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Laminations, Spring, 1979 (number 3)

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Laminations, Spring, 1979 (number 3)
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Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
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Denver, CO
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University of Colorado Denver
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English

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Auraria Library
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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
A
AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION SPRING 79 No.3


LAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
LAMINATIONS Mailing Address: Room 303 Bromley,c/o College of Environmental Design, U.C.D.,1100 lAth Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202
Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer.
Special thanks for this issue to:
Liz Bravo Don Dethiefs Mike Fuller
Geoff Kampe Rob Murphy Paula Schulte
Doug Ward Jim Wilson Jim Wright
Gary Miles
This is the third and final issue of LAMINATIONS for this Spring Semester. Herein we are featuring some student graphic work, some humor articles and an interview with exiting faculty member Bob Utzinger.
We hope you have enjoyed LAM this year. Persons interested in working on the paper next year should contact Mike Fuller with any questions about credit arid amount of work involved.
Our congratulations go to those finishing this semester and best wishes to those continuing. Enjoy your summer. DW
Faculty Awards
Undergraduate Division Graduate Division Dana Giffin Soper Memorial Scholarship
David M. Oliver Brett J. Richards
Scott A. MacCormack
College of Environmental Design Awards
Dwayne C. Nuzum, Dean,
College of Environmental Design AIA School Medal Thomas D. Lee
AIA School Medal Mention Arthur G. Sturz
Alpha Rho Chi Medal Kay L. Liske
JEFF PECKA Landscape Architecture "Student of the Year"
AIA Educational Fund Awards, Colorado Society of Architects
Kenneth R. Fuller, AIA
Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G. Chester C.
Fisher Traveling Scholarship I D’Autremont Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G.
Fisher Traveling Scholarship II Vija Berzins
Monarch Tile Manufacturing, Inc. Scholarship
Denver Chapter Producers’ Council Scholarship Colorado Masonry Institute Scholarship Madeline Livaudais Memorial Grant C. Gordon Sweet Scholarship Robert K. Fuller Scholarship
Nicholas D. Docous AIA Design Certificates
Architecture 500 Robin A. Fisher Architecture 600
Architecture 700
Dean A. Foreman Urban Design 700
Lisa M. Godbolt AIA National Scholarships Lila Rioth v
Randall D. Williamson
Randall D. Williamson Jeffrey D. Markwith Robert S. West (Gordon) Kent Gonzales
Foreman Grubb-. y Williamson
Dean Dan, Rand


It is that lamentable time of the year again!!! The snow is out, the croci are in, and it is time to set about summer job hunting or, as the more experienced are inclined to call it, job scrounging. It can be a terrible, anxiety-provoking ordeal. For example, one has to up-date last year’s resume with a listing of that last great job, and what a wonderful flood of fond memories are stirred up from the depths of a belleaguered soul. As part of this task one is also obliged once again to wrestle with the Webster’s in order to maintain the seasonal guise that one could spell if one wanted to. Then again, one has to find the portfolio binder, dust it off, and with steeled courage, face past accomplishments. And if that were not a sufficient ordeal in itself, what of the endless flights of stairs and the long, dark corridors at the end of which sits a secretarial face attached to an outstretched secretarial hand anxious to receive the resuscitated resume which, for some inexplicable reason never seems to see daylight thereafter? What a horrendous ordeal is this spring ritual.
Last year was, I will admit, my first experience at this. I was wet behind the ears; as a matter of fact, I did not even have my Corbu glasses then.
(Young and aspiring, yet no Corbu glasses...Wow, but that is another story altogether!) My first lead was passed on to me by a rugby player who fancied himself an instructor. Whispered between chunks of donuts and gulps of coffee, it was hard to get the name and number both. Nevertheless, persistence triumphed over a mouthful of Winchell’s and I had my first prospective employer lined up within an hour. Glamor and fame were certainly going to be mine. Just think, sitting all day in Knolllnternational and being surrounded by Herman Miller. The voice on the other end of the line quickly shattered this fantasy when it said,"Meet me at the trailer behind Cocoa's Restaurant..." Could that be what he really said, or was it another problem of Winchell's? As it turned but, it was those little powdered sugar donuts all rolled up together into a cellophane tube which MJ was addicted to, although they had not prevented me from hearing accurately.
To my horror, I found the trailera mustard-colored sausage with rounded—off windows-sitting ever so complacently in a good six inches of very good mud.
My initial reaction was to give into my aversion to sausages and in so doing save the Brooks Brothers from the mud. Yet for some inexplicable reason, I was drawn to that homely sausage. And that was the memorable first act to my first summer working in the profession.
This year, there has been little difference. The tip came by way of a professor who passed it on to a friend who whispered it to me during a cement class.
The lead was hush-hush and so when the class was over we walked briskly yet calmly, as not to divulge our
secret, to a corner phone in Bromley» The number was dialed, the phone rang and was answered by a cordial man who explained the job in detail. The snag, working for engineers, was quickly glossed over when he explained there was a considerable amount of design work to be done. This could turn out to be, we prop-hesized, an absolute field day of design freedom!
(After all, did you ever meet an engineer who was convinced that checks and stripes have no business clothing one body at the same time?) Fantastic lead, fantastic prospect-now let’s arrange the interview.
The time and date had been arrived upon; only the location had to be scribbled down on my spiral notepad. "Could you repeat that please," I intoned. I was stalling for time. Momentary feelings of deja vu had befuddled my thinking. I saw Winchell’s as he told me to meet him at building no, 19 "...it’s the one behind the parking lot with the smoke stack!" ("Oh, you mean the one that looks like a sausage?" was the unspoken repartee.)
Next morning was fraught with indecision when it came to dressing for the interview,. Brooks Brothers was without question too much for the engineering set— too many stripes and hardly enough checks. Then in a flash I remembered an article I had read in this very publication on Khaki Impact. This "look" would be the image I would present. I had all the garments necessary for impact status, even if my old khakis refused to stay zippered for very long,
I arrived at building no, 19 early the next morning via a parking garage and a parking lot. And sure enough, building no. 19 had a brick smoke stack growing very successfully out of its gabled roof. Upon entering, I was greeted by the familiar checks and stripes and was instantly assured that I had reached my destination. I chose the blue chair behind the plant that is on its last leaf, so as not to squander the initial khaki impact of my assemblage. The place was in utter disarray, obviously a victum of the engineer's unhampered renovation schemes. There was no mud in sight, but there were wedding anouncements laminated to the walls and small trivial articles intended for ornamentation scattered about. My spirits began to soar with this auspicious beginning. I felt very competent for the job; had I not after all been this route before? I remained confident as I was escorted to the private office where the interview would take place. I gloated openly. I knew I had an edge over the S.O.M. types who would reveal their thin-skinned nature by turning green at the first sight of plants hanging from multi-colored macrame holders.
As I rounded the corner and entered the office, I put on an incredible smile to greet the plants which, as expected, were dancing randomly and without partners from the suspended ceiling. I was psyched, as the expression goes, for this interview.


