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Laminations, March, 1984

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Title:
Laminations, March, 1984
Series Title:
Laminations
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University of Colorado Denver
Filkins, John
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Denver, CO
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University of Colorado Denver
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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LOMIIMOnaiMS
MARCH 1984
OF COLORADO AT DENVER


"PRESERVATION IN AURORA"
We do not usually associate Aurora with historic buildings, but Aurora does have some very nice pre-1900 homes. Especially of note is one on Galena Street. 1630 Galena St. is situated in what was once called New England heights, in Fletcher (today Aurora). The property was bought by Lucy C.R. Milliken, the wife of Fletcher's first Mayor, H.M. Milliken. Dave Hicks says in his book Aurora From the Beginning, "The town fathers met on April 30, 1891, and selected H.M. Milliken as Mayor. The meeting was held at the Milliken home on Hathaway St., now Galena St.
The style is a vernacular late Victorian with an imposing 2-story wrap-around verandah, and nicely fluted wooden columns, probably added as late as 1915-1920. Presently, it is occupied by another Lucy, Lucy Morse and Dames Alcantara, who solemnly claim that they are not married (yet). Interestingly enough, some historians claim that the first Lucy of 1891 might never have been married to Aurora's first mayor either-. History repeats itself.
by Nils Hjermann
Behind the open doors of Laminations there is an interest growing. We believe some of the best minds in the world... no, history are at our door.
We would like to let them speak, give them a forum, place a new soap box in the public square.
To facilitate the growth of ideas, we hope to expand and provide more pages for print.
Our advertisers are helping the cause, but we need YOU, everybody, to expound your ideas, show us your work and ask us to think.
Letters to the Editor m
Dear Editor,
The Designer's Ball is once again upon us. Last year's ball, the first of its kind, proved to be a success on every count: good music, creative costumes, large numbers of guests from the professional community, fun for all, and importantly, a $4,000 profit for the Design and Planning Library. The coordinators of this year's ball, being wiser for their experience in planning the First Annual Designer's Ball, are hoping for similar success in the upcoming gala. There will be one glaring difference, however. Tickets will be $2 more for everyone: $12 for non-students and $7 for students. All students. Including those in the College of Design and Planning.
It is my contention that having already donated one week's class time, tuition money and the cost of materials for our first project to the Ball, it is entirely unfair that Design students be required to pay the full student price for the Ball, for which they have already donated so much.
Ideally, I feel each Design student should receive one pair of tickets, free. This seems, to me, a fair exchange for our "required donation" in the form of time, money and effort, to make this ball as fun and successful as the last.
I urge all of you, who agree with this sentiment, to approach the Designer's Ball coordinators about this situation.
Sincerely,
Disenchanted
WHICH CAME FIRST ?
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IN DESIGN
"My feeling is that the major thrust of womens' contribution to the business world today and in the future will be to bring a new prospective.
. . The extreme aggressive nature of our society needs to change. That is not to say that people do not need to be assertive. There is a difference between blindaggression and assertion."
The quote is from Elizabeth Wright Ingraham, grand-daughter of the late Frank Lloyd Wright and noted architect in her own right. Together with her husband of thirty years, Ingraham has completed some seventy-odd projects throughout the country, She stands, in fact, as an ideal example of the female Colorado architect. But, is her situation, in fact, a common one? What is the status of women in design today?
very many women stars. When I f. think of stars, I think of people like Suzanne Notori and Denise Scott Brown. I still 1 don't see women stars rising on the horizon. There has to be a reason for that. I sus- I pect women aren't given the room to do it. Also, we were J not raised to be stars. We were not raised to be outstanding professionals... The i Women who are agressive and competitive and dedicated need ? to continue to be so."
Ms. Ingraham believes we need to take stock and see whatj; happens. "In the future, I imagine, men will not be the only breadwinners. Women, likewise, must have the help of men to run the home," she states.
Ms. Ingraham was born into the field of architecture.
What happens to women who enter the field of design and struggle even as good designers? Do they have the problems women have encountered in their attempts to rise to the top in other fields.
Surely some would say "yes."
Too many cases of sexual discrimination have been documented for the idea of discrimination to be discounted. Still, how widespread are the attempts to disqualify women as equals?
Jennifer Moulton, architect with Barker-Rinker and Seacat for six years, and herself a successful architect sees her position as a nearly ideal one:
"I've felt no different treatment from the principals at all about my being female. They just don't have that kind of attitude. There are differences... I realize, however, that other generations of women fought the battles for me. Elizabeth Wright Ingraham would probably tell you a different story of what she had to go through. I do hear stories from other women designers of not being treated as equals.
It's just not true here."
