Citation
Laminations, May, 1984

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Title:
Laminations, May, 1984
Series Title:
Laminations
Creator:
University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
May 1984 volume six number four

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i NOTES!
If you've never seen LAMINATIONS until now, you're not alone. LAMINATIONS is a production of the students of the School of Design and Planning at the University of Colorado in Denver, and...LAMINATIONS is expanding its purpose. Our basic goal of being a service and a resource to the School of Design and Planning remains unchanged. We would, however, like to become a greater tool for education on a personal, level. Students and non students alike become more aware of the life surrounding them by becoming more involved in it. Interchange is the key. LAMINATIONS would like to promote that energy which precipitates personal involvement, namely expression! The expression of opinion is an expression of interest and (hopefully) thought. The exchange of thought is the forum of knowledge, and we, in mv opinion, can put that to good use. In serving that interest we hope to tie our school and our students with the activities and the issues of the design profession and the populace at large (our clients). In interacting with each other we can serve and enrich each other. Anybody can participate but only students can get a 1 hour credit. (Sign up next semester).
Editor
P.S. Our thanks to Debbie Meredith and Nicole Langley at The Business Cooperative for quality word processing!
The Deezine Club is a U.C.D. student organization for the promotion of social and educational activities. Although Deezine Club membership is open to all students at U.C.D. , its concerns are geared specifically to those of the College of
Design and Planning. Our primary concerns for the coming academic year are:
1. To be an umbrella orga-
nization dedicated to increasing the spirit of unity and cooperation within the
College of Design and Plan-
ning.
2. To encourage enthusiastic
participation within Deezine Club in order to better serve the student body and become a more legitimate voice of their concerns.
3. To establish and further
develop activities such as an orientation/welcome back
party next fall, the Lecture Series, a film series, the
Designers' Ball, etc.
If we as the student body pull together and work to become a cohesive group, our time at the College of Design and Planning could be a more rewarding
experience.
Deezine Club Executive Committee
Brian Bartholomew
Judy Gubner
Ron Radznier
Julia Sandelman
Kat Vlahos
P.SS. We are seeking a talented cartoonist!
Laminations staff
Faculty advisor Robert Kindig
Editors Mark Hogan
Nate Kahn Peggy Kinsey Jeniffer Isbi 11
CALENDAR
4th Annual NCARB Exam Brush-Up June 2nd & 3rd.
For more information call Jeanne Cabral at 722-1608 or Diane Gayor at 831-4462. Deadline for registration is May 11th.
Letters to the Editor...
Dear Editor:
I would like to first thank all of my students for making the semesters I taught such a joy. I also thank the school for the opportunity to teach an independent, introductory computer course. I am truly sorry the course had to come to an end. The saddest part of the course's demise is the emptiness of the computer room, all that stuff sitting unused. Computers may be popping up everywhere, but without a little push, without someone's enthusiasm prodding a newcomer, without readily available help, the computer room sits empty. Perhaps ray course should have developed into a two—seines— ter continuous course. The spring semester would then serve as a continuation of the directions taken in the Fall semester . I hope that in the future such a class can be established; for our graduate students to not be computer savvy is to deny the inevitability of computers in all our futures.
The fear by some that the school could be headed in the direction of a technical college, I feel, is misguided. Our chances of being a leader in design in the world of architectural schools is further from reality than the very real possibility that this school, with its solar connections and the administrative support for computers, could easily and quickly become a leader in such areas. We should be a center for research and a clearinghouse of information. We should be known around the state as the place to look for expertise and guidance. We should be recognized around the country as a leader in the use of new technical devices and systems for the betterment of the design profession and its products.
Carol Farino
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE
"Architects for Social Responsibility is a national, non-profit organization of architects, related professionals and students. It was organized to help the public understand the catastrophic consequences of nuclear war and the negative effect that massive and disproportionate expenditures for nuclear weapons have on the quality of life in America."
Architects for Social Responsibility, 225 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012
Architects for Social Responsibility (First National Meeting)
"A Guide to Armageddon" May 5th. Phoenix Convention Center. For information, Donald R. Levy (202) 626-7458.
AIA Annual Convention Phoenix, Arizona. Contact AIA (202) 626-7300.
TO: UCD Students & Faculty
RE: Women in Architecture
We are a small organization of design professionals that act as a support group and information source. We have monthly meetings that range from tax advise to slides of India and Nepal. We will be offering our 4th Annual NCARB Exam Brush-Up Seminar this spring. Our direction is networking and community involvement. If anyone is interested in attending a meeting or joining WIA, please feel free to do so.
Contact: Diane Gayer, Editor 321-0622 (w)
Linda Stansen, President, 695-0411 (w)
THE MEMBERS DOWNTOWN DENVER, INC.
Production Bill Nelson
Artwork Annie Rule
Concerning advertising in LAMINATIONS:
LAMINATIONS is circulated throughout the Denver
Auraria/UCD campuses as well as the C.U. campus in Boulder. Several drop spots in the downtown area include City Spirit Books, The Delectable Egg Restaurant, the Market in Larimer Square, City Graphics in Oddfellows Hall and the CSA Carriage House Office on 1459 Pennsylvania. Bulk Mailing will extend LAMINATIONS to design offices throughout the City and State. Additions to our mailing list are accepted upon request.
Great City Symposium
Events sponsored by the Urban Design Forum (575-5571)
The Challenge - May 24 th Edmund Bacon - Ingredients of a Great City. Paramount Theater, 7:30 p.m.? Recep-
tion at 6:30 p.m.
Great City Ideas Campaign -May 24 - July 19. What would make Denver a Great City? A city-wide campaign to solicit Great City ideas from the public, design professionals, schools, business and community groups.
The Report - September (Presentation and Publication of Great City Ideas).
LAMINATIONS advertising rates are based on cost per column inch. Format: (4) 3 3/16"
columns, 18" maximum height, full page 12 3/4"xl8". Introductory rates are starting at $2.50/co.Tumn inch. (Cheap).
Spring Fever
Events sponsored by Downtown Denver Inc. (534-6161).
Cinco de Mayo Celebration on the Mall. May 4, 5, 6.
LAMINATIONS is a publication of the students in the College of Design and Planning at the University of Colorado, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. It is published four times a year, generally in October, December, March and May. The opinions expressed in Laminations are those of th.e authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the College of Design and Planning, or of the University of Colorado. Letters to the editor and other communications areencouraged and may be submitted to the Laminations mailbox on the second floor of Bromley
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Fourth of July Blast June 29 and 30 and July 4th. Barbecue, beer, parades, square dancers, rides and fireworks.
Festival of Mountain
and
Plain - Labor Day Weekend, ;r 1,2 and 3.
Septembe:
t- L
For The Breakfast Lover. . .
Is Now Open Serving Breakfast 7 Days A Week
MON.-FRI. 6:30A M. to 2P.M. SAT. & SUN. 7 A.M. to 2 P.M.
Also Serving Lunch 11 A.M. to 2 p.m:
1642 Market Street
Phone: 572-8146
RAPIDOGRAPH H.R.S. SETS
List $72
The Humidifier Revolving Selector enables draftsmen and artists to store their drawing point sections in a compact holder that keeps them ready for use Humidified interior prevents ink from drying in the points when the drawing point sections are uncapped, point down in the sleeves during work intervals #3165 HRS 6 Set o* 6 Pe^s 00 0 1 2 34
H. R. Meininger Company 1415Tremont Place Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 571-5775
Downtown Denver, Inc., through the active support and involvement of its members, is continuing its highly visible role in directing business and community energies toward an integrated program of center city development.
Traditionally a strong advocate for downtown business interests, DDI has broadened its center city involvement to include the management, operation and promotion of downtown.
With the knowledge that its strength as an advocate and manager of downtown is a function of the support and leadership of its members, DDI continually seeks to enlarge its membership base to include the broadest possible representation of the downtown business community.
In addition to addressing critical center city issues such as housing, transportation systems management, retail development, planning, zoning, design and preservation, DDI also provides a full range of services and benefits to its members. Foremost among these is the unique opportunity to participate in planning and implementing programs which enhance growth and vitality and the quality of life in our center city.
Note: Denver's catching "Spring Fever" again during Downtown Denver's second annual salute to the rites of spring, April 27 -May 13th.
From Civic Center to the 16th Street Mall, the DCPA to Aura-ria, the city will come alive with music, food, fountains, greenhouse garden sales, flowering planters, spring fashions, athletic competitions, Mother's Day and Cinco de Mayo festivities. See Calendar for dates or call Downtown Denver Inc.


The highlight of the 1984 Awards Banquet was the appearance of the noted Scottish planner, Ian McHarg. Captivating his audience with a wry and roguish commentary on the state of architecture, he claimed, "I may not be right, but I am irreverent ! "
McHarg chose to share his view on the current state of architecture declaring, "After all, it is in a bit o'disarray." The proliferation of the International Style with its dedication to the minimization of detail and the expression of structure was seen to be of profound inconsequence, with the resulting forms being, "coequally unsuitable for all people regardless of race, creed or place of natural origin,"
The current vogue of post modernism was not immune to the unyielding criticism of McHarg. Rather than rejecting the frivolous details of the past in favor of a system of simplistic geometry and cubism, post modern architects take bits and pieces of the past and combine them into conglomerations of ornament that seem to address the esoteric needs of the designer above those of the general public.
McHarg stressed that one needs to be an expressionist not an eclecticist when dealing with the past. Using the natural sciences as a guide, which McHarg has dedicated his career to promoting, one can apply scientific methods to develop design. He compared nature's ability to adapt to new environments, with society's need to recognize its changing conditions, using examples of the past to learn from and build upon. He qualified his expertise by noting, "I've spent 30 years in the profession learning the things that the years at Harvard so expensively denied me 1 "
McHarg's challenge to Colorado was that of a wise use of our resources, such as the U.S.G.S. and other government agencies conveniently located in this area as well as the universities. THose present at the banquet answered this call with supportive applause, recognizing that a resource is only a function of the perceptions of the observer.
ARCHITECTURE STUDENT AWARD WINNERS
The following students and professionals were selected by the architectural student body asde-serving special recognition in their respective levels and fields for design excellence. The winners are:
500 Level:
Ron Radziner Visitor Center Design
600 Level:
Paul Borman
Train Station Design
700 Level:
Doug Hanson
High Rise (Pre-Thesis)
Local Professional:
S.L.P.
Terracenter
There was a good turnout of students voting for these awards and the voting was close on every level. Congratulations to all those nominated.
In the future perhaps the success of design will be measured by the degree of human [ health and well being in a given environment. For Ian McHarg the ! quest continues.
by Randy Yerzyk
I I
big guys
The winners were officially recognized a*t the student awards banquet on Friday, April 20th.
HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS
It has become increasingly apparent to the architectural literati that a general distaste or dissatisfaction exists in the present form of the "state-of-the-art" solar home. This article offers a possible explanation and suggests a solution of this dilemma.
A brief investigation of the past illustrates the evolution of this problem. The invention and subsequent assimilation of the thermostatically controlled furnace combined with plentiful cheap fossil fuels led to a gradual disappearance of the functional hearth in modern housing. As time passed, furnaces became the accepted means of heating a home. With the hearth removed as an element in (The floorplan, new prototypes of space planning evolved.
Among them is the "ranch house" so popular with tract developers. As fuel prices rose, so did the efficiency of the furnaces until they began to reach their asymptotic limit. Solar energy as a means to heat a home began to become a cost-effective alternative from which the current "solar home" evolved. What happened? We lost an element (hearth) and gained a new architectural language (solar vernacular)•
Three facets to the problem merit a more detailed analysis; symbolism, priority, and element.
Symbolism: Present solar homes lack iT~ clear, identifiable architectural language that relates specific meanings to specific forms. Solar homes, with sloped greenhouse glazing and glass curtain wall elevations prioritize energy efficiency as "raison-d'etre," sidestepping the real issue of shelter. As put by a colleague, "The solar house has become more a symbol of status than one of energy."
Elements: Frank Lloyd Wright developed a personal language which recognized that the responses to organic influences ultimately determine the success or failure of a particular design. One element he never failed to acknowledge was the time honored and cross-cultural-ly recognized concept of the hearth as the organizing element of the home and more importantly the symbolic nucleus of the family.
The point of all this is that the current generic solar home fails aesthetically due to unclear architectural symbolism, misappropriated priorities in the programming and missing physical elements that constitute the classical shelter. For example, the ancient Greeks used a central atrium in which to focus the family activities and organize the spatial functions. The homes of the Victorian genre used one or more massive hearths around which the spaces and circulation were ordered.
In conclusion it is evident that a realignment of priorities is long overdue. Just as a house is a home only because of the timeless and universal principles that define it as such, an architect cannot hope to succeed in housing design without careful attention to the qualities of comfort, beauty and utility. It is therefore incumbent on all designers to reexamine the very definition of the word "house" and to incorporate the profound meaning and inherent situational quality without which one can only hope to create a "soulless machine for living."
by Steven B. Walsh
GRADUATION DAY CEREMONIES
Priority: The sequence of the wording in "Solar Home" gives a clear indication of the priority that solar energy collection receives in the programming of a home design. That is, "solar" first and "home" second. The traditional values associated with shelter and the family are often overlooked in favor of maintaining the comfortable but increasingly tiresome cliches that immediately identify a house as "solar" to the layman.

