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Laminations, Spring, 1979

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Laminations, Spring, 1979
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Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
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Denver, CO
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University of Colorado Denver
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English

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LAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
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LAMINATIONS Mailing Address: Room 303 Bromley,c/o College of Environmental Design, U.C.D.,1100 l^th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer.
Special thanks for this issue to:
Don Dethlefs Jamie F i tzpat r i ck Mike Fuller Kent Gonzales Geoff Kampe
Kevin Nichols Dan Rawson Paula Schulte Linda Stansen Doug Ward
Mary Warren Jim Wi1 son Jim Wright Rob Murphy
LETTER TO LAMINATIONS:
One of the greatest untapped educational resources In the College of Environmental Design is the knowledge that students can gain from each other. Right now there is no interaction between,di fferent design studios or departments. As each student makes his or her final design presentation,, the knowledge that he or she has acquired is shared only with a hand full of students and jurors. A11 too quickly those beautiful and informative design solutions are rolled up and entombed in an individual's portfolio.
It is time now to end this wasteful practice. As an alternative, I suggest that LAMINATIONS publish jury dates and time tables to encourage open presentations. Also, I would recommend that all design instructors exhibit final drawings on the walls and the stairwell of the schoo1.
From the depths of the drawing tubes, we would exhume an amazing wealth of knowledge that would continue to grow in the minds of fellow students.
Elizabeth Houck
This is the second theme-oriented LAMINATIONS. With this collection of essays, Interviews and polemics, UCD college of Environmental Design takes a look at itself. Main targets for criticism and congrats are our facilities, attitudes, faculty, programs, leadership and relation to the professional community. When we,first mentioned an issue on UCD/CED, we had no trouble finding people wishing to express themselves. You will note that the LAM is packed with strong opinion thistime.
A paradox: With our anticipation of this outpouring of opinion, a fear arose that only the angry and militant would rise to the challenge of writing (it was one of those early 701s paranoias that sneaks up behind you). On the possibility that there was a contented silent majority too busy with homework to complain, we circulated the "Get It Off Your Chest" questionnaire. Fortunately our fears were unjusti-fied; the writings submitted represent a wide range of views. The questionnaires were, however, reason for a different paranoia. The response was small and the answers largely negative in tone. With this and other evidence I must draw one of the following conclusions :
1. Questionnaires are an invasion of privacy and our heroic student body has once again safeguarded its Constitutional Rights.
2. Who cares about apathy? Not UCD/CED.
3. Designers are reluctant to express themselves in writing. I have reason to believe they are terrified, but that's another editorial.
k. )fle should be happy with the answers we got and keep our peace.
Those who did respond cried for better classroom and assembly space. The need for more indoor and outdoor lounging space was, however, the most consistently mentioned item. The concensus about the program was that the design sequence is weak and more integration between program aspects is needed. The faculty took a bath. Their attitudes and techniques were severely criticized. A few students suggested that certain facu1ty don't take the Three-Year Program seriously. Acceptance or discontinuance was urged. Claps and whistles went to Doyle, Holder, Mays, Long and Willi ams.
Bitterness reigned in the slogan contest: "Matchbook Col 1ege","Aspire to Mediocracy","Seedy-U" and "From Buffalo Chips to Bullshit, Enfeebling minds for five generations." People were also down on qur location: "Study in the Rocky Mountain Air Pollution Belt","UCD=Ug1y Campus Downtown" and "The so-called 'urban experience' is actually finding a place to park."
This all could mean that there are several hundred miserable people here. Oh! Heartfelt sadness; look of genuine anguish! I really feel that we are all Okay, but after denying, ignoring and 'pussyfooting about' the real problems here we have come to be angry. The energy generated by anger can well be used for constructive change. This sentiment is echoed by the NCAAB and more than a few students, and it also lies at the heart of this LAMINATIONS. UCD/ CED is no longer the forgivable, neophyte, satellite program. The original vision that spawned us has now been realized. We are here, operating and doing quite we 11 under the circumstances. Our responsibility now |fis to formulate a new,high set of goals and to achieve them with all due spfeed. Doug Ward


I 1 ve
There has probably always been some conflict between teachers and students. I find it difficult to imagine a schooKin which all the students find all the teachers both stimulating and irrefutable.
It has only been in the last twenty years, however, that student-teacher conflict has become pandemic in the United States. A little gnashing of the old teeth is probably, in the end result, healthy.
Teachers have their day in court, so to speak, and they can count on a certain percentage of their classes viewing themselves as jurors. On the other hand, students have the obligation to make their viewpoints known. This is one viewpoint; if you don't like it, speak up.
There are a variety of ways of teaching architecture. As G.K. stated in the last issue of LAMINATIONS, U.C.D. has tried several of them.m.
We can assume that the present curriculum is the result of laudible experimentation. I still see some bones which, rather than picking, I'd like to see fleshed out.
Eliel Saarinen had a design principle which found useful for much more than design, "Look to the next largest thing." In evaluating the architectural program, we are already dealing with the profession. The next largest thing is society. Urban designers and architects create physical changes in the environment of societies which have important results. Architects are, then, in a position of directing society, to a limited degree, toward certain ends.
As members of the society, we presumably already have some ideas along those lines. The question is whether we know how, architecturally, those directions can be created. As things presently stand, the emphasis at U.C.D. seems to be technologically oriented, rather than human oriented. That‘may be a natural outgrowth of this technologically oriented society, but it doesn't lead to architecture. There may be some great admirers of "Anaconda" type buildings out there, but in my opinion they are monuments to the efficiency ethic. This extension of the McDonald's mentality leads to a the efficiency with which it is of plastic.
That is not what we need, about human, social responses to architecture. We need to know what the historical buildings of Western culture, of all cultures for that matter, represent in terms of the social, economic, political and technological realities of their day; whether they worked, for what purpose, and, most importantly, what of all of that is applicable today. We need classes in the psychology of architectural space, the economics of architecture, the politics of architecture, and the social significance of architecture. In short, we need classes which will help us to form critical, well informed attitudes which can be useful for evaluating al1 the circumstances in the design situations we encounter.
Now I think I'd better explain what it appears to me that we are being taught, and why. I suspect
that students learn in direct proportion to the amount of time they spend working on individual
society which admires served another piece
We need to know more
classes. Depending on previous experience, that will vary from student to student. I would say, however, that at least "J0% of my study time over the last three years has been spent in technical study; engineering, drafting, building systems, etc. I'm not suggesting that these are unimportant; they're the tools of the trade and the means of communication. An architect without these skills would be as incongruous as an illiterate writer.
Just as literacy, however, is not the only necessity for high quality writing, so the basics of the architectural language are not the only requirements for high quality architecture.
Historically architects got most of their education through apprenticeship. The apprentice surely got a grounding in the philosophical as well as the technical necessities from his mentor. Frank Lloyd Wright worked for Louis Sullivan who worked for H. H. Richardson, and so on. The Masters Program has taken over,at least in part, the place of apprenticeships. Theoretically, groups of professional teacher/architects should be able to present a broader education than any one firm. The Masters Programs are also, in part, an attempt to upgrade the profession. That being the case, we should expect to have the diploma mean that we are more thoroughly competent to practice the entire art of architecture than comparable apprentices. I don't think that's the case. In three years of school we cannot hope to develop the technical skills which we would develop in a three year apprenticeship. If the point of architecture school is to help people get jobs, and I've heard that statement, then the state would be better off
spending the money it uses to subsidize our education by paying architectural firms to take on apprentices. Three years of ^0-hour weeks in almost any architectural firm will develop far more employable graduates.
The most disturbing aspect of this to me is that if a questionnaire were passed out to all students asking them to spell out in detail, citing historical precedent, their opinion of what role architecture has to play in society, that it would be the first time that many of them had even thought about the question in a coherent way. I don't mean to imply that the students are a bunch of "air-heads". On the contrary, I have a great deal of respect for the intellectual capabilities of the student body. What I do mean to imply is that the school places absolutely no premium on that kind of thought. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times that students, in presentations, have prefaced their remarks with any theoretical, philosophical or comprehensively analyzed justification for their work (l include myself among those who haven't). Usually presentations begin with some sort of drivel like, "Well, I wanted to keep as much open space as possible, so . . .". What nonsense! "I hate open space, it gives me agoraphobia," I always want to shout, even at myself. "So why do you like it so
cont. p. 18.


Stuart Ohlson received his Masters in Architecture from M.I.T. He has worked in Philadephia and Denver and has had his own practice in Denver since 1961.
In addition to having designed many buildings in Colorado, he has been an integral part of the architectural community having served as Co-Director for the Environment '76 Program, Director of the Regional Urban Design Assistance Team Study, Director of the CSA Board in 1977, Director of the LLC Board in 1977 and President of the LLC in 1976.
LAM: Having practiced in Denver for approximately 18 years, are there any specific elements of design which you feel are more significant than others? OHLSON: The word “practice" is too near to the truth. It's embarrassing to have practiced anything for 18 years. An aspiring architect should “practice" until that time he is examined. After a certain respectable period following examination and legal sanctioning, we should be doing something more than practicing: when do we become expert?
About specific elements of design:* my early training tended to discount the importance of the element of human scale in favor of universal structural systems, geodesic dome, folded plate, thin shell hyperbolic paraboloides, and various other structural disciplines. Mastering the predictable pattern provided some security in facing the next design challenge, but produced a grim bunch of heartless forms and predictable spaces. So then, the human, provocative aspect of form and design have become more important where we are rediscovering that in order for a designer to provide a total solution, the finished product must be an object of pride; a space that one wants to be a part of and a place that warrants preservation through the next round of renewal.
LAM: What is your opinion of the place of architecture in this society?
OHLSON: I'm big on “place" at the moment. Archi-
tecture j_£ the place. If the work.is carefully done; with meaning, heart, and scale, it warrants preser-vation and survives renewal. Architecture is the essence of current or historical place. However, it is interesting to compare the magnetism of our new urban spaces such as Skyline Park or the First of Denver Plaza with the mesmerism of the wonderous TV tube. It is possible that electronic illusions will become a perfectly fine replacement for the square or the park or random human spaces, particularly when a New York elementary school teacher ordered his students to cold turkey the tube for one day because of a constant complaint that homework was interfering with their favorite programs. The teacher asked the students to report on their reactions. Most of the students were in a state of shock, without the will to find an alternate activity while one hapless case confessed that she sat in front of
a blank box and imagined her favorite programs. A quote from Edmund Carpenter's, They Became What They Beheld, “Daddy, are we live or on tape", vividly describes the impending predominance of artificial experience over individual contact with traditional “real" people, places and things.
Can our new architecture, real places, the conversation Kiva, the play yard, the sidewalk cafe, the community meeting hall . . . compete with the limitless audio/visual electronic experience? If not, the importance and place of architecture and the role of the architect are suspect and those lifeless urban canyons will somehow proliferate.
LAM: Given this economic system, is it possible for the architect to put his ideas into practice?
OHLSON: Forgetting the terrible electronic audio/ visual threat, let's attempt to focus on the architect and his ideas in today's economic system. The architect has survived because he has been patronized by those who either have no alternative other than to employ his services, or by those who value the skills he has evolved. The architect has more opportunity now than ever before to provide more appropriate solutions. The new dimensions of computerized analysis and design, the collection, storage, and dissemination of information gives him the opportunity to "tune" his design response. The current economic restraints impose a discipline that may appear stifling, but in fact, intensifies the challenge and perfects the solution. The architect doesn't have a bunch of “ideas" floating around waiting to be hauled into action. Rather, he should be evolving a problem-solving capability and with knowledge and some spontaneity, do what's right! The present economic system gives the architect a greater opportunity for more “good" ideas.
LAM: Phillip Johnson said, “Great architecture requires a great client". Do you believe this is so; and if so, what attributes does a great client have? OHLSON: I don't believe the architect can wait for a
great client. There just aren't that many around these days. If your collection of low-budget, slow-paying clients doesn't measure up to Phillip Johnson's enlightened following, then just pretend that your clients are a lot smarter than they seem and just see if a great work doesn't appear. If that approach doesn't produce something great, then be your own client and see where that gets you . . . the second or third mortgage on your house.
The principal objective of a design-oriented firm should be to provide rational solutions to real problems and to avoid the temptation of either adopting or superficially creating “style". The superior client enjoys the adventure of creative solutions rather than imposing tired ideas on new possibilities. He is able to define his needs and encourage the architect to search for the unique and appropriate answer. A certain willingness to forward a substantial retainer should not be discounted as one of the clients greatest attributes.


LAM: Do you have any specific ideas as to the direction which architecture is likely to take in the next twenty years?
OHLSON: It appears that the development team will command the greatest attention in the next twenty years. The pressure to resolve the economics, particularly the ‘‘yield", of a project requires that all aspects of the project be developed simultaneously. The architects program, therefore, requires the organization of fragmented market studies, lender requirements, building system costs, and projected building schedules. Outside of the governmental or institutional market, nothing happens the way one might expect.
Governmental agencies will have a greater impact on a proposed project. Knowing requirements
and time for approval is of vital importance.
The sensitive solutions that tend to give direction to architecture, spring from the individual who is not restrained by the anonymous limits and dictations passed down through the development entity. The small practitioner wi11, therefore, have a place threatened by the temptation to join with the biggies and lose the luxury of independent reaction.
LAM: Are there areas in which education should go in order to prepare future architects for these possi-bi1 ities?
OHLSON: I suppose that in preparation for working within the development team, the architect's education should include a greater familiarity with the other disciplines outside the architect's domain; namely law, economics, financing procedures, development concepts, and probably construction management techniques. These concerns seem to be current subjects of continuing education within the profession. In addition to the basic design, engineering, and professional subjects, some attempt should be made to better equip the student for communicating with the varied elements of the construction industry. Programs such as Internship certainly help to point out the everyday procedural problems. Beyond good draftsmanship and problem solving skills, the student needs to understand that what he produces in the way of design, working drawings, and specifications are, to a large extent, directions to others in the industry to perform in a certain way. Clear instructions are essential. Understand the predicament of the next guy in line and be sure "directions" can be easily understood. Can the carpenter expeditiously work from your details; can the estimator accurately measure quantities and costs; can the mechanical and electrical trades expect to find happiness within the architectural design constraints? In addition to this kind of communication, a semester or two should be dedicated to spelling, grammar, and the letter.
LAM: Can you compare graduates of the University of Colorado's architectural program with graduates from other universities?
OHLSON: Graduates of C.U. compare very favorably with those from other universities. Design and graphics talent, together with production skill, are basic to our evaluation. Generally, C.U. grads have developed skills that effectively assist in conceptualizing and problem solving.
LAM: What level of competence do you think architectural firms do, or should .expect from recent graduates?
OHLSON: I expect a recent graduate to understand the purpose and utility of his training, to have working knowledge of drafting skills, construction documents, and production procedures, and to have a consuming desire to enhance the environment as a result of his inspired vision, remarkable skills, and continuing good nature.