The fact that discrimination has existed and still does in some houses cannot be denied. There will undoubtedly always be those "good ole boys" who would like to keep women in the home or at least in subservient roles. However, it is obvious that women have made strides in the professional would? and they will continue to do so.
But, perhaps not always with the greatest of ease.
"It is important that one beL involved in a whole range ot activities," says Ingraham.
She currently serves as prin- 1 cipal of Elizabeth Wright Ingraham and Associates, Archi- j tects and Planners, directors | of the Wright-Ingraham Institute, a non-profit educational/| research institute outside |
Colorado Springs; and is invol-| ved in the Women's Forum of Colorado, an important organ- | ization for professional women in the state. She recommends this type of involvement with other professional women for young women just starting a career. In addition, she states, "My advice to young women in architecture is to start early. One cannot become a master at, say, the piano or the violin without a total devotion. The same is true of architecture."
How, then does a professional woman handle a career and family? Ms. Ingraham, mother of four says, "It is very difficult for a woman to be both a mother and career woman, impossible, in fact.
But I suppose one must try.
One can only try."
Jennifer Moulton thinks a career and family can be handled. "I will always work," she says. "I like it. There's more room now for coping with both a family and a career.
I'm under no illusion that it's easy; but I have friends who do it... There's just been a lot of guilt. It seems much more selfish for a woman to want both a family and a career than it has been for a man. It seems normal for a man to want both; abnormal, in fact, if he doesn't."
Says Ingraham, "What drives me crazy about young women today is their ambivalence." Women, she says, have been trained to give in, not to stand up to the demands of the professional would." Women have not, as yet, been able to pull through the rough times in business." The reason? Ms Ingraham believes it to be unequal pay and not enough advan cement.
Her advice to young women starting out? "Go into architecture not as a woman but as a human being. Don't forget you're a woman? don't deny it. But don't think that being a woman is a liability. It is not. Don't look for problems, they'll find you soon enough. Work hard, for there is a saying that you're going to have to be better than your male counterpart go get equal recognition.
by Margo Schultz


COMPUTER 1 TALK

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THE MICROCOMPUTER WORLD TAKES A GIANT LEAP FOR DESIGNERS
It is 10 years since I first published on the impact of computers in architecture. During that time I have made many predictions - some have been accurate, some not. My latest prediction made at the ACADIA (Association of Computer Aided Design in Architecture) conference at Ohio State University in 1983 was that practitioners who were not using computers in their office on a regular basis (for word processing, accounting, job costing and maybe even drafting) in five years would not be competitive in the market place. This prediction was made as a response to research findings from the east coast that indicate at least a 3:1 productivity ratio by automated systems over manual systems.
I recently spent some time working with the new generation of microcomputers which permit integrated processing. Word processing, electronic spreadsheets and graphic in full color can be processed simultaneously. This experience confirms my belief. In fact, the Apple Lisa and Macintosh computers have more advanced graphic presentation capabilities as standard features than state of the art computer aided design systems just five years ago. Let me give you an example. Choosing from a menu on the Macintosh screen in the Macpoint program, a user has access to some twenty features (from simple crosshatching to rather complex "tartan" grids). From another menu on the same screen some ten or more application devices are available (these include caligraphy pens, broad brushes, fine brushes and pencils). If we select the spray can from one menu, we can graphically spray a texture (selected from the other) over any part of the screen. We can even (and this is remarkable) change the angle of the spray nozzle! All this is done graphically (without using the keyboard) by using the "mouse." Even a new user can very quickly create complex drawings which can be printed or stored on disk. The word processor (Macwrite) is also an incredible package which allows selection from about ten types of fonts in any of about five sizes, and each will be displayed on the screen as well as being printed when required. Remember this is a general purpose home computer! I believe this generation of machine has advanced user friendliness to an incredible degree. It is equivalent to the jump down from the horse and carriage (where we had to feed the horse and know how to harness one to the other which had strict limitations) to the automatic automobile (where we don't need to know any of the internal operations).
I encourage everyone to make some time, go to your nearest Apple store, and have a demonstration for your own education. This may sound like a promotion but I mention trade names only because Apple (with the possible exception of Hewlett Packard) are the only people with this sophisticated software on micro computers. I would be interested in any reactions!
by Don Woolard
"fin
COLLINS
JOHN COLLINS-INTELLIGENT ART
John Collins' firm, the Delta Group, sent in just two designs for consideration in the 1983 A.S.L.A. annual awards. Of the five top awards presented, the Delta Group walked away with two. Both awards were under the category of design. In the last twenty years, Collins' firm has collected thirty such awards. Quietly, yet firmly, John Collins has forged into the forefront, the cutting edge, of the designed landscape. Yet what exactly is so special about Collins' art? Many designers, including those on the jury, find it elusive. Fortunately, Mr. Collins was here last February 17th and 18th to shed some light on the nature of his art.