+ + + + + + + +
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ + ♦ + + ■»• + ♦
FAY JONES

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦ +
Graduation ceremonies will be held Saturday May 19th, at 2:00 p.m. in the Denver Auditorium Arena (1323 Champa Street). This year the College of Design and Planning will host a reception for its graduates, their families and friends, and the faculty immediately following the ceremony at the Lawrence Street Center Plaza.
The College looks forward to bringing the graduates, families, friends and the faculty together on this joyous occasion.
Congratulations, graduates!
From the Deezine Club Executive Committee
The UCD Spring Lecture Series began on a high note with Mr. Euine Fay Jones, Architect. Mr. Jones spoke to an "overflow" crowd of students and professionals at the Science Building on the Auraria Campus. An apprentice and devotee of Frank Lloyd Wright, Mr. Jones is the former Dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas where he presently teaches design, while engaged in professional practice. His career has primarily consisted of designing private residences, which has earned him national as well as international recognition.
Mr. Jones displays an affinity for blending his architecture with the environment. His use of natural materials and extensive landscaping creates an intertwining of nature and house — a Iji his mentor, F. L. Wright. His keen attention to detail and the carrying out of his design concepts throughout the structure reflect the depth of.his work.
While his images are unlike today's post modernist, Mr. Jones is noted for the historical references in the forms he uses for design. However, he feels that classical forms do not have to be copied, but rather can function as a start-


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your way in and out of® library. We decided to first take measures to keep materials from walking away. Now with that out of the way, we plan on spending this year's proceeds on badly needed resources. If you have any suggestions, let us know. What have you looked for which wasn't in the collection?
What expensive sets have you heard about that you thought you'd never see in the library?
We welcome your expertise in this matter. Here's hoping that spending the money will be most enjoyable task of committee's work.
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The first event was a Designers Office Tour. Ten offices in the Civic Center area spiffed
themselves up and opened up their doors to the public. About 100 brave souls ventured into the snowy, windswept afternoon to see design offices in action.
Our thanks to the participants: Heppner & Associates, k t Partnership, Gensler & Associates, HDR Inc., HWH
Associates, Pahl-Pahl-Pahl, RNL Inc., SOM and SLP, and to the Al^r Associates put on tbe
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PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
NAME ADDRESS PHONE NAME ADDRESS PHONE
APCOR CAVTC ROBERT 30?O f "TM AVE DENVER *"206 333-4706 ANGCRSON ANORIENNE A 7**0 SO .'EH DENVER 80222 757-00 JC
ALLEN ROBERTA JANE 1277 ADAMS ST CENVER. 80206 329-633* ANOER SON-GOC-LEN R J 676 CASPAOE AVE POULDEP 80302 •43-5230
AMIS THOMAS LEIGH 1495 LINDEN POULDEP 80302 442-0170 BERGER CAROL ®NN 551 PEARL ST #106 DENVFR 80203 698-0057
APPFLL CHERYL KAY 864 T R T s ROULCCR 80302 447-3278 BRAUN KARTANNE 20*0 * L cIN E POULDER 80302 447-1*80
AVGE RINOS KARY K 5S5 SO GILPIN DENVFp R0209 733-5803 COLEBANK MELVIN W uR P 0 POX 19289 CENVER 80219 92*-9 712
AKELRAO MICHAEL JACK 2956 SO XANTHTA CT DENVER 8023i 755-9753 EDWARDS MARY SUMMERS 2*°ft S ZEPHYR ST L AKCWOOO 80227 *86-397*
BETZ CARTER JOSEPH 2351 S IOALIA ST ?n7 A UROR A 80013 695-4315 FTNAKORE EUGENE JOSFFH 2676 VRAfN $T DENVER 8*212 *55-8717
BOWOEN JERRY BENNff 3000 ALPION ST CENVFR B0207 333-08 38 FLORES HELEN MARIE 1027 VATH1NGTON* #2* DENVER 80203 061-001*
CALAKIA MARK ANTHONY 10*5 SHERMAN #20? OFNVFP 80203 863-01*0 FRYE DEBRA SUSAN 2*2 AOAHS DENVER 80206 320-1769
CAPLAN PETER MICHAEL 1*50 HIGH ST #* DENVER 80218 333-75 35 GRU9ER LORI ROUSEK 90^ 13TH ST 0?1 GOLDEN 80401 278-431*
CARLIN DEVON .K 626 SPRUCE jT pOULPER 80202 **2-^637 HANSEN RICHARD LESTER *30 .DOWNING DFNVER 80218 722-8820
CLLMENTE RCPEPT ALLEN lq72 S VAN GORDON CT L AKEVO00 8 0 228 9B5-1383 HEBERT GREGORY JAMES 50? CORONA OENVER *0210 778-0583
CODY THOMAS PATRICK 20*2 RACE ST OENVFp 80205 39**2179 HOUSTON LINDA M S 722P S HUDSON WAY LITTLETON 80122 7*1-1150
COAIN-JPROAN ELLEN m 2050 COUNTY RD rVErPREEN 80*39 674-7596 JOHNSON STEVEN MICHAEL 1300 MON'ROC #201 DENVER 80206 322-2460
oe feytep Kenneth lpe *72° D0Vr © ST WHE ATR I Or E 80033 *21-5* 02 KASZA CATHERINE JOAN 3750 0• NE AL CP #C6A BOULDER 80301 *4 1185
diaz juan pfnpo 1 02 0 1f Tm £T n2 PM ft E N V E R 80202 352-7* 06 KELLAM ELIZABETH ANKC 16550 °TM ST FOULDER 80302 *49-9077
DICKERSON WILLIAM h 1 0 0 f S VACO WAY A 11Q C 0 / p r. r i 7 755-n976 KNAUER ANDREW R 8676 YUKON 0201* ARVADA *0005 471-9761
DRAKE THOMAS ALLEN Plr) w CHf YE NNE PL VD C C L 0 s F R I N 80906 *73-6375 KOTfWICZ JILL ANNE 10150 E VIRGNA 7-301 DENVER 80231 344-4095
OR AKE-HOLZHAUER C*-fPYL 1 0 2 T6 w 3 PO AVE #2 0CLESN 0 0 4 01 2 7 ? • * ; f»« LANTERMAN JOHN CHCSLEY 519 AO AMS LOUISVILLE 80027 666-9003
EASLEY THOMAS WAYNE 1505 S STFELE ST DENVER 80210 722-3961 MAC CORKACK SCOTT A 26. SO GRIPC ST r ENVER 80222 377-4808
SSPERANCE MAR’ET^E A 1*07* r NASSAU DR A UP OP A 8001 7 693-207* NACHLIN PAULA RENEE 1255 AT AMS ST DENVER 00206 355-0960
EWELL MARYC 6APP 1424 SNOWMASS CT rOULDER 80303 *9*-02 93 MARTIN JOANNE SIMONE 2217 SO DOWNING DENVER 80210 733-8377
FIELD KATHLEEN LYNCH 37A SMITH FT CCLLINS 8052* *82-1256 HC CANOLE'SS MARY L 2** S CLEVELAND LOUISVILLE 80027 665-92*6
FOLEY SUSAN JUNE 101*0 E V A 014-10* PFNVFR 80231 361—601° MC CRANCY BRUCE A 25 F 16TH AVE #7208 DENVFR 80202 861-8300
G I r t C N SANCRA SHARP 2255- walnut rCULnE R *0202 444-75 6 3 flc GCVF® N RUTH M 2107 CPPSS *T APT A POULPFR 6 0*02 ***-*3*6
GLUECK STEVEN JOSEPH 8*6 SO HARLAN ST LAKEWOOD 80226 022-79 33 MORGAN DENNIS LEE 646 MARION 04 DENVER 00218 861-*102
GOOOE PATRICK ELLIS 2*6 CLARK SCN* A °T C CENVFR 80218 733-7595 POSTLEUAIT JORDAN L 2750 CARNFGTE POULDER 80303 822-733*
FREER GEORGE ARTHUR 2*^5 W 73PD AVE DENVER 90231 629-7630 RAHIMT SHOHREH 9794 y ooth PL WESTMINSTER 8*020 431-7319
GUSS CHRISTOPHER IAN 1*20 COLUMBINE ST DENVER 80206 322-2761 SCHULTZ MARGARET C *14 SPRUCE ST BOULDER- 00202 449-0884
HARRISON SUSAN J U 520 S MILLER qT L A *£UOOC 80226 986-2659 SHAM8ERG JAMES WILLIAM 12*0 UTICA ST DENVER 80204 825-6280
HONN THOMAS EDWARO 2255 W rroof aVf LITTLETON 8016* 795-3748 SHERICAN SALLY 421* S FOREST CIRCLE FN6LEU00D 80110 7*8-1663
HOOPES THOMAS JOSEPH 1265 SO maRTPOSA ST DENVER 80223 722-90 7* STIRLING eLAKE ECWARC 749« f IMCY 07GB CENVER 8*237 770-2060
1MANSEPAHI A LI *600 E KENTUCKY 0216 DENVER 80222 692-0488 takcuchi lih miyo 70BC W 20TH AVE »2G7 LAKEWOOO 80215 238-0844
JACKSON KAROL EVE 1010 YORBLNO PL 1127 °LACFNTIA ° 2 6 70 996-5* 33 THORSHEIM ROBERT L 12398 W 1 ♦ AVf GOLTEN 8*401 230-81*3
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PAY WILLIAM SCOTT 2000 CANYON DLVD 012 boulder 80302 447-1867 BROWN TFRESA M P 10946 DAHLIA WAY THORNTON 8023? *52-5162
PENNY CHRIS DAVID 752 1/ ASH DENVER 00220 329-6746 COMSTOCK GREGORY KGORE 137* SO PENN DENVER 00210 778-0170
PIERCE JAY WILOER 6277 SO PRINCE ST LITTLETON 80120 794-71*2 COOKE JILL CHAMf»ERLATM 2731 STUART DENVER 80212 *33-54*3
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Dear Friends,
In my last letter the suggestion that tweed had become more than the relic Harvard man sporting Brooks Brothers, provoked little response, as tweed and its conservative relatives continue to prevail (with a few small exceptions).
It is true enough that we suffer problems of proximity. That is to say that New York is two thousand miles away, L.A. one and Cheyenne just around the corner. In this growing mecca in the west, finding a decent pair of shoes is like asking for a ''Shirley Temple" in the outbacks of Africa. Ridiculous!
There was however a brilliant flash of glitter on the eve of March 30th. One glimpse of this great escape from sartorial provincialism was all that was needed for a new optimism as regards the state of western fashion.
From tuxedos to tiger skins, One Denver Place may not witness such regalia for some time to come. This rakish display of Denver's new "haute couture" said it's a long way to Paris but a longer way to Cheyenne.