Laminations: You’ve chosen the role of teacher rather than practitioner of Architecture. What do you hope to convey to future practitioners in a program like UCDs? Bob: Essentially if you look at this school, its stated focuses are the result of faculty discussions, and of hiring over the years, and are: one, that the school be professionally oriented; and second that the school be regionally oriented. Very frankly that’s probably the only way we can compete with other architectural institutions today. We can’t be a Harvard, a California or a Michigan because we don’t have the resources, and we're a state school which attracts primarily regional students. We probably enjoy the reputation now as the best Architectural school in the region. That being the case, the education we provide should contain the elements of the geology, topography, vegetation, climate, culture, the political system, material and labor supply and other direct problems and possibilities of the region. Within that system of facts there is a methodology and process which can then be transferred to other regions. That's a better approach than trying to transfer a style. That doesn't work, whereas the regional approach does.
I'm a native of Wyoming and a graduate of the University of Colorado, although I received my architectural degree from the University of Michigan.
I have a very strong attachment to this region. After graduation I practiced in Wyoming and eventually got into teaching through the back door. Coming from a practice background in this area, my concerns are for a professional and regional orientation. I do, though, think that schools which have a variety of people who think in a variety of ways are healthier than those which are single minded. A faculty providing an architectural design education which is programmed to fit together very cohesively may be doing a disservice to the students.
Laminations: Then you're suggesting that the students provide their own organization by making some decisions about their education?
Bob: Yes. In the program here we get students who are in the top 25% of their class, and come very qualified They are sophisticated enough to make their own choices. I think that, so long as we don't have a faculty that's entirely in agreement, the opportunities for providing a variety of viewpoints is healthy, even though the design education might seem disjointed. The design education consists of synthesizing whatever facts the student knows at the time. As the process continues the solutions become more and more complete, and each time it's a recycling. You do the same things in the thesis that you did in the beginning, it's just that you have more information by the time you get to the thesis. Each faculty member emphasizes something different and the student eventually should be able to determine what of that, aside from the essentials, is important to him or her.
Laminations: Though the variety of educational experience is valuable there seems to be a push here
for more unity within the school. Do you have any comments on this?
Bob: Well, architectural programs generally have some of that unity because of their self contained nature. We have the problem here of being a downtown university in an area where many of our students work, are older and come from a variety of backgrounds. It seems that there isn't the level of participation that there was in their undergraduate days. I think we have to accept that we are a "streetcar" campus. Students come, grab a little of us, then they are off. They don't participate in the after class life of the school. They don't have, the "bizarre-bazaar" weeks of just doing crazy things. I think that's more typical of undergraduate days. We don't have the campus lifestyle and we therefore have to expect a lower participation from our students. I think in some ways that infects the faculty. Many of us commute from Boulder to Denver, or practice part time, and we're not here all day, every day, so we can't provide much of the life. I don't think it's realistic to expect it. The accreditation committee picked that up, but I'm not sure they were aware of all the realities.
There's another thing we have to say too. The work that the students are doing may reflect the lack of enthusiasm. The negative attitude that "this isn't a good place to go to school" can have devest-ating effects. I don't see a great evidence of that, however.
Laminations: Given our backgrounds what influence, if any, can we as architects have on society?
Bob: We have to start earlier in the process of education to make any judgements about the future. The Masters degree in Architecture can be equated to the old five year program, it's a first professional degree. The student at graduation has hopefully been prepared in three ways. First, he should have survival skills. The first order of business is to get a job, and in order to get a job you've got to offer something to a practitioner or employer. The graphics courses, the technological courses, professional practice, and the internship hopefully contribute to this. After working for three years in an office the student will take the exam, and he should be well enough prepared to pass it. That's the second job of preparation we hope to do. Our school has an extraordinary number of people pass it the first time. We can only assume that the educational process here at Colorado is helping. We can only whet your appetite though; after your graduation you've got to continue your education.
Third, after perhaps ten years in practice you'll be in a position to start making decisions about the environment. Hopefully by that time you'll have developed a methodology and a conceptual framework in which to operate. Because we've got you started right, we hope, you'll be making good decisions.
Also, we hope to give you confidence in your ability to solve problems. That continuing education is very important. By the time you've reached the


Thesis Presentations Spring 1979
PRESENTATION LOCATIONS:
ARCH: Bromley 202, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence
UD: Bromley 202, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence
MURP: Bromley 201, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence
LA: St. Francis Interfaith Center, Auraria
Thursday May 10, 1979 Thursday May 17, 1979
9:00 MURP Sharon Menard Growth Management 8:30 ARCH Regina Grady Elderly Housing
10:00 MURP Andy McMinimee Cities in Economic Development 9:00 MURP Jamie Fitzpatrick Stapleton Alternative Use
9:30 ARCH Bill Hoffman Residence
Monday May 14, 1979 10:30 ARCH Mark Dorian Vanderbur Block, Rehab
8:30 ARCH Mary Kay Donahoe Fox Street Center, Urban Reuse 11:30 ARCH Bob Busch RTD- Civic Center Terminal
9:30 ARCH Cherie Hartley & Activity Complex for the Deaf 1:30 ARCH Geoff Kampe Civic Center Hotel
Tia Jenkins and Hearing Impaired 2:30 UD Charles Adkissun Greeley Town Center
11:30 ARCH Kaki Zeeb Presbyterian Mountain 3:30 ARCH Kurt Wilson Lodge Building, Beaver Creek
12:00 MURP Pru Larson Recreational Riverfront Study 4:30 ARCH Mike Hall New Airport for Denver
1:30 ARCH Don Dethiefs Evans Center School 1:00 MURP Diane Smucny What’s Happening to Main St.
2:30 ARCH Serge Arrestouilh Housing Development, Tom River
3:30 ARCH David Brown Hotel/Rec. Center Complex Friday May 18, 1979
4:30 ARCH TBA 8:30 UD Julia Takahashi Trapper’s Loop Town Center
9:30 ARCH Don Ennis Multi-family Housing
Tuesday May 15, 1979 10:30 ARCH Douglas Ward Recreation Center/Five Pts.
8:30 ARCH Sun Wen Chun High School, Jefferson County 11:30 ARCH Olaug Strand East Entry Lodge, Beaver Cr,
9:30 ARCH Geoffrey Drake Ski Area Employee Apts. 1:30 UD Kent Gonzales Downtown Meeker Redesign
10:30 UD Ryuzo Hasegawa Curtis Street Redevelopment 2:30 ARCH Dan Ferraro Colorado National Bank
11:30 ARCH Brett Richards Urban Hotel 3:30 ARCH Will Salerno Marina Hotel Casino
1:30 ARCH Steve Wallick Lodge/Conference Facility 3:30 MURP Peter Patten Jamestown Environmental Study
2:30 ARCH Cindy Hoover Ski Lodge 4:30 ARCH Mike Gallagher Restaurant
3:30 ARCH Dana Reingold Childrens1 Museum
4:30 ARCH Duane Boyle Fine Arts Gallery Saturday May 19, 1979 (Tentative)
9:00 ARCH Wayne Stryker Ski Lift Terminal
Wednesday May 16,1979
8:30 ARCH Linda Eddy, Steve Pueblo Regional Center Tuesday, May 22, 19/9
Patton & M. Smith for the Mentally Handicapped 10:00 LA Nancy McCurdy Watertown Development Dist.
10:30 ARCH Duane Hansen Chausler Ranch Condo/Resort
11:30 UD Katy Liske Carbondale Downtown Plan Thursday May 24, 1979
1:30 UD Marilyn Mueller Auraria Community 9:30 LA Gail Barry Mueller Ranch Evaluation
2:30 ARCH Vija Berzins Downtown Housing
3:30 ARCH Bob West Student Union, DU Friday 25, 1979
4:30 ARCH Diane Gayer Continuing Ed. Building, NJH 9:00 LA Jim Zelensky Streetscape Design Modeling
1:00 LA Terry Teague Preventive Wildfire Design