Collins graduated from Pennsylvania State University, Strongly capable in both graphics and construction knowledge, Mr. Collins was pursued by Ian Mcharg to attend graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania. Collins declined, opting to attend the Harvard Graduate School of Design on a scholarship, graduating in 1962. Shortly after finishing school, Collins formed the Collins/Dutot partnership. In 1971 Collins reorganized and created the Delta Group. It is in the nature and organization of these firms that the first rays of light about the art of John Collins shines through.
In the Delta Group, for example, nine principals are supported by one part time draftsman (as well as a business support staff). This is a bit different than Skidmore, Owings and Merril. Who, you might wonder, does the drafting the 'grunt work'? The principals do. In fact, the day before Collins spoke here he had been doing just such work. Furthermore, Collins' firms are interdisciplinary. Collins believes that "landscape architects, architects, and engineers must work as members of a full-time team, and that urban design and planning can only be successful when all the design disciplines are fully involved from analysis to maintenance." Good design by interdisciplinary grunt work.
But doing 'cutting edge' design work requires more. The A.S.L.A. jury began to see some of Mr. Collins light. Of the Delta Group's award winning Chestnut Park, the jury said, "Outstanding in the way that it combines the attractiveness of a great amount of detail with a very straightforward scheme. There is a lot going on, but it is very simply handled. Unique in its whimsical incorporation of local elements which go beyond studio design -sacred stones and animal totems of the original Indian tribes in the Philadelphia region are handled in a deft fashion... This craftsmanship adds a strong sense of place to a very crisp design... provides a refreshingly private and 'hightough' place in a public landscape..." The key to this is that John Collins listens, and has been listening sence before his days at Penn State and Harvard. Collins listens, observes and detects. Then he thinks and designs.
Yet Collins goes even further. Maintenance is a critical part of the design. Says Collins, "Even though I'm not really supposed to, I do a lot of clean up - once a week - and pruning whenever it's needed... I still maintain the individual plants and fountain." (It's hard to imagine Phillip Johnson shoveling the sidewalks around the new United Bank building).
One on one, the intelligent art of Mr. Collins shines through even more. He says he has mellowed, that getting angry does more harm than good. He takes on a Henry Kissinger approach to often hostile groups. Collins spends time at each site, getting to know his many users and clients on a first name basis, perhaps over a glass of beer (but just one beer - at least at a time). Collins is confident in defense of his own work, but he lacks the ego of Lawrence Halprin Halprin and the bravado of Ian McHarg. Moreover, like any top artist, John Collins continues to search. For example, for years he has hated the computer. But during his stay here he examined some of the capabilities of computer graphics. He went back to Philadelphia considering using computers. To have such an open mind, after twenty years of award winning designs, is the mark of most confident and important artists.
Collins work is not perfect, and he makes no claim to it being so. His design teams do not include specialists outside the design/engineering professions. Jurors claim that a clear sense of style does not shine through, but rather is borrowed from surrounding architects. Both these points have some merit but do not detract greatly from his work. What begins to approach perfection in John Collins' design work is in his firms design process, client/user communication, and responsibility.
The great intelligence of his art is reflected in the final outcome, the finished work. It is John Collins' intelligent art that brings forth the product that A.S.L.A. jurors, designers and users continue to wonder and marvel at.
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registration
IMPORTANT REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Here is the reason why you should register either during mail-in registration or during walk-in registration I Funding for the College is based on student credit hours. If enrollments drop, it affects funding the next year. If students are not registered for classes by Census Date, (which is usually two weeks after the first day of classes,) and then come-in to register for a class the College does not get credit for those hours. The University loses about $70.00 of State funding per each student credit hour when a student is not registered by Census Date.
Therefore, a policy has been set, that no one can register or add a class after census date. Another reason for registering before Census Date is that a small class normally will have to be cancelled during the first week if there are not ten to twelve students registered for it. Please remember, if we are short on student credit hours, then we are also short on dollars.
Believe it or not, there is another bunch of schools across Speer Boulevard. One day I wanted to see for myself and managed to cross that viciously busy Speer, and - there I found a land of milk and honey, cute churches, art galleries and shops, trees (1*11 explain that one later) and art faculties. The people over there look just like you and me and many understand English as well. If you speak slowly.
What is more, art departments exist there too, yes; both UCD's and Metro's. As a matter of fact, we on this side of Speer are always welcomed to use their facilities. Laminations has gotten positive feed back from the staff 'over there' concerning more interdepartmental cooperation, and we now invite staff and students for your input on the matter -write to us!
by Nils Hjermann
"INFORMATION ON PROFESSIONAL REGISTER"
The Division of Architecture and the Colorado Society of Architects have developed a professional register of architects who are willing to assist in the architecture program. Through a questionnaire, architects were invited to re-gester with the CSA to offer help to the division, in a variety of ways, as follows:
1. As an end of semester critic/ juror .
2. As a participant in the design studio at program introduction, mid-point review, and final presentation
The "three visit" project is preferred as this enables the critic to be aware of and to comment on the design process as well as the design product.