Listed below are a selection of responses from the LAMINATIONS questionalre. Though the overall sentiment is negative and possibly not representative of the school in general we feel it is our responsibility to print the opinions of those who are concerned and committed enough to take the time to express themselves.
“The weakest program in the entire school is design. The administration here seems to think that just because someone is a respected architect in town that he/she will make a good teacher. Unfortunately, that is not true. These architects are thrown into the classroom without any teacher training or experience. The result being that students become guinea pigs to the ego-tripping power hungry whims of the so called 1 teacher.1“
"Excellent guest lecturers surely laugh at our facilities for slide/talk shows!"
"This is a fine kettle of fish you've gotten us into this time, Stanley!"
"Weakness of program: Truely disappointing quality of instruction.
Graphics - Doyle is indispensable!"
"Hooray for guest lecturers like Brian Goodey.
How about more exchange profs, from the USA and the worl d?"
"I appreciate the fact that most instructors here value student's persistant efforts, even when they miss the mark, as well as when they succeed."
"Interiors program is unrealistic - no way to complete it in three years - also‘wish there was some flexibility in the program, with some electives."
"Nothing to write home about. UCD's 'urban experience' is actually finding a place to park."
"I feel as though, in the future, the interior degree, as it is now set up, will not sufficiently prepare a person to enter the job market with any degree of knowledge about good interior design."
"Use student designs and person power to build something decent outdoors - it would make a good design competition and be a good 'hands-on' construct ion project.
"Let's get the faculty inspired to teach again. They're all in the Colorado Rocky Mountain high ozone and can't see, or aren't here - doesn't help us much."
"What assembly space? What exhibition space? My^ space is fine. Outdoors? What is outdoors?
"The program is fine. Could be better with more instructors to broaden the scope of input, but I have no major gripes beyond that."
"I think our program is alive, flexible and positively growing and changing."
"Because of the turmoil of Bromley studio space I have forsaken the benefits of peer group interaction for the productive solitude of my own home.
"How about a system that allows some enthusiasm on the part of the faculty so the students might develop some enthusiasm or is this raging case of apathy typical of graduate schools?"
"There is no assembly, outdoor, or exhibition space! Classrooms are usually too small or inadequate/ inappropriate for the course. The studios are a mess -no organization, just chaos. With faculty support we could improve things.
"The whole program suffers due to faculty apathy, and lack of facilities! The program is well rounded, but needs more enthusiasm.
"As to our program director - "Please give our lion some courage" (Dorothy) as he has problems with pressure, decisions, etc...."
"The parking lot 'outdoor space' can only be taken as a reflection on our inabilities to control and shape our own environment, the skill we are supposed to be learning here.
"I feel that the program is weak. There seems to be no real direction guiding and unifying the curricula. The classes are poorly integrated with one another (i.e., structures) and with design. Teaching and organization is weak, with a few exceptions.
"Faculty doubts about the three year program are extremely irritating. The program should be dropped, or accepted and supported, but not beaten into a mediocre victim of no support."
"What happened to the exhibition committee? No one knows or sees What the other studios are doing. Exhibition space should be provided and it should be the faculty's responsibility.
"Need some good lectures - Scully, Blake, Tiger-man, etc."
"Struggling - but going in the right direction. Satisfactory for this stage of development."
"I want to see the outdoor sandpit made into a park, or a 'beach' for us."
" We need: Graduate level history courses;
Structure classes with more architectural relationship, instead of enqineer-i ng;
More visiting profs - well known."


JF
Image, as most anyone will agree, is quintessential ly important to a school. Its importance to the student body lies in the fact that image often has the power to condition how one feels about his institution; and in turn, about himself. To the public, image is even more important because the school reality is seldom experienced. Therefore, image has tremendous importance as to how a school is perceived both on the inside and on the outside. All of which means that we as a school should direct our attention to this question of self-image; especially since this is a matter of student concern as the questionnaire responses indicate. The consensus is that the school remains imageless. As I see it, the problem can successfully be corrected by directing our corrective energy in two directions: First is the physical transformation of Bromley; and, second is the institution of school tradi tions.
Regrettably, Bromley has yet to be claimed as our very own design project number one. At the present, the building is visually and spiritually less of a school of design than it is a nineteenth century warehouse. This can be rectified once we are willing to admit that this is not essentially a funding problem, as currently promoted; but rather a problem of vision. Once over this hurdle and armed with the talent and conviction of the faculty and student body, Bromley can once again be the proud building its designer ostensibly intended it to be.
The studios are the most logical place to start as they cry out to be transformed into creative and reassuring physical expressions of the school's self-worth. And, if this takes the celebration of a "Hammer Day" or two, at the beginning of each semester during which the studios become the first design project, then so be it.
The stairwell is next in order. A rebirth could perhaps be accomplished with slashes of life-giving color; a mural, maybe of a balloon man who stands onv the first floor while his helium-filled, multi-colored balloons rise to the second, third, and fourth floors; or some other graphic scheme which celebrates that volumetric space, and which serves as a constant reaffirmation of our belief in human creativity.
Other worthwhile projects could include signage or graphics for the south facing wall of Bromley; a school of environmental design banner for the flag pole, graphic signage for the interior of the building and the creation of a special and comfortable space out of our fledgling library. The possibilities are endless and the rewards are reassuring; so let's start planning in earnest now.
Second, yet of equal importance for the creation of a positive schools image, is the institution of traditions for they have the power to evoke a past, imply a future and hint at continuity. We could begin with biannual exhibitions of recent student work at the Auraria Art Gallery which can be billed as public events to which the school and professional community is invited. These would greatly serve to increase our perceived self-worth among ourselves and the community at large.
Additional celebrations and events of this sort are also needed. For example, the Beaux Arts Ball is the highlight of the school year at Rhode Island School of Design where a Newport mansion is borrowed for the evening. A Beaux Arts Ball cou1d be the same sort of culminating social experience for the College of Environmental Design which would take us most probably to lower Downtown and the Oxford Hotel with its marvelous art deco Cru i se Room. Celebrated events could also be created around beginning design exercises such as the designing of structures with a minimum of material which shou1d protect an egg from breaking on impact from the second floor of Bromley. Another event could possibly be created around Gary Long's Light Box exercise. And, wi thout question, an all-school celebration should be centered around thesi s presentations.
These are but a few suggestions for Bromley's transformation and for the introduction of school trad i t ions. Let th is be seen on 1y as the start i ng point on the road to creating a physically and psycholog ica11y a 1 luting school env ironment. Thi s effort cannot but enhance the way we feel about ourselves. Confidence, after all, is.one of the best gifts one can bestow on anyone, even ourselves.


Denver seems to be well provided with most things; autos, pollution, new homes and subdividions, downtown development, entertainment opportunities . . and press coverage! The newcomers cannot help but be impressed by the number Of citizens who take up their pens in order to attack or defend the city. If you believe in growth and visible evidence of American success (albeit with Canadian, European and Saudi dollars), then Denver (on a bright day) offers hope for that dream. If, on the other hand, you believe that the disaster plan for U.S. cities was announced in the early 19601s and that Denver is working with those outmoded documents, then again there is a press coverage to aid the course of blood to the head.
One thing is certain, Denver and the state that exists beyond its built frontiers, arouse more local and national interest than do the capitals of most states. Having lived in Indiana and North Dakota,
I can identify at least two which have less public concern for their condition. The recent progress of environmental awareness in the State and the City was well posed (to my naive British eyes, at least) by the final episode of TV's Centennial with the forces of traditional conservation and rural interest set against the growth-minded developer. Coloradoans I have talked to about this dismiss Centennial as folksy and inaccurate, but fail to dismiss the inconclusive conclusion of the program.
Given international and national forces at work, it is fairly clear that the City and the State have until about 198A to decide whether they want to feature a state-wide enactment of Orwell's desperate dream or whether a new, humane direction can be salvaged from the scrap pile off good intentions which go nowhere.
The Urban Mission
America gets better and better at coining new words. One of my favorite TV pundits has written books on the subject; and one which seems in vogue in the vicinity of U.C.D is "Mission". To this lapsed churchman, 'mission' implies going out to spread the gospel. So what gospel does U.C.D., and specifically the College of Environmental Design Design, preach? Can it be the codes and beliefs that have spawned random central city growth, suburban sprawl and auto-generated pollution? Generally, this doesn't seem to be the case . . . the prevailing words I've heard in C.E.D. corridors seem to be at variance with what I can see out of the window.
But this really shouldn't be too surprising, for the gospel as preached seems to be more applicable to places which are anywhere but Denver. As in life, there seems to be more interest in traveling to the outer limits rather than working in the vicinity; community reaction is better held at arm's length! (in a similar pattern, we at Oxford seem to focus more on London than on the city in which we are located.)
Academics everywhere are very conscious of their local image. Student projects, publications, exhibitions, media critiques all stand in danger of generating negative response from the immediate community and are, therefore, put to one side in favor of work at a distance.
From an admittedly brief and, therefore easily discountable view, it seems that C.E.D. maintains a very low profile when it should be visible, both to Denver and to the State. In truth, the U.C.D. concept of an urban "Mission" is hollow rhetoric if measured in terms of converts or impact on the visible form of the urban community;
How can this be when each of my temporary collegues seems to work with considerable energy on resource and community-related activities which should contribute to the "Mission"? In design schools, both European and American, the tradition has always been that teachers are also practitioners. As designers, the loner instinct is strong, so whilst each faculty member may contribute toward the community, it is on an individual basis rather than as a member of an educational "Mission" to the city.
It seems to me that "accountability" is becoming increasingly important in academic life and that casual mention of "community service" is not enough. A relatively new college with small staff resources is in a better position to readjust to this community orientation than is a large, traditional college. At Oxford, we have 100 or so faculty in architecture, urban design, planning and estate management and the problem is compounded by being in an ancient city which refuses to admit that it has contemporary urban problems.
Actions Not Words
In the meat of this note I want to suggest a few ideas which might be explored by faculty and students at U.C.D. They are based on experiences in Europe and the U.S.A.; they may seem shallow and even inappropriate, but in the process


of discarding or accepting them, other ideas may emerge:
1) College Not Departments
Each faculty member has a vested interest (or a doubly vested interest) in maintaining professional boundaries and his view is quickly passed to students who join in a parody of the real life game by playing territorial acquisition in the studio! Given accreditation methods, library cataloging, journals and, not last, the job market, it is unlikely that the professional boundaries in education will be lowered but there is every good reason for providing a united, environmental design, front to the outside world.
The non-professional community "out there" seems unable to discern the precise boundaries within which architects, planners, landscape architects . . . even urban designers, operate, instead, Joe Public (and you and I when off duty) identify and worry about issues, plans, problems, hazards and opportunities. Educating the public as to the precise role of each profession is a waste of time, if only because professional self-perceptions change very rapidly.
This lends me to suggest that the college should take time out to identify an environmental1 design role in Denver and in the State. Some of the activities suggested below may aid this process of role definition, others may be activities which result from it. In suggesting what follows, I am aware that the college has a clearly identified "community" wing, but the physical separation of this wing seems to indicate the need for reintegration of the operation and the idea.
2) Opening Community Eyes
There are 107 booklets on Denver, but no readily accessible guide to the Denver environment which highlights the good, the bad and the ugly. A first shot at this may emerge from my current course, but what better opening for the college than to publish its own gospel. A cheap, attractive guide to downtown which articulates a corporate view of environmental quality and design which the colleqe can defend?
3) College Seminars
The college is still small enough to offer seminar series, policy discussions and encounters with visitors where al1 can participate without disciplinary lines being drawn. This is a very valuable characteristic which should not be lost. Seminars featuring local or nationally known figures could be co-sponsered with professional or business
groups giving greater visibility to the college as a forum for environmental desrgn debate (the present series seems to be the only one in town that doesn't make the papers).
A) Design Center/Urban Studies*Center
Being as close as we are to the revising inner city (sic.) there is the opportunity for the collage to combine with the city, museums, libraries, etc., in creating a design and urban studies center as popular focus for environmental interest. Student projects could explore the design and financial needs for such a center (possibly the "honeypot" for revival of an old area), the aim being to provide an attractive mini-museum and exhibition space with modest backup reserved facilities for school and community interest groups. Given the high standard of art, natural history and heritage presentations in Denver, it is strange that there is no comparable statement on the urban fabric. There are many models for this type of facility which complement roles rather than capture the communityty architect role.
5) Visibility
Any design school has the potential to offer to a community a range of lowcost, but much needed, skills and facilities. Increasingly, learning seems to be evidenced most effectively in "live" projects where staff and students offer professional services and insights in exchange for public knowledge about place. This form of educational barter can be profitable to all but it is not to be founded on pious hopes, it needs management and visibility. The corporate enterprise of staff and students in the college should be yielding more return in learning terms than is presently the case. Visibility, both internal and external, is much needed . . . and the college is still small enough to achieve this.
Each of these suggestions can be easily discounted by the use of a standard discounting table in which each is measured against faculty attitudes, cost, community attitudes, the legislative, accommodation, political implications, etc. . . you've probably done it as you've read thus far. But, on the positive side, the college seems to have a great deal going for it, so why not set these suggestions against the following list: city center location; modest scale; evident communication between departments; faculty and student enthusiasm, innovative cross-disciplinary projects and a city that needs you before 198A!