point where you can have influence the issues have changed and will be modified so that if you don't continue to read, to participate and to take courses you won’t have any influence at all. In the process you may take some 180° changes, but as long as the changes are indications of growth you’re doing alright.
Architectural concerns are so broad I don't think that a specialized education is appropriate. There's a basic starting point which is what we're attempting to give you. The rest is up to you. The architectural degree is as useful as a degree in law. You don't have to practice in the traditional sense. Some graduates may go back to their first degree, but having a basic knowledge of architecture will be useful in almost any pursuit. We're beginning to see architects in administrative, managerial and political roles. There are a lot of decisions being made in those roles which affect the environment and architects can lend an expertise to the process. That's really necessary. We're so much better off having people with design skills helping in the decision making process.The traditional design role is one that may be filled by as little as 20% of our graduates, the other 80% will fill significant positions utilizing the skills they have learned.
neglecting. The prestige rewards won't be as great, though the financial rewards could be. There's certainly a lot of opportunity. It requires a person who is willing to take design skills and use them in a way that the final result is not so defined as his own work. He becomes a design participant rather than a designer.
The three year program may help with the concept of participation between fields. These students have an entirely different perspective and may be willing to fill non-traditional roles, perhaps returning to their first degree field. On one side we have people like Bill Caudill saying that these three year programs are nonsense, that they're not producing people with design skills, which may be true, but the possibility that there will be professionals with some design skills in other fields as a result of these programs makes it worthwhile.
We hope every graduatehas some design skills, but also we hope that every graduate will be able to be a critic; that they will be able to tell good design from bad. Those who are not as good at design may ultimately play greater roles than those who are very good. Architecture is a broad field in which there's room for a lot of different roles. We won't all be doing the same thing.
Laminations: Do you think that those who fill the traditional roles are responding to society's needs, or are they responding to the other professionals in the field and thereby making architecture an "arcane" profession? .
Bob: P.A. and Architectural Record have a tremendous effect. The effect tends to be in the highly formalistic design approach, it can become almost a severe form of eclecticism. In a sense we do practice for each other. We like to see some completeness in what we do, and we like to express that completeness as ours. We don't often participate in the consultant role or on a partial basis. But we've got to be aware that 96% of the built environment is designed by people other than architects. Architects are setting a level of taste that will be picked up by others.
With only 4% being done by architects it has to be a very visible 4%. Architects have to be concerned with the question of who's doing the other96%. Who does mobile homes, who does dams, and who do the hundreds of engineering projects which could benefit from architectural imput? There's so much that could be done if we'd begin to participate in a consultant or employee capacity. Those won't be the prestige type functions, we all want our own offices and we want to have the whole project to claim as our own. We haven't devised many other ways to make ourselves useful.
Laminations: Would you say that it is the responsibility of architects to make themselyes more useful and move into that 96%, or should they concentrate on making the 4% as visible as possible?
Bob: I think that both are important, but everyone wants to do the 4%. It's the other 96% that we're
Laminations: Can you tell us anything about the new job to which you're going?
Bob: I've been selected to be the Director of Architecture at Montana State University in Bozeman,
Montana. Bozeman happens to be my wife's home.
It's a five year program with about 330 students and 16 full time faculty and is located in a brand new set of buildings which contain the Fine Arts, Architecture, Film Making and Television, Theatre and the Performing Arts and Music departments.
It appears to be a great opportunity in a very beautiful physical setting - particularly to a person who loves to fly fish, ski and kayak. Also, the pay is right.
Laminations: Have you got any final words of wisdom which you would like to leave with us?
Bob: The first thing I'd like to say is that I've enjoyed the University of Colorado and I'm leaving a faculty of which I'm very fond. There are few faculties that I know of which are as qualified and capable. Part of the reason we moved from Boulder to Denver was to get professional participation and design project opportunity in an urban setting, and as this progresses I see great possibilities for the future for UCD.
There are some terrific opportunities for students here, including the Center for Community Development and Design and the internship program, and I hope that the student body will begin to take advantage of them and forge hew directions in terms of school spirit rather than mourning over the lack of the old ones. This is a regionally oriented institution and our goal, in addition to the education of individuals, is to serve the people of the State.
That alone is a challenge for everyone associated with UCD.