3. As a thesis advisor.
This assistance requires a commitment of one hour/week for 15 weeks. Students are matched to advisors by project type and expertise offered, they present their portfolio and meet weekly in the architects' office at a mutually convenient time. Students also maintain faculty advisers during regular thesis studio time.
4. As a guest lecturer-/Slide show/ recent work speakers for the lunch time presentations .
Much additional information has been input to the CSA computer and we will be able to sort the data to find architects offering assistance in a particular location of the state, or for a particular building type. We hope it will be a useful way to exchange ideas and benefit practicing professionals as well as students (not to mention faculty!),
A current list of registrants will be kept in the division and students can make requests for information through any faculty member. Many interested architects are located outside the Denver/Boulder area. It would be good to plan to visit them if anyone is traveling throughout the state. This could create much goodwill and probably open up many opportunities for all.
by Don Woolard
1. Students who plan to Graduate Spring 1984 semester need to complete a diploma card. Diploma cards are available from the office.
2. Spring Break - March 19-25
3. Awards Banquet - April'20
4. Last Day of Classes - May 18
5. Graduation - May 19, 1984. The College of Design and Planning will have a reception at the Lawrence Street Center in the Plaza following the Graduation ceremonies. The Lawrence Street Center is located next door to the Bromley Building.
6. THEFT IS ON THE RISE AGAIN Please watch your personal belongs.
7. Dean's Search - There is nothing new to report at this time. The two candidates are being considered.
"â–  i
"Laminations" is a publica- • tion of the students in the College of Design and Planning \ at the University of Colorado 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. It is published four times a year, gen- • erally in October, December, March, and May. The opinions expressed in Laminations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the College of Design and Planning, or of the University of Colorado. Letters to the editor and other communications are encouraged and may be submitted to the Laminations mail-\ box on the second floor of Bromley.
We wish to extend a hearty "thanks" to all of you who have contributed to Laminations.
For those who missed the deadline we are providing this convenient space in which to write your article. (Better late than never!) Or, best of all, please submit early for the next issue....
staff_______________
â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– 
FACULTY ADVISOR Robert Kindig
EDITORS
Mark Hogan Nate W. Kahn Peggy Kinsey Bill Nelson Jeniffer Isbill
awards I
banquet |
STUDENT AWARDS BANQUET SPEAKER - Ian L. Me Harg
April 20th will be a "Special Day" for the College. We will have exhibits of students in our Building and in the Lawrence Street Center next door. Beginning at 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. the College will host an Open House on the second floor for the professional community. The professional organizations will be meeting for a joint informal lunch with our Division Directors at Saint Francis Interfaith Center, then some will also have their board meeting on campus that afternoon.
The Awards Banquet will be held at the Denver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm Place, with cash bar at 6:00 p.m., dinner at 7:00 p.m., and the Awards and Speaker at 8:00 p.m. Cost to Students and their guests is $9.00.
PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR AN EVENING THAT IS SPECIAL FOR COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING STUDENTS AND THEIR GUESTS.
lecture
series
AIA LECTURE SERIES.
Gretchen Bellinger March 7, 1984
Tai Soo Kim
March 14, 1984
Stewart Johnson
March 21, 1984
Ralph Caplan
March 28, 1984
Edward Mills
April 4, 1984
At City Spirit we serve you architecture or) a platter.