B
KINDRID
SPIRITS
BOOKSTORE AND MORE NEW ALTERNATIVE AT
City Spirit is more than just^ a"
bookstore. It is a resource,
gallery, and cafe. The whole
aura of the place is special.
This bookstore is unique in
Denver, but it cpmpares to
places such as the "Urban
Center" in New York City,
"William Stout" in San Francisco, and the "Prairie Avenue Bookstore" in Chicago.
The sign above the door reads "Morton Zeppelin, Esq. — City Spirit." Inside you will find the pleasant company of Michael Fagan, Beverly Fischer, and Marty Phillips. The variety of books there is exhaustive. Categories include: Arch.
History, Theory and Criticism, Design and Color, Building Types, Vernacular, American Regionalism, Graphics, Energy — solar/underground, Technical
Business Management, Aesthetics, Art History, and there are monographs and periodicals
galore. There is a small gallery which is presently showing various works by Edward Mills, etchings and commemorative posters by Michael Graves, and photography by Elke Kuhn Moore. There is also a display of Objects and Textiles by a group of New York artists.
All this is merely the beginning of what is to become the realization of a marvelous vision... Michael Fagan and Morton Zeppelin are the originators of this vision, with the help of Berkeley artist Susan Wick — City Spirit's "aestheti-
cian-at-large." Plans forsee a large gallery of art on the first floor, and a cafe in the back, hopefully to open this summer. Michael Fagan has elaborated on some of the philosophy behind these plans.
Fagan asserts that there is no "Public Art" in Denver, and that there is a need to create an atmosphere for this to happen. Up until now there has been no encouragement for Public Art in Denver. HOwever, Architecture and Art are on the verge of a quantum leap in this city, according to Fagan. "Laypeople" are taking a much greater interest in Architecture," he says. Fagan has a keen interest in the philosophies of the Construetivist/Suprematism movement of the early 1900's. This movement strove to achieve an interpenetration of art on all levels of public life. With City Spirit, Fagan hopes to realize this kind of philosophy.
Michael Fagan hopes that City Spirit will be a place to sit, talk read, exchange ideas, and be comfortable. The completion of the cafe will facilitate this. Fagan envisions "lots of space to hang out, inexpensive sandwiches, and a really good cup of coffee!" His subtle enthusiasm is quite contagious. If you haven't visited City Spirit yet, then please discover it soon. It will be worth your while!
by Nate W. Kahn
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alphSOraphiGs
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MASONIC
PHOENIX FROM THE FLAMES: THE MASONIC TEMPLE BUILDING SURVIVES A DEVASTATING FIRE
On the evening of March 3, 1984, a four-alarm fire swept through the Masonic Temple Building. The blaze gutted the interior of the building, and caused the collapse of the roof and most of the floors. The massive masonry walls at the exterior remained intact, but they had no support to prevent them from collapsing as well. The destruction was so severe that it seemed likely the historic structure, designed by Frank E. Edbrooke and built in 1889, would be lost completely.
But despite the extensive damage, the process of restoring the Masonic Temple Building is already under way. Saving the building required an unusual degree of cooperation and dedication from both public and private groups. Only hours after the heroic efforts of the Denver Fire Department to quench the blaze, a team of developers, architects, and engineers began work on a plan to restore the building. Their immediate goal was to stabilize the exterior walls. The unbraced walls presented a safety hazard to the public, and the city's Building Inspection Division required an expeditious solution. Several meetings were held on March 4 and 5 to determine building code limitations and stabilization schemes.
The developers of the Masonic Temple Building, Cambridge Development Group, coordinated the work of the engineers with the concerns of the city's building and transportation departments. Borman Smith & Partners, Engineers, designed the steel bracing scheme, being careful to check the availability of the steel sections with local fabricators. Cambridge worked with RTD and Mall officials to come up with a rerouting plan for traffic during the restoration process. By March 8 the stabilization and transportation plan had been approved, and erection of the braces began on March 9.
removed, a crane the alley to with debris, crossing the and driving right-of-way parking lot.
Now that the bracing is in place, the second phase of the restoration has begun. The building is filled with charred debris, and all of it must be removed before new construction begins. Cambridge Development Group examined several options, and decided to access the debris by removing a portion of the brick wall facing the alley next to the Kittredge Building. The mortar between bricks was so, weakened by the head of the fire^ that workmen have been able to^/xV^^Y’o^/-x v/ pull out the bricks by hand with.«iT / \n
As the wall is will be placed in load dump trucks The trucks will be 16th Street Mall through a rented on the adjacent After the debris near the brick wall is removed, the crane will be positioned inside the building shell on a raised pad. From this location, the crane will be used to reach the rest of the debris and, eventually, to erect the new interior structure. Jill Morelli, Project Manager for Cambridge, estimates that the debris removal process will take about eight weeks.
Once the debris removal is complete, work will begin on the interior structural system, floor and roof loads will be carried by a 36-foot bay steel frame with composite steel deck. The exterior walls will support only their own weight, and the steel frame will brace the walls from the inside. Once this is accomplished, the exterior steel braces can be removed. The steel frame will be supported by drilled piers set inside the exterior walls by 12 to 15 feet to avoid damaging or disturbing the walls.
Construction documents are
currently being prepared by Gensler & Associates, Architects. According to Ms. Morelli, the plans will call for removing the bricks in the upper story window openings and installing new glazing. The
granite and sandstone exterior will be checked for damage, cleaned, and repainted. The
first floor will have a new storefront design reminiscent of the storefronts in the early
1900's. The 16th Street en-
trance will be restored, and will lead to an interior atrium. The first three levels will be rented to retail businesses. The fourth and fifth floors will be occupied by the Masons, who will have their own access off
Weiton Street. The sixth and seventh floors will house
offices. Cambridge Development
is currently considering adding two more floors for offices set well back from the facade, though they will need approval from historic officials to make If work proceeds Denver will see Temple Building
preservation this change, on schedule, the Masonic back in fine
orm by the end of 1985.
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by Kelly Anne Karmel
occasional use of a

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N.V. Langley & Associates BUSINESS COOPERATIVES
The Grant Street Mansion 1115 Grant Street Denver, Colorado 80203
word processing office automation secretarial services computer consulting
303-863-8400/863-8633
EDMUND BACON TO OPEN GREAT CITY SYMPOSIUM '84
Great City Symposium '84, title of the third annual Urban Design Symposium presented by the Urban Design Forum, is a 3-part public event this year that will ask area residents the vital question, "What will make Denver a great city?" The Symposium goal is to collect citizen's ideas and communicate them to decision makers who shape Denver's future.
Mayor Federico Pena will open Part I, The Symposium Challenge, at the Paramount Theater, May 24 at 7:30 p.m., reception 6:30 p.m. He will introduce Edmund Bacon, Philadelphia's controversial city planner from 1949 -1970, and author of the classic Design of Cities. Bacon will speak on the ingredients of great cities and illustrate his talk with slides from his award-winning film series, "Understanding Cities". Mr. Bacon's appearance is sponsored by The Denver Partnership, Inc.
The award-winning film series, "Understanding Cities", features London, Paris, Rome, the American urban experience, and the city of the future. In conjunction with the Symposium, this series will air in Denver on KRMA-TV for five Saturdays at 5:30 p.m., May 19 - June 16.
The Mayor will also announce the opening of Part II, the Great City Ideas Campaign, which will run from May 25 through July 19. The Campaign will ask the public to contribute great city ideas for Denver. Articles in the media, ads sponsored by the Denver Post, special mailings and meetings will be used to solicit response for Great City Ideas from the public, schools, design professionals, neighborhood, business and community groups.
During the campaign, various organizations will offer special activities highlighting these five urban issues during focus week: June 1-7, Neighborhoods and Housing; June 8-14, Growth and Preservation; June 15-21, Transportation; June 22-28, Downtown; June 29-July 5, Recreation and Open Space. The Urban Design Forum will offer a walking tour, "Surprising Urban Spaces and Places", May 26. Groups who wish to present events in conjunction with the Symposium are asked to contact the Forum.
The Urban Design non-profit citizen founded in 1982 to increase public urban design, sponsors are the Office of the Department of Development, The ship, Inc. and Public-Private
Forum is a organization educate and awareness of Symposium co-City of Denver, Mayor and the Planning and Denver Partner-the Center for Sector Coopera-
tion. Supporting organizations include the Denver Chapter, American Institute of Architects; Colorado Chapter, American Planning Association; and Historic Denver, Inc.
Tickets for the Edmund Bacon Symposium Challenge are $5, available at the Paramount box office or in advance from the Forum. For tickets and information on Great City Symposium '84, contact the Urban Design Forum, 938 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204, 573-5551