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Mike Fuller




The Urban Planning Department at UCD is alive and well and those hard-working,"nose-to-the-grindstone" students have finaliy come together in an organized fashion under the newly formed Student Advisory Committee (SAC). The Committee, in an attempt to meet some of the students' interests, problems, needs, gripes, etc. has met several times over the last four months to set up and organize the respective subcommittees representing some of the more important issues to the MURP Students.
The first matter on the agenda was to construct and circulate a survey whose results would present a general overview of the students' perceptions and criticisms of the program.
The survey has just recently been tabulated and analyzed. See MURP Survey article for results.
Two other events of considerable interest to most planners will be a presentation by Dave Wallace of Wallace, McHarg 6 Todd put on jointly by the Planning and Architecture departments, and the APA meeting at the Phipps Ranch House. The latter will involve a discussion on the controversial Mission Viejo development proposed for the Phipps Ranch land.
Jamie Fitzpatrick
SPRING BANQUET: SAC is still working on setting an exact date for the spring banquet. The SAC voted unanimously that this event should be open to all students and faculty and that a combination luncheon and barbeque might be most appropriate. A sign-up sheet will be posted and anyone interested in helping please contact the SAC.
PLANNING THEORY: As a result of student unrest with some of the required core courses in the MURP program, the faculty has undertaken a re-evaluation of some of the requirements— in particular, Planning Theory 530.
STUDIO SPACE: The problem of poor and inadequate studio space was brought up by SAC at the last Faculty Meeting. The faculty is aware of this problem and indicated that adequate space would be provided on the Ath floor as of March 28. Also, by next fall improved studio facilities will be available in the basement of Bromley.
VOLUNTEERS: The faculty needs volunteers to assist on the review committee for new MURP applicants. Interested persons please contact Herb Smith.
ARTICLES: Anyone interested in submitting articles for publication in LAMINATIONS contact Jamie Fitzpatrick at 778-6115 or 399-7602.
Don't be shy----say itl!
During the first week of this semester, a "Planning Student Survey" was conducted by the MURP Student Advisory Committee. The primary purpose of this survey was to get student ideas on the MURP curriculum and on what speakers they would like to hear this semester. Students may now view the results of the survey which are posted outside of Dolores Hasseman's office.
This survey shed considerable light on the makeup ot the MURP student body, their interests in planning, and suggestions on how to improve our program.
As you might expect, our student body is a working one with over 2/3 employed full or part-time. Many of our students (63%) reported that they have had some planning experience prior to entering the program (ranging from a 3 month internship to 15 years as a county planner). When asked "What are your interests in the planning field?", it became evident that the planning student body is heavily oriented toward physical-type planning issues (environmental planning, site analysis, etc.). Strong interests were also reported in such subjects as economic development, neighborhood planning, housing/social services, small towns, and community development.
While the majority of the MURP students felt that the present program was meeting their needs for the most part, several grievances were also expressed. These pointed to the highly generalized nature of the curriculum, its lack of flexibility, and a shortage of courses in recreation planning, health planning, economic development, and energy issues. Considerable concern was also expressed on the present method of course evaluation. Most were satisfied with the content of the evaluation process, however, many students questioned why the results were not published. The survey also yielded several excellent ideas on what subjects and speakers students would like to hear for the Spring lecture series. Working with these ideas, the Student Advisory Committee organized a series of lectures which met student interests and covered a broad range of subjects. MURP students were also quizzed for suggestions on improving the existing facilities of our program. A substantial number pointed to the need for a student lounge/study area, better classroom space (more room and less heat), and adequate studio facilities. Our faculty has been quite open-minded to these ideas, and is working diligently to secure space for MURP studios, workshops, and meetings.
Lastly, when asked "What issues do you think the SAC should be involved with?", most of the comments called for work on curriculum revision. Taking this input, the SAC has been working closely with the MURP faculty in reviewing the present setup of "Planning Theory" as a core requirement, and the procedures involved in Studio ill projects.
Thanks goes to all of the MURP students who took the time to fill out a survey. Your ideas are essential to improving our program.
Kevin Nichols


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HERE WE ARE
The Masters degree Program in Landscape Architecture is design-oriented. Its goal is to understand problem-solving and thus learn to design with a process. With an understanding of the problemsolving process, landscape architects from U.C.D. are trained to design solutions in the total landscape, from urban plazas to regional parklands. Accordingly, the program's concept offers as many courses as possible to develop our problem-solving techniques for a wide range of solutions. The curriculum stresses design and is reinforced with hearty doses of plant materials, graphics, engineering and construction.
Is the program meeting its goal? Are first year students thoroughly introduced to the problemsolving process and are second and third year students designing by process and producing thoughtful and responsive designs? For the most part, the answer is yes. My first year class experience clearly mapped the problem-solving process, the core faculty is committed 100% to the philosophy of design through process and the quality of student work takes quantum leaps each class year.
WHERE ARE WE HEADED
Congratulations to second year L.A. student Paul Hellmund, whose poster design was selected for use in the Landscape Architecture Program at U.C.D.! Tee** shirts of the poster are highly visible on Bromley's fourth floor. The Landscape Architecture program is alive and well at U.C.D.!!!
This May, the class of 1979 will be the first to graduate from the U.C.D. Landscape Architecture program and head out into the professional community. Because the program is new, traditions have not yet developed. And, instead of waiting for time inevitably to bring a tradition to U.C.D., we choose to design one. We want a frame of reference, an inherited body of standards, a design for a tradition of excellence to begin and to grow at U.C.D..
Borrowing six problem-solving steps from The Universal Traveller, by D. Koberg and J. Bagnall, we must first ACCEPT THE SITUATION. We have a problem to solve. We have no tradition to use as a frame of reference; we want a tradition. Next, ANALYZE THE SITUATION. The Masters degree L.A. program is new, almost three years old. The program is growing, changing, being refined; traditions have not had time to solidify. Even the landscape architecture profession is discovering new areas of activity; areas of interest have grown larger than the tradition. Boundaries are expanding. Third, DEFINE. What traditions do we seek? We seek a standard of excellence for the program to keep it dynamic and in tune with new field demands. V/e must include careful provision for the human needs
I in landscaping and we must protect the land from
misuse by understanding the relationship of all of us to the land. Now, IDEATE. How do we design a tradition? By developing a select student body who are offered good growing facilities and a faculty which will challenge students to technical excellence and thoughtful and responsive designs. IMPLEMENT with a constant striving to excell on the part of both students and faculty and the future
1$, tools
Citing a lack of published information written for professionals dealing specifically with landscape plant materials for Colorado, approximately ten Landscape Architecture students have organized an independant study course to produce a Colorado plant materials handbook. The handbook will be a collation of plant material data and will be written for the professional community. It will be available for purchase at a later date; contact Paul Hellmund, L.A. studio, *»th floor Bromley, for the publication timetable and to place your orders.
Did you know that In the Site Development Master Plan 1976 for the Auraria Campus the parking lot bounded by Larimer and Lawrence Streets and Speer Blvd. and 11th Street was designed by E.Allan Rollinger, one of Denver's top landscape designers, to be the Auraria Green, a two block part of the campus greenbelt along Cherry Creek? Quoting from the Master Plan,
"The Green is admittedly an enticing location"*^ for future campus expansion, and because the Green satisfies an Intangible value it may hold a precarious position at Auraria. Hopefully time will allow for the development of traditions which will make the Green an tndespensible part of campus and urban life."
The Auraria Green didn't even get a chance.


M
The. Powers That'S^..
Larry Gong slumps dejectedly into a chair in Zane Loosem's inner office. Together they form the administration of an obscure school of architecture somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. Zane looks carefully at Larry and asks. "Is everything alright?"
"Of course everything is not alright," Larry shoots back. "The All Powerful, All Knowing esteemed officials of the Accreditation Board will be here any minute, and you ask me if things are alright?"
"Well, everything will not be alright if you don't knock off the All Powerful, All Knowing B.S., Larry."
"It works with the Regents, they love it."
"This is a different power structure, kiddo,"
Zane explains patiently. "You've gotta keep cool."
"KEEP COOL!" Larry shouts. Leaping to his feet he begins to pace the office. "How can you sit there and puff that stogie when the demons of design school deans will descend upon us any moment?"
"Will you relax, Larry. I tell you everything is under control. Look, when they get here we take them to lunch where we can talk and make our points."
Zane leads Larry back to the chair next to his desk and pleads, "Will you stop racing around like that, you'll make me nervous. Here, take a seat and reeelax. Put your feet up if you like."
"Really, Zane?" Larry asks sceptically as he carefully props his cordovans on top of the formica top. Zane leans back in his chair and takes a deep puff on his cigar. Suddenly Larry jerks his feet off the desk, and slams them back on the floor. Zane is startled and coughs a cloud of smoke toward the ceiling.
"What about the library?" Larry shouts.
Zane settles back in the chair and says, confidently, "Well, what about the library?"
"There are't any books in it for one thing."
"I took care of that yesterday, don't worry."
"How?" Larry asks, sceptically.
"Well we moved in some more shelves and took the few books we have and spread them around."
"But Zane, that will leave huge gaps, won't they get suspicious?"
Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus and rumor has it that an honest-to-goodness, ammonia-based print machine will soon be among us!!! Compliments of the DEEZINE CLUB and especially due to the efforts of Mark Dorian and Wayne Stryker, the print machine should be here within four to six weeks. The plan is for students to supply their own paper and the processing chemicals will be on the house. That's good news!!!
Postscript: The DEEZINE CLUB is potentially a very responsive and powerful vehicle for accomplishing the collective wishes of the students. With fee allotments unclaimed by us until now, the club's founders are purchasing equipment, sponsering social events and raising funds for the library. This organization needs ideas for this year and leadership for next.
No one should miss the April 12 meeting.
mike fuller
"Naw, with this well read student body we can't keep them on the shelves," Zane adds with a wink.
Larry's face is still clouded, but he forces a smile as Zane studies Larry's appearance.
"I like your jacket, Larry. Isn't that new?"
"Yup, it's leather. I bought it for the occasion. Like you suggested* I got this too." Larry indicates his tie clasp, which is a porsche emblem.
"But Larry, you don't own a porsche," Zane says, a little bewildered.
"They don't know that. It's part of the image."
"Well, O.K. But don't you think that those mirror sunglasses are going a bit too far for inside the building? We don't want them to think that the place is over lumined."
"You're right," Larry says as he pushes the glasses on top of his head. "The physical plant is important. At least it's cool outside. The sight of all the windows open and the heat going full blast is enough to give me the heeby-geebies
The phone rings and the secretary informs them that the Accreditation Committee has arrived. They both leap to their feet. Larry hesitates, grabs Zane's arm, and asks, "Do you think we should let them cool their heels for awhile? Just for effect?"
"Now's not the time to get pompous, Larry"
Pulling his arm away Zane heads for the door and adds over his shoulder, "We have to get them out of here and into a restaurant, pronto."
Larry falls in behind as they greet the Committee members and introductions are made. Zane suggests that they go somewhere for lunch. As they head for the door Larry asks nervously how long they plan to stay. One of the members chuckles and says, "Well, not too long.
I want to get this over with so that I can get in some skiing. You guys kept putting this thing off and I was afraid that all the beautiful snow would melt by the time we finally got here. Hey, Zane. V/here did you say that condo was we could use?"
Zane flicks a sheepish grin at Larry and answers. "Wei 1...uh...it's in Leadville, actually. It's not too far from the slopes, but we're trying to work out something better. Let's see how things go in the next few days."
Zane leads the party to the elevator leaving the committee member with a puzzled look on his face.
"Leadvilie?"


AMP THE /y.
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U.C.D. is a unique urban institution which is firmly based on the reality which faces us now and in the next years.
I contend that the college is serving us in two major ways; it is giving us an education based on reality with a sufficient dose of idealism and, secondly, it is encouraging the students as individuals.
This is not to say that either the existing program or the facilities could not use improvement.
Regarding reality-based education, our program is heavily oriented toward the technical aspects and everyday practice in the design profession. Can we do without any of these courses?
I think not. These are the aspects of the profession we must learn and understand or be ruled by. Idealism in our program of study is found in our design courses. Secondarily, it comes from history £ theory which have a much smaller emphasis in our program. This brings us back to design which I contend is often quite idealistic. The design of the finest building or space is encouraged by faculty; not whether a design meets a certain budget or whether it is the simplest to construct.
My experience has been one of faculty encouraging exploration of form, differing responses to context and creative responses to program.
The conditions which face us presently are
encouraging the development of individual inclinations and talents. This sense of independence has immense value but the students who have not also experienced a "team approach" may find their abilities of interaction compromised in the future.
The physical facility in which we work fosters this sense of individualism. According to the NCAAB (Review Board ), we have a 'normal amount of space'. This space, however, is not adequate for group instruction, presentation or exhibits. We may desire more facilities but government has sent a clear message that we must do without. Students must use what presently exists at our institution and get the most from what we do have.
The other major factor which leads to individualism is that U.C.D. is a work-oriented, commuter campus. Students in our program want accessibility to the facility and the faculty, and desire an efficiency in the educational process. U.C.D. cannot operate on the assumption that if students stay around the building long enough knowledge will be produced.
This is foreign to the entire idea of a commuter campus.
Fortunately, our faculty have diverse ideas and methods of teaching, and U.C.D. does not promote any "school of thought".
Students are faced with differing ideas and encouraged to present new ideas. This strengthens the educational process for each individual at U.C.D.
"It is impossible for the urban designer to acquire the skills of all of the other allied professions; it is his role to emerge as the middle-man or broker between the major professions; creating the links which are essential in bringing* the various professions into working relationships.
The primary role of the urban desiqner is to direct development of, and change toward, a phased series of desired ends using design, communication and political skills0“ Brian Goodey.
It is apparent that our Urban Design Program will undergo changes. One reason for this is the refusal of the NCARB to accredit an "Urban Design Program", although 8 of the major design schools offer one at the moment. UCD should offer a central skill in dealing with such large, complex projects as new towns, urban renewal, or downtown rehabilitation. According to Dean Nuzzum the Urban Design degree will in future be offered as a second professional degree.
From a strong participatory design studio experience of three years, the Urban Design Program is degenerating into a thin finish coat applied to students of varying backgrounds.
Although the UCD bulletin "advertises" an MA in Urban Design the the school hierarchy has steered new students into the Architecture Program.
If this is to be school policy perhaps it should be announced as such in the bulletin.
For those students interested in experiences im not found in the architectural studios, where one is submerged in fenestration, flashing and fancy model building, the Center for Community Design and Development offers a spirit and enthusiasm nonexistant in the architectural program. Also, if one is interested, try a course in the Landscape program, which has a strong and healthy interest in the built form of exterior spaces.
The Urban Design students require a multitude of learning situations found in an interdisciplinary program, something that barely exists in the midst of the rivalry present at this institution. The present program seems to merge Urban Design with Architecture, but, the Architecture Program offers very little in the way of urban awareness, which is necessary for the well rounded student, and absolutely essential for those in an Urban Design Program.