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The Colorado Chapter ASLA sponsored the fourth in a series of professional, continuing education annual seminars April 8,9 and 10 at Vail. The published purpose of the conference was to bring together the country^ foremost practitioners of'the process-oriented landscape resource analysis and project design and to provide a forum to share ideas and experience, learn the latest skills and techniques of resource analysis as it affects design, and understand the background, state-of-the-art and future trends of landscape and environmental analysis.
Food for thought from acknowledged experts in the field of landscape analysis: BILL JOHNSON- Design is a discovery point of view. A unique problem demands a unique process so there must be alot of processes around ready to user Environmental impact study as design process product?Always!!! RICHARD HAAG- Find what is most sacred on a site and then fight to keep it. Go for more than you even dream you can get so after the optimum is whittled, you have enough for a good design. Bring kids up in adventure playgrounds!!! JOE PORTER- You can educate the client!!! CHARLES KILLPACK- Analysis and synthesis are scientific pro-ceedures that ask questions. The job of design is to answer these questions. CARL STEINITZ- Have you thought about the landscape of zero dollar economies? ROBERT ROYSTON- Go into a design with an idea of the optimum solution. It's easier then to modify and compromise and still have a good design. Planning is an advance design for what a city should be. Therefore, every developer doesn't need to finance an environmental impact study; the city will already have one! PAUL FREID-BERG- LA's are traditionally anti-urban;LA's must make a commitment to the city. Read Defensible Space, by Oscar Newman and Landscapes, by J,B. Jackson(see book review this issue LAMINATIONS). IAN McIlARG- The degree of ability of an LA is directly related to the degree an LA understands natural science. Design forms should be as specific and related to the region as plant material is. GARRETT ECKBO- Design is a construction of the future. Change is what makes designers important. Successful designers have big egos because they're the only ones who can survive the whittling of the optimum. LA's must have values, principles, goals and standards and can't just be scientists. Paula Schulte
LANDSCAPES
Selected Writings of J.B. Jackson reviewed by
Edited by Ervin H. Zube Liz Bravo
Univ. of Mass. Press, Amherst, 1970
To those in Landscape Architecture, J,B„ Jackson's name seems to be cropping up more and more frequently. Although he founded and edited the journal "Landscape" from 1951-1968, the value of his penetrating essays was not immediately recognized. Recently, the field has been coming abreast of his progressive challenges to generally accepted cliches about the landscape.
The book consists of a collection of fourteen commentaries on the human-to-land relationship taken from his editorials and lectures. His focus is on the landscape that we are a part of, not apart from—the humanized landscape—structures, landforms and all human influences on it. His thoughts cover topics from the influence of Jefferson and Thoreau on the public's perception of landscape beauty in America to contemplations on the social and political landscapes of contemporary times.
Jackson acts as a highly articulate interpreter and critic of American landscape. Land use patterns familiar to any American eye portend meaning for our behavior and our heritage in Jackson's opinion.
("Images of the City" and "The Many Guises of Suburbia")
This book contains one of his most-often mentioned essays, the "Westward-Moving House" wherein Jackson describes five generations of the Tinkham family and the motivating forces that fuel them to migrate westward from Connecticut to the plains of Illinois and Texas.. The landscape is described as the guide for their lifestyle-^—a cryptic insight to all contemporary land use and the evolution of the structures, their form and function, on the land..
Landscapes is choice reading for the richness of literary symbols and the latitude of perception of our land and its history. It's a must for history buffs or anyone interested in environment-influenced behavior.
O
Lake Tahoe April 23-25, 1979
A spring blizzard at Lake Tahoe heralded the beginning of a conference on Applied Techniques for Analysis and Management of the Visual Resource. In two 10-hour days, a range of subjects discussing the state of the art/science of managing the visual resources in our national landscape totally absorbed the 560 conference attendants (who came from the U=.S: and eight foreign countries including Korea, The Netherlands and New Zealand) .LLLiz Bravo and Jan Caniglia, UCD Landscape Architecture students, received a scholarship to attend from Colorado Chapter ASLA.. This will be an annual stipend to Master Program LA students for whatever the chapter deems a worthy cause.
A philosophical viewpoint was expounded by Alan Cussow at the conference orientation. An artist and philosopher, Gussow wondered if the American vernacular landscape is vanishing along with "sense of place"—
'e. is only one shopping center and it is everywhere we performing an autopsy on a dying landscape? t, like Pogo, are we surrounded by insurmountable opportunities?" Those attending were charged with the responsibility to examine major challenges in landscape planning (surface mining and reclamation, ski area development, timber management and highway development) and search for legal policy tools available to use in solving landscape management problems. Liz Bravo
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Michael Fuller
One of the most valuable benefits derived from traveling/studying abroad is the opportunity to be exposed to new ideas and unique personalities. One such opportunity came with a visit to Otto Kartoffel-kopf at his Institute for Subtractive Architecture in the Black Forrest of southeastern Germany. To reach the Institute I traveled at night by train from Munich to Freiburg. From there I took a bus which passed through several hamlets until I transferred to the shuttle bus which took me deeper into the densely wooded countryside where the Institute is located. I arrived in the early morning, before the regular daily routine had begun.
The morning air is fresh and clean, but heavy with a thick mist of fog. The trees are silouetted against the light gray mist. Their damp bark appears black at close range. The trees fade into the distance, a progression of ever-lightening grays, until everything is the same flat gray. I am drawn by the sounds of pounding echoing through the forrest.
As I enter a clearing I can make out a lone workman painstakingly chipping away at a massive block of concrete. He is working from the scaffolding which surrounds the huge mass. The block is 22 sections of scaffolding high - the height of a 10 story office building, and extends hundreds of meters into the thick misty wood. Wrinkles of concentration crease his face as each blow is measured and the mass is transformed flake by flake. The morning shift begins to arrive, and the scaffolding is again filled with workers from all over the world who have come to the Black Forrest to live and work at Archiblock. The grand scheme of Archiblock - to carve an entire city out of a single block of concrete - is the brain child of Otto Kartoffelkopf, the self styled architect/philosopher. The laborers are busy hammering and grinding when Kartoffelkopf arrives on the site with a retinue of foreman, advisors and camp followers. He moves easily among the workers offering advice and encouragement. He will spend most of his morning in this way - among his followers.
In the afternoon in his grotto-like studio, I asked Kartoffelkopf to explain his concept of subtractive architecture. He took a puff from his knobby pipe and gazed at me reflectively for some moments through his blue tinted monical. His hair is gray, neat and short. His stature is small but his athletic build and erect posture give his movements a dignity and grace that commands authority. He begins speaking in his distinctively high-pitched, reedy voice. "Instead of starting with various parts of a building and putting them together as an assemblage, the subtractive approach begins with a mass of material and the builder, or as we should say in this case, the remover /designer simply removes that which is not his building. The architect/builder becomes an artisan, shaping and sculpting the environment. Not in a process of connecting pieces of technology, but by removing the excess and allowing the building to become what it wants to be."
The seeds of this theory were sown, Kartoffelkopf explains, while he was working as model builder in the office of the Spanish architect - El Crayola.
Beethoven was the hero of the old Spanish master and he felt that an architect should be able to design a building without the aid of sight just as Beethoven composed symphonies even after he lost his hearing. In the venerable Iberian's office everyone was required to wear blindfolds which led to Kartoffelkopf*s early experiments with clay and soap bars. The break for Kartoffelkopf came with the now famous Ivory Soap House. The one tragic design flaw - the tendancy of soap to melt when it comes into contact with free water - led to the search for a new material. The quest led eventually to concrete. Kartoffelkopf began casting small blocks of concrete and experimenting with various techniques to shape the material. As Kartoffelkopf explains, "The effort is always made to keep the technology as simple as possible. This is the architecture of the masses as well as of the mass." At first simple everyday items such as knives and spoons were used. As bigger blocks were cast, chisels, garden implements and explosives were tried. In a dramatic attempt to illustrate thkt^any1WHSti could be used as a tool, Kartoffelkopf attempted to create a garage by ramming a block with his own 1957 Olds Stratocruiser. After a setback of a few short months in the plastic surgery clinic in Buenos Aires, Kartoffelkopf was ready to begin his most ambitious project - Archiblock.
Many months of preparation were necessary to build the forms and assemble the materials. Once the giant block was cast Kartoffelkopf made the announcement to the world and invited those interested in learning about his methods/philosophies to come to Archiblock to live and work, for a small fee. As Kartoffelkopf explained, "We have fresh air, healthy German fog and daily excercise and philosophical training sessions. We also try to provide some of the comforts of home in this international atmosphere. For instance you Americans will be interested to know that we now have granola and Coca Cola machines throughout the Institute."
Those interested in obtaining more information or in making an application to attend The Institute for Subtractive Architecture, please drop a note to the office of LAMINATIONS.