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WE NEED GREAT IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY NEEDS GREAT 7 IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY A GREAT CITY NEEDS GREAT NEEDS GREAT IDEAS FOR IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY
In anticipation of the Great City Symposium sponsored by the Urban Design Forum, LAMINATIONS asked several prominent Denverites their opinions of Denver, past, present and future. Responses were limited to one page, and were to emphasize personal visions of a Great city.
by George Writer (jr.)
The genesis of Denver - the rush for minerals - gold and silver at the confluence of the South Platte and Cherry Creek, as well as being the distributional and financial center for mining and agricultural interests between the Missouri River and the West Coast. Denver has been truly blessed with a perfect location^ wonderful climate and abundant water to supply growth to date. A combination of good fortune and dynamic leadership has brought us to where we are today a thriving metropolis casting upward a breathtaking skyline of our core city surrounded by beautiful parks and some of the finest open space residential communities in the country. This setting, along with our diversified employment base, portends an unlimited future potential - but does it?
Until the last five years we have always been able to get around without the pressures of creeping gridlock well known by New Yorkers, Houstonians and Californians. Stapleton International has become the seventh largest airport in the world, but now is also high on the prominent list of airports to be avoided. Intergovernmental
bickering is threatening our destiny. We probably have enough water to keep the metro area green until the year 2000, but these problems threaten the lifestyle that has made us want to live here in the first place.
What are our solutions? They're the toughest of the touch ones, but to start with, we must create a real opportunity for leadership to work toward solving our problems over a reasonable period of time. With our governmental structure on the front range'consisting of 55 different municipalities and over 100 separate water districts, each with their own turf concerns taking first priority. Even our creative governor throws up his hands in despair. If somehow by referendum of the citizens of the front range we can set up a system of metropolitan government that represents the different regions of our great city we can simplify the process and deal with a mutual interest purpose in solving the problems of water, transportation and what we really want our destiny to be. It will take great statesmanship on the part of our present city, county and municipal officials to create an opportunity for effective leadership, which is our only chance to make anything happen.
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ODD FELLOWS HALL 1 543 CHAMPA STREET DENVER. COLO 80202
by
CABELL CHILDRESS FA IA
Somewhere in your mind, e line is drawn between town and city. Another is drawn to separate great cities. These lines are as fluid as imagination itself.
Each incoroprehensibily complex mind sees from a unique life-path. Hundreds of thousands form but a single city.
While geography provides uterine nourishment . . . cities outgrow places and become their own spirits.
New York, London, Tokyo/Paris, Athens, Rome/Hiroshima, Jerusalem, Berlin/Chicago, Stockholm/ Venice, Kyoto/Atlanta, Seattle, Toronto/New Orleans, San Fran-cisco/Portland . . . conjure images. Do you think each a great city?
In thinking of Denver, my mind focuses on Oklahoma City, 2:00 a.m., 5 July 1934; John S. Robins installed the first parking meter.
In 1967 John envisioned platforms over Denver's 280 acre rail switching yards. 30,000 parking meters would finance the construction. All transportation forms could be centered. The platforms, 50' lower than the Colorado National Bank, would provide a site for the Olympics, the proposed Auraria Campus. Free light rail would transport citizens to the city core.
Here was one mind offering a heroic concept to the City. It is the nature of cities not to respond to a single mind. Ideas, seemingly rejected, are taken and passed through many minds. They emerge, occasionally recognizable, most often not in the same form. In the city we share a common mind. Ideas soar into the city's imagination. They forever change the city's lifepath.
Sit with three good friends. Think your best thoughts about a great Denver. You probably cannot achieve them • • . yet strangely within twenty years they will happen. You'll never really know if you were the originator . . . yet . . . you will know it is your city and you share its mind.
Bicycle paths, historical preservation, regional transportation, a sports complex, Larimer Street, grass over streets, the Platte are all things I heard my friends wish for.
The adjustable parking meters, the 16th Street Mall, Union Station discussions, Big Mac all share a bit of John's vision. The city feels no debt to John, yet the city gave John audience and I suspect great joy.
In my mind, Denver is presently the world's great city. In the new downtown canyons is the air of village innocence. I relish it!
My thoughts a few years ago were a downtown that saw mountains (it bombed), red brick along the railroads (now in place). Now my thought is the historical renovation of the May D&F/Hilton Complex by Chuck Sink, Richard Weldon, Ron Mason and I.M. Pei.
Jane Marshall Smith's is one shopping evening a week downtown. Between us we intend to wake Denver up to its greatest sleeping asset • . • then on to another thought.
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by
dana h. crawford
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This fall will find me in Denver three decades. In October I arrived to a vital Denver, booming with an oil and uranium fever. Its population was about the same in number as in 1984, with scattered suburban development. Downtown's tallest buildings were the Daniels and Fisher Tower, the Conoco Building with Zeckendorf's stirring Mile High Center underway, later to become the United Bank Center. There was a small-town feel to Seventeenth Street. People seemed to know each other and there was an energy building even then. Zeckendorf was talking about the Court House square site for a major new hotel and department store. He had discovered Denver, and he would fly in with I.M. Pei at his portly side to amaze us all with his vision of the city at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.
The air in Denver that fall was like breathing champagne. Views of the mountains were crystal-clear and magnificent. You almost felt you could touch the mountains. There was a snap about downtown that no longer exists. Denver was beautiful.
Parking was plentiful, the electric buses were still in operation, and Denver's first shopping center, Cherry Creek, was emerging from the old City Dump. The airport was about on-one-hundredth of its present scope and was topped by the Sky Chef restaurant, where the primary attraction was the propeller airplanes taxiing in and out. The Brown Palace and the Navarre were absolutely the hub of the city. There were almost no other restaurants of note except the Tiffin, and Pagliacci's was the place to go across the Platte River. Architecturally, the fabric of the city was in place, representing an identity, a character which was uniquely Denver.
Denver is 125 years old this year, so my brief time on this beautiful piece of arid land spans almost a quarter of its existence as a community and its greatest period of growth.
When history is written about this time, these thirty years, I wonder what the conclusions will be. Will it talk about the opening of the Valley Highway, placed on the lowest land available, and its immediate creation of the creeping brown cloud? Will it reflect on the phenomenon of urban renewal with its metamorphosis of 26 downtown blocks and its refusal to take advantage of one of the nation's greatest opportunities to achieve an integrated new city center where people could live and work and play in an environment of hospitality? Will these reflections smile on all our civic efforts to build a symphony, a zoo, botanic gardens, museums for art and natural history and our own history?
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My greatest regrets are our inability to cope with this wretched pollution of our air and our remarkable failure to plan the evolution of our urban setting. We are still a collection of entrepreneurial pioneers; we don't know how to cooperate to achieve that hospitality of urban design that Bill Chafee of Downtown Denver, Inc. spoke of in such eloquent terms. I often wonder where Denver would be now if he had not been removed from our midst four years ago.
Chafee's legacy is the Sixteenth Street Mall. The Mall. He and John Simpson fought for that mall. They saw it as the way to a metro-wide transportation system, Phase One. The bus system we now see falteringly in place. However, there is little faltering, in my opinion, about the Mall. It is the stunning mile-long landmark of the century which begins to pull it all together. Its little buses carry 25,000 people each day.
Chafee fought for the quality of the Mall and after his fateful departure, the Denver Chapter of the A.I.A. was vigilent in its effort to monitor the installation of I.M. Pei's grand design for its combination transportation and people function. It is, as malls go, an international achievement.
We now talk about making Denver a world-class city. For downtown, it's not too late. In spite of its collection of fairly bland buildings, its future is promising. With some public and private dollars to prime the pump, the Mall's retail life can be greatly enhanced. I believe it's just a matter of time before we see a Saks and a Neiman on our handsome Mall. The opening of Tabor Center on October 14th this year will mark a new era for downtown. Downtown housing is difficult to achieve, but we are working on it.
Our new mayor, the vigorous young Federico Pena, won last year's election by a sweeping margin, challenging the people to "imagine a great city", an idea which obviously appeals to a lot of us. What we lack is a forum to achieve our inspirations. The Denver Partnership has brought us a long way but we now need a metropolitan-wide citizen's forum to brinq our collective imagination to bear on the political system. Complicated as that system is, it still responds to a vision and persuasion. Both are needed for the next 30 years.
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CALL FOR ENTRIES: UCD COLLEGE
OF DESIGN AND PLANNING, FALL LECTURE SERIES
POSTER DESIGN COMPETITION
The competition for next fall's lecture series poster design is open to all College of Design and Planning students. All entries are due by Friday, July 20, 1984 at 12:00 noon at the
College, of Design and Planning office, 2nd floor Bromley. The printing process will be diazo or reverse diazo (i.e. one color) with an 18"x24" sheet size (either vertical or horizontal) . Poster entries will be judged by professional graphic designers and the winning entrant will receive a $50.00 cash prize as well as name recognition on the printed poster. The face of a submitted poster design may not include the name of the entrant, but the reverse side of the presentation must include the entrant's name, college division (ARCH., L.A. , PLAN, INT.) and telephone number.
Information to be included on the poster design:
WHAT:
Fall lecture series
College of Design & Planning
Univ. of Colorado at Denver
WHERE:
Denver Center for the Performing Arts, The Cinema 14th & Curtis Streets
WHO:
The lecturers and the dates of each lecture: Below is
the list of dates and the division responsible for that evening's speaker:
Oct. 12 Architecture
Oct. 19 Interior Design
Oct. 26 Landscape Arch.
Nov. 2 Planning/Community Development
Nov. 9 Architecture/Urban Design
Nov. 16 Generalist to be selected by lecture committee
Space must be allowed under each of the above dates for the following:
Lecturer's name & affiliation, brief statement of qualifications, and the date.
WHEN:
Consecutive Fridays at 5:15 p.m. in October & November.
AND:
All lectures are free and open to the public. Each lecture to be followed bv a reception in the Green Room of the D.C.P.A. The address of the College and the College logo. For further information please call 303/629-2877.
Please refer to the 1984 Spring Lecture Series poster. Additional copies of design competition guidelines are available at the College of Design and Planning office, 2nd floor Bromley. Any questions about the competition should be referred to either Judy Gubner (388-8088) or Virginia DuBrucq (698-2200) .
In addition, Faculty and students with suggestions for any of the above lecturers should leave them with Karen at the Col lege of Design and Planning Office, 2nd floor Bromley.
The Lecture Committee
are. ...............'
Why do planners plan? This is
5UeStl°n most Planning ™ tST. WOuld rather not ^er: 1 ve. been stumped by it n . times at cocktail
,es where well-meaninq
guests search for conversation
do?1”’ d° Planners really
get another drink."
In preparing myself for better answers to these important ^eSt,.^ns/ I,ve concluded that the why' of planning must be bound up in what is referred to
fon?lanning "theory". I can't be 100% sure about this point because I have yet to read a book that spells out theory without frequently referring to the great planning thinkers and their great works. Just because they did something does not prove that there was a need for it. Nonetheless, I am convinced the need does exist for good planning and deserves some discussion.
Perhaps the most significant activity in which planners engage themselves involves the development of process. Certainly every discipline has an order to the tasks it does, but I will assert that the process of societal problem-solving is distinctly within the realm of planning. The discipline sets out rules for problem identification, data gathering and research, analysis of alternatives, and strategy formulation. Community issues and debates are rarely simple and straightforward? they usually reflect a variety of interests, opinions, and concerns. These complex problems are indicators of the need for comprehensive data gathering and holistic analysis.
In one of its highest forms, planning is the process for preventing the problem in the first place. Moving out of reactive or crisis management and into proactive planning, communities attempt to shape their destiny — in other words,
FOLLOW - UP
FOLLOW-UP: CROSS-CAMPUS CO-
OPERATION
By Nils Hjermann
In our last issue we invited students and staff to an ongoing discussion on improving crosscampus cooperation. Well... Things are happening? UCD Art Dept.'s Celia Rabinovitch has, together with our Francine Haber, taken an initiative by planning cross-listing of courses and exchange of classes between UCD Fine Arts and Design/Planning.
In a recent interview with LAMINATIONS, Prof. Rabinovitch confirmed that a 20th Century Modern Art course will be offered to Design students soon, and that Fine Arts students would subsequently be offered a 20th Century Architecture course taught bv Prof. Haber.
Prof. Rabinovitch stressed that her 150-odd Fine Arts students were in great need of a more in-depth introduction to Architecture. "After all," she says, "so much of our creative process is comparable to that of an architect. In teaching Art History an understanding of the parallel architectural development and theories is essential."
to envision a future and figure out how to get there. This never happens without a conscious effort to map out a process, an agenda for action, that will lead them in the right direction.
The success of any process depends on implementation. Indeed, without implementation, the work seems pointless. Here again, the planner is the professional uniquely qualified for the job. The good planner approaches implementation not with dogmatic feelings for a particular style or philosophy, but with an eye towards consensus and compromise. How would one construct and present ideas so that they have the optimum chance to survive the political meat-grinder? It is this consideration for actually getting the project or plan approved that separates planners from other professionals.
Throughout the planning process, communication acts as the method for achieving goals. It is as much of a "why" planners plan as anything else. Whereas aspects of design can develop and evolve in the abstract, planning does not utilize a philosophical base? it ijs application and therefore it ils communication. Planners are information brokers. They first synthesize information from disparate chunks of data, and they then disseminate it through writing, speech or graphics. The specifics of the way they communicate are guided by the process mentioned earlier. If the communication is effective, the process results in implementation .
This has been, admittedly, a long response to a short question. But it indicates that there are concrete reasons why planners plan and why perhaps planning ought not to be restricted to just planners. Most people concerned with government, and particularly those deeply involved in the political arena, stand to benefit from utilizing a logical process infused with good communication. At the very least, one can sound intelligent at cocktail parties.
And if the Rabinovitch/Haber team gets its way, Design students will get valuable additional exposure within Art History and Theory? Such topics as 20th Century Art with emphasis on modernism/surrealism, and cross-cultural studies as well as topics in Asian Art.
CALENDAR PROJECT
The 1984 architecture calendar, published by the College of |]
Design and Planning, has made approximately $1,900 in net proceeds. Over 425 copies of the calendar were sold. The majority of calendars were purchased by Denver area residents. However, fifteen percent of the copies were mailed outside the state of Colorado to New Mexico, Texas, Illinois, Wisconsin, California, Oregon, Arizona, North Carolina, Louisiana, New York, Washington, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C.
The calendar was designed by Architecture Design 501 students in the Spring of 1983. Mr. Kenneth R. Fuller and the Colorado Society of Architects' Educational Fund provided $650 as seed money for the project.
The College of Design and Planning donated an additional $100 to defray mailing costs.
fl
Ili
This year's proceeds will be used to advertise the 1985 calendar in professional architecture journals, as well as covering the costs of production. Negotiations with a corporate sponsor are being undertaken in order to print the calendar in advance of taking orders this fall.
Professor Gary Crowell plans to continue as the faculty sponsor of the project with a new group of students from the Spring '84 Architecture 501 Design Studio.
The calendar committee will consider a change in format for the 1985 calendar, including a 12" x 12" desk calendar. The sales goal will be 1,000 copies for next year.
As the 1984 Calendar Committee, we believe our goals were met for the 1984 project. The calendar has become a self-sustaining publication of the College. It has the additional potential for fund-raising for the College of Design and Planning in the future • Most importantly, the calendar has become a positive link with the professional community as a showcase of work by UCD's graduate architecture students.
May the project have continued successi
Joanne Wahbeh
Kelley Anne Karmel
Bess Althaus Graham
Also, there is work going on to improve the library situation for both Fine Arts as well as Design students.
One main objective is to systematically acquire more books in those fields where the need is the greatest.
Auraria Library's Bob Wick has been approached with an interdisciplinary acquisition plan. This is a program designed to save money and save a larger segment of the student body within the structure of present library budget policy. This will not be an easy task, and again, interdepartmental cooperation is one keyword.
LAMINATIONS will follow up on these stories and other developments in issues to come.
Calendar Committee '84
Serving the Denver Chapter of AIA and many of its members.
draft-aid
< I I.IM
leprcduct
• Specializing in Architectual reprographics and associated services.
• Bidding and Construction Document sets; full or reduced size; single or multi-colored.
• Production capabilities of up to 36,000 30x42 inch sheets per day. Largest in the Denver area.
• Complete specification reproduction and binding service.
• "Overlay Drafting System" service and supplies.
• Other services include Consulting, Pick-up and Delivery, Supplies, Reductions, Enlargements,
Laminating, Mounting, and Format Printing.
Conveniently located at the NW end of the 16th st. viaduct. Call 455-8611 for further information.
%*who
\are
these ^ people
and what are they talking ABOUT??
I


