a b l i s h wage p arity with all con structio n industry workers b y r a i sing a r c h i tect s ' wages , not by lowering the wages of others. We must also fight against racism by r efusing t o incorporate racist "artwork" o r sculture in our a r chitectural projects. W e mus t striv e for these goals. Only with concerte d e ffort will we achieve them. It i s fair to say tha t architects serve the moneyed ruling c lass. Whethe r this be in the private o r public sect or. I f a socially conscientious architect considers that the m ajority of the working class people have little or no s a y in architectural matters, but yet must live with the results , he o r she would conclude tha t someo n e has shirke d his res ponsibility to a g reat number of p eopl e (rea d users.) In the n o t so recent p ast, the architect (usually male) took it upon himself to rescue the working class by changing architecture . Working class consciousness was manifested only in the form of housing in which enforced discom fort in the nam e o f uniformity wa s the norm. Diversity among workers was not accepted nor understood as a healthy actuality, even in the context of unified worke r sentiment. Total uniformity is an ide a which the ruling c lass would have like d to e ncourage, thus m aking their subjugation of the masses muc h e asie r . C ertain ideas p erpetra t e d b y Bauha u s a r chitects s u c h a s "the intellectually worker" and his lack of a r chitectura l p e rspicacity s how u s j u s t how sympathe t i c the s e a rchit e c t s were t o the need s of the w o rker . These w e r e e l itis t ideas of uninte reste d a r c h i t e c t s who f elt w orke r s didn't m atter. W ell, t h e y d o matter. It i s time for the a r c h i tect t o e x t e n d his o r h e r concern for aesthe t ics to a wider r a n g e of buil d i n g type s , s u c h a s to quality w orke r h o u sing a n d decent factories. W e mus t r ecogniz e t h a t the common p erso n needs and d eserves places of quality in w h i c h t o live, slee p and w ork. This i s n o t a dif ficult o r abstract conclusi o n t o r each . It i s reas o n able a n d necessary. In order to break dow n the c lass div ision s between people , we should imple men t work whic h combines mental as w ell as manual labor . This would be p articularly b e neficial in the field of arch i t ecture . A complet e under s tandin g of t h e art of building desi g n r equires a g reat deal o f p ractical experience, which is not always so easy t o gain these days. The str uggles of the apprentice a rchitect could be g reatly lessen e d d u e t o m a ndat o r y f i eld w ork. Physical w ork of a benefit t o both mind and body. Wom a n exp erie nce great d iffi c u l t y in gainin g f ield experience a t the p resent time . Man y contract o r s just won ' t hire women. I h a v e t r i e d . Th e s exism whic h wom a n e ncounter if t hey d o obtain a p ositio n for whi c h they a r e qua lifi e d is deplor able . Sexi s m ext ends right into the a r chitectual office, wher e w o m a n have h a d t o and still d o have t o work h a rder tha n t h e i r m a l e c o unter p arts in o r d e r to obt a i n inc reased resp o n sibility and e q u a l pay. Men a n d w o m a n mus t f i ght togethe r t o c h a nge these injus t i c e s Minority men a n d w oma n the sam e proble m s of d iscr imin atio n . W e must strive for a multiric i al, antisexi s t architectura l community . O n t h e s ubject o f wages, w h y shouldn ' t architect s ear n wages compa rable t o those of o ther construction industry worke rs? Th e proposal here i s t o achieve wage p arity not b y d epriving o r freezin g wages o f othe r s , but t o r aise the wages o f a r c hite cts. Construction w o rkers, engineer s and a rchitect s all g o thro u g h exte n s ive tra inin g and thus s houl d be p aid ea11Rllv t o compensat e them for