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Bill


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AN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT PUBLICATION SPRING 79 No.3 / ' {) = 0 0

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I LAMINATIONS UNIVERSITY O.F COLORADO AT DENVER LAMINATIONS Mailing Address: Room 303 Bromley,c/o College of Environmental Design, U.C.D.,llOO 14th Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202 Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of anyone other than the writer. Special thanks for this issue to: Liz Bravo Geoff Kampe Doug Ward Gary Miles Don Dethlefs Rob Murphy ' Wilson Mike Fuller Paula Schulte Jim Hright This is the third and final issue of LAMINATIONS for this Spring Semester. Herein we are featuring some student graphic work, some humor articles .and an interview with exiting faculty member Bob Utzinger. We hope you have enjoyed LAM this year. Persons interested in working on the -paper next year should contact Mike Fuller with any questions about credit arid amount of work involved. Our congratulations go to those finishing this semester and best wishes to those continuing. Enjoy your summer. DW faculty Awards Undergraduate Division Graduate Division Dana Giffin Soper David M . Oliver Brett J. Richards Memorial Scholarship Scott A. MacCormack College of Environmental Design Awards Dwayne C. Nuzum, Dean, College of Environmental Design AlA School Medal AlA School Medal Mention Alpha Rho Chi Medal Thomas D. Lee Arthur C. Sturz Kay L. Liske AlA Educational fund Awards, Colorado Society of Architects Kenneth R . Fuller, AlA Monarch Tile Manufacturing, Inc. Scholarship Nicholas D. Docous Denver Chapter Producers' Council Scholarship Robin A. Fisher Colorado Masonry Institute Scholarship Dean A. Foreman Madeline Livaudais Don Dethlefs Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G. Chester C. Fisher Traveling Scholarship I D'Autremont Arthur A. Fisher and Florence G. Fisher Traveling Scholarship II Vija Berzins AlA Design Architecture 500 Architecture 600 Architecture 700 Urban Design 700 Randall D. Williamson jeffrey D. Markwith Robert S. West (Gordon) Kent Gonzales JEFF PECKA Landscape Architecture "Student of the Year" Memorial Grant C. Gordon Sweet Scholarship Robert K. Fuller Scholarship Lisa M. Godbolt Lila Rioth AlA National Scholarships Dean Fo}:'man Dan GruQ Randall D. Williamson W1 liamson

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It is that lamentable time of the year again!!! The snow is out, the croci are in, and it is time to set about summer job hunting or, as the more experienced are inclined to call it, job scrounging. It can be a terrible, anxiety-provoking ordeal. For example, one has to up-date last year's resume with a listing of that last great job, and what a wonderful flood of fond memories are stirred up from the depths of a belleaguered soul. As part of this task one is also obLiged once again to wrestle with the Webster's in order to maintain the seasonal guise that one could spell if one wanted to. Then again, one has to find the portfolio binder, dust it off, and with steeled courage, face past accomplishments. And if that were not a sufficient ordeal in itself, what of the endless flights of stairs and the long, dark corridors at the end of which sits a secretarial face attached to an outstretched secretarial hand anxious to receive the resuscitated resume which, for some inexplicable reason never seems to see daylight thereafter? What a horrendous ordeal is this spring ritual. Last year was, I will admit, my first experience at this. I was wet behind the ears; as a matter of fact, I did not even have my Corbu glasses then. (Young and aspiring, yet no Corbu glasses ••• Wow, but that is another story altogether!) My first lead was passed on to me by a rugby player who fancied himself an instructor. Whispered between chunks of donuts and gulps of coffee, it was hard to get the name and number both. Nevertheless, persistence triumphed over a mouthful of Winchell's and I had my first prospective employer lined up within an hour. Glamor and fame were certainly going to be mine. Just think, sitting all day in Knollinternational and being surrounded by Herman Miller. The voice on the other end of the line quickly shattered this fantasy when it said,"Meet me at the trailer behind Cocoa's Restaurant .•• " Could that be what he really said, or was it another problerr: of Winchell's? As it turned out, it was those little powdered sugar donuts all rolled up together into a cellophane tube which MJ was addicted to, although they had not prevented me from hearing accurately. To my horror, I found the traileu-a mustardcolored sausage with rounded-off windows-sitting ever so complacently in a good six inches of very good mud. My initial reaction was to give into my aversion to sausages and in so doing save the Brooks Brothers from the mud. Yet for some inexplicable reason, I was drawn to that homely sausage. And that was the memorable first act to my first summer working in the profession. This year, there has been little The tip came by way of a professor who passed it on to a friend who whispered it to me during a cement class. The lead was hush-hush and so when the class was over we walked briskly yet calmly, as not to divulge our secret, to a corner phone in Bromley" The number was dialed, the phone rang and was answered by a cordial man who explained the job in detail. The snag, working for engineers, was quickly glossed over when he explained there was a considerable amount of design work to be done. This could turn out to be, we prophesized, an absolute field day of design freedom! (After all, did you ever meet an engineer who was convinced that checks and stripes have no business clothing one body at the same time?) Fantastic lead, fantastic prospect-now let's arrange the The time and date had been arrived upon; only the location had to be scribbled down on my spiral notepad. "Could you repeat that please," I intoned. I was stalling for time. Momentary feelings of deja vu had befuddled my thinking. I saw Winchell's as he told me to meet him at building noc 19 " ••• it's the one behind the parking lot with the smoke stack!" ("Oh, you mean the one that looks like a sausage?" was the unspoken repartee.) Next morning was fraught with indecision when it came to dressing for the Brooks Brothers was without question too much for the engineering set-too many stripes and hardly enough checks. Then in a flash I remembered an article I had read in this very publication on Khaki Impact. This "look" would be the image I would present. I had all the garments necessary for impact status, even if my old khakis refused to stay zippered for very longo I arrived at building nop 19 early the next morning via a parking garage and a parking lot. And sure enough, building no. 19 had a brick smoke stack growing. very successfully out of its gabled roof. Upon entering, I was greeted by the familiar checks and stripes and was instantly assured that I had reached my destination. I chose the blue chair behind the plant that is on its last leaf, so as not to squander the initial khaki impact of my assemblage. The place was in utter disarray, obviously a victum of the engineer's unhampered renovation schemes. There was no mud in sight, but there were wedding anouncements laminated to the walls and small trivial articles intended for ornamentation scattered about. My spirits began to soar with this auspicious beginning. I felt very competent for the job; had I not after all been this route before? I remained confident as I was escorted to the private office where the interview would take place. I gloated openly. I knew I had an edge over the S.O.M. types who would reveal their thin skinned nature by turning green at the first sight of plants hanging from multi-colored macrame holders. As I rounded the corner and entered the office, I put on an incredible smile to greet the plants which, as expected, were dancing randomlv and without partners from the suspended ceiling. I was psyched, as the expression goes, for this interview.