Full Text

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT D ENVER MAY 1984 volurne six nurnber four Nonprofit .. • U . S ' PAID :' .• .. Denver, Colorado 1 Permrt ,.16 , 5 ,

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2 iNDTES! If you 've never SPPn LAMINATION S un l-:_ ! . now , you're not a lone. LAMINJI':"IONS is a production of the students the School of Design and PJ nr.ning at the Universit y nf CoJorado in flc r.vcr , a!1d ... LNH!!A'T'I0N S is expanding i t s purpcsc. Our b asic o,oo l of being a service Rnd a resource t o the School of Design and Planninq remains unchanaed. W e however , like h e com e a greater tool for educatio n o n a persona l level. n o n students alike b e c ome more aware o f the liFe surrounrlino h v hecoming m o r e involved it. Interchange is the key. LAMINA wou l d like to promote that e n eray which precipitates personal i nvolvement, namely expression! The expression of opinion i s an expr ession o f interest and (hopefully) thought. The exchange of thought is the forum of knowledge; and we , in opinion, can put that to goocl. use. In serving that interest we hope to tie our school and our students with the activities and the issues of the design profession and the populace at largc (our clients) . In interacting with each other we can serv e and enrich each other. Any b ody can participate but only students can get a 1 hour credit. (Sign up next semester). F.cl.itor P.S. Our thanks to Debbie th and Nicole Langley at Th e Business Cooperative for q uality word processing! P.SS. We are seeking a talented cartoonist! Laminations staff Faculty advisor Editors Production Artwork Flobert Kindig Mark Hogan Nata Kahn Peggy Kinsey .Jeniffar I &bi II Bill Nelson Annie Rule Concerning LAHINATIONS: advertising in LAMINATI01'1S is circulated throughout the Denver Auraria/UCD campuses as well as the C.U. campus in Boulder. Several drop spots in the downtown area include City Spirit Books, The Delectable Egg Restaurant, the Market in Larimer Square, City Graphics in Oddfellows Hall and the CSA Carriage House Office on 1459 Pennsylvania. Bulk Mailing will extend LMHNATIONS to cl.esign offices throughout the City and State. Additions to our mallina list are accepted upon request.-LMliNATIONS advertising rates are based o n cost per column inch. Format: (4) 3 3/16" coJumns, 18" maximum height, full page 12 3 /4"xl8". Introduc tory rates are starting at $2.50/column inc h . (Cheap) --' . . j LAMINATIONS is a publication of the students in the College of Design and Planning a t the University of Colorado, 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. It is published four times a year, generally in October, December, 11arch and !'lay. The opinions expressed in Laminations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the College o f Design and P-lanning, or of the University of Colorado. Letters to the editor and other communications areencouraged and may be submit ted to the Laminations mailbox on the second floor of Bromley. 1\ .,J L.. L .J l. 7 -.J Th e Deezine Cluh is a U . C . D . student organizatio n for the pronot:inn of social and educi' tional ict:ivities. Although ncezine Club membership is open to all students a t U . C . D., its c0rcerns a r e geared specifically tn those of the Colleo e of Design and Plrrning. Our primary concerns for the com ing year are: 1 . T o b e an umbrella organization dedicated to in the spirit of unity and cooperation within the ColJ eg0. of Design and P lanning . 2 . T o encourage enthusiastic participation within Deezine Club i n order to b etter serve the student body and become a more legitimate voice of their concerns. 3. To establish and further develop activities such as an orientation/welcome back party next fall , the Lerture Series, a film series, the Designers' Ball, etc. If we as the student body pull togethe r and work t o become a cohesive group, our time at the College of Design and Planning could be a more rewarding experience. Deezine CJuh Executive Committee Brian Bartholomew ,Judy Gubner Ron Radznier cTnlia Sandelman Kat Vlahos C A L E N D A R 4th Annual NCARB Exam Brush-Up June 2nd & 3rd. For more information call Jeanne Cabral at 722-1608 or Diane Gavor at 831-4462. Deadline for registration is May 11th. Great City Symposium Events sponsored by the Urban Design Forum (575-5571) The Challenge May 24th Edmund Bacon Ingredients of a Great City. Paramount Theater, 7 : 30 p.m.; Reception at 6 : 30 p.m. Great City Ideas Campaign May 2 4 -July 19. What would make Denver a Great City? A city-wide campaign to so-licit Great City ideas from the public, design professi onals, schools, business and commu ni t_y groups. The R eport September (Presentation and Publication of Great City Ideas). Spring Fever Events sponsored b y Downtown Denver Inc. (5 3 4 -6161). Cinco de Mavo Celebration on the Mall. May 4, 5 , 6. Fourth of July Blast June 29 and 30 and July 4th. Barbecue, bee r , parades, square dancers, rides and fireworks. Festival of Mountain and Plain Labor Da y Weekend, September 1,2 and 3. V r-('" ,._ r-L ... 7 " ., 7 < v Letters to the Editor ... [)ear Editor: I would like to first thank all o f my students f o r making the semestecs I taught such a joy. I also thank the school f o e the opportunity t o teach an independent, introductory co,nputer course. I am tcu l y sorry the course had t o co1ne to <>n end. The saddest pact of the c ourse's demise is the emptiness o f the computer room, all that stuff sitting unused. C ompu t ers may be popping up everywhere, but without a little push, without s omeone's enthusiasm pcodding a newcomer, without readily available help, the computer r oom sits empty. Perhaps r.1y course should have developed into a two-semester continuous course. The spring semester w ould then serve as a continuation o f t.lle din"c tions taken in the Fall semes ter. I hope that in the future such a class can be established; for our graduate students to not be computer savvy is to deny the inevitability o f computers in all ouc futures. The fear by s ome that the school could be headed in the direction of a technical college, 1 feel, is misguided. Our chances o f being a leader in design in the world of architectural s chools is further from reality than the very real possibility that this school, with its solar connections and the administrative support foe computers, could easily and quickly become a leader in such areas. We should be a center for research and a clearinghouse of information. We should be known around the state as the place to look for expertise and guidance. We should be recognized around country as a leader in the use of new technical devices and systems for the betterment of the design profession and its products. Carol Farino For The Breakfast Lover ... Is Now Open Serving Breakfast 7 Days A Week MON.-FRI. 6:30AM. to 2P.M. SAT. & SUN. 7 A.M. to 2 P.M. Also Serving Lunch 11 A.M. to 2 P.M: 1642 Market Street Phone: 572-8146 RAPIDOGRAPH H.R.S. SETS T h e Humrd tfrer Revolvrng Select or enables araftsmen and anrsts t o sto re therr drawrng pornt sectrons rn a compact holder that keeps tnem re ady for use Hum1d1l 1ed 1nter1or p re vents 1 nk i rom dry1ng 1n the po•nts when the araw1ng po1nt sect10ns ar e uncapped_ po1nt down m the sleeves dunng work Int ervals HR$ 6 5f'TOI6Pens 000123-l _I ... H. R. Meininger Company 1415 Tre mont Place De nv er , Co lorado 80202 (303) 571 sane more notes --------PURPOSE "Architects foe S ocial Responsibility is a national, n on-profit organization of architects, related professionals and stu• dents. It was organized to help the public understand the catastrophic consequences of nuclear war and the negative effect that massive and disproportionat e ex penditures for nucleac weapons have on the quality of life in America." Architects f o r Social Responsi bility, 225 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 1001 2 Architects for Social Responsibility (First National Meeting) " A Guide to Armageddon" May Phoenix Convention Center. information, Donald R. (202) 626-7458. AIA Annual Convention 5th. For Levy Phoenix, Arizona. Contact AIA (?02) 626-7300. TO: UCD Students & l 'acu.L ty RE: Women in Architecture We are a small organization of design professionals that act as a support group and information source. We have monthly meetings that range from tax advise to slides of India and Nepal. We will be offering our 4th Annual NCARB Exam Brush-Up Seminar this spring. Our direction is networking and community involvement. If anyone is interested in attending a meeting or joining WIA, please feel free to do so. Contact: Diane Gayer, Editor 321-0622 (w) Linda Stansen, President, 695-0411 {w) THE MEMBERS DOWNTOWN DENVER, INC. Downtown Denver, Inc. , through the active support and involvement of its members, is continuing its highly visible role in directing business and community energies toward an integrated program of center city development. Traditionally a strong advoca t e for downtown business inte rests, DDI has broadened its center city involvement to include the management, operation and promotion of downtown. With the knowledge that its strength as an advocate and manager of downtown is a function of the support and leacl.er ship of its members, DDI continually seeks to enlarge its membership base t o include the broadest possible representation of the downtown business community. Jn addition to addressing critical center city issues such as housing, transportation systems management, retail development, planning, zoning, design and preservation, DDI also provides a full range of services and benefits to its members. Foremost among these is the unique opportunity to participate in planning and implementing programs which enhance growth and vitality and the quality of life in our center city. Note: Denver's catching "Spring Fever" again during Downtown Denver's second annual salute to the rites of spring, April ?7 May 13th. From Civic Center to the 16th Street Mall, the DCPA to Auraria, the city will come alive with music, food, fountains, greenhouse garden sales, flowering planters, spring fashions, athletic competitions, Mother's Day and Cinco de Mayo festivities. See Calendar for dates or call Downtown Denver Inc.