Gene Benda was educated at the University of Prague where he received diplomas in both engineering and architecture. In addition to teaching at the University of Colorado, he has taught at the University of Prague and has been a lecturer and critic at the Staatsuniversitat Hamburg, the University of Frankfurt, the University of London, Liverpool University, and Edinburgh University.
From 19^9 to 1966 he practiced in Czechoslovakia designing four schools, a hospital, a cultural and educational center, a civic and shopping center and the Petoring Residential Quarter for ^*8,000 inhabitants in Prague. He won first prize in three separate competitions including the Petoring project, the renewal plans for three war-damaged mining towns, and the cultural/educational center in the "new town" of Ostrava.
From 1966 to 1972 he was an architect and planner in Great Britain working on the City Center Redevelopment in Liverpool, the Waterfront Commercial and Cultural Center in London, and was in charge of the redevelopment program of the city center in Edinburgh and the Ring Road Project in Glascow.
From 1973 to the present he has been on the faculty of the University of ColoradOi
LAM: Having practiced architecture in a wide diversity of places, you're in a position to compare the practice of architecture in several countries. What do you feel are the major differences from country to country?
BENDA: The major difference is in how much architecture becomes a part of the life of the country; how seriously it is taken in participating in the life of the society. That certainly has always been true, in ancient Greece, with a few enlightened individuals in Frank Lloyd Wright's time, or in patches of "architecture" done for prestigiously oriented corporations, just as examples.
In some countries there is a strong pride in good craftsmanship, and this applies to architects as well. There are no buildings that can be built without architects; and because they are in charge of the entire performance, better quality buildings overall are the result. In countries where nobody will buy cheaply made products, they are not designed. The design and the ethics of a society tend to be very mutually supportive. Appreciation of quality design is instilled from the time children are toddlers in those countries. In Europe this appreciation is encouraged from a very early age because good craftsmanship is seen everywhere, all the time. When a window is broken, or a railing is falling down, or when the plumber comes into the house, the care which he gives to his craft is noticeable.
The tragedy is that many people live and die without getting even a glimpse of the richness of life. Making the society sensitive is a responsibility which makes some of these differences between countries clear. Architecture is capable of sensi* tizing the society, and has responsibilities to the society. It serves the society first of all; it
serves the client as well, but its first responsibility is to the society.
LAM: Can you give us some comparison in the way architecture is taught from country to country?
BENDA: In some countries there is more stress on
technical ability, as well as understanding of art, as an essential part of life. The students seem to be stronger in these prerequisites before coming to the university. That, perhaps, gives more room for the utilization of logic in combination with artistic ability sooner, and less dependence on applications of formula. More preparatory courses also introduce the students to the organization of architectural space, uses of materials and their relationship to elementary decision-making, etc., and consequently, this approach may strengthen the overall intellectual challenge of the student in design.
LAM: Isn't it one of the goals of this school to
bring people from varying backgrounds into the field?
BENDA: This is absolutely true, and undoubtedly the variety of people coming into the school could greatly enrich the potential of their education, and this is one of the biggest advantages of our school. Yet there should be more encouragement in the physical and social environment so that exchange of ideas and better communication among the students would still further contribute to this basic advantage.
LAM: Are there any changes you would make in the way architecture is taught at U.C.D.?
BENDA: Recent accreditation procedures, though very favorable to our school, suggested more stress be placed on design and I fully agree. How to do it may start with vital preparation of the student for design. Supportive laboratories, experimental exercises, which are courses which should be mandatory, would introduce not only the tangled relationships within the environment, but also the fundamentally related craft and arts, with stress on imaginative thinking in combination with practical exercises which would support individual growth so that the students could brush up their taste and judgement, as well as developing qualities of self discipline and self criticism before coming to the first larger design project.
LAM: How do you think our graduates stack up on a worldwide and national basis?
BENDA: Last year's Europe study semester partly answered the question in practical terms. Though I heard from them that they did not represent the best students in terms of their previous grades, the results were in the majority of cases excellent.
Why? Because of the intensive exposure which generated student enthusiasm and demanded the appropriate self discipline. This proved to me that our students can stand very competitive comparison. The program within the semester was very demanding on students1 time, concentration and their overall ability to digest that enormous amount of information. They stacked up very wel1.
LAM: Can you give us your definitions of Urban Design and Architecture and how they differ?


BENDA: Definitions in words have substantial limitations, and are often misused, yet to me architecture physically represents the art of living. It should therefore orchestrate what is itemized in art, economics, engineering, urban design and the ethics of the society. Urban design is an important part of it and means picking up those ingredients which could make sense out of planning. Architecture in its total form represents to me what we should be striving for in our living space. Urban design includes many of the goals of architecture, and strives to create a sense, using them, of planning goals.
LAM: What do you see as the important directions in the field for the foreseeable future?
BENDA: These are excellent questions, but the answer to each could be a book. The young generation coming out of school is more aware of the revolutionary environmental changes in the society as necessary consequences of the present crises. To cope with it requires quality of thinking and using those enormous material tools available. These people, whether establishing their own small offices or joining big computer oriented firms, are environmentally creative, and that will become again the paramount direction.
The society, our environment, is starving for improvement of the pitfalls of the high standard of life instead of striving for more sensible cultural life. In both cases, our environment will only im*-prove through coordinated, synchronized efforts. New and provocative solutions are the creative challenge.
The lasting task for architecture in any country is to try to reconcile the irreconcilable. How to do our job is a big question which is related to the fact that architecture is a part of the society. The media and our image-making groups confuse the society, so the issues become muddled. Architecture has very specific, nonverbal, means of influencing the society. An attitude of "let the client have what he wants" instead of teaching quality, damages architecture's potential. That ends up with lack of freedom, and all art is based on freedom, not the subservience of architects to production. Architecture requires a humble, patient, self critical attitude rather than a builders bravado. The builders certainly want to build, but neither they nor the general public know how to do things better. I received a card from my bank advertising their savings program in which was included the slogan, "If you don't see it, you'll never miss it" and that is unfortunately true, even if they were after a totally different point. The society hasn't been given better choices. The sprawl of the cities continues crippling the economy, human souls and the ethics of the society. Architecture must stress just the opposite of what is too often performed today, the very mechanistic, pragmatic work with technological mechanisms, social mechanisms, figures, etc., without human beings being responded to. Striking examples were produced by corporate architecture of recent years, totally misusing and misinterpreting the modern movement's philosophy of architecture. If that attitude starts in kindergarten, it is hard to overcome. The cities present the image
of what the citizens deserve.
Architecture has to provoke people to think of a better destiny, but provoke with quality and not cheap Las Vegas interpretations which promote the perversion of taste. Architects have, historreal 1y, been strongly criticized for their ideas, but at least they had the courage to express them rather than being captivated by their money earning capacity.
The field is fairly fragmented now, with architects, landscape architects, interior designers, planners, engineers, etc., but it is only through * coordinated effort that the solution will be forthcoming. The latest thing is "let's go solar", but if we always only throw out the baby with the bathwater and forget all we've learned throughout history to take up the latest "thing", we will always be in the same trouble. It is coordinated effort which will combine all the ideas of the past and present, as well as goals for the future, which is necessary.
LAM: What, then, is your opinion of the role of architecture in society?
BENDA: Architecture has to constantly offer better options, variety and growth, and in doing so to apply the basic rules of nature. Yet as everything changes, architecture has to respond to using all that we've learned from our forefathers. In the world of changes in which we live, the imaginative coordination of materials and forces available is the only constant. Architecture must become once again a vehicle responding to senses, people's activities, instead of computerized mechanisms. The creative mind has to alter rigid routines and cliches to help to establish a building industry which practically does not exist at the present to cope with the huge task of reconstruction, especially in urban areas. There is a hope in my mind that we have reached the bottom, in terms of the overall pollution of our living space in all the senses of the word, which means we can only go up in understanding and appreciating the essential role of architecture in society, and by society. Nobody will help unless the architects make it clear to the whole population and the decision makers, by the quality of their projects, setting examples, that without healthy architecture, the economy, urban life and our total growth will suffer still more.
It will be difficult for architects to do this when they now have to 1ive on obtaining their projects.
The problem is to get the best service for the society. Perhaps architects should be paid for like any other service, electricity, garbage disposal and so forth. Sincere architects, freed of the struggle for jobs, would strive for the benefit of society, rather than individual clients.
Our environment, and architecture is a major part of it, should help people bring the best out of themselves. That is the sense in which architecture should be provocative, to show the society what options are available. When that happens architecture is of benefit to society, and could become a coordinative force iwth the other related disciplines. If that does not happen, architecture is betraying its essential role.


The University of Colorado was recently visited by a three member team with the task of reviewing the programs of the College of Environmental Design, The team consisted of Bill Geddes, a former partner of The Architect's Collaborative; Edie Cherrie, a professor at the University of New Mexico; and David Perkins, a professor at the University of Louisianna.
The program at Colorado is fully accreditable and they saw the purpose of their visit as assisting the school, helping it to do things better. They wanted to discover problems and symptoms which will lead to problems in the future.
On the first day of their visit, a group of about ten student representatives met with the Review Board. The major topics covered were curriculum, faculty leadership and the school's facilities.
It was suggested that the technical courses (working drawings, mechanical systems, structures, materials and methods) need to be more integrated among themselves and related to design classes.
The desire for much more solar emphasis, especially with SERI so close by, possibly in the form of a series of studios, was discussed.
The major criticism was that our program does not offer a continuation beyond the standard classes at graduate level, thereby eliminating the development of more specialized knowledge and interests.
Our need for more, larger, and better facilities was realized by the Board immediately. The library situation in particular was explained by the students as developing too slowly, as lacking funds, and overlapping to some degree with books and slides in Boulder.
He ended, saying he was impressed, but as always there is room for improvement,
Ms. Cherrie added some other thoughts. She said the team is quite confident about the library's future. The budget for it is allotted by the University. She felt perhaps a slide collection could be added to the library with slides from students and the professionals in Denver. She also noted the upper echelons of the administration at the University of Colorado support the programs of the college which is not the case at many other institutions.
Criticisms of faculty and leadership in the school were as follows: The school doesn't have any "philosophy" or image or goals which set it apart from other schools in the region or country. The students felt this should be discussed continually, but cannot be decided on as it must evolve. The school leadership doesn't seem to have the commitment to get the school moving by promoting the school to the legislature in order to gain funds. It is felt this should be done much more vigorously than in the past. More outside input is desired, with visiting jurors, through exhibits with the public invited. It is felt this can only improve the school.
At a meeting summing up the Review Board findings from its brief stay, Bill Geddes commented that he felt that on paper we have "a damn good program" at the University of Colorado.
He cited the dynamic quality of leadership in the architecture program, specifically the job Dean Nuzum has been doing; but he feels there should be a greater linkage between the Denver and Boulder campuses.
Mr. Geddes listed both ideas and criticisms for this school. U.C.D. is in a unique setting, creating a laboratory workshop which provides a much richer context than if it were in a suburban or rural setting. The programs at U.C.D. are in need of finetuning which Geddes felt would require the renewal of spirit in both faculty and students. The team also sees the need for two more faculty positions which can enrich the course offerings.
The team also criticized the first year of the three year architectural program. They felt this part of the program could be accelerated or changed. There is a greater need for more coordination between students and the profession here in Denver.
Geddes commented that Bromley doesn't look like a studio or an architecture facility.
Mr. Perkins also commented on the change needed in the three year program. He said the facilities at U.C.D. are better than many, but that we still need more.
He stated that the students must inspire faculty as well as expecting the faculty to inspire them.
cont. from p. 3
much?" Why? Keeping as much open space as possible isn't a reason, it's a goal, and I want to know the reasons. That applies for most of what I hear, and say, during presentations.
One last comment. I'm not damning the school. I suspect that much of what's now being taught is the result of complaints from former students and from local architects. The students complaining that they can't find work, and the architects that U.C.D. graduates are useless. It's hard to find answers for those complaints, but I have a couple. First, I heard recently that 50% of all people with Masters degrees in architecture are not working in the field; related fields, but not architecture.
If that's true, then 50% of the students will even-
tually need to apply the principles rather than the practice of architecture. Second, it's my belief that it is the obi igation of professionals to undertake the training of future professionals in their field. That's what firms who take interns are, hopefully, trying to do, but the apprenticeship period should last beyond the period of internship. Graduates who are not yet licensed should not expect much pay (my wife and I can easily live on under $10,000 a year). Unfortunately, graduates with Masters degrees seem to think it's their right to make substantial sums of money (it isn't); and architectural firms seem to think it's their right to expect recent graduates to be able to turn a buck for them (it isn't). So it goes.


- Tish Popachristo, doing city planning in Egypt, will be speaking in Boulder at C.U. for the World Affairs Conference.
- Peter Blake will be speaking at a luncheon at the Brown Palace Hotel on Monday, May 7*11: 45 to 2:00. The cost for luncheon and talk will be $7*50 and talk alone will be $2.00.
- Regional ASC/AIA Conference is to be held April 20, 21, 22 at Arizona State University in Tempe. Students from New Mexico, Utah, Arizona and Colorado are all slated to meet for seminar and discussion, all in hopes of strengthening communications among schools in the region. See Linda Stansen for more information.
- The next Western Mountain Region Conference for AIA will be held in Keystone in September.
- The AIA/Denver Chapter wants to know from us if it is possible to have a Student Chapter of the Denver Chapter:
A. Would you want to be a member?
B. Would you be willing to pay a modest fee to cover mailing costs and printing of their newsletter.
Please let Linda Stansen or Doug Ward know how you feel, or leave a note in the LAM I NAT IONS s" box.
Another goal of the College of Environmental Design is being realized; the various disciplines have teamed-up for a learning experience outside the classroom. Landscape Architects, Planners, Urban Designers and Architects are working together through the Center for Community Development and Design to produce a conceptual land development plan for the Frying Pan-Roaring Fork River Valley region between Aspen and Glenwood Springs, Six of the students will spend the summer living at Colorado Mountain College near Basalt, gathering and researching information for the study. Funding is provided through a grant from the Kellogg Foundation, See Dan Schler for information concerning other CCDD projects this summer that would need your help.
The book buying budget will soon be released and available for purchasing whatever our environmental hearts desire. Chris Guleff, head librarian, asks students and faculty to compile lists of books they feel are needed by the Environmental Design Library and submit them to him. Please include title, author, publisher, address, and date and rate the books in order of purchasing preference.
NOTICE: New library hours are Monday thru Thursday, 10:30 to 6:30; Friday, 8:00 to 4:00.
L®.
Wednesday, April 25th ASLA, Colorado Chapter,
monthly meeting
October 1979 National convention, ASLA, in New Orleans
October 1980 NATIONAL CONVENTION, ASLA, IN DENVER!!!
Thurs., 4/12
Wed., 4/18 Thurs., 4/19
Wed., 4/25
7:30pm Dave Her1inger speaks on "State's Role in Providing Low/Moderate Income Housing" 1:00pm & 7:30pm Dave Wallace of Wallace, McHarg & Todd speaks 5:00pm APA meeting at Phipps Ranch House; Subject: Mission V i e j o
1:00pm & 7:30pm Chester Hartman speaks on "Housing in the 1980*s"
Since the middle of February, there have been two now faces on the.second floor. Introducing DONNA LEE,full time administrative help, processing applications and filling in for or helping Dolores And LAURA BUEL, who works two days a week, to fill in those extra gaps and help where needed.




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AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION SPRING 79 No.2 . ' . . .' ' .. .. .,.. .. . . ...