I ROOKS I ((CAFF. • GAl.I.ERYi)
1434 llljke Micel Ikiivti i iiliiuilo ttOJO:
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Mon.-Fri. 11-6
Sat. 12-5


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• • • • :oo_5 :oo I • • • MARCH 1984 • • 'NIVL"SITV OF COLORADO .l.T DENVER • • •

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:c. "PRESERVATION IN AURORA" We do not usually associate Aurora with historic buil dings, but Aurora does have some very nice pre-1900 homes. Especially of note is one on Galena Street. 1630 Galena St. is situated in what was once called New England l!e iyhts, in Fletcher (today Aurora). The property was bought by Lucy C . R. Milliken, the w ife of Fletcher's first Mayor , H.M. Milliken. Dave Hicks say s in his book Aurora From the Beginning, "T h e t own fathers met on April 30, 1 891, and selected H .M. Milliken as Mayor. The meeting was held a t the Milliken home on Hathaway St., now Ga lena St. Behind tne open doors o f Lam inations there is an interest g r owing. We believe s ome of the best m inds in the w o r l d ... n o , history a r e at our door. We woulJ l ike t o let ti1em speak, give them a forum, place a new s oap b o x in the public square. To facilitate the g rowth of ioeas, we h ope t o expand a n d provide more pages for print. Our aavertisers are helping the cause, but we neea YOU, everybody, t o expound your ideas, show us y our work and ask us to think. Letters to the Dear Editor, 1 The Designer' s Ball is once again upon us. Last year's ball, the first of its kind, p roved t o be a success on ever y count: good music , creative costumes, l arge num bers of guests from the professional community, fun for all, and importantly , a $4 ,000 profit for the Design and Plan n ing Libra r y . The coordinat o r s of this year's ball, being wiser for their experience in planning the First Ann ual Designer's Ball, are hoping for s i milar success in the upcoming gala. There will be one glaring difference, however. Tickets will b e $2 more for everyone: $12 for non-students and $7 for students. All students. Including those in the College of Design and Planning. It is m y contention that having already donated one week's class time, tuition money and the cost of materials for our first project t o the Ball, it is entirely unfair that Design students be required to pay the full student price for the Ball, for which they have already donated so much. Ideally , I feel each Design student should receiv e one pair o f tickets, free. This seems, to me, a fair exchange for our "required donation" in the form of time, money and effort, to make this ball as fun and successful as the l ast. I urge all o f you, who agree with this sentiment, to approach the Designer's Ball coordinators about this situation. Sincerely, Disenchanted The style is a vernacular late Victorian with an 2 -story wrap-around verandah, and nicely fluted wooden columns, probably added as late as 1915-1920. Presently, it is occupied by another Lucy, Lucy Morse and Dames Alcantara, who solemnly claim that they are not married (yet) . Interestingly enough, some historians claim that the first Lucy o f 1891 might never have been married to Aurora's first mayor either-. History repeats itself. b y Nils Hjermann WHICH CAME FIRST? For The Breakfast Lover ... Is Now Open Serving Breakfast 7 Days A Week MON .-FRI. 6 A.M. to 2 P.M. SAT. & SUN. 7 A.M. to 2 P.M. Also Serving Lunch 11 A.M . to 2 P.M: 1642 Market Street Phone: 572-8146 IN DESIGN "My feeling is that the major thrust of womens ' contribution to the business world today and in the future will be to bring a new prospective. .. The extreme aggressive nature o f our society needs to change. That is not to say that people do not need to be assertive. There is a difference between blindaggression and assertion." The quote is from Elizabeth Wright Ingraham, grand-daughter of the late Frank Lloyd Wright and noted architect in her own right. Together with her husband of thirty years, Ingraham has completed some sevent y -odd projects throughout the country, She stands, in fact, as an ideal example of the female Colorado architect. But, is her situation, in fact, a com mon one? What is the status of women in design today? Ms. Ingraham was born into the field of architecture. What happens to women who enter the field of design and struggle even as good designers? Do they have the p r o blems women have encountered in their attempts to rise to the top in other fields. Surely some would say "yes." Too many cases of sexual discrimination have been documented for the idea of discri minatio n to be discounted. Still, how widespread are the attempts to disquali f y women a s equals? Jennifer Moulton, architect with Barker-Rinker and Seacat for six years, and herself a successful architect sees her position as a nearly ideal one: "I've felt no differen t treatment from the principals at all about my being femal e . They just don' t have that kind of attitude. Ther e are differences ... I realize, however, that other generation s of women fought the battles for me. Elizabeth Wright Ingraham would probably tell you a different story of what she had to go through. I do hear stories from other women designers of not being treated as equals. It's just not true here." The fact that discrimination has existed and still does in some houses cannot be denied. There will undoubtedl y always be those "good ole boys" who would like to keep women in the home or a t least in subservient roles. However, it is obvious that women have made strides in the professional would; and they will continue to do so. But, perhaps not always with the g reatest of ease. Says Ingraham, "What drives m e c r a z y about young women today is their ambivalence." Women, she says, have been trained to give in, not to stand up to the demands of the p rofessional would." Women have not, as yet, been able to pull through the rough times