the i r educatio n a n d ability t o p e rform involved task s . The a bove s t a t e d d e mand s a r e revolu tion a r y w orki n g class dem a nds. They a r e , w h e n employed as a whole, a s tep toward achieving a n egalitarian so c iety, without raci sm, sexi s m or imp erialis m . M aking individual c h a nges in o n e p rofessio n i s a r espect able accompl i shme nt. H o wever , c reating a soci e t y that e ncou rages and e nables all wor k i n g peopl e t o lea d decent, healthy q u a l i t a tively f ine l ives is t h e g reat e r g o a l t o keep in m i n d . O nly by c h a n ging soci e t y from its decaden t , decrepit presen t s tate to a wholesome egalitaria n state i n the future can w e hope t o pro doc u e those reflectio n s of societ y which w e may be proud a nd justified in sayi n g , "Yes , THAT IS A R CHITECTURE ! "

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DESIGN+ ENERGY The architecture division recently annot•nced. the names of students who won a preliminary phase of the D esig n and Energy competition sponsored by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. Glen Hill, Victor Garcia and eithe r alternate Rob Rogers, or a student from the Boulder campus will have their designs sent t o Washington D.C . to compete nationally for a prize of $2000. Runners up were Steven Walsh, Nick Antonopoulis and Michael Shen. According to Gary Long, the jury considered whe ther the building succeeded contexturally, whether the public spaced could enhance the experience of travel, whether the desig n considered bioclimactic implications, and whether utility was addressed. {((fiUtiJ MICHAEL SHEN VICTOR L. GARCIA STEVEN B . WALSH NICK I. ANTONOPOULOS 7 GLENN E. HILL

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, I CALENDAR EVENTS CALENDAR LECTURES/TOURS/SPECIAL EVENTS DEC. 4 5 Colorado Historical Society: DEC. 7 DEC. 10 DEC. 10 Denver Mansion Tour including the McAllister, Zang, Mallo, and Grant-Hurnphries Homes. Purchase tickets at the GrantHurnphries. $2.00/person. Sunday, Dec. 4 from 12-4; Monday, Dec. 5 from 10-4. Colorado Historical Society: Pierce McAllister Horne. Open house; "A 1920's Christmas" 1800 Gaylord. 5:30-7:30 P.M. Non-members: $2.00 Members: Free. Reservations requested, 866-3682. Colorado Historical Society Holoday celebration at the Heritage Center. Seasonal events for parents and children. 1-4 P.M. For info, call 866-3682. Denver Chapter AlA: 5th Annual Meeting. Stanley Abercrombie, Editor of Interior Design Magazine, Keynote Speaker. 1983 Interior Design Awards Presentation. Community Achievement Awards Pre sentation. At the Denver Athletic Club. Cocktails and dinner, beginning at 6:30 P. M. Prices: AlA Mernbers .$25.00, Students $20.00, Non-Members $30.00 Reservations required 831-6185. JAN. 23 or 30 Denver Chapter AlA: COMPETITIONS Mayor Pena and Bill Lamott. Date to be confirmed. $5.00 for s-udents, $8.00 for members, $10.00 for rnon-rnernbers. Reservations requested. 831-6185. JAN. 25 Registration deadline. A New American House. Contact Harvey Sherman, Minneapolis Minn. 55404 (612)870-3238. JAN. 31 Entry deadline, Innova student design competition sponsered jointly by Wilsonart and the Interior Design Educators Council. Contact Innova: A Design Challenge Competition, McKone & Co. 2 700 Stemmons Tower East, Suite 800, Dallas, Texas 75207 or call toll-free 1-800-792-6000. JAN. 31 Application deadline, National Institute for Architectural Education Traveling Fellowship in Architecture Contact NIAE, 30 W. 22 St. New York, N. Y. 10010. CONFERENCES/WORKSHOPS DEC. 6-8 Mid-Atlantic Energy Con ference and exhibition. Baltimore Convention Center, Contact Elliot Boardrnen (301) 251-9250 CoLLEGE NaTES NOTES FROM DOLORES The University will be officially closed from December 23 -January 2, 1984. HOLIDAY PARTYStudents Staff, Faculty, Monday, December 1 2 , 