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I LAMINA110NS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER LAMINATIONS Mailing Address: Room 303 Bromley,c/o College of Environmental Design, U.C.D., 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202 Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. Special thanks for this issue to: Don Dethlefs Jamie Fitzpatrick Mike Fuller Kent Gonzales Geoff Kampe Kevin Nichols Dan Rawson Paula Schulte Linda Stansen Doug Ward LETTER TO LAMINATIONS: Mary Warren Jim Wilson Jim Wright Rob rphy One of the greatest untapped educational resources in the College of Environmental Design is the knowledge that students can gain from -each other. Right now there is no interaction between different design studios or d epartments. As each student makes his or her final design presentation, the knowledge that he or she has acquired is shared only with a hand f u l l of students and j u r or s • A l l too quickly those beautiful and informative desi9n solutions are rolled up and entombed in an individual 1S portfolio. It is time now to end this wasteful practice. As an I suggest that LAMINATIONS publish jury dates and time tables to en co u rage o p c n p r e sen t a t i on s . A l so , I wo u 1 d recomm e nd that all design instructors exhibit final drawings on the walls and the stairwell of the school • From the depths of the drawing tubes, we would exhume an amazing wealth of knowledge that would continue to grow in the minds of fellow students. Elizabeth Houck This is the second theme-oriented LAMINATIONS. With this collection of essays, interviews and polemics, UCD col lege of Environmental Design takes a look at itself. Main targets for criticism and congrats are our facilities, attitudes, faculty, programs, leadership and relation to the professional community. When we_first mentioned an issue on UCD/CED, we had no trouble finding people wishing to express themselves. You will note that the LAM is packed with strong opinion this-time. A paradox: With our anticipation of this outpouring of opinion, a fear arose that only the angry and militant would rise to the challenge of writing (it was one of those early 701s paranoias that sneaks up behind you). On the possibility that there was a contented silent majority too busy with homework to complain, we circulated the 11Get It Off Your Chest11 questionnaire. Fortunately our fears were un.justified; the writings submitted represent a wide range of views. The questionnaires were, however, reason for a different paranoia. The response was small and the answers largely negative in tone. With this and other evidence I must draw one of the following conclusions: 1. Questionnaires are an invasion of privacy and our heroic student body has once again safeguarded its Constitutional Rights. 2. Who cares about apathy? Not UCD/CED. 3. Designers are reluctant to express in writing. I have reason to believe they are terrified, but that1s another editorial. 4. We should be happy with the answers we got and keep our peace. Those who did respond cried for better classroom and assembly space. The need for more indoor and outdoor lounging space was, however, the most consistently mentioned item. The concensus about the program was that the design sequence is weak and more integration between program aspects is needed. The faculty took a bath. Their attitudes and techniques were severely criticized. A few students suggested that certain faculty don1t take the Three-Year Program seriously. Acceptance or discontinuance was urged. Claps and whistles went to Doyle, Holder, Mays, Long and i ams. Bitterness reigned in the slogan contest; 11Matchbook Co 11 ege11, 11Asp ire to i ocracy11, 11Seedy-U11 and 11From Buffalo Chips to Bull shit, Enfeebling minds for five generations.11 People were also down on our location: 11Study in the Rocky Mountain Air Pollution Belt11,11UCD=Ugly Campus Downtown11 and 11The so-cal led 1urban experience1 is actually finding a place to park.11 This al 1 could mean that there are several hundred miserable people here. Oh! Heartfelt sadness; look of genuine anguish! I really feel that we are all Okay, but after denying, ignoring and 1pussy footing about1 the real problems here we have come to be angry. The energy generated by anger can well be used for constructive change. This sentiment is echoed by the NCAAB and more than a few students, and it also lies at the heart of this LAMINATIONS. UCD/ CED is no longer the forgivable, neophyte, satellite program. The original vi5ion that spawned us has now been realized. We are here, operating and doing quite well under the circumstances. Our responsibility now is to formulate a new,high set of goals and to achieve them with all due Doug Ward

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d: jim wilson There has probably always been some conflict between teachers and students. I find it to imagine a school , in which all the students find all the teachers both stimulating and irrefutable. It has only been in the last twenty years, however, that student-teacher conflict has become pandemic in the United States. A little gnashing of the old teeth is probably, in the end result, healthy. Teachers have their day in court, so to speak, and they can count on a certain percentage of their classes viewing themselves as jurors. On the other hand, students have the obligation to make their viewpoints known. This is one viewpoint; if you don1t like it, speak up. There are a variety of ways of teaching architecture. As G.K. stated in the last issue of LAMINATIONS, U.C.D. has tried several of them.m. We can assume that the present curriculum is the result of ]audible experimentation. I still see some bones which, rather than picking, I 1d like to see fleshed out. Eliel Saarinen had a design principle which I •ve found useful for much more than design, 11Look to the next largest thing.11 In evaluating the architectural program, we are already dealing with the profession. The next largest thing is society. Urban designers and architects create physical changes in the environment of societies which have important results. Architects are, then, in a position of directing society, to a limited degree, toward certain ends. As members of the society, we presumably already have some ideas along those 1 ines. The question is whether we know how, architecturally, those directions can be created. As things presently stand, the emphasis at U.C.D. seems to be technologically oriented, rather than human oriented. be a natural outgrowth of this technologically oriented society, but it doesn1t lead to architecture. There may be some great admirers of 11Anaconda11 type buildings out there, but in my opinion they are monuments to the efficiency ethic. This extension of the McDonald1s mentality leads to a society which admires the efficiency with which it is served another piece of plastic. That is not what we need. We need to know more about human, social responses to architecture. We need to know what the historical buildings of Western culture, of all cultures for that matter, represent in terms of the social, economic, political and technological realities of their day; whether they worked, for what purpose, and, most importantly, what of all of that is applicable today. We need classes in the psychology of architectural space, the economics of architecture, the politics of architecture, and the social significance of architecture. In short, we need classes which will help us to form critical, well informed attitudes which can be useful for evaluating all the circumstances in the design situations we encounter. Now I think l1d better explain what it appears to me that we are being taught, and why. I suspect that students learn in direct proportion to the amount of time they spend working on individual classes. Depending on previous experience, that will vary from student to student. I would say, however, that at least 70% of my study time over the last three years has been spent in technical study; engineering, drafting, building systems, etc. 11m not suggesting that these are unimportant; they1re the tools of the trade and the means of communication. An architect without these skills would be as incongruous as an illiterate writer. Just as literacy, however, is not the only necessity for high quality writing, so the basics of the architectural language are not the only requirements for high quality architecture. Historically architects got most of their education through apprenticeship. The apprentice surely got a grounding in the philosophical as well as the technical necessities from his mentor. Frank Lloyd Wright worked for Louis Sullivan who worked for H. H. Richardson, and so on. The Masters Program has taken over, at least in part, the place of apprenticeships. Theoretically, groups of professional teacher/architects should be able to present a broader education than any one firm. The Masters Programs are also, in part, an attempt to upgrade the profession. That being the case, we should expect to have the diploma mean that we are more thoroughly competent to practice the entire art of architecture than comparable apprentices. I don1t think that1s the case. In three years of school we cannot hope to develop the technical skills which we would develop in a three year apprenticeship. If the point of architecture school is to help people get jobs, and I 1ve heard that statement, then the state would be better off spending the money it uses to subsidize our education by paying architectural firms to take on apprentices. Three years of 40-hour weeks in almost any architectural firm will develop far more employable graduates. The most disturbing aspect of this to me is that if a questionnaire were passed out to all students asking them to spell out in detail, citing historical precedent, their opinion of what role architecture has to play in society, that it would be the first time that many of them had even thought about the question in a coherent way. I don1t mean to imply that the students are a bunch of 11air-heads11• On the contrary, I have a great deal of respect for the intellectual capabilities of the student body. What I do mean to imply is that the school places absolutely no premium on that kind of thought. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times that students, in presentations, have prefaced their remarks with any theoretical, philosophical or comprehensively analyzed justification for their work (I include myself among those who haven't). Usually presentations begin with some sort of drivel like, 11\.Je ll , I wanted to keep as much open space as possible, so ... ••. What nonsense! 111 hate open space, it gives me agoraphobia, 11 I a l ways want to shout, even at myself. 11So why do you like it so cont. :p. 18.

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I Stuart Ohlson received his Masters in Architecture from M. I .T. He has worked in Philadephia and Denver and has had his own practice in Denver since 1961. In addition to having designed many buildings in Colorado, he has been an integral part of the architectural community having served as Co-Director for the Environment '76 Program, Director of the Reg.ional Urban Design Assistance Team Study, Director of the CSA Board in 1977, Director of the LLC Board in 1977 and President of the LLC in 1976. LAM: Having practiced in Denver for approximately 18 years, are there any specific elements of design which you feel are more significant than others? OHLSON: The word 11practice11 is too near to the truth. It's embarrassing to have practiced anything for 18 years. An aspiring architect should 11practice11 un iil that time he is examined. After a certain respectable period following examination and legal sanctioning, we should be doing something more than practicing: when do we become expert? About specific elements of design: my early training tended to discount the importance of the element of human scale in favor of universal structural systems, geodesic dome, folded plate, thin shell hyperbolic paraboloides, and various other structural disciplines. Mastering the predictable pattern provided some security in facing the next design challenge, but produced a grim bunch of heartless forms and predictable spaces. So then, the human, provocative aspect of form and design have become more important where we are rediscovering that in order for a designer to provide a total solution, the finished product must be an object of pride; a space that one wants to be a part of and a place that warrants preservation through the next round of renewal. LAM: What is your opinion of the place of architecture in this society? OHLSON: I'm big on ''place•• at the moment. Architect u re i s the p 1 ace . I f the work i s ca ref u 1 1 y done ; with meaning, heart, and scale, it warrants vat ion and survives renewal. Architecture is the essence of current or historical place. However, it is interesting to compare the magnetism of our new urban spaces such as Skyline Park or the First of Denver Plaza with the mesmerism of the wonderous TV tube. It is possible that electronic illusions will become a perfectly fine replacement for the square or the park or random human spaces, particu larly when a New York elementary school teacher or dered his students to cold turkey the tube for one day because of a constant complaint that homework was interfering with their favorite programs. The teacher asked the students to report on their reac tions. Most of the students were in a state of shock, without the will to find an alternate activity while one hapless case confessed that she sat in front of D a blank box and imagined her favorite programs. A quote from Edmund Carpenter's, They Became What They Beheld, 11Daddy, are we live or on tape11, vividly describes the impending predominance of artificial experience over individual contact with traditional 11rea111 people, places and things. Can our new architecture, real places, the conversation Kiva, the play yard, the sidewalk cafe, the community meeting hall ... compete with the 1 imitless audio/visual electronic experience? If not, the importance and place of architecture and the role of the architect are suspect and those lifeless urban canyons will somehow proliferate. LAM: Given this economic system, is it possible for the architect to put his ideas into practice? OHLSON: Forgetting the terrible electronic audio/ visual threat, let's attempt to focus on the architect and his ideas in today1s economic system. The architect has survived because he has been patronized by those who either have no alternative other than to employ his services, or by those who value the skills he has evolved. The architect has more opportunity now than ever before to provide more appropriate solutions. The new dimensions of computerized analysis and design, the collection, storage, and dissemination of information gives him the opportunity to 11tune11 his design response. The current economic restraints impose a discipline that may appear stifling, but in fact, intensifies the challenge and perfects the solution. The architect doesn't have a bunch of 11ideas11 floating around waiting to be hauled into action. Rather, he should be evolving a problem-solving capability and with knowledge and some spontaneity, do what's right! The present economic system gives the architect a greater opportunity for more 11good11 ideas. LAM: Phillip Johnson said, 11Great architecture requires a great cl ient11• Do you believe this is so; and if so, what attributes does a great client have? OHLSON: I don't believe the architect can wait for a great client. There just aren't that many around these days. If your collection of low-budget, slowpaying clients doesn't measure up to Phillip Johnson's enlightened following, then just pretend that your clients are a lot smarter than they seem and just see if a great work doesn 1 t appear. If that approach doesn't produce something great, then be your own client and see where that gets you ... the second or third mortgage on your house. The principal objective of a design-oriented firm should be to provide rational solutions to real problems and to the temptation of either adopting or superficially creating 11style11• The superior client enjoys the adventure of creative solutions rather than imposing tired ideas on new possibilities. He is able to define his needs and encourage the architect to search for the unique and appropriate answer. A certain willingness to forward a substantial retainer should not be discounted as one of the clients greatest attributes.

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LAM: Do you have any specific ideas as to the direction which architecture is likely to take in the next twenty years? _ OHLSON: It appears that the development team will command the greatest attention in the next twenty years. The pressure to resolve the economics, particularly the 11yield11, of a project requires that all aspects of the project be developed simultaneously. The architects program, therefore, requires the organization of fragmented market studies, lender requirements, building system costs, and projected schedules. Outside of the governmental or institutional market, nothing happens the way one might expect. Governmental agencies will have a greater im pact on a proposed project. Knowing requirements and time for approval is of vital importance. The sensitive solutions that tend to give direction to architecture, spr.ing from the individual who is .not restrained by the anonymous limits and dictations passed down through the development entity. The small practitioner will, therefore, have a place threatened by the temptation to join with the biggies and lose the luxury of independent reaction. LAM: Are there areas in which education should go in order to prepare future architects for these possibi 1 it ies? OHLSON: I suppose that in preparation for working within the development team, the architect's education should include a greater familiarity with the other disciplines outside the architect's domain; namely law, economics, financing procedures, development concepts, and probably construction management techniques. These concerns seem to be current subjects of continuing education within the profession. In addition to the basic design, engineering, and professional subjects, some attempt should be made to better equip the student for communicating with the varied elements of the construction industry. Programs such as Internship certainly help to point out the everyday procedural problems. Beyond good draftsmanship and problem solving skills, the student needs to understand that what he produces in the way of design, working drawings, and specifications are, to a large extent, directions to others in the industry to perform in a certain way. Clear instructions are essential. Understand the predicament of the next guy in 1 ine and be sure 11directions11 can be easily understood. Can the carpenter expeditiously work from your details; can the estimator accurately measure quantities and costs; can the mechanical and electrical trades expect to find happiness within the architectural design constraints? In addition to this kind of communication, a semester or two should be dedicated to spelling, grammar, and the letter. LAM: Can you compare graduates of the University of Colorado1s architectural program with graduates from other universities? OHLSON: Graduates of C.U. compare very favorably with those from other universities. Design and graphics talent, together with production skill, are basic to our evaluation. Generally, C.U. grads have developed skills that effectively assist in conceptualizing and problem solving. LAM: What level of competence do you think architectural firms do, or should expect from recent graduates? OHLSON: I expect a recent graduate to understand the purpose and utility of his training, to have working knowledge of drafting skills, construction documents, and production procedures, and to have a consuming desire to enhance the environment as a result of his inspired vision, remarkable skills, and continuing good nature.