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I Laminations: You've chosen the role of teacher rather than of Architecture. What do you hope to convey _to future practitioners in a program like UCDs? Bob: Essentially if you look at this school, its stated focuses are the result of faculty discussions, and of hiring over the years, and are: one, that the school be professionally oriented; and second that the school be regionally Very frankly that's probably the only way we can compete with other architectural institutions today. We can't be a Harvard, a California or a Michigan because we don't have the resources, and we're a state school which attracts primarily regional students. We probably enjoy the reputation now as the best Architectural school in the region. That being the case, the education we provide should contain the elements of the geology, topography, vegetation, climate, culture, the political system. material and labor supply and other direct problems and possibilities of the region. Within that system of facts there is a methodology and process which can then be transferred to other regions. That's a better approach than trying to transfer a style. That doesn't work, whereas the regional approach does. I'm a native of Wyoming and a graduate of the University of Colorado. although I received my architectural degree from the University of:Michigan. I have a very strong attachment to this region. After graduation I practiced in Wyoming and eventually got into teaching through the back door. Coming from a practice background in this area, my concerns are for a professional and regional orientation. I do, though, think that schools which have a variety of people who think in a variety of ways are healthier than those which are single minded. A faculty providing an architectural design education which is programmed to fit together very cohesively may be doing a disservice to the students. Laminations: Then you're suggesting that the students provide their own orsanization by making some decisions about their education? Bob: Yes. In program here we get students who are in the top 25% of their class, and come very qualified. They are sophisticated enough to make their own choices. I think that, so long as we don't have a that's entirely in agreement, the opportunities for providing a of viewpoints is healthy, even though the design education might seem disjointed. The design education consists of synthesizing whatever facts the student knows at the time. As the process continues the solutions become more and more complete, and each time it's a recycling. You do the same things in the thesis that you did in the beginning, it's just that you have more information by the time you get to the thesis. Each faculty member emphasizes something different and the student eventually should be able to determine what of that, aside from the essentials, is important to him or her. Laminations: Though the variety of educational experience is valuable there seems to be a push here for more unity within the school. Do you have any comments on this? D . Bob: Well, architectural programs generally have some of that unity because of their self contained nature. We have the problem here of being a down tmm uni versity in an area where many of our students work, are older and come from a variety of backgrounds. It seems that there isn't the level of participation that there was in their undergraduate days. I think we have to accept that we are a "streetcar" campus. Students come, grab a little of us, then they are off. They don't participate in the after class life of the school. They don't have. the "bizarre-bazaar" weeks of just doing crazy things. I think that's more typical of undergraduate days. We don't have the campus lifestyle and we therefore have to expect a lower participation from our students. I think in some ways that infects the faculty. Many of us commute from Boulder to Denver, or practice part time, and we're not here all day, every day, so we can't provide much of the life. I don't think it's realistic to expect it. The accreditation committee picked that up, but I'm not sure they were aware of all the realities. There's another thing we have to say too. The work that the students are doing may reflect the lack of enthusiasm. The negative attitude that "this isn't a good place to go to school" can have devestating effects. I don't see a great evidence of that, however. Laminations: Given our backgrounds what influence, if any, can we as architects have on society? Bob: We have to start earlier in the process of education to make any judgements about the future. The Masters degree in Architecture can be equated to the old five year program, it's a first professional degree. The student at graduation has hopefully been prepared in three ways. First, he should have survival skills. The first order of business is to get a job, and in order to get a job you've got to offer something to a practitioner or employer. The graphics courses, the technological courses, professional practice, and the internship hopefully contribute to this. After working for three years in an office the student will take the exam, and he should be well enough prepared to pass it. That's the second job of we hope to do. Our school has an extraordinary number of people pass it the first time. We can only assume that the educational pro'cess here at Colorado is helping. We can only whet your appetite though; after your graduation you've got to continue your education. Third, after perhaps ten years in practice you'll be in a position to start making decisions about the environment. Hopefully by that time you'll have developed a methodology and a conceptual framework in which to operate. Because we've got you started right, we hope, you'll be making good decisions. Also, we hope to give you confidence in your ability to solve problems. That continuing education is very important. By the time you've reached the

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Thesis Presentations Spring 1979 PRESENTATION LOCATIONS: ARCH: Bromley 202, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence UD: Bromley 202, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence MURP: Bromley 201, UCD Campus, 14th and Lawrence LA: St. Francis Interfaith Center, Auraria Thursday May 10, 1979 9:00 MURP Sharon Menard 10:00 MURP Andy McMinimee Monday May 14, 1979 8:30 9:30 ARCH Mary Kay Donahoe ARCH Cherie Hartley & 11:30 12:00 1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 Tia Jenkins ARCH Kaki Zeeb MURP Pru Larson ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH Tuesday May 8:30 ARCH 9:30 ARCH 10:30 UD 11:30 ARCH 1:30 ARCH 2:30 ARCH 3:30 ARCH 4:30 ARCH Don Dethlefs Serge Arrestouilh David Brown TBA 15, 1979 Sun Wen Chun Geoffrey Drake Ryuzo Hasegawa Brett Richards Steve Wallick Cindy Hoover Dana Reingold Duane Boyle Wednesday May 16,1979 8:30 ARCH Linda Eddy, Steve 10:30 11:30 1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 Patton & M. Smith ARCH Duane Hansen UD UD ARCH ARCH ARCH Katy Liske Marilyn Mueller Vija Berzins Bob West Diane Gayer Growth Management Cities in Economic Development Fox Street Center, Urban Reuse Activity Complex for the Deaf and Hearing Impaired Presbyterian Mountain Recreational Riverfront Study Evans Center School Housing Development, Tom River Hotel/Rec. Center Complex High School, Jefferson County Ski Area Employee Apts. Curtis Street Redevelopment Urban Hotel Lodge/Conference Facility Ski Lodge Childrens' Museum Fine Arts Gallery Pueblo Regional Center for the Mentally Handicapped Chausler Ranch Condo/Resort Carbondale Downtown Plan Auraria Community Downtown Housing Student Union, DU Continuing Ed. Building, NJH Thursday .May 17, 1979 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:30 11:30 1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 1:00 Friday 8:30 9:30 10:30 11:30 1:30 2:30 3:30 3:30 4:30 ARCH MURP ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH UD ARCH ARCH MURP Regina Grady Jamie Fitzpatrick Bill Hoffman Mark Dorian Bob Busch Geoff Kampe Charles Adkissun Kurt Wilson Mike Hall Diane Smucny May 18, 1979 UD Julia Takahashi ARCH Don Ennis ARCH Douglas Ward ARCH Olaug Strand UD Kent Gonzales ARCH Dan Ferraro ARCH Will Salerno MURP Peter Patten ARCH Mike Gallagher Elderly Housing Stapleton Alternative Use Residence Vanderbur Block, Rehab RTDCivic Center Terminal Civic Center Hotel Greeley Town Center Lodge Building, Beaver Creek New Airport for Denver What's Happening to Main St. Trapper's Loop Town Center Multi-family Housing Recreation Center/Five Pts. East Entry Lodge, Beaver Cr, Downtown Meeker Redesign Colorado National Bank Marina Hotel Casino Jamestown Environmental Study Restaurant Saturday May 19, 1979 (Tentative) 9:00 ARCH Wayne Stryker Ski Lift Terminal TuesdayJ May 22, 1979 10:00 LA Nancy McCurdy Thursday May 24, 1979 9:30 LA Gail Barry Friday 9:00 1:00 May 25, 1979 LA Jim Zelensky LA Terry Teague Watertown Development Dist. Mueller Ranch Evaluation Streetscape Design Modeling Preventive Wildfire Design