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AWARDS! McHarg 1984 The highlight of the 1984 Awards Banquet was the appearance of the noted Scottish planner, Ian Captivatinq his audience with a wry and roguish commentary on the state of architecture, he claimed, "I may not be right, but I am irreve rent!" McHarg chose to share his view o n the current state of architecture declaring, "After a 11, it is in a bit o'disarray." The proliferation of the International Style with its dedication to the minimization of detail and the expression of structure was seen to be of profound inconsequence, with the resulting forms being, "coequally un suitable for all people regardless of race, creed or place of natural origin." The current vogue of post modernism was not immune to the un yielding criticism of McHarg. Rather than rejecting the frivolous details of the past in favor of a system of simplistic geometry and cubism, post modern architects take bits and pieces of the past and combine them into conglomerations of ornament that seem to address the esoteric needs of the designer above those of the general public. McHarg stressed that one needs to be an expressionist not an eclecticist when dealing with the past. Using the natural sciences a s a guide, which McHarg has dedicated his career to promoting, one can apply scientific methods to develop design. He compared nature's ability to adapt to new environments, with society's need to recognize its changing condi t i ons, using examples of the past to learn from and build upon. He qualified his expertise by noting, "I've spent 30 years in the profession learning the things that the years at Harvard so expensively denied Me!" McHarg's challenge to Colorado was that of a wise use of our resources, such as the U.S.G.S. and other government agencies conveniently located in this area as well as the universities. THose present at the banquet answered this call with supportive applause, recognizing t hat a resource is only a function of the perceptions of the observer. In the future perhaps the s uccess of design will be measured b y the degree of human health and well being in a given environment. For Ian McHarg the q u est continues. by Randy Verzyk ARCHITECTURE STUDENT AWARD WINNERS The following students and professionals were selected by the architectural student body asdeserving special recognition in their respective levels and fields for design excellence. The winners are: 500 Level: Ron Radziner Visitor Center Design 600 Level: Paul Borman Train Station Design 700 Level: Doug Hanson High Rise (Pre-Thesis) Local Professional: S.L.P. Terracenter There was a good turnout of students voting for these avJards and the voting was close on every level. Congratulations to all those nominated. The winners were officially recognized the student awards banquet on Friday, April 20th. HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS It has become increasingly apparent to the architectural literati that a general distaste or dissatisfaction exists in the present form of the "state-ofthe-art" solar home. This article offers a possible explanation and suggests a solution of this dilemma. A brief investigation of the past illustrates the evolution of this problem. The invention and subsequent assimilation of the thermostatically controlled furnace coMbined with plentiful r.heap fossil fuels led to a gradual disappearance of the functional hearth in modern housing. As tiMe passed, furnaces became the accepted means of heating a home. With the hearth removed as an element in {he floorplan, new prototypes of space planning evolved. Among them is the "ranch house" so popular with tract developers. As fuel prices rose, so did the efficiency of the furnaces until they began to reach their asymptotic limit. Solar energy as a means to heat a home began to become a costeffective alternative from which the current "solar home" evolved. vlhat happened? We lost an element (hearth) and gained a new architectural language (solar vernacular). Three facets to the merit a more detailed symbolism, priority, ment. problem analysis; and eleSvmbolism: Present solar homes lack a clear, identifiable architectural language that relates specific meanings to specific forms. Solar homes, with sloped greenhouse glazing and glass curtain wall elevations prioritize energy efficiency as "raison-d'etre," sidestepping the real issue of shelter. As put by a colleague, "The solar house has become more a symbol of status than one of energy." Priority: The sequence of the wording in "Solar Home" gives a clear indication of the priority that solar energy collection receives in the programming of a home design. That is, "solar" first and "home" second. The traditional values associated with shelter and the family are often overlooked in favor of maintaining the comfortable but increasingly tiresome cliches that immediately identify a house as "solar" to the layman. !the ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ + + + + FAY JONES +++++++ +++++++ +•+++++ +++++++ +++++++ +++++++ +++++++ +++++++ +++++++ ++++++++ ++++++++ The UCD Spring Lecture Series began on a high note with Mr. Euine Fay Jones, Architect. Mr. Jones spoke to an "overflow" crowd of students and professionals at the Science Building on the Auraria Campus. An apprentice and devotee of Frank Lloyd Wright, Jones is the former Dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas where he presently teaches design, while engaqed in professional practice. His career has primarily consisted of designing private residences, which has earned him national as well as international recognition. 3 Elements: Frank Lloyd Wright developed a personal language which recognized that the responses to organic influeror.es ultimately determine the success or failure of a particular design. One element he never failed to acknowledge was the time honored and cross-cultural ly recognized concept of the hearth as the organizing element of the home and more importantlv the symb olic nucleus of the family. The point of all this is that the current generic solar home fails aesthetically due to unclear architectural symbolism , misappropriated priorities in the programming and missing physical elements that constitute the classical shelter. For example, the ancient Greeks used a central atrium in which t o focus the family activities organize the spatia 1 functions. The homes of the victorian qenre used one or more massive hearths around which the spaces and circulation were ordered. In it is evident that a realignment of priorities is long overdue. Just as a house is a home only because of the timeless and universal pri n ciples that define it as such, an architect cannot hope to succeed in housing design without careful attention to the qualities of comfort, beauty and utility. It is therefore incumbent on all designers t o reexamine the very definition o f the word "house" and to incorporate the profound meaning and inherent situational quality without which one can only hope to create a "soulless machine for living." by Steven B . Walsh -----------------GRADUATION DAY CEREtiONIE S Graduation ceremonies will be held Saturday May 19th, at 2:00 p.m. in the Denver Auditorium Arena (1323 Champa Street). This year the College of Desig n and Planning will host a recep tion for its graduates, their families and friends, and the faculty immediately following the ceremony at the Lawrenc e Street Center Plaza. The College looks forward to bringing the graduates, families, friends and the faculty together on this joyous occasion. Congratulations, graduates! From the Deezine Club Executive Committee -----------------Mr. Jones displavs an affinity for blending his architecture with the environment. His use of natural Materials and extensive landscaping creates an intertwining of nature and house la his mentor, F. L. Wright. His keen attention to detail and the carrying out of his design concepts throughout the structure reflect the depth of his work. While his imeges are unlike todav's post modernist, Mr. Jones is noted for the historical refereroces in the forms he uses for design. However, he feels that classical forms do not have to be copied, but rather can function as a start ing point from. which n e w design can evolve. Stephen E. Cash

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I College of Design and -------------r-----------, UNIVERSITY ! student ! OF COU .. AAOO I I ATDENVER ! directory ! ARCHITECTURE -------------------------------------NAME ADDRESS PHONE NAME ADDRESS PHONE LYALY ravrc LCIIIS 'oCEMS ?!11 S "'I!V :L"f rfiiV(P 42C avr 1.386 PEP"' rQ 1 • """Lrr• F2? PX 301 I"TONOCC1ULr.S !'( I < "021• on211 -3'73 ar,, 1 c P'ZOe ]7 AC0!3 7]-1',)0. ? AOZ!O 7''-3 pr,403 7'i5-H1P A021P. 33 • OZO! 704-7 391 Rll2]0 IA Sfd-0282 27FI-l!.67 220 n.r-6t :;>4 110218 eo•:Q 217-J02A 4"777-70,] 444-70"'a A!7-::IJ81 eo2o• <1118-H 3' •o231 e o 2 o 2 a 2 2 3 sn?o2 8021J6 321-10:n l\0211 4!1!1-23!11 8.,201 42A-tl22-JOO 2 2 2 1SCJ '7 232-93'16 80203 P00!2 P.0111 771-4'!17 00123 a7J-3!a2 80231 7!!D-'H8' 70 7-"-3771 • 0 211 44 '16 -4-03J'! 8 0 211 8021R 80210 722-3210 an2o3 863-0023 13020CI 722-101!!! R0207 1!.022-!33-4Hl 1!0206 372-469!1 KELLY APINF ICATZ l'llll GAt •E'LLI:P CHARLES OAVtO SCO'IT t<.P51 s 15011 FLP""I OJ; r DIVf q D(rJVI'R eo210 110206 388-52Rl ao218 9eo-25f3 762-1404 DENVE'R 802?0 80302 4a4-7616 q 223-4118 779-097a !'10210 722-aA1'l LE'Y!Ne-III)$(N !!ETI< 't.T"II IUR!ON LONCP'ONT onvr.• @0!101 07 @0212 H3-4432 80218 SH-9521 861-1483 ll1J2!8 '!?4-7542 80203 80011 364-6'525 A0222 7";9-3452 LlrDLE CHPISTOFH[R C L !U III:P)NG Ll t: ,., S Ill G C HE: 1.1 G 11Z2 FL POULD(R 11f.O r0NA ST lA rNV(R 11'51 :3n4 1209 "f'RL ST "fNvr:q (')EIJVn •UT4ULL 'J'?! ( 1'TH :? MATHIOTT LIURA MC KITHRTN I < '1!LAII< J<'HN I'AOK C'AVIO RoEC Ill MUELL(P MYLINOEO GATL( I.IILL!IP' A NIELSEN qay ANI"P[W 120 T '"' l02b >RASER Sl 2835 S . . • < . 1!l'S• I 111 r 'JE ')lEY A Vf. 1130 !VI'IHOf 1!10 HV•"CLDT ST AURORA G OL Dt . l"f'IVF'R r:o:vER r r 111 vr A I'>QULOEf< fiJAuRA 80210 F98-'l5:53 8 0 3 0 ... '1-'16 3 7 I'IO:?'E, q3--'?7ac 44a-'H 83 80013 (,99-9'552 0 114PA JOHN OLSON .JEAN CONLE'I' PYEATT KEITH Y GEORG[ PTl!K CHPISTOPHE" J SCOTT qOX 7n LOR"'TTO qA 1CTH ST 1505 H6S S CI'IUeE CC ST 206'5 ]7TH ST 80033 POULr.EP P0!02 a4Q-)690 9!50 !'UP lOt; ST D(NVF'R 80218 OTJS ST APT 1!0033 ROGI:RS ROeroT W JP RULE. l'N CI!C;' liH FR(O ZELCA J" ') an• Jll<' !50' 3!7 r (L'IJICr-1/[L(W ao--a110 pn2of. 3'1,-77-a 802'3 8022!1

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PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ---------------------------------NAME ADDRESS PHONE NAME ADDRESS PHONE arCOR CAYTC ROPERTA JANf L(Jr.H 4PPf.LL I YG( A I'JOS P' A R Y 4XELRAO MICHAEL JACK 8f.Tl BOWDEN CAFLAN C H L P.l 0 E V 0 'l CODY THOMAS fLLEN CE FEYTrP Lr( !>! Al JUlN WILLJAP' tlSLfY WATHr A tiJELL IURYC Glllr FTELC FOLEY JUNE r.LU[CK STEVEN r.OODE PATRICK ELLIS r-P((R Gf.ORG( AOTHUR t:Ul'S CHR !STOPHER JAN J W HONN THO"AS [DWARO HOOPES THO"AS I I ALI JACKSON EVE ERIC RUSSELL K!H SHIN WON II'JNG 3 P; fl f TJI AVE 1277 t;T 14q'5 1\64 JilTS SO t:TLPtr; SO XANTHTA CT rn:vo C[ajYf.P P "OULC[R I"[NVI"'P [I EN 'IEP S ST ?n7 IL1RORI 3000 ST Qn206 80206 3?9-633q 80!02 U2-0170 n o 2 "" 1 -g 2 7 a 733-SS03 8023i POOU !:95-431!: 11(1207 38 110203 86::1-.A 1 ao 80218 :n::l-7535 1102211 e o2o5 3S4 2179 104':-HJf:H ST IQ oPH1Ct 3T 1Q72 S VAN GOqDQN (T ;>04.? "CE ST 2 P C 0 U'l T Y 0 a oovrc ST 1 0 2 0 1 T" T " ;: P fJ ICOf < . 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A'"S ST WAY flfiJVfq L'ENVE" 80203 8020!\ 8 0 1.32 830-H> 73 9b1-fl&l'l4 411R-27 25 LEUTWlL(R qzCHARO SC 8021!1 1'0303 ""'"-77'!5': 8C211 477-7159 NTCI'OLAS KARL 4f!\7 CT '"AY BIRAARA II tEFF PL COLLEEN JC$[ P Jq MOUSSALLl Alir.IISTE OGPONNA LIVINUS AMAH oavER HOLLY o PAY SCOTT CHRIS O:VIC PJ(PC JAT WILDER PJPO ROXIr POLLMAN JAN!Cf POURFAYAZ H POwERS PINKENBACH SHEPLE 110((1ER fMlll[ B OYOER 5JFFELL POPEPT STEVN SASS CATHERINE C S.&YR E JOE C P.CIAQ L'EE SELEB "liiClE R ljQNALO A 'ElOEL KAliL( SHANLEY SH(DIOC HIOT ELIZAPETH P TALr(CIT T!MOTI-'Y A R fLLEN PA HI TAUPY ELlliA[TH r. ULI6AARI JAMES FELl• VA" KARl KAT VILAA JOHFIHA VIOLETTE MABLE D WING!ICHLER CARRIE C JAMES IIFINER M WEST STEPHEN ROBERT WH[(L(II C LUCY GC!EENE WONG ROSE I'HITE YOUNG JOHN REAC 126 W PL11 a2qo F!rERAL E M[qC(P (1R AURORA R00[3 rENVfR 1145 ST DO!Vf.R S [I[NY[R 2000 112 11" ISH r.O!YER !0 3!'"7 II SVF' I"ENV[P 11!020CJ 80203 80210 1'10302 1\0220 o 1 22 447-1867 7'H q2 1'10211 80209 7U-78Cq 11020:5 so r .. 52q \lASH ST U304 47a0 II 101ST PL 1J ( '5T M HI!: T[ 1 8 0 0 0 61 1:1-7 SO HliMSOLO T CE'NVf:R Q?2'5 II PL 1n1 L4Kfii00C 110 SO r(NVER •P1 SO SALINA P.OUTE ROULDF'R S WY AURORA en• 692 C/0 VAIL R0210 7'33 q2:?-q705 t'-0221! 8 .030' H2-'S231 8001:5 690-93 (,4 816!!7 HF..-3'514 f060 [ f.,.A Tl' P O . 3:1;:tF' UT TC" COI"•ERCE C' !10022 1138-'3130 204o "ROAOW.A'I" $1) L(1W(LL 530 lG'\2 IVANHOE 71!6 GAYLOPC ST 12bS 20'i n(NV[R SOIIL!1R 80212 <;136-964:! 80302 44'J-'J210 8023t 7q7-31 611 FT COLL!NS 80!121 110?20 A93-•Q 18 r1(NV[R f• E Ill VER DENVER l"ftiVER C T PCLF ROULOER I! 0206 333-.. f\1 802(1Q 722-'55(,7 1111234 450•'H62 322 811206 06 110!e2 442-n1! 11022fl qiii'J-4 .. 30 IIPI!':HT IULF:'Hil q 1 7 II L F' 720 S ST 2P 35 DOVE P CP 724 (l(.A PS r:J ro ROX 52;>c @AL!:ll'l l21 n 0 !lOll 2 lflA"S ST tP02 VI't sTqr.rT $(1 f' 12R" tT LAI'F'IIOOn ClfNVfR I'OUUCA E'OUUlEP IUAO"I J'tVIDI 4RVAOA rE!tfVt ONVER 80302 110303 BOOll 811i32 1!0002 80001 80206 Pn4on S Z!:PHYR ;<;T (UGfN( JOSFF4 1/AITM I"'LOP[S MAP![ 1027 Fqy( DteRl SUSAN ROUSEK GREGORY s 2112 AOA,.S 9n" 13TH ST 1?1 .OOIINJI'!G St''? COQOfll 72?r JOHNSON ST[VEN 1300 CP TI-4 ST n r N VI 'l !>OULOEP f'[t.JVr . R FI'J11Lr1ER C( loiV(P L U"WOOO nENVER OENYER GOLDEN nrNvc.:q OENYER LIT TL [ T 0'! r.ENYEFI fo OULN' Q .E'OULn(R CATHERINE JOAN ELIZABETH KNAUEP l "f('q(W R JILL iNN( YIIKON A tPVA"I E 'I!RGU 7-301 nENVER 8 0 3 0 2 Q II 3-5 2 3 0 80203 1'10302 4"7-1P80 11021'! 'l!4-q712 80227 Q@6-397<;1 811212 I7 110203 80206 80401 S0218 80122 278-4314 722-">B 20 7H-l15tl 1111206 IJ0301 44-11 80302 449-'!077 l>OI'I0'!5 80231 344-.. 095 LOUTSV!LLf 80027 666-9003 r('IVEII ('[NVF'II 80222 OA tl 02 0 80210 733-8371 HAC SCOTT A 11ACHLlN PIULA R['-4(( MARTIN L 2217 Sl1 244 S CLEVfLAP-!0 LQUISVILLf 80027 CRANEY @RUC[ I f IJ'.TH AVf A "AR TON rENVrll I"(NVfP 80202 86I-Il300 44'1-Q3•E: 1!0218 1'\C N IIIlTH " DENNIS LE POSTL[WAIT JORDAN L RIH!II!I !:HOHAEH SCHULTZ II!Ur,AAET C SHERICAN SALLY STIRLING eLAKf EC\IAOC TAKEUCHI MIYO OOPERT L 271110 C.ARNf'(;J( W '!lOTH PL R14 SPIIIJCE POUlOER 80303 WEST"lNSTEA 1'1"020 80302 1161-"'1112 82!5-6280 7!18-1663 770-2060 238-08 44 2:08-'\1 4 3 47 761-959!5 777-9740 711 '34-8112 l'R 1 TER(S A YAh EYT[NPffK R P C.:LEANQII( C WOLLEP"•N JftiN( DIAN( INTERIOR DESIGN 1:!"'0 UTICJ 1121" F'OPEST I"'JIGLE\100(1 HQ! ' T"'CT 1:'1111 CENVE!I AVE 1207 LAK(WOOD I II 1 W( GOLrN r. ILF'T jj --a..t: o; BfLLFVIEW PL "87 ST 811q OfTERSON WAY \IOLFF ST O(NVfP Pj(;L( \10Q(l "F'NVER VI"' II IJ0204 80110 811237 8021!! 811401 80211 80110 80218 80?23 80236 ------------l------SUL•I"AN !04e II AV jQ3 I"[WVFR 80236 Q35-3Jbb BRCOKS JENNIFER a S r. IIF'SL[Y AVf 110210 "P 109"6 WIY T!lrRNTON CO"STOCK G!IE50RT 137• SO PNN COOKE JILL quaRT OAHLfERG P"'f'EN qc;q7 E OPCIIARO r11 F'SLICI< NA!ICY HAIIL FOLLENWflO[R J S 0[1/ry MEL!NCA L W 7TH E.IJI . ' JEfl JUO I TH L 2590
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I -......... I ...... -Dear Friends, In my last letter the suggestion that tween had more thar the relic Harvard man sporting Brooks Brothers, provoked little response, as tweed and its conservative relatives continue to prevail (with a few small exceptions). It is true enough that we suffer problems of proximity. That is to say that New York is two thousand miles away, L.A. one and Cheyenne just arourd the corner. In this growing mecca in the west, finding a decent pair of shoes is like asking for a "Shirley Temp le" in the outbacks of Africa. Ridiculous! There was however a brilliant flash of glitter on the eve of March 30th. One glimpse of this great escape from sartorial provincialism was all that was needed for a new optimism as regards the state of western fashion. From tuxedos t o tiger skins, One Denver Place mav not witness such regalia for some time to This rAkish display of nev! "hautP. r.outure" it' s a long way t o Paris larger way to Cheyenne. Oh do be daring, won ' t you? Most Sincerely, . Lilly Bovar J / I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ' ,. . I -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

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6 KIND RID SPIRITS BOOKSTORE AND MORE NEW AL7F.RNATIVE AT . .-,., . . ,, . ,,, ,..,., ........ , ... ..... , .... , , __ , , ... , ... -,1'_, , ... , .... 1;"'-:_1 ... I '' .... .::__.,_:,\/\ ,_ -' \ '7 ' ... \ _,_ ' ......... ... ... ':,)'::,'' , .... _, .... !....'-: .. .''1 1\1.,; • ' City Spirit is more than just' a'" bookstore. It is a resource, gallery, and cafe. The whole aura of the place is special. This bookstorP. is unique in Denver, but it cpmpares to places such as the "Urban Center" in New York City, "William Stout" in San Francisco, and the "Prairie Avenue Bookstore" in Chicago. The sign above the door reads "Morton Zeppelin, Esq. City Spirit." Inside you will find the pleasRnt company of Michael Fagan, Beverly Fischer, and Marty Phillips. The variety of books there is exhaustive. Categories include: Arch. History, Theory and Critic ism, Design and Color, Building T ypes, Vernacular, American Regionalism, Graphics, Energy -solar/underground, Technical Business Management, Aesthetics, Art History, and there are monographs and periodicals There is a small gallery which is presently showing various works by Edward etchings and corrunemorative posters by Michael Graves, and photography by Elke Kuhn Moore. There is also a display of Objects and Textiles by a group of New York artists. All this is merely the beginning of what is to become the realization of a marvelous vision ... Michael Fagan and Morton Zeppelin are the originators of this vision, with the help of Berkeley artist Susan Wick City Spirit's "aesthetician-at-large." Plans forsee a large gallery of art on the first floor, and a cafe in the back, hopefully to open this surruner. Michael Fagan has elaborated on some of the philosophy behind these plans. Fagan asserts that there is no "Public Art" in Denver, and that there is a need to create an atmosphere for this to happen. Up until now there has been no encouragement for Public Art in Denver. HOwever, Architecture and Art are on the verge of a quantum leap in this city , according to Fagan. "Laypeople" are taking a much greater interest in Architecture," he says. Fagan has a kee n interest in the philosophies of the Constructivist/Suprematism movement of the early 1900's. This movement strove to achieve an interpenetration of art on all levels of public life. With City Spirit, Fagan hopes to realize this kind of philosophy . PHOENIX FROM FLAMES: THE TEMPLE BUILDING SURVIVES A DEVASTATING FIRE On the evening of March 3, 1984, a four-alarm fire swept through the Hasonic Temple Building. The blaze gutted the interior of the building, and caused the collapse of the roof and most of the floors. The massive masonry walls at the exterior remained intact, but they had no support to prevent ther:1 from collapsing as well. The destruction was so severe that it seemed likely the historic structure, designed b y Frank E. Edbrooke and bui 1 t in 1889, would be lost completely. But despite the extensive damage, the process o f restoring the Masonic TemplP Building is already unde r wa y . Saving the building required an unusual degree of cooperation and dedication from both public and private groups. Only hours after the heroic efforts of the Denver Fire Department to quench the blaze, a t eam of developers, architects, and engineers began work on a plan to restore the building. ThP.ir irrunediate goal was t o stabilize the exterior walls. The unbraced walls presented a safety hazard to the public, and the city's Building Inspection Division required an expeditious solution. Several r:1eetings were held on March 4 and 5 to determine building code limitations and stabilization schemes. The developers of the Masonic Temple Building, Cambridge Development Group, coordinated the work of the engineers with the concerns of the city's building and transportation departments. Borman Smith & Partners, Engineers, designed the steel bracing scheme, being careful to check the availability of the steel sections with local fabricators. Cambridge worked with RTD and Mall officials to come up with a rerouting plan for traffic during the restoration process. By March 8 the stabilization and transportation plan had been approved, and erection of the braces began on March 9. I EMR..E As the woll is removed, a crane will be placed in the alley to load dump trucks with debris. The trucks will be crossing the 16th Street Mall and driving through a rented right-of-way on the adjacent parking lot. After the debris near the brick wall is removed, the crane will be positioned inside the building shell on a raised pad. From this location, the crane will be used to reach the rest of the debris and, eventually, to erect the new interior structure. Jill Morelli, Project Manager for Cambridge, estimates that the debris removal process will take about eight weeks. Once the debris removal is complete, work will begin on the interior structural system. floor and roof l oads will be carried b y a 36-foot bay steel frame with cor:1posite steel deck. The exterior walls will support only their own weight, and the steel frame will brace the walls from the inside. Once this is accomplished, the exterior steel braces can be removed. The steel frame will be supported by drilled piers set inside the exterior walls by 12 to 15 feet to avoid damaging or disturbing the walls. Construction documents are currently being prepared by Gensler & Associates, Architects. According to Ms. Morelli, the plans will call for removing the bricks in the upper story window openings and installing new glazing. The granite and sandstone exterior will be checked for damage, cleaned, and repainted. The first floor will have a new storefront design reminiscent of the storefronts in the early 1900's. The 16th Street entrance will be restored, and will lead to an interior atrium. The first three levels will be rented to retail businesses. The fourth and fifth floors will be occupied b y the Masons, who will have their own access off Welton Street. The sixth and seventh floors will house Now that the bracing is in offices. Cambridge Development place, the second phase of the is currently considering adding restoration has begun. The two more floors for offices set building is filled with charred well back from the facade, debris, and all of it must be though they will need approval removed before new construction from historic preservation begins. Cambridge Development officials to make this change. Group examined several options, If work' proceeds on schedule, and decided to access the debris Denver will see the Masonic b y rer:1oving a portion of the Temple Building back in fine brick wall facing the alley next form by the end of 1985. to the Kittredge Building. The _ _ _ , ,__, mortar between bricks was • .... ""\ I..... ......, .... I/ ' ' ' ... I weakened by the head of the b y Kelly Anne Karmel that workmen been able. ... .... pull out the hr1cks bv hand _ .J /'...-,..-, ..... , ... ,, .. _ .. ,\ .. ,,,,-,/,:-,, ... -,, ..... '; .... -,-,. occasional use of a crowbar. \'....'..-•,,., ... .... /_..1-:_t .... ',.!.-... ...... ..... /" Michael Fagan hopes that City Spirit will be a place to sit, talk read, exchange ideas, and be comfortable. The completion of the cafe will facilitate this. Fagan envisions "lots of space to hang out, inexpensive sandwiches, and a really good cup of coffee!" His subtle enthusiasm is quite contagious. If you haven't visited City Spirit yet, then please discover it soon. It will be worth your while! .. \ , .... ,-/ / , ... .... ,""-',.., .... ,_:-.... \ ... ,; .... ,• ... ::;: '''/_., .,..,, ..... _, __ ,-,'...:\':::.r/\-'1 '' '1'\ .............. ,.... .... . I' .... -:..,,:.: .... / :t ... 1.!._!.....-;',;•,--; '\' by Nate Ka.hn DIPhllraphiGG" Printshops Of The Future e BID DOCUMENTS e JOB SPECIFICATIONS e PORTFOLIQYACKAGES STUDENT/FACULTY DISCOUNT 1036 Fourteenth Stroot • Donm, CO 80202 • {303) 534 5525 N . V . & Associates 1 BUSINEsS COOPERATIVES The Grant Street Mansion 1115 Grant Street Denver , Colorado 80203 word processmg offrce automation secretarial serv ic es computer consulting 303-863-8400 / 863-8633 EDMUND BACON TO OPEN GREAT CITY SYMPOSIUM '84 Great City Symposium '84, title of the third annual Urban Design Symposium presented by the Urban Design Forum, is a 3-part public event this year that will ask area residents the vital question, "What will make Denver a great city?" The Symposium goal is to collect citizen's ideas and corrununicate them to decision makers who shape Denver's future. Mayor Federico Pefia will open Part I, The Symposium Challenge, at the Paramount Theater, May 24 at 7:30 p.m., reception 6:30 p.m. He will introduce Edmund Bacon, Philadelphia's controver sial city planner from 1949 1970, and author of the classic Design of Cities. Bacon will speak on the ingredients of great cities and illustrate his talk with slides from his award-winning film series, "Understanding Cities". Mr. Bacon's appearance is sponsored by The Denver Partnership, Inc. The award-winning film series, "Understanding Cities", features London, Paris, Rome, the American urban experience, and the city of the future. In conjunction with the Symposium, this series will air in Denver on KRMA-TV for five Saturdays at 5:30p.m., May 19-June 16. The Mayor will also announce the opening of Part II, the Great City Ideas Campaign, which will run from May 25 through July 19. The Campaign will ask the public to contribute great city ideas for Denver. Articles in the media, ads sponsored by the Denver Post, special mailings and meetings will be used to solicit response for Great City Ideas from the public, schools, design professionals, neighborhood, business and corrununi ty groups. During the campaign, various orqanizations will offer special activities highlighting these five urban issues during focus week: June 1-7, Neighborhoods and Housing; June 8-14, Growth and Preservation; June 15-21, Transportation; June 22-28, Downtown; June 29-July 5 , Recreation and Open Space. The Urban Design Forum will offer a walking tour, "Surprising Urban Spaces and Places", May 26 . Groups who wish to present events in conjunction with the Symposium are asked to contact the Forum. The Urban Design Forum is a non-profit citizen organization founded in 19 8 2 to educate and increase public awareness of urban design. Symposium cosponsors are the City of Denver, Office of the Mayor and the Department of Planning and Development, The Denver Partnership, Inc. and the Cent.er for Public-Private Sector Cooperation. Supporting organizations include the Denver Chapter, American Institute of Architects; Colorado Chapter, American Planning Association; and Historic Denver, Inc. for the Edmund Bacon Symposium Challenge are $5, available at the Paramount box office or in advance from the Forum. For tickets and information on Great City Symposium '84, contact the UrbRn Design Forum, 938 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204, 573-5551