in business. " The reason? Ms. Ingraham believes it to be unequal pay and not enough advancement. I I • , • s supported by "There aren' t very many women stars. When think of stars, I think of people like Suzanne Notori and ' Denise Scott Brown . I still don' t see women stars rising on the horizon. There has to be a reason for that. I suspect women aren' t given the room to do it. Also, we were not raised t o be stars. We were not raised t o be out standing professionals ... The Women who are agressive and competitive and dedicated need to continue to be so." I l wha t ! Ms. Ingraham believes we need to take stock and see happens. "In the future, I imagine, men will not be the only breadwinners. Women, likewise, must have the help of men to run the home," she states. I f l ' { I i l "It is important that one bel• involved in a whole range ot r activities," says Ingraham. She currently serves as prin1 cipal of Elizabeth Wright Inyraham and Associates, Architects and Planners, directors of the Wright-Ingraham Insti\ tute, a non-profit educational/\ research institute outside ( Colorado Springs; and is ved in the Women's Forum of Colorado, an important organization for professional women in the state. She recommends this type of involvement with other p rofessional women ) for young women just starting a ;1 1 . career. In addition, she states, "My advice to young ! 1 women in architecture is to l start early. One cannot be! I come a master at, say, the piano or the violin without a total devotion. The same is true of architecture." How, then does a professional woman handle a career and family? Ms. Ingraham, mother of four says, "It is ver y difficult for a woman to be both a mother and career woman , impossible, in fact. But I suppose one must try. One can only try." Jennifer Moulton thinks a career and family can be handled. " I will always work," she says. " I like it. There' s more room now for coping with bot h a family and a career. I ' m under no illusion that it's easy; but I have friends who do it ... There' s just been a lot of guilt. It seems much more selfish for a woma n to want both a family and a career than it has been for a man. It seems normal for a man t o want both; abnormal, in fact, if he doesn't." Her advice to young women starting out? "Go into architecture not as a woman but as a human being. Don ' t forget you 're a woman ; don' t deny it. But don' t think that being a woman is a liability. It is not. Don ' t look for problems, they'll find you soon enough. Work hard, for there is a saying that you're going to have to be better than your male counterpart go get equal recognition. Margo Schultz -•

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I I ! ! l t [ I I ! r ! I I ! i I DMPUTE TALK THE M ICROCOMPUTER WORLD TAKES A GIANT LEAP FOR DESIGNERS It is 10 years since I first published on the impact of computers in architecture. During that time I have made many predictions -some have been accurate, some not. My latest prediction made a t the ACADI A (Association of Computer Aided Design in Architecture) conference a t Ohio State Univ ersity in 1983 was that p rac titioners who were not using computers in their office on a regular basis (fo r word pro cessing, accounting, job costing and maybe even drafting) in five years would not be com petitive in the market place . This prediction was made as a response to findings from the east coast that indicate a t least a 3 : 1 productivity ratio by automated systems over manual systems. I recently spent some time working with the new generation of microcomputers which permit integrated processing. Word electronic spreadsheets and graphic in full color can be processed simultaneously. This experience confirms my belief. In fact, the Apple Lisa and Macintosh computers have more advanced g raphic presentation capabilities as standard features than state of the art computer aided design systems just five years ago. Let me give you an exam ple. Choosing from a menu on the Macintosh screen in the Macpoint program, a user has access to some twenty features (from simple crosshatching to rather complex "tartan" grids). From another menu on the same screen some ten or more application devices are available (these include caligraphy pens, broad brushes, fine brushes and pencils). If we select the spray can from one menu, we can graphically spray a texture (selected from the other) over any part of the screen. We can even (and this is remarkable) change the angle of the spray nozzle! All this is done graphically (without using the keyboard) by using the "mouse." Even a new user can very quickly create complex drawings which can be printed or stored on disk. The word processor (Macwrite) is also an incredible package which allows selection from about ten types of fonts in any o f about five sizes, and each will be displayed on the screen as well a s being printed when required. Remember this is a general purpose home computer! I believe this generation of machine has advanced user friendliness to an incredible degree. It is equivalent to the jump down from the horse and carriage ( where we had to feed the horse and know how to harness one to the other which had strict limitations) t o the automatic automobile (where we don't need to know any of the internal operations) . I encourage everyone to mak e some time, go t o your nearest Apple store, and have a demonstration for your own education. This may sound like a promotion but I mention trade names only because Apple (with the possible exception of Hewlett Packard) a r e the only people with this sophisticated software on micro computers. I wou l d be interested in any reactions! by Don Woolard JOHN COLLINS-INTELLIGENT ART John Collins' firm , the Delta Group, sent in just two designs for consideration in the 1983 A.S. L . A . annual award& O f the five top awards presen ted, the Delta G roup walked away with two. Both awa rds wer