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point where you can have influence the issues have changed and will be modified so that if you don't continue to read, to participate and to take courses you won't have any influence all. In the process you may take some 180 changes, but as long as the changes are indications of growth you're doing alright. Architectural concerns are so broad I don't think that a specialized education is appropriate. There's a basic starting point which is what we're attempting to give you. The rest is up to you. The architectural degree is as useful as a degree in law. You don't have to practice in the traditional sense. Some graduates may go back to their first degree, but having a basic knowledge of architecture will be useful in almost any pursuit. We're beginning to see architects in administrative, managerial and political roles. There are a lot of decisions being made in those roles which affect the environment and architects can lend an expertise to the process. That's really necessary. We're so much better off having people with design skills helping in the decision making process.The traditional design role is one that may be filled by as little as 20% of our graduates, the other 80% will fill significant positions utilizing the skills they have learned. Laminations: Do you think that those who fill the traditional roles are responding to society's needs, or are they responding to the other professionals in the field and thereby making architecture an "arcane" profession? . Bob: P.A. and Architectural Record have a tremendous effect. The effect tends to be in the highly formalistic design approach, it can become almost a severe form of eclecticism. In a sense we do practice for each other. We like to see completeness in what we do, and we like to express that completeness as ours. We don't often participate in the consultant role or on a partial basis. But we've got to be aware that 96% of the built environment is designed by people other than architects. Architects are setting a level of taste that will be picked up by others. With only 4% being done by architects it has to be a very visible 4%. Architects have to be concerned with the question of who's doing the other96%. Who does mobile homes, who does dams, and who do the hundreds of engineering projects which could benefit from architectural imput? There's so much that could be done if we'd begin to participate in a consultant or employee capacity. Those won't be the prestige type functions, we all want our own offices and we want to have the whole project to claim as our own. We haven't devised many other ways to make ourselves useful. Laminations: Would you say that it is the responsibility of architects to make themselves more useful and move into that 96%, or should they concentrate on making the 4% as visible as possible? Bob: I think that both are important, but everyone wants to do the 4%. It's the other 96% that we're The prestige rewards won't be as great, though the financial rewards could beo There's certainly a lot of opportunitye It requires. a person who is willing to take design skills and use them in a way that the final result is not.so defined as his own work. He becomes a design participant rather than a designere The three year program may help with the concept of participation between fieldso These students have an entirely different perspective and may be uilling to fill non-traditional roles, perhaps returning to their first degree fieldo On one side we have people like Bill Caudill saying that these three year ' d . programs are nonsense, that they re not pro uc1ng people with design skills, which may be true, but the possibility that there will be professionals with some design skills in other fields as a result of these programs makes it worthwhileo We hope every graduatehas some design skills, but also we hope that every graduate will be able to be a critic; that they will be able to tell good design from bado Those who are not as good at design may ultimately play greater roles than those who are very good. Architecture is a broad field in which there's room for a lot of different We won't all be doing the same thingo Laminations: Can you tell us anything about the new .job to which you're going? Bob: I've been selected to be the Directoi of Architecture at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. Bozeman happens to be my wife's home. It's a five year program with about 330 students and 16 full time faculty and is located in a brand new set of buildings which contain the Fine Arts, Architecture, Film Making and Television, Theatre and the Performing Arts and Music departments. It appears to be a great opportunity in a very beautiful physical setting -particularly to a person who loves to fly fish, ski and kayak. Also, the pay is righto Laminations: Have you got any final words of wisdom which you would like to leave with us? Bqb: The first thing I'd like to say is that I've enjoyed the University of Colorado and I'm leaving a faculty of which I'm very fond. There are few faculties that I know of which are as qualified and capable. Part of the reason we moved from Boulder to Denver was to get professional participation and design project opportunity in an urban setting, and as this progresses I see great possibilities for the future for UCD. There are some terrific opportunities for students here, including the Center for Community Development and Design and the internship program, and I hope that the student body will begin to take advantage of them and forge new directions in terms of school spirit. rather than mourning over the lack of the old ones. This is a regionally oriented institution and our goal, in addition to the education of individuals, is to serve the people of the State. That alone is a challenge for everyone associated with UCD.