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WE NEED GREAT IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY NEEDS GREAT IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY A GREAT CITY NEEDS GREAT NEEDS GREAT IDEAS FOR IDEAS FOR A GREAT CITY of the Grent. City Symposium sponsored b y the UrJ?an Design Forum, LAHINATimTS asked several prominent Denverites of Denver, past, present and future. Responses were limited to one page, and were to emphaslze personal visions of 7 In anticipation their opinions a Great city. by George Writer Or. ) The genesis of Denve r the rush for minerals gold and silver at the con f luence of the South Platte and Cherr y Creek, as well as being the distributional and financial center for mining and agricultural interests between the Missouri River and the West Coast. Denver has been trul v blessed with a perfect location: wonderful climate and abundant water to supply growth to date. A combination of good fortune and dynamic leadership has brought u s to w h e r e we are today a thriving metropolis casting upward a breathtaking skyline of our core city sur rounded by beautiful parks and some of the finest open space residential communities in the country . This setting, along with our diversified employment base, portends an unlimited future potential but does it? Until the last five years we have always been able to get around without the pressures of creeping gridlock well known by New Yorkers, Houstonians and Californians. Stapleton Inter national has become the seventh largest airport in the world, but now is also high on the prominent list of airports to be avoided. Intergovernmental bickering is threatening our des tiny. We probably have enough water to keep the metro area green until the year 2000, but these problems threaten the lifestyle that has made us want to live here in the first place. What are our solutions? They're the toughest of the touch ones, but to start with, we must create a real opportunity for leadership to work toward solving our problems over a reasonable period of time. With our governmental structure on the front range-consisting of 55 d ifferent municipalities and over 100 separate water dis tricts, each with their own turf concerns taking first priority. Even our creative governor throws up his hands in despair. If somehow b y referendum of the citizens of the front range we can set up a system of metro politan government that repre sents the d ifferent regions of our great city we can simplify the process and deal with a mutual interest purpose in sol ving the problems of water, transportation and what we really want our destiny to be. It will take great statesmanship on the part of our present city, county and municipal officials to create an opportunity for effective leadership, which is our only chance to make anything happen. cit\] graphic) 623-CITY 000 FELLOWS HALL 1 543 C HAMPA STREET DENVER. COLO 80202 by CABELL CHILDRESS FA IA somewhere in your mind, 2 J ine is drawn between town and city. Another is drawn t o separate qreat cities. These lines are as fluid as imagination itself. Each mind path. but a incomprehensibily complex sees from a unique life Hundreds of form single city. l'lhile geography provides uterine nourishment . cities outgrow places and become their own spirits . New York, London, Tokyo/Paris, Athe n s , Rome /Hiroshima, Jerusa lem, Berlin/Chicago, Stockholm/ Venice, Kyoto/Atlanta, Seattl e , Toronto/New Orleans, San Francisco/Portlnnd conjure images. Do you think each a great city ? In thinking of Denver, m y mind focuses on Oklahoma City, 2 :00 a .m., 5 July 1934; John S. Robins installed the first parking meter. In 1967 John envisioned plat forms over Denver's 280 acre rail switching yards. 30,000 parking meters wou l d finance the construction. All transportation forms could be centered. The platforms, 50' lower than the Colorado National Bank, would provide a site for the Olympics, the proposed Aurar ia Campus. Free light rail would transport citizens to the city core. Here was one mind offerinq a heroic concept to the City. It is the natun" of cities not to respond to a single mind. Ideas, seemingly rejected, are taken and passed through many minds. They emerge, occasionally recognizable, most often not i n the same form. In the city we share a common mind. Ideas soar into the city' s imagination. They forever change the city's lifepath. Sit with three good friends. Think your best thoughts about a great Denver. You probably cannot achieve them yet strangely within twenty years they will happen. You' 11 never really know if you were the originator yet you will know it i s your city and you share its mind. Bicycle paths, historical preservation, regional transportation, a sports complex, Larimer Street, grass over streets, the Platte are all things I heard my friends wish for. The adjustable parking meters , the 16th Street Mall, Union Station discussions, Big Mac all share a bit of John • s vision. The city feels no debt to John, yet the city gave John audience and I suspect great joy. In my mind, Denver i s presently the world's great city. In the new downtown canyons is the air of village innocence. I relish it! My thoughts a few years ago were a downtown that saw mountains (it bombed), red brick along the railroads (now in place) . Now my thought is the historical renovation of the May D&F/Hilton Complex b y Chuck Sink, Richard Weldon, Ron Mason and I.M. Pei. Jane Marshall Smith's is one shopping evening a week down town. Between us we intend to wake Denver up to its greatest sleeping asset . . then on to another thought. > ,.., < "" t.. ,.. '"'.., > 1\ r" ..J t.. " v < .l > <" > < .l .) A,. ... ., ) 1\<,._L.) "\(,._,. >"'r.,"'.,t.. ..l"'.l" ... "a..., "" "'""" 'v L. A 7 >\..o\""1< .,, < "' ?"< ..a
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CALL FOR ENTRIES: UCD COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING, FALL LECTURE SERIES POSTER DESIGN COMPETITION The competitioP for next fall's lecture series poster design is open to all College of Design and Planning students. All entries are due by Fridav, July 20 , 1984 at 12:00 noon at the College. of Design and Planning office, 2nd floor BrOJ'1lev. The printing process will bediazo or reverse diazo (i.e. one color) with an 1R"x24" sheet size (either vertical o r hori zoPtal). Poster entries will be judged b y professional graphic designers and the winning entrant will receive a $50.00 cash prizP. as well as name recognition on the printed poster. The face of a submitted poster design may not include the name of the but the rgverse side of the presentation must include the entrant's name, college division (ARCH., L.A., PT.AN, INT.) and teJ ephone number. Information to be included on the poster design: WHAT: Fall lecture series College of Design & Planning Univ. of Colorado at Denver WHERE: Denver Center =or the Performing Arts, The Cinema 14th & Curtis Street. s WHO: The lecturers and the dates of each lecture: Below is the list of dates and the division responsible for that evening's speaker: Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26 Nov. 2 Nov. 9 Nov. 16 Architecture Interior Design Landscape Arch. Planning /Communi Development. Architecture/Urban Design Generalist to be selected by lecture committee Space must be allowed under each of the above dates for the following: Lecturer's name & affiliation, brief statement of qualifica tions, and the date. I'IHEN: Consecutive Fridays at 5:15 p.m. in October & November. AND: All lectures are free and open to the public. Each lecture to be followed bv a reception in the Green Room of the D.C.P.A. The addres!': of the College and the College logo. For further information please caJ. l 303/629-2877. Please refer to the 1984 Spring Lecture Series poster. Additional copies of desiqn competi guidelines are available at the College of Design aPd Planning office, 2nd floor Bromley. Any questions about the competition should be referred to either ,Tudv Gubner (388-8088) or Virginia-DuBrucq (698-2200). In addition, Faculty and stuc1 ents with suggestions for any of the above lecturers should leave them with Karen at the CoJ lege of Design and Planning Office, 2nd floor Bromley. The Lecture Committee -y (_a,n