e under the category of design. In the last twenty years, Collins' firm has collected thirty such awards. Quietly , yet firmly, John Collins has forged into the forefront, the cutting edge, of the designed landscape. Yet what exactly is so special about Collins' art? Many designers, including those on the jury, find it elusive. Fortunately, Mr. Collins was here last February 17th and 18th to shed some light on the nature of his art. Collins graduated from Penn sylvania State University, Strongly capable in both graphics and construction knowledge, Mr. Collins was pursued by Ian Mcharg to attend graduate school at the University o f Pennsylvani a . Collins declined, opting to attend the Harvard Graduate School of Design on a scholarship, graduating in 1962. Shortly after finishing school, Collins formed the Collins/Dutot partnership. In 1971 Collins re organized and created the Delta G roup. It is in the nature and organization of these firms that the first ray s of light about the art of John Collins shines through. In the Delta Group, for example, nine principals are supported by one part time draftsman (as well as a business support staff). This is a bit different than Skidmore, Owings and Merril. Who, you might wonder , does the drafting the ' grunt work' ? The principals do. In fact, the day before Collins spoke here he had been doing just such work. Furthermore, Collins' firms are interdisciplinary. Collins believes that "landscape arch itects, architects, and engineers must work as members of a full-time team, and that urban design and planning can only be successful whe n all the design disciplines are fully involved from analysis to maintenance." Good design by interdisciplina r y grunt work. But doing 'cutting edge' design work requires more. The A .S.L. A . jury began to see some of Mr. Collins light. Of the Delta Group' s award winning Chestnut Park, the jury said, "Outstanding in the way that it combines the attractiveness of a great amount of detail with a very straightforward scheme. There i s a lot going on, but it is ver y simply handled. Uni que in its whimsical incorporation of local elements which go beyond studio design -sacred stones and animal totems of the orig inal Indian tribes in the Philadelphia region are handlec in a deft fashion ... This craftsmanship adds a strong sense of place to a ver y crisp design ... provides a refreshingly private and 'hightough' place in R public landscape ... " The key to this is that John Collins listens, and has been listening sence before his days at Penn State and Harvard. Collins listens, observes and detects. Then he thinks and designs. Yet Collins goes even further. Maintenance is a critical part of the design. Says Collins, "E ven though I ' m not really supposed to, I do a lot of clean up -once a week -and pruning whenever it' s needed ... I still maintain the individual plants and fountain." (It' s har d to imagine Phillip Johnson shoveling the sidewalks around the new United Bank building). One on one, the intelligent art of Mr. Collins shines through even more. He says he has mellowe d , that getting angry does more harm than good. He takes on a Henrv Kissinger approach to often hostile groups. Collins spends time at each site, getting to know his many users and clients on a first name basis, perhaps over a glass of beer (but just one beer -at least at a time). Collins is confident in defense of his own work, but he lacks the ego of Lawrence Halprin Halprin and the bravado of Ian McHarg. Moreover, like any top artist, John Collins continues to search. For example, for y ears he has hated the computeL But during his stay here he examined some of the capabilities of computer graphics. He went back to Philadelphia considering using computers. To have such an open mind, after twenty years of award winning designs, is the mark o f most confident and i mportant artist& Collins work is not perfect, and he makes no claim to it being so. His design teams do not include specialists outside the design/engineering profes sions. Jurors claim that a clear sense of style does not shine through, but rather is borrowed from surrounding architects. Both these points have some merit but do not detract greatly from his wo r k . What begins to approach per fection in John Collins' design work is in his firms design process, client/user communication, and responsibility . The great intelligence of his art is reflected in the final outcome, the finished work. It is John Collins' intelligent art that brings forth the p r o duct that A.S.L.A. jurors, designers and users continue to wonder and marvel at. by Scott MacCormack ,__.EININGER F i ne Art Supp lies • Commercial Art Materials Silk Screen Prod uc ts • Drafting Equ i pment Call Us Entertainment 893•DCPA 0 alphagraphius Print s hops Of The Futur e e BID DOCUMENTS e JOB SPECIFICATIONS e PORTFOLIO PACKAGES STUDENT /FACULTY DISCOUNT 1036 Fourteenth Street • Oen•er . CO 80202 • (303) 5)4 . 5525 MILE HI NUTRITION CO MPLETE. STORE VITAMINS VEGETARIAN PROD4u\:) HERBS PP.OTEIN SjU I G ES YOCj4RT5 DE'L101 0 US TAKE:.OL.jf 1oso 1411-1 s-r 10% OFF STUDENT DISCOUNT 0 LOOK INTO IT presentation des1gn • ex h ibits framing ROANS PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS OF COLORADO 388-7259 243 STEELE ST IN NORTH CH(RRY (R((K AT TH( SUN PLAC( S HOPS