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I The Colorado Chapter ASLA snonsored the fourth in a series of professional, continuing education arinual seminars April 8,9 and 10 at Vail. The published pose of the conference was to bring together the country's foremost practitioners ofthe process-orienterl landscape resource analysis and project design and to provide a forum to share ideas and experience, learn the latest skills and techniques of resource analysis as it affects design, and understand the background, state-of-the-art and future trends of landscape and environmental analysis. Food for thought from acknowledged experts in the field of landscape analysis: BILL JOHNSONDesign is a discovery point of view. A unique problem demands a unique process so there must be alot of processes around ready to use. Environmental impact study as design process product?Always!!! RICHARD HAAG-Find what is most sacred on a site and then fight to keep it. Go for more than you even dream you can get so after the optimum is whittled, you have enough for a good design. Bring kids up in adventure JOE PORTERYou can educate the client!!! CHARLES KILLPACKAnalysis and synthesis are scientific proceedures that ask questions. The job of design is to answer these questions. CARL STEINITZHave you thnught about the landscape of zero dollar economies? ROBERT ROYSTONGo into a design with an idea of the optimum solution. It's then to modify and compromise .and still have a good design. Planning is an advance design for what a city should be. Therefore, every developer doesn't need to finance an environmental impact .study; the city will already have one! PAUL FREIDBERG-LA's are traditionally anti-urban;LA's must make a commitment to the city. Read Defensible Space, by Oscar Newman and Landscapes, by J . . B. Jackson (see book review this issue LAMINATIONS). IAN The degree of ability of an LA is directly related to the degree an LA understands natural science. Design forms should be as specific and related to the region as plant material is. GARRETT ECKBODesign is a construction of the future. Change is what makes designers important. Suc cessful designers have big egos because they're the only ones who can survive the whittling of the optimum. LA's must have values, principles, goals and standards and can't just be scientists. Paula Schulte 000 LANDSCAPES Selected Writings of Jackson E(ited Ervin H. Zube Univ. of. Mass. Press, Amherst, 19711 reviewed by Liz Bravo To those in Landscape Architecture, Jackson1s name seems to be cropping up more and more frequently. Although he founded and edited the journal "Landscape" from 1951-1968, the value of his penetrating essays was not immediately recognized. Recently, the field . has been coming abreast of his progressive challenges to generally accepted cliches about the landscape. The book consists of a collection of fourteen commentaries on the human-to-land relationship taken from his editorials and lectures. His focus is on the landscape that we are a part of, not apart from--the humanized landscape--structures, landforms and all human influences on it. His thoughts cover topics from the influence of Jefferson and Thoreau on the public's perception of landscape beauty in America to contemplations on the social and political landscapes of contemporary times r . Jacksor. acts as a highly articulate interpreter and critic of American landscape. Land use patterns familiar to any American eye portend meaning for our behavior and our heritage in Jackson's opinion. ("Images of the City" and "The Many Guises of Suburbia") This book contains one of his most-often mentioned essays, the "Westward-Moving House" wherein Jackson describes five generations of the Tinkham family and the motivating forces that fuel them to migrate westward from Connecticut to the plains of Illinois and Texas. . The landscape is described as the euide for their cryptic insight to all contemporary land use and the evolution of the structures, their form and function, on the land" Landscapes is choice reading for the richness of literary symbols and the latitude of perception of our land and its history. It's a must for history buffs or anyone interested in environment-influence( behavior. Lake Tahoe April 23-25, 1979 A spring blizzard at Lake Tahoe heralded the begin of a conference on Applied Techniques for Analvsis and Management of the Visual Resource. In two 10-hour days, a range of subjects discussing the state of the a rt/science of managing the visual resources in our nRtional landscape totally absorbed the 560 conference attendants (who came from the U . S . and eight foreign rountries including Korea, The Netherlands and New Zealand).LLLiz Bravo and Jan Caniglia, UCD Landscape Architecture students, received a scholarship to attend cram Colorado Chapter ASLA. This will be an annual stipend to Master Program LA students for whatever the r.hapter deems a worthy cause. A philosophical viewpoint was expounded by Alan at the conference orientation, An artist and philosopher, Gussow wondered if the American vernacular ..... is vanishing along with "sense of place"--is only one shopping center and :i.t is everywhere we performing an autopsy on a dy1ng like Pogo, are we surrounded by insurmountable opportunities?" Those attending were char.aed with the to examine major challenges in landscane planning (surface mining and reclamation, ski area development, timber management and highway development) and search for legal policy tools available to use in solving landscape management problems, Liz Bravo

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-----------------------------------------------One of the most valuable benefits derived from traveling/studying abroad is the opportunity to be exposed to new ideas and unique personalities. One such opportunity came with a visit to Otto Kartoffelkopf at his Institute for Subtractive Architecture in the Black Forrest of southeastern Germany. To reach the Institute I traveled at night by train from Munich to Freiburg. From there I took a bus which passed through several hamlets until I transferred to the shuttle bus which took me deeper into the densely wooded countryside where the Institute is located. I arrived in the early morning, before the regular daily routine had begun. The morning air is fresh and clean, but heavy with a thick mist of fog. The trees are silouetted against the light gray mist. Theirdamp bark appears black at close range. The trees fade into the distance, a progression of ever-lightening grays, until everything is the same flat gray. I am drawn by the sounds of pounding echoing through the forrest. As I enter a clearing I can make out a lone workman painstakingly chipping away at a massive block of concrete. He is working from the scaffolding which surrounds the huge mass. The block is 22 sections of scaffolding high -the height of a 10 story office building, and extends hundreds of meters into the thick misty wood. Wrinkles of concentration crease his face as each blow is measured and the mass is transformed flake by flake. The morning shift begins to arrive, and the scaffolding is again filled with workers from all over the world who have come to the Black Forrest to live and work at Archiblock. The grand scheme of Archiblock -to carve an entire city out of a single block of concrete -is the brain child of Otto Kartoffelkopf, the self styled architect/philosopher. The laborers are busy hammering and grinding when Kartoffelkopf arrives on the site with a retinue of foreman, advisors and camp followers. He moves easily among the workers offering advice and encouragement. He will spend most of his morning in this way among his followers. In the afternoon in his grotto-like studio, I asked Kartoffelkopf to explain his concept of subtractive architecture. He took a puff from his knobby pipe and gazed at me reflectively for some moments through his blue tinted monical. His hair is gray, neat and short. His stature is small but his athletic build and erect posture give his movements a dignity and grace that commands authority. He begins speaking in his distinctively high-pitched, reedy voice. "Instead of starting with various parts of a building and putting them together as an assemblage, the subtractive approach begins with a mass of material and the builder, or as we should say in this case, the remover/designer simply removes that which is not his building. The architect/builder becomes an artisan, shaping and sculpting the environment. Not in a process of connecting pieces of technology, but by removing the excess and allowing the building to become what it wants to be." The seeds of this theory were sown, Kartoffelkopf explains, while he was working as model builder in the office of the Spanish architect -El Crayola. Michael Fuller Beethoven was the hero of the old Spanish master and he felt that an architect should be able to design a building without the aid of sight just as Beethoven composed symphonies even after he lost his hearing. In the venerable Iberian's office everyone was required to wear blindfolds which led to Kartoffelkopf's early experiments with clay and soap bars. The break for Kartoffelkopf came with the now famous Ivory Soap House. The one tragic design flaw -the tendancy of soap to melt when it comes into contact with free water -led the search for a new material. The quest led eventually to concrete. Kartoffelkopf began casting small blocks of concrete and experimenting with various techniques to shape the material. As Kartoffelkopf explains, "The effort is always made to keep the technology as simple as possible. This is the architecture of the masses as well as of the mass." At first simple everyday items such as knives and spoons were used. As bigger blocks were cast, chisels, garden implements and explosives were tried. I!! __ dramatic attempt to illustrate ..._ aii.yn ... could be used as a tool, Kartoffelkopf to create a garage by ramming a block with his own 1957 Olds Stratocruiser. After a setback of a few short months in the plastic surgery clinic in Buenos Aires, Kartoffelkopf was ready to begin his most ambitious project -Archiblock. Many months of preparation were necessary to build the forms and assemble the materials. Once the giant block was cast Kartoffelkopf made the announcement to the world and invited those interested in learning about his methods/philosophies to come to Archiblock to live and work, for a small fee. As Kartoffelkopf explained, "We have fresh air, healthy German fog and daily excercise and philosophical training sessions. We also try to provide some of the comforts of home in this international atmosphere. For instance you Americans will be interested to know that we now have granola and Coca Cola machines throughout the Institute." Those interested in obtaining more information or in making an application to attend The Institute for Subtractive Architecture, please drop a note to the office of LAMINATIONS. '11

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I