11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 2nd Floor, Bromley Building. Please bring your favorite Holiday speciality and enjoy a snack and sandwich with all of us. See you at the snack table. Walk in registration -Week of January 23, 1984. Spring Semester classes begin -January 30, 1984. Spring Break-March 19 -23, 1984. Spring Semester classes end 18 . CALENDAR REMINDERS Designer's Ball Awards Banquet Commencement March 30, 1984 --April 20, 1984 --May 19, 1984 JAN. 18-24 Bau 84, Trade Exhibi-EXHIBITS tion of building mat erials, systems, and renovation, Munich, West Germany Contact Gerald G. Kallman Associates (201) 652-7070 DEC. 1 APRIL 1 Colorado Historical Society: Stobie Paintings, Portraits and Landscapes. DEC. 1 APRIL 1 Colorado Historical Society: 19th and 20th Century Western Indian Basketry DEC. 10 -FEB. 5 Denver Art Museum: Colorado Artists Biennial NOV. -JAN. 8 Denver Art Museum: Planuwa Prehistoric Arts From The Southwest NOV. JAN. 5 Herbert Bayer: Early Works on Paper NOV. DEC. 31 NOV. -FEB Denver Art Museum: Intimate Fashions, Then and Now Denver Art Museum: Phillippe Hallsrnan Photographs JAN. 3 -FEB. 20 American Institute of Ar chitects Building 1735 New York Ave. N .W. Washington, D. C. Exhibition: "The Art of Designed Environments in the Netherlands." SPRING 1984 LECTURE SERIES: CCT"LEGE OF DESIGN & PLANNING FEB. 3, FAYE JONES, ARCH. DIVISION FEB. 17, JOHN COLLINS, LANDSCAPE ARCH. FEB. 29, MEYER WOLFE, PLANNING DIV. MARCH 14, STEVE PETERSON, ARCH. DIV. BARBARA LITTENBERG MARCH 26, KEN WALKER, INTERIOR DIV. APRIL 6, ROBERT FRASCA, URBAN DESIGN GREG BALDWIN APRIL 11, ROGER AHLBRENDT, PLANNING All lectures will begin at 5:30 P. M. Locations will be announced. Lecturers will also spend time in respective division studios with prior to lecture. :OLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING ARCHITECTURE DIVISION PRESENTATION SCHEDULE-DESIGN REVIEW WEEK December 5-9, 1983 Final FIRST YEAR Presentations (500 Level) Project: A Vistors Center on the South Platte. Mon. , Dec. 5th Wed., Dec. 7th Fri. , Dec. 9th 9-12 A.M. 9-12 A.M. 9-12 A.M. Final SECOND YEAR Presentations (600 Level) Project: Auraria Campus Art Museum Mon., Dec. 5th 1-5 P.M. Wed., Dec. 7th 1-5 P.M. Fri., Dec., 9th 1-5 P.M. Final Presentations (700 Level) Professors: Kindig Orleans Kindig Heath Davis Tues., Dec. 6th 1-5 P.M. Wed., Dec. 7th 1-S P.M. Rrn. 813 tower Bldg. Thurs. Dec. 8th 1-5 P.M. Thurs. Dec. 8th 7-11 P.M. Thurs. Dec. 8th 9-12 A.M. Fri., Dec. 9th 5-9 P.M. Fri.; Dec. 9th 1-5 P.M. 660 Glenarm Master of Architecture THESIS PRESENTATIONS Monday Morning December 5th 8:30 Pat Johnson Ghost Art Colony 9:30 Kelly Moon Buddhist Retreat 10:30 Susan Gracey Mixed-Use Bldg. W FLA 11:30 Mark Fitzwilliam UCD Performing Arts Ctr Tuesday Morning December 6th 8:30 Susan Lon g Suburban Hotel 9:30 Tony Fort Florida Shopping Center 10:30 Kathy Noble Art Acadeuy 11:30 Linde Weller Boulder Hotel Wednesday Morning December 7th 8:30 Dan Dalziel Club Sheraton 9:30 Chuck Steckley Roxborough Town Center 10:30 Yazid Al-Sulairnan Heddah Shopping Center 11:30 Kim Saporit Artist Co-op Thursday Morning December 8th 8:30 Les Nelken Denver 9:30 Barbar a Spruce St. Plaza 10:30 Beth Greenber g Omaha Mixed Use 11:30 Mark Williams Concert Hall Friday Mornin g December 9th 8:30 C. Foster Community Housing 9:30 Laura Gre enfield Uni Hill Research Center 10:30 Alvaro Pisoni Santa Fe Dr. Development FINAL CRITS LANDSCAPE ARCH. LA 510 GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION 12/13/83 9 -10:30 A.M. EC 214 Display of final design project which is also final graphic project. All faculty invite d for informa l discussions and to pic k your three favorite g raphics. Fa culty votes will be revealed during session. LA 510 FORMAL OF FINAL DESIGN 12/9/83 1:305:30P.M. Dravo Building, Room 720 'Your Retreat Horne' Faculty and outside professionals are invited for jury.