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registration IMPORTANT REGISTRATION INFORMATION Here is the reaso n why you should register either during mail-in registration or during wa l k-in registration! Funding f o r the College is based on student credit hours. If enrollments drop, it affects funding the next year. If students are not registered for classes b y Census Date, (which is usually two weeks after the first day o f classes,) and then come-in to r egister for a class the College does not get credit for those hours. The Univer sity l oses about $70.0 0 of State funding per each student credit hour when a student is not registered b y Census Date. Therefore, a policy has been set, that no one can register or add a class after census date . Another reason for registering before Census Date is that a small class normally will have to be cancelled during the first week if there are not ten to twelve students registered for it. Please remember, if w e are short on student credit hours, then we also short on dollars. other SideS "THERE IS LIFE AFTER SPEER.,." Believe it or not, there is another bunch of schools across Speer Boulevard. One day I wanted to see for myself and managed to cross that viciously busy Speer, and -there I found a land of milk and honey, cute churches, art galleries and shops, trees (I'll explain that one later) and art faculties. The people over there look just like you and me and many understand English as well. If you speak slowly. What is more, art departments exist there too, yes; both UCD's and Metro's. As a matter of fact, we on this side of Speer are always welcomed to use their facilities. Laminations has gotten positive feed back fro m the staff 'over there' concerning more interdepartmental cooperation, and we now invite staff and students for your input on the matter -write to us! by Nils Hjermann / At City Spirit we serve you OIJ a platter. \t)l )"" HOURS Mon . -Fri. Sat. 11-6 12-5 "I TI ON ON PROFESSIONAL REGISTER" The Division of Architecture and the Colorado Society of Architects have developed a professional register of architects who are willing to assist in the architecture program. Through a questionnaire, architects were invited to regester with the CSA to offer help to the division, in a variety of ways, as follows: 1. As an end of semester critic/juror. 2. As a participant in the design studio at program introduction, mid-point review, and final presentation The "three visit" project is preferred as this enables the critic to be aware of and to comment on the design process as well as the design product. 3. As a thesis advisor. This assistance requires a commitment of one hour/week for 15 weeks. Students are matched to advisors by project type and expertise offered, they present their portfolio and meet weekly in the architects' office at a mutually convenient time. Students also maintain faculty advisers during regular thesis studio time. 4. As a guest lecturer-/Slide show/ recent work speakers for the lunch time presentations. Much additional information has been input to the CSA computer and we will be able to sort the data to find architects offering-assistance in a particular location of the state, or for a particular building type. We hope it will be a useful way to exchange ideas and benefit practicing professionals as well as students (not to mention faculty!t A current list of registrants will be kept in the division and students can make requests for information through any faculty member. Many interested architects are located outside the Denver/Boulder area. It would be good to plan to visit them if anyone is traveling throughout the state. This could create much goodwill and probably open up many opportunities for all. by Don Woolard notes 1. Students who plan to Graduate Spring 1984 semester need to complete a diploma card. Diploma cards are available from the office. 2. Spring Break -March 19-25 3. Awards Banquet -April 20 4. Last Day of Classes May 18 5. Graduation May 19, 1984. The College of Design and Planninq will have a reception at the Lawrence Street Center in the Plaza following the Graduation ceremonies. The Lawrence Street Center is located next door to the Bromley Building. 6. THEFT IS ON THE RISE AGAIN Please watch your personal belongs. 7. Dean's SearchThere is nothing new to report at this time. The two candidates are being considered. "Lamination.s" is a publication of the students in the College of Design and Planning at the University of Colorado 1100 14th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202. It is published four times a year, generally in October, December, March, and May. The opinions expressed in Laminations are those of the authors and do not necessaril y reflect the views of the College of Design and Planning, or of the University of Colorado. Letters to the editor and other communication: are encouraged and may be submitted to the Laminations mail box on the second floor of Bromley. We wish to extend a hearty "thanks" to all of you who havE contributed to Laminations. For those who missed the deadline we are providing this convenient space in which to write your article. (Better late than never!) Or, best of all, please submit early for the next issue ... staff FACULTY ADVISOR Robert Kindig EDITORS Mark Hogan Nate W. Kahn Peggy Kinsey Bill Nelson Jeniffer Isbill awards banquet STUDENT AWARDS BANQUET SPEAKER -Ian L. Me Harg April 20th will be a "Spe cial Day" for the College. We will have exhibits of students in our Building anQ in the Lawrence Street Center next door. Beginning at 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. the College will host an Open House on the second floor for the professional community. The professional organizations will be meeting for a joint informal lunch with our Division Directors at Saint Francis Interfaith Center, then some will also have their board meeting on campus that afternoon. The Awards Banquet will be held at the Denver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm Place, with cash bar at 6:00p.m., dinner at 7:00p.m., and the Awards and Speaker at 8:00 p.m. Cost to Students and their guests is $9.00. PLEASE MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR AN EVENING THAT IS SPECIAL FOR COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING STUDENTS AND THEIR GUESTS. lecture series AIA LECTURE SERIES. Gretchen Bellinger l1arch 7, 1984 Tai Soo Kim March 14, 1984 Stewart Johnson March 21, 1984 Ralph Caplan March 28, 1984 Edward Mills April 4, 1984 I