Citation
El Malcriado, Number 30

Material Information

Title:
El Malcriado, Number 30 The Voice of the farm worker
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


El Malcriado
"The Voice of the Farm Worker"
m


f
Published every two weetcs ln Spanish and Engllth by I Farm Wotker Press, Inc., P.O. Box 1060, Delano, Calli | Office of publlcatlon—102 Albany, Delano, Callf. Se-cond class postage pald at DelanoCallf. Permlt appll- 1 3ation pending. To subscribe at $2 a year or to submit news Items, telephone i 725-9908 or write to P.O. Box 1060. #30 2-28-66
>■■■■ IF YOU MOVE YOU MUST'LET US KNOW YOUR NEW ADDRESS.---------------------—E
GIBBIS40*
EDITORIAL:
HUNGER... FOR JUSTICE
The realities of a strike are sometimes very hard. Simply, After six months., people get tired, and the road ahead seems very long and very painful. Why wonft they under stand, these ranchers, these contractors, these scabs that we are only fighting for the well-being of everyone? Why is it so hard to have jus- ; tice, so that all men may live with dignity and free and at peace? Why must there be so inany people that live only to oppress and to abuse others, to twist the truth, to teli lies and to do what they do, only because they feel like it?
These are questions that trouble us deeply at the end of another day, when we?re weary and tired of having travelled across two counties talking to scabs, to poor' people like ourselves who were brought here from very far av/ay—from Mexico, Texas and Calexico--only to break this strike; people so poor that they don?t have even enough money to pack their things and leave the strike area, as all are wont to do, so they wonft bother us.
They are not at fault. The guilty ones are the ranchers and the contractors who do not want this strike to win, becauSe justice would take away all the profits : they draw from the misery of their workers.
But in spite of how hard this strike has been, the resistance these thieves, these vampires, have given us only makes us stronger. It inspires us to head out to the fields again every moming, with new dedication and new heart. We j will go on fighting harder than ever before, because now we have tasted of the 1 dignity of free men who know how to claim their rights. If the ranchers and the j contractors have imposed many hungers on us, they have now imposed a hunger I for justice. iVnd this is why we shall win this strike.
7S3Utfifl


IN THIS ISSUE:
-3-
The Strike Reaches the Governor. . . Page 5
Unemployed Laborerj| Stage Protest March
Salinas Farni Workers Stand Up for Their Rights Page 7
DiGiorgio Answers EI Malcriado "We are not water Thieves” Page 12
"Why are the County Hospitals so Bad?” Page 14
The Boycott Covers the Nation Page 20


-4-
The Biggest "Esquirol” of Them AII
LARRY ITUONG IS RUNNING
Esquirol ES-KEE-ROLE Liter ally, a squirrel. As used in strikes against California ranchers, the word means scato or strikebreaker. In any language it is one of the strongest words possi-tole to use against another persoiu
This is Lewis Rosensteil, president of Schenley Industries, whose wife bought $50,000 worth of dothing in just one store, who could spend $1,000 a day and not run out of money for a thousand jears, who sometimes pays his field workers 30^ an hour. (See EI Malcri-ado #29, page 8). This is the man who will not sit at the table with the Farm Workers Association and agree to pay a just vage.
Larry Itliong, leader of the Filipine strikers (AWOC) has registered as a candidate for City council. The picture shovs Cfesar Chavez signing his nomi-nation papers. The ”Delano Record” called him ’'The People*s Candidate.” EI ftfcilcriado predicts that he will win.
From the AFL-CIO Convention
"Resolved: That this convention pledges its full support and solidarity toehind the struggle of the workers on strike against the growers around Delano, California, and we call upon all affiliates of the AFL-CIO to extend both moral and financial support to these workers, who have been the victims of inhuman exploitation, in order to help them win their struggle for a fuller measure of economic and social justice.”
Send this coupon to EL MALCRIADO, BOX 1060 DELANO, CALIFORNIA