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Listed below are a selection of responses from the LAMINATIONS questionaire. Though the overall sentiment is negative and possibly not represent of the school in general we feel it is our responsibility to print opinions of those who are concerned and committed enough to take the time to express themselves. "The weakest program in the entire school is design. The administration here seems to think that just because someone is a respected architect in town that he/she will make a qood teacher. Unfortunately, that is not true. These architects are thrown into the classroom without any teacher training or experience. The result being that students become guinea pigs to the ego-tripping power hungry whims of the so called 'teacher. '" "Excellent guest lectur.ers surely laugh at our fa c i 1 i t i e s f o r s 1 i de I t a 1 k shows ! ' • "This is a fine kettle of fish you've gotten us into this time, Stanley!" "\.J e a k n e s s of p r o q ram : T r u e 1 y d i sa p p o i n t i n g quality of instruction. Graphics Doyle is indispensable!" "Hooray for guest lecturers 1 ike Brian Goodey. How about more exchange profs. from the USA and the world?" "I appreciate the fact that most instructors here value student's persistant efforts, even when they miss the mark, as well as when they succeed." " Interiors p rag ram is un rea 1 is tic no v.1ay to complete it in three years-also wish there was some flexibility in the program, with some electives." "Nothing to write home about. UCD's 'urban experience' is actually finding a place to park." "I feel as though, in the future, the interior degree, as it is now set up, will not sufficiently prepare a person to enter the job market with any degree of knowledge about good interior design." "Use student designs and person power to build something decent outdoors -it would make a good design competition and be a good 'hands-on' construction project. "Let's get the faculty inspired to teach again. They're all in the Colorado Rocky Mountain high ozone and can't see, or aren't here-doesn't help us much." "What assembly space? \-lhat exhibition space? t1y space is fine. Outdoors? What is outdoors? "The program is fine. Could be better with more instructors to broaden the scope of input, but I have no major gripes beyond that." "I think our program is alive, flexible and positive 1 y grov.Ji ng and changing." "Because of the turmoil of Bromley studio space have forsaken the benefits of peer group interaction for the productive solitude of my own home. "How about a system that allows some enthusiasm on the part of the faculty so the students might develop some enthusiasm or is this raging case of apathy typical of graduate schools?" ''There is no assembly, outdoor, or exhibition space! Classrooms are usually too small or inadequate/ inappropriate for the course. The studios are a mess no organization, just chaos. With faculty support we could improve thinqs. "The whole program suffers due to faculty apathy, and lack of facilities! The program is well rounded, but needs more enthusiasm. 11As to our program director"Please our lion some courage" (Oorothy) as he has problems with d • • II pressure, ecJSJons, etc .... "The parking lot 'outdoor space' can only be taken as a reflection on our inabilities to control and shape our own environment, the skill we are supposed to be learning here. --"1 feel that the program is weak. There seems to be no real direction guiding and unifying the curricula. The classes are poorly integrated with one another (i.e., structures) and with design. and organization is weak, with a few exceptions. "Faculty doubts about the three year program are extremely irritating. The program should be dropped, or accepted and supported, but not beaten into a mediocre victim of no support." "What happened to the exhibition committee? No one knows or sees what the other studios are doino. ' Exhibition space should be provided and it should be the fa c u l t y ' s res pons i b i l i t y . "Need some good lectures Scully, Blake, Tigerman, etc.'' "Struggling -but going in the right direction. Satisfactory for this stage of development." "I want to see the outdoor sandpit made into a park, or a 'beach' for us." " e need : G r a d u a t e l eve 1 h i s to r y co u r s e s ; Structure classes with more architectural relationship, instead of engineer-. Jno •.. ' More visitinq profs-well known."

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Image, as most anyone will agree, is quintessen-t i a 11 y important to a schoo 1. Its importance to the student body 1 ies in the fact that image often has the power to condition how one feels about his institution; and in turn, about himself. To the public, image is even more important because the school reality is seldom experienced. Therefore, image has tremendous importance as to how a school is perceived both on the inside and on the outside. All of which means that we as a school should direct our attention to this question of self-image; especially since this is a matter of student concern as the questionnaire responses indicate. The consensus is that the school remains imageless. As I see it, the problem can successfully be corrected by directing our corrective energy in two directions: First is the physical transformation of Bromley; and, second is the institution of school traditions. Regrettably, Bromley has yet to be claimed as our very own design project numbe r one. At the present, the building is visually and spiritually less of a school of design than it is a nineteenth century warehouse. This can be rectified once we are willing to admit that this is not essentially a funding problem, as currently promoted; but rather a problem of v1s1on. Once over this hurdle and armed with the talent and conviction of the faculty and student body, Bromley can once again be the proud building its designer ostensibly intended it to be. The studios are the most logical place to start as they cry out to be transformed into creative and reassuring physical expressions of the school's selfwo r t h . An d , i f t h i s t a k e s t he c e 1 e b r a t i on o f a 11Hammer Day11 or two, at the beginning of each semester during which the studios become the first design project, then so be it. The stain.vell is next in order. A rebirth could perhaps be accomplished with slashes of 1 ife-giving color; a mural, maybe of a balloon man who stands on the first floor while his helium-filled, multi-colored balloons rise to the second, third, and fourth floors; or some other graphic scheme which celebrates that volumetric space, and which serves as a constant reaffirmation of our belief in human creativity. Other worthwhile projects could include signage or graphics for the south facing wall of Bromley; a school of environmental design banner for the flag pole, graphic signage for the interior of the building and the creation of a special and comfortable space out of our fledgling library. The possibilities are endless and the rewards are reassuring; so let's start planning in earnest now. Second, yet of equa 1 importance for the creation of a positive school image, is the institution of traditions for they have the power to evoke a past, imply a future and hint at continuity. We could begin with biannual exhibitions of recent student work at the Auraria Art Gallery which can be billed as public events to which the school and professional community is invited. These would greatly serve to increase our perceived self-worth among ourselves and the community at large. Additional celebrations and events of this sort are also needed. For example, the Beaux Arts Ball is the highlight of the school year at Rhode Island School of Design where a Newport mansion is borrowed for the evening. A Beaux Arts Ball could be the same sort of culminating social experience for the College of Env!ronmental Design which would take us most probably to lower Downtown and the Oxford Hotel with its marvelous art deco Cruise Room. Celebrated events could also be created around beginning design exercises such as the designing of structures with a minimum of material which should protect an egg from breaking on impact from the second floor of Bromley. Another event could possibly be created around Gary Long's Light Box exercise. And, without question, an all-school celebration should be centered around thesis presentations. These are but a few suggestions for Bromley's transformation and for the introduction of school traditions. Let this be seen only as the starting point on the road to creating a physically and psychologically alluring school environment. This effort cannot but enhance the way we feel about ourselves. Confidence, cJfter all, is. one of the best gifts one can bestow on anyone, even ourselves.

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@ ________________________________________ _ Denver seems to be well provided with most things; autos, pollution, new homes and subdividions, downtown development, entertainment opportunities .. and press coverage! The newcomers cannot help but be impressed by the number Of citizens who take up their pens in order to attack or defend the city. If you believe in growth and visible evidence of American success (albeit with Canadian, European and Saudi dollars), then Denver (on a bright day} offers hope for that dream. If, on the other hand, you believe that the disaster plan for U.S. cities was announced in the early 1960's and that Denver is working with those outmoded documents, then again there is a press coverage to aid the course of blood to the head. One thing is certain, Denver and the state that exists beyond its built frontiers, arouse more local and national interest than do the capitals of most states. Having lived in Indiana and North Dakota, I can identify at least two which have less public concern for their condition. The recent progress of environmental awareness in the State and the City was well posed (to my naive British eyes, at least) by the final episode of TV's Centennial with the forces of traditional conservation and rural interest set against the growth-minded developer. Coloradoans I have talked to about this dismiss Centennial as folksy and inaccurate, but fail to dismiss the inconclusive conclusion of the program. Given international and national forces at work, it is fairly clear that the City and the State have until about 1984 to decide whether they want to feature a state-wide enactment of Orwell's desperate dream or whether a new, humane direction can be salvaged from the pile off good intentions which go nowhere. The Urban Mission America gets better and better at co1n1ng new words . • One of my favorite TV pundits has written books on the subject; and one which seems in vogue in the vicinity of U.C.D is "Mission". To this lapsed churchman, 'mission' implies going out to spread the gospel. So what gospel does U.C.D., and specifically the College of Environmental Design Design, preach? Can it be the codes and beliefs that have spawned random central city growth, suburban and pollution? Generally, this doesn't seem to be the case ... the prevailing words I've heard in C.E.D. corridors seem to be at variance with what I can see out of the window. 0 But this really shouldn't be too surprising, for the gospel as preached seems to be more applicable to places which are anywhere but Denver. As o 0 in life, there seems to be more interest in traveling to the outer limits rather than working in the vicinity; community reaction is better held at arm's length! (In a similar pattern, we at Oxford seem to focus more on London than on the city in which we are located.) Academics everywhere are very conscious of their local image. Student projects, publications, exhibitions, media critiques all stand in danger of generating negative response from the immediate community and are, therefore, put to one side in favor of work at a distance. From an admittedly brief and, therefore easily discountable view, it seems that C.E.D. maintains a very low profile when it should be visible, both to Denver and to the State. In truth, the U.C.D. concept of an urban "Mission" is hollow rhetoric if measured in terms of converts or impact on the visible form of the urban community: How can this be when each of my temporary collegues seems to work with considerable energy on resource and community-related activities which should contribute to the "Mission"? In design schools, both European and American, the tradition has always been that teachers are also practitioners. As designers, the loner instinct is strong, so whilst each faculty member may contribute toward the community, it is on an individual basis rather than as a member of an educational "Mission" to the city. It seems to me that "accountability" is becoming increasingly important in academic 1 ife and that casual mention of "community service" is not enough. A relatively new college with small staff resources is in a better position to readjust to this community orientation than is a large, traditional college. At Oxford, we have 100 or so faculty in architecture, urban design, planning and estate management and the problem is compounded by being in an ancient city which refuses to admit that it has contemporary urban problems. Actions Not Words In the meat of this note I want to suggest a few ideas which might be explored by faculty and students at U.C.D. They are based on experiences in Europe and the U.S.A.; they may seem shallow and even inappropriate, but in the process

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0 of discarding or accepting them, other ideas may emerge: 1) College Not Departments Each faculty member has a vested interest (or a doubly vested interest) in maintaining professional boundaries and his view is quickly passed to students who join in a parody of the real life game by playing territorial acquisition in the studio! Given accreditation methods, library cataloging, journals and, not last, the job market, it is unlikely that the professional boundaries in education will be lowered but there is every qood reason for providing a united, environmental desigh, front to the outside world. The non-professional community 11out there11 seems unable to discern the precise boundaries within which architects, planners, landscape architects ... even urban designers, operate. tnstead, Joe Public (and you and I when off duty) identify and worry about issues, plans, problems, hazards and opportunities. Educating the public as to the precise role of each profession is a waste of time, if only because professional self-perceptions change very rapidly. This lends me to suggest that the colleqe should take time out to identify an environmentall design role in Denver and in the State. Some of the activities suggested below may aid this process of role definition, others may be activities which result from it. In suggesting what follows, I am aware that the college has a clearly identified 11community11 wing, but the physical separation of this wing seems to indicate the need for reintegration of the operation and the idea. 2) Opening Community Eyes There are 107 booklets on Denver, but no readily accessible guide to the Denver environment which highlights the good, the bad and the ugly. A first shot at this may emerge from my current course, but what better opening for the college than to publish its own gospel. A cheap, attractive guide to downtown which articulates a corporate view of environmental quality and design which the colleqe can defend? 3) College Seminars The college is still small enough to offer seminar series, policy discussions and encounters with visitors where all can participate without disciplinary lines being drawn. This is a very valuable characteristic which should not be lost. Seminars featuring local or nationally known figures could be co-sponsered with professional or business groups g1v1ng greater visibi 1 ity to the college forum for environmental design debate (the present series seems to be the 6nly one in town that doesn't make the papers). 4) Design Center/Urban Studies•Center Being as close as we are to the revising inner city (sic.) there is the opportunity for the to combine with the city, museums, libraries, in creating a design and urban studies center as popular focus for environmental interest. Student projects could explore the design and financial needs for such a center (possibly the 11honeypot11 for revival of an old area), the aim bei ng to provide attractive mini-museum and exhibition space with m6dest backup reserved facilities for school and community interest groups. Given the high standard of art, natural history and heritage presentations in Denver, it is strange that there is no comparable statement on the urban fabric. There are many models for this type of facility which complement roles rather than capture the communityty architect role. 5) Visibility Any design school has the potential to offer to a community a range of lowcost, but much needed, skills and facilities. Increasingly, learning seems to be evidenced most effectively in 11live11 projects where staff and students offer professional services and insights. in exchange for public knowledge about place. This form of edu catiottal barter can be profitable _to all but it is not to be founded on pious hopes, it needs management and visibility. The corporate enterprise of staff and students in the college should be yielding more return in learning terms than is presently the case. Visibility, both internal and external, is much needed ... and the college is still small enough to achieve this. Each of these suggestions can be easily discounted by the use of a standard discounting table in which each is measured against faculty attitudes, cost, community attitudes, the legislative, accommodation, political implications, etc ... you've probably done it as you've read thus far. But, on the positive side, the college seems to have a great deal going for it, so why not set these suggestions against the following list: city center location; modest scale; evident communication between departments; faculty and student enthusiasm, innovative cross-disciplinary projects and a city that needs you before 1984!

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t1 i ke F u 1 1 e r

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) " ' ' . . . . . . .,
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ll$ ____________________________________ _ The Urban Planning Department at UCD is alive and well and those hard-working,11noseto-the-grindstone" students have finally come together in an organized fashion under the newly formed Student Advisory Committee (SAC). The Committee, in an attempt to meet some of the students• interests, problems, needs, gripes, etc. has met several times over the last four months to set up and organize the respective subcommittees representing some of the more important issues to the MURP Students. 000 The first matter on the agenda was to construct and circulate a survey whose results would present a general overview of the students' perceptions and criticisms of the program. The survey has just recently been tabulated and analyzed. See MURP Survey article for results. Two other events of considerable interest to most planners will be a presentation by Dave Wallace of Wallace, McHarg & Todd put on jointly by the Planning and Architecture departments, and the APA meeting at the Phipps Ranch House. The latter will involve a discussion on the controversial Mission Viejo development proposed for the Phipps Ranch land. Jamie Fitzpatrick SPRING BANQUET: SAC is still working on setting an exact date for the spring banquet. The SAC voted unanimously that this event should be open to all students and faculty and that a combination luncheon and barbeque might be most appropriate. A sign-up sheet will be posted and anyone interested in helping please contact the SAC. PLANNING THEORY: As a result of student unrest with some of the required core courses in the MURP program, the faculty has undertaken a reevaluation of some of the requirements--in particular, Planning Theory 530. STUDIO SPACE: The problem of poor and inadequate studio space was brought up by SAC at the last Faculty Meeting. The faculty is aware of this problem and indicated that adequate space would be provided on the 4th floor as of March 28. Also, by next fall improved studio facilities will be available in the basement of Bromley. VOLUNTEERS: The faculty needs volunteers to assist on the review committee for new MURP applicants. Interested persons please contact Herb Smith. ARTICLES: Anyone interested in submitting articles for publication in LAMINATIONS contact Jamie Fitzpatrick at 778-6115 or 399-7602. Don't be shy---say it!! During the first week of this semester, a "Planning Student Survey" was conducted by the MURP Student Advisory Committee. The primary purpose of this survey was to get student ideas on the MURP curriculum and on what speakers they would like to hear this semestero Students may now view the results of the survey which are posted outside of Dolores Hasseman's office. This survey shed considerable light on the makeup ot the MURP student body, their interests in planning, and suggestions on how to improve our program. As you might expect, our student body is a working one with over 2/3 employed full or part-time. Many of our students (63%) reported that they have had some planning experience prior to entering the program (ranging from a 3 month internship to 15 years as a county planner). When asked "What are your interests in the planning field?'', it became evident that the planning student body is heavily oriented toward physical-type planning issues (environmental planning, site analysis, etc.). Strong interests were also reported in such subjects as economic development, neighborhood planning, housing/social services, small towns, and community development. While the majority of the MURP students felt that the present program was meeting their needs for the most part, several grievances were also expressed. These pointed to the highly generalized nature of the curriculum, its lack of flexibility, and a shortage of courses in recreation planning, health planning, economic development, and energy issues. Considerable concern was also expressed on the present method of course evaluation. Most were satisfied with the content of the evaluation process, however, many students questioned why the results were not published. The survey also yielded several excellent ideas on what subjects and speakers students would like to hear for the Spring lecture series. Working with these ideas, the Student Advisory Comm ittee organized a series of lectures which met student interests and covered a broad range of subjects. MURP students were also quizzed for suggestions on improving the existing facilities of our program. A substantial number pointed to the need for a student lounge/study area, better classroom space (more room and less heat), and adequate studio facilities. Our faculty has been quite open-minded to these ideas, and is working diligently to secure space for MURP studios, workshops, and meetings. Lastly, when asked "What issues do you think the SAC should be involved with?", most of the comments called for work on curriculum rev1s1ono Taking this input, the SAC has been working closely with the MURP faculty in reviewing the present setup of "Planning Theory" as a core requirement, and the procedures involved in Studio I I I projects. Thanks goes to all of the MURP students who took the time to fill out a survey. Your ideas are essential to improving our program. Ke vi n N i c ho 1 s

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HERE WE ARE The Masters degree Program in Landscape Architecture is design-oriented. Its goal is to understand problem-solving and thus learn to design with a process: With an of the problemsolving process, landscape architects from U.C.D. are trained to design solutions in the total landscape, from urban plazas to regional parklands. Accordingly, the program's concept offers as many courses as possible to develop our problem-solving techniques for a wide range of solutions. The curriculum stresses design and is reinforced with hearty doses of plant materials, graphics, engineering and construction. Is the program meeting its goal? Are first year students thoroughly introduced to the problemsolving process and are second and third year students designing by process and producing thoughtful and responsive designs? For the most part, the answer is yes. My first year class experience clearly mapped the problem-solving process, the core faculty is committed 100% to the philosophy of design through process and the quality of student work takes quantum leaps each class year. WHERE ARE WE HEADED This May, the class of 1979 will be the first to graduate from the U.C.D. Landscape Architecture program and head out into the professional community. Because the program is new, traditions have not yet developed. And, instead of waiting for time inevitably to bring a tradition to U.C.D., we choose to design one. We want a frame of reference, an inherited body of standards, a design for a tradition of excellence to begin and to grow at U.C.D .. Borrowing six problem-solving steps from The Universal Traveller, by D. Koberg and J. Bagnall, we must first ACCEPT THE SITUATION. We have a problem to solve. We have no tradition to use as a frame of reference; we want a tradition. Next, ANALYZE THE SITUATION. The Masters degree L.A. program is new, almost three years old. The program is growing, changing, being refined; traditions have not had time to solidify. Even the landscape architecture profession is discovering new areas of activity; areas of interest have grown larger than the tradition. Boundaries are expanding. Third, DEFINE. What traditions do we seek? We seek a standard of excellence for the program to keep it dynamic and in tune with new field demands. We must include careful provision for the human needs in landscaping and we must protect the land from misuse by understanding the relationship of all of us to the land. Now, IDEATE. How do we design a tradition? By developing a select student body who are offered good growing facilities and a faculty which will challenge students to technical excellence and thoughtful and responsive designs. IMPLEMENT with a constant striving to excell on the part of both students and faculty and the future of the program will be its own EVALUATION. Paula Schulte 000 Congratulations to second year L.A. student Paul Hellmund, whose poster design was selected for use in the Landscape Architecture Program at U.C.D.! Teeshirts of the poster are highly visible on Bromley•s fourth floor. The Landscape Architecture program is alive and well at U.C.D.!!! ll\NDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE u.c.D.erwer Citing a lack of published information written for professionals dealing specifically with landscape plant materials for Colorado, approximately ten Landscape Architecture students have organized an independant study course to produce a Colorado plant materials handbook. The handbook will be a collation of plant material data and will be written for the professional community. It will be available for purchase at a later date; contact Paul Hellmund, L.A. studio, 4th floor Bromley, for the publication timetable and to place your orders. Old you know that In the Site Development Master 1976 for the Auraria Campus the parking lot bounded by Larimer and Lawrence Streets and Speer Blvd. and 11th Street was designed by E.Allan Rollinger, one of Denver's top landscape designers, to be the Auraria Green, a two block part of the campus greenbelt along Cherry Creek? Quoting from the Master Plan, "The Green is admittedly an enticing for future campus expansion, and because the Green satisfies an Intangible value It may hold a precarious position at Auraria. Hopefully time will allow for the development of traditions which will make the Green an tndespensible part campus and urban ltfe.11 The Auraria Green dldn1t even get a chance .

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I • Larry Gong slumps dejectedly into a chair in Zane Loosem's inner office. Together they form the administration of an obscure school of architecture somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. Zane looks carefully at Larry and asks. "Is everything alright?" "Of course everything is not alright," Larry shoots back. "The All Powerful, All Knowing esteemed officials of the Accredftation Board will be here any minute, and you ask me if things are alright?" "Well, everything will not be alright if you don't knock off the All Powerful, A1T Knowing B.S., Larry." "It works with the Regents, they love it." 11Th is is a different pO\.'Jer structure, k i ddo, 11 Zane explains patiently. "You've gotta keep cool." "KEEP COOL!" Larry shouts. Leaping to his feet he begins to pace the office. "How can you sit there and puff that stogie when the demons of design school deans will descend upon us any moment?" "\.Ji 11 you relax, Larry. I tell you everything is under control. Look, when they get here we take them to lunch where we can talk and make our points." Zane leads Larry back to the chair next to his desk and pleads, "Will you stop racing around 1 ike that, you'll make me nervous. Here, take a seat and reeelax. Put your feet up if you 1 ike." "Really, Zane?" Larry asks sceptically as he carefully props his cordovans on top of the formica top. Zane leans back in his chair and takes a deep puff on his cigar. Suddenly Larry jerks his feet off the desk, and slams them back on the floor. Zane is startled and coughs a cloud of smoke toward the ce i 1 i ng. "What about the library?" Larry shouts. Zane settles back in the chair and says, confid-ently, "Well, what about the 1 ibrary?" "There are't any books in it for one thing." ''I took care of that yesterday, don 1 t worry.'' ''How?'' Larry asks, sceptically. "Well we moved in some more shelves and took the few books we have and spread them around.'' ''But Zane, that will leave huge gaps, won't they get suspicious?" Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus and rumor has it that an honest-to-goodness, ammoniabased print machine will soon be among us!!! Compliments of the DEEZINE CLUB and especially due to the efforts of Mark Dorian and Wayne Stryker, the print machine should be here within four to six weeks. The plan is for students to supply their own paper and the processing chemicals will be on the house. That's good news!!! Postscript: The DEEZINE CLUB is potentially a very responsive and powerful vehicle for accomplishing the collective wishes of the students. With fee allotments unclaimed by us until now, the club's founders are purchasing equipment, sponsering social events and raising funds for the library. This organization needs ideas for this year and leadership for next. No one should miss the April 12 meeting. mike :fo.ller "Naw, with this well read student body we can't keep them on the she 1 ves, 11 Zane adds with a wink. Larry's face is still clouded, but he forces a smile as Zane studies Larry's appearance. "I like your jacket, Larry. Isn't that new?" "Yup, it's leather. I bought it for the occasion. Like you suggested. I got this too." Larry indicates his tie clasp, which is a porsche emblem. "But Larry, you don't own a porsche," Zane says, a 1 ittle bewildered. "They don't know that. It's part of the image." "Well, O.K. But don't you think that those mirror sunglasses are going a bit too far for inside the building? We don't want them to think that the place is over lumined." "You're right," Larry says as he pushes the glasses on top of his head. "The physical plant is important. At least it's cool outside. The sight of all the windows open and the heat going full blast is enough to give me the heeby-geeb i es. 11 The phone rings and the secretary informs them that the Accreditation Committee has arrived. They both leap to their feet. Larry hesitates, grabs Zane's arm, and asks, "Do you think we should let them cool their heels for awhile? Just for effect?" "Now's not the time to get pompous, Larry" Pulling his arm away Zane heads for the door and adds over his shoulder, "We have to get them out of here and into a restaurant, pronto." Larry falls in behind as they greet the Committee and introductions are made. Zane suggests that they go somewhere for lunch. As they head for the door Larry asks nervously how long they plan to stay. 0ne of the members chuckles and says, "Well, not too long. I want to get this over with so that I can some skiing. You guys _kept putting this thing off and I was afraid that all the beautiful snow would melt by the time we finally got here. Hey, Zane. Where did you say that condo was we could use?" Zane flicks a sheepish grin at Larry and answers. 11Well ... uh ... it's in Leadville, actually. It's not too far from the slopes, but we're trying to work out something better. Let's see how things go in the next few days." Zane leads the party to the elevator leaving the committee member with a puzzled look on his face. "Leadville?"

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OtJn h lef.s U.C.D. is a unique urban institution which is firmly based on the reality which faces us now and in the next years. I contend that the college is serving us in two major ways; it is giving us an education based on reality with a sufficient dose of idealism and, secondly, it is encouraging the students as individuals. This is not to say that either the existing program or the facilities could not use improvement. Regarding reality-based education, our program is heavily oriented toward the technical aspects and everyday practice in the design profession. Can we do without any of these courses? I think not. These are the aspects of the profession we must learn and understand or be ruled by. Idealism in our program of study is found in our design courses. Secondarily, it comes from history. & theory which have a much smaller emphasis in our program. This brings us back to design which I contend is often quite idealistic. The design of the finest building or space is encouraged by faculty; not whether a design meets a certain budget or whether it is the simplest to construct. My experience has been one of faculty encouraging exploration of form, differing responses to context and creative responses to program. The conditions which face us presently are " ;It is impossible for the urban designer to acquire the skills of all of the other allied professions; it is his role to emerge as the middle-man or broker between the major professions; creating the 1 inks which are essential in bringing' the various professions into working relationships. The primary role of the urban desiqner is to direct development of, and change toward, a phased series of desired ends using design, communication and political skillso11 Brian Goodey. It is apparent that our Urban Design Program will undergo changes. One reason for this is the refusal of the NCARB to accredit an "Urban Design Program", although 8 of the major design schools offer one at the moment. UCD should offer a central skill in dealing with such large, complex projects as new towns, urban renewal, or downtown rehabilitation. According to Dean Nuzzum the Urban Design degree will in future be offered as a second professional degree. From a strong participatory design studio experience of three years, the Urban Design Program is degenerating into a thin finish coat applied to students of varying backgrounds. ,__ _______ AtiP THE I 11 .. DIV IPIIAJ. encouraging the development of individual incl inations and talents. This sense of independence has immense value but the students who have not also experienced a "team approach" may find their abilities of interaction compromised in the future. The phys i ca 1 fac i 1 i ty in which we work fosters this sense of individualism. According to the NCAAB (Review Board), we have a 'normal amount of space'. This space, however, is not adequate for group instruction, presentation or exhibits. We may desire more facilities but government has sent a clear message that we must do without. Students must use what presently exists at our institution and get the most from what we do have. The other major factor which leads to individualism is that U.C.D. is a work-oriented, commuter campus. Students in our program want accessibility to the facility and the faculty, and desire an efficiency in the educational process. U.C.D. cannot operate on the assumption that if students stay around the building long enough knowledge will be produced. This is foreign to the entire idea of a commuter campus. Fortunately, our faculty have diverse ideas and methods of teaching, and U.C.D. does not promote any "school of thought". Students are faced with differing ideas and encouraged to present new ideas. This strengthens the educational process for each individual at U.C.D. Although the UCD bulletin "advertises" an MA in Urban Design the the school hierarchy has steered new students into the Architecture Program. If this is to be school policy perhaps it be announced as such in the bulletino For those students interested in experiences not found in the architectural studios, where one is submerged in fenestration, flashing and fancy model building, the Center for Community Design and Development offers a spirit and enthusiasm nonexistant in the architectural program. Also, if one is interested, try a course in the Landscape program, which has a strong and healthy interest in the built form of exterior spaces. The Urban Design students require a multitude of learning situations found in an interdisciplinary program, something that barely exists in the midst of the rivalry present at this institution. The present program seems to merge Urban Design with Architecture, but, the Architecture Program offers very little in the way of urban awareness, which is necessary for the well rounded student, and absolutely essential for those in an Urban Desigri

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I n ______________________________________ _ Gene Benda was educated at the University of Prague where he received diplomas in both engineering and architecture. In addition to teaching at the University of Colorado, he has taught at the University of Prague and has been a lecturer and critic at the Staatsuniversitat Hamburg, 1 . he Univer$ity of Frankfurt, the University of Lo11don, Liverpool Uni and Edinburgh From 1949 to 1966 he practiced in Czechoslovakia designing four schools, a hospital, a cultural and educational center, a civic and shopping center and the Petoring Residential Quarter for 48,000 inhabitants in Prague. He won first prize in three separate competitions including the Petoring project, the renewal plans for three war-damaged mining towns, and the cu 1 tu ra 1 I education a 1 center in the ''new town'' of Os t r ava. From 1966 to 1972 he was an architect and planner in Great Britain working on the City Center Redevelop ment in Liverpool, the Waterfront Commercial and Cultural Center in London, and was in charge of the redevelopment program of the city center in Edinburgh and the Ring Road Project in Glascow. From 1973 to the present he has been on the faculty of the University of Colorado. LAM: Having practiced architecture in a wide diversity of places, you're in a position to compare the practice of architecture in several countries. What do you feel are the major differences from country to country? BENDA: The major difference is in how much architecture becomes a part of the 1 ife of the country; how seriously it is taken in participating in the life of the society. That certainly has always been true, in ancient Greece, with a few enlightened individuals in Frank Lloyd Wright's time, or in patches of "architecture" done for prestigiously oriented corporations, just as examples. In some countries there is a strong pride in good craftsmanship, and this applies to architects as well. There are no buildings that can built without architects; and because they are in charge of the entire performance, better quality buildings overall are the result. In countries where nobody will buy cheaply made products, they are not designed. The design and the ethics of a society tend to be very mutually supportive. Appreciation of quality design is instilled from the time chi-ldren are toddlers i'n those countries. In Europe this appreciation is encouraged from a very early age because good craftsmanship is seen everywhere, all the time. When a window is broken, or a railing is falling down, or when the plumber comes into the house, the care which he gives to his craft is noticeable. The tragedy is that many people live and die without getting even a glimpse of the richness of 1 ife. Making the society sensitive is a responsibility which makes some of these differences between countries clear. Architecture is capable of sensi• tizing the and has responsibilities to the society. It serves the society first of all; it ) 0 0 serves the client as well, but its first responsibil-ity 1s to the society. LAM: Can you give us some comparison in the way architecture is taught from country to country? BENDA: In some countries there is more stress on technical ability, as well as understanding of art, as an essential part of 1 ife. The students seem to be stronger in these prerequisites before coming to the university. That, perhaps, gives more room for the utilization of logic in combination with artistic ability sooner, and less dependence on applications of formula. More preparatory courses also introduce the students to the organization of architectural space, uses of materials and their relation ship to elementary decision-making, etc., and consequently, this approach may strengthen the overall intellectual challenge of the student in design. LAM: Isn't it one of the goals of this school to bring people from varying backgrounds into the field? BENDA: This is absolutely true, and undoubtedly the variety of people coming into the school could greatly enrich the potential of their educat_ion, and this is one of the biggest advantages of our school. Yet there should be more encouragement in the physical and social environment so that exchange of ideas and better communication among the students would still further contribute to this basic advantage. LAM: Are there any changes you would make in the way architecture is taught at U.C.D.? BENDA: Recent accreditation procedures, though very favorable to our school, suggested more stress be placed on design and I fully agree. How to do it may start with vital preparation of the student for design. Supportive laboratories, experimental exercises, which are courses which should be mandatory, would introduce not only the tangled relationships within the environment, but also the fundamentally related craft and arts, with stress on imaginative thinking in combination with practical exercises which would support individual growth so that the students could brush up their taste and judgement, as well as developing qualities of self discipline and self criticism before coming to the first larger design project. LAM: How do you think our graduates stack up on a worldwide and national basis? BENDA: Last year's Europe study semester partly answered the question in practical terms. Though I heard from them that they did not represent the best students in terms of their previous grades, the results were in the majority of cases excellent. Why? Because of the intensive exposure which generated student enthusiasm and demanded the appropriate self discipline. This proved to me that our students can stand very competitive comparison. The program within the semester was very demanding on students' time, concentration and their overall ability to digest that enormous amount of information. They stacked up very well. LAM: Can you give us your definitions of Urban Design and Architecture and how they differ?

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BENDA: Definitions in words have substantial limitations, and are often misused, yet to me architecture physically represents the art of living. It should therefore orchestrate what is itemized in art, economics, engineering, urban design and the ethics of the society. Urban design is an important part of it and means picking up those ingredients which could make sense out of planning. Architecture in its total form represents to me what we should be striving for in our 1 iving space. Urban design includes many of the goals of architecture, and strives to create a sense, using them, of planning goals. LAM: What do you see as the important directions in the field for the foreseeable future? BENDA: These are excellent questions, but the answer to each could be a book. The young generation coming out of school is more aware of the revolutionary environmental changes in the society as necessary consequences of the present crises. To cope with it requires quality of thinking and using those enormous material tools available. These people, whether establishing their own small offices or joining big computer oriented firms, are environmentally creative, and that will become again the paramount direction. The society, our environment, is starving for im provement of the pitfalls of the high standard of life instead of striving for more sensible cultural life. In both cases, our environment will only prove through coordinated, synchronized efforts. New and provocative solutions are the creative challenge. The lasting task for architecture in any country is to try to reconcile the irreconcilable. How to do our job is a big question which is related to the fact that architecture is a part of the society. The media and our image-making groups confuse the society, so the issues become muddled. Architecture has very specific, nonverbal, means of influencing the society. An attitude of ''let the client have what he wants11 instead of teaching quality, damages architecture's potential. That ends up with lack of freedom, and all art is based on freedom, not the subservience of architects to production. Architecture requires a humble, patient, self critical attitude rather than a builders bravado. The certainly want to build, but neither they nor the general public know how to do things better. I received a card from my bank advertising thei-r savings program in which was included the slogan, 11lf you don't see it, you'll never miss i t•• and that is 1 y true, even if they were after a totally different point. The society been given better choices. The sprawl of the cities continues crippling the economy, human souls and the ethics of the society. Architecture must stress just the opposite of what is too often performed today, the very mechanistic, pragmatic work with technological mechanisms, social mechanisms, figures, etc., without human being responded to. Striking examples were produced by corporate architecture of recent years, totally misusing the modern movement's philosophy of architecture. If that attitude starts in kindergarten, it is hard to overcome. The cities present the image of what the citizens deserve. Architecture has to provoke people to think of a better destiny, but provoke with quality and not cheap Las VP.gas interpretations which promote the perversion of taste. Archftects have, historically, been strongly criticized for their ideas, but at least they had the courage to express them rather than being captivated by their money earning capacity. The field is fairly fragmented now, with architects, landscape architects, interior designers, planners, engineers, etc., but it is only through coordinated effort that the solution will be forthcoming. The latest thing is 11let1s go solar11, but if we always only throw out the baby with the bathwater and forget all we've learned throughout history to take up the latest 11thing11, we will always be in the same trouble. It is coordinated effort which will combine all the ideas of the past and present, as well as goals for the future, which is necessary. LAM: What, then, is your opinion of the role of architecture in society? BENDA: Architecture has to constantly offer better options, variety and growth, and in doing so to apply the basic rules of nature. Yet as everything changes, architecture has to respond to using all that we've learned from our forefathers. In the world of changes in which we live, the imaginative coordination of materials and forces available is the only constant. Architecture must become once again a vehicle responding to senses, people's activities, instead of computerized mechanisms. The creative mind has to alter rigid routines and cliches to help to establish a building industry which practically does not exist at the present to cope with the huge task of reconstruction, especially in urban areas. There is a hope in my mind that we have reached the bottom, in terms of the overall pollution of our 1 iving space in all the senses of the word, which means we can only go up in understanding an9 appreciating the essential role of architecture in society, and by society. Nobody will help unless the architects make it clear to the whole population and the decision makers, by the quality of their projects, setting examples, that without healthy architecture, the economy, urban 1 ife and our total growth will suffer still more. It will be difficult for architects to do this when they now have to live on obtaining their projects. The problem is to get the best service for the society. Perhaps architects should be paid for 1 ike any other service, electricity, garbage disposal and so forth. Sincere architects, freed of the struggle for jobs, would strive for the benefit of society, rather than individual clients; Our environment, and architecture is a major part of it, should help people bring the best out of themselves. That is the sense in which architecture should be provocative, to shbw the society what options are available. When that happens architecture is of benefit to society, and could become a coordinative force iwth the other related disciplines. If that does not happen, architecture is betrayirig its essential role.

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I The University of Colorado was recently visited by a three member team with the task of reviewing the programs of the College of Environmental Design , The team consisted of Bill Geddes, a former partner of The Architect's Collaborative; Edie Cherrie, a professor at the University of New Mexico; and David Perkins, a professor at the University of Louisianna. The program at Colorado is fully accreditable and they saw the purpose of their visit as assisting the school, helping it to do things better. They wanted to discover problems and symptoms which will lead to problems in the future. On the first day of their visit, a group of about ten student representatives met with the Review Board. The major topics covered were curriculum, faculty leadership and the school's facilities. It was suggested that the technical courses (working drawings, mechanical systems, structures, materials and methods) need to be more integrated among themselves and related to design The desire for much more solar emphasis, especially with SERI so close by, possibly in the form of a series of studios; was discussed. The major criticism was that our program does not offer a continuation beyond the standard classes at graduate level, thereby eliminating the development of more specialized knowledge and interests. Our need for more, larger, and better facilities was realized by the Board immediately. The 1 ibrary situation in particular was explained by the students as developing too slowly, as lacking funds, and overlapping to some degree with books and slides in Boulder. He ended, saying he was impressed, but as always there is room for improvement. Ms. Cherrie added some other thoughts. She said the team is quite confident about the library's future. The budget for it is allotted by the University. She felt perhaps a slide collection could be added to the library with slides from students and the professionals in Denver. She also noted the upper echelons of the administration at the University of Colorado support the programs of the college which is not the case at many other institutions. Criticisms of faculty and leadership in the school were as follows: The school doesn't have any "philosophy" or image or goals which set it apart from other schools in the region or country. The students felt this srould be discussed continually, but cannot be decided on as it must evolve. The school leadership doesn't seem to have the commitment to get the school moving by promoting the school to the legislature in order to gain funds. It is felt this should be done much more vigorously than in the past. More outside input is desired, with visiting jurors, through exhibits with the public invited. It is felt this can only improve the school. At a meeting summing up the Review Board findings from its brief stay, Bill Geddes commented that he felt that on paper we have "a damn good program" at the University of Colorado. He cited the dynamic quality of leadership in the architecture program, specifically the job Dean Nuzum has been doing; but he feels there should be a greater 1 inkage between the Denver and Boulder campuses. Mr. Geddes listed both ideas and criticisms for t h i s s c hoo 1 • U . C . D . i s i n a u n i que set t i n g , creating a laboratory workshop which provides a much richer context than if it were in a suburban or rural setting. The programs at U.C.D. are in need of finetuning which Geddes felt would require the renewal of spirit in both faculty and students. The team also sees the need for two more faculty positions which can enrich the course offerings. The team also criticized the first year of the three year architectural program. They felt this part of the program could be accelerated or changed. There is a greater need for more coordination between students and the profession here in Denver. Geddes commented that Bromley doesn't look like a studio or an architecture facility. Mr. Perkins also commented on the change needed in the three year program, He said the facilities at U.C.D. are better than many, but that we still need more. He stated that the students must inspire faculty as well as expecting the faculty to inspire them. cont. from. p. 3 ____ ...._ _________ _ much?" Why? Keept'ng as much open space as possible isn't a reason, it's a goal, and I want to know the reasons. That applies for most of what I hear, and say, during presentations. One last comment. I'm not damning the school. 1 suspect that much of what's now being taught is the result of complaints from former students and from lbcal architects. The students complaining that they can't find work, and the architects that U.C.D. graduates are useless. It's hard to find answers for those complaints, but I have a couple. First, I heard recently that 50% of all people with Masters degrees in architecture are not working in the field; related fields, but not architecture. rf that's true, then 50% of the students will even-tually need to apply the principles rather than the practice of architecture. Second, it's my belief that it is the obligation of professionals to undertake the training of future professionals in their field. That's what firms who take interns are, hopefully, trying to do, but the apprenticeship period should last beyond the period of internship. Graduates who are not yet 1 icensed should not expect much pay (my wife and I can easily live on under $10,000 a year). Unfortunately, graduates with Masters degrees seem to think 1t1s their right to make substantial sums of money (it isn't); and architectural firms seem to think it's right to expect recent graduates to be able to turn a buck for them (it isn't). So it goes.

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I [. I f I 1 J -Tish Popachristo, doing city in Egypt, will be speaking in Boulder at C.U. for the World Affairs Conference. -Peter Blake will be speaking a luncheon at the Brown Palace Hotel on Monday, May 7, to 2:00. The cost for luncheon and talk will be $7.50 and talk alone will be $2.00. Regional ASC/AIA Conference is to be held April 20, 21, 22 at Arizona State University in Tempe. Students from New Mexico, Utah, Arizona and Colorado are all slated to meet for seminar and discussion, all in hopes of strengthening communications among schools in the region. See Linda Stansen for more information. The next Western Mountain Region Conference for AlA will be held in Keystone in September. The AlA/Denver Chapter wants to know from us if it is possible to have a Student Chapter of the Denver Chapter: A. Would you want to be a member? B. Would you be willing to pay a modest fee to cover mailing costs and printing of their newsletter. Please let Linda Stansen or Doug Ward kn6w how you feel, or leave a note in the LAMINATIONSs11 box. Another goal of the College of Environmental Design is being realized; the various disciplines have teamed-up for a learning experience outside the classroom. Landscape Architects, Planners, Urban Designers and Architects are working together through the Center for Community Development and Design to produce a conceptual land development plan for the Frying Pan-Roaring Fork River Valley region between Aspen and Glenwood Springso Six of the students will spend the summer living at Colorado Mountain College near Basalt, gathering and researching information for the studyo Funding is provided through a grant from the Kellogg Foundationo See Dan Schler for information concerning other CCDD projects this summer that would need your help. The book buying budget will soon be released and available for purchasing whatever our environmental hearts desire. Chris Guleff, head librarian, asks students and faculty to compile lists of books they feel are needed by the Environmental Design Library and submit them to him. Please include title, author, publisher, address, and date and rate the books in order of purchasing preference. NOTICE: New library hours are Monday thru Thursday, 10:30 to 6:30; Friday, 8:00 to 4:00. Wednesday, April 25th ASLA, Colorado Chapter, monthly meeting October 1979 National convention, ASLA, in New Orleans October 1980 NATIONAL CONVENTION, ASLA, IN DENVER!!! Thurs., 4/12 Wed., 4/18 Thurs., 4/19 4/25 7:30pm Dave Herlinger speaks on ••state's Role in Providing Low/Moderate Income Housing11 1:OOpm & 7:30pm Dave Wallace of Wallace, McHarg & Todd speaks 5:00pm APA meet'ing at Phipps Ranch House; Subject: Mission Viejo 1:OOpm & 7:30pm Chester Hartman speaks on 11Housing in the 1980's" Since the middle of February, there have been l\vO rw\v f < KC'> on tllc.second floot-. lntt-oducinq DONNA LEE,fulltime administrative help, processing opplications and filling in for or helping Dolores. And LAURA BUEL, who works two days a week, to fil 1 in those extra gaps and help where needed.

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I A Forma ----Affair? I I April14,1979 Oxford Aotel17 & \NAZEE Grand Ballroom B=30pm Music byVerlon Thompson $3.00/Person Cash Bar Tickets at door or from Dolores Sponsered by OEEZINE CLUB Professionals \Nelcome Proceeds go to the ne\N library ! ' \ . (--.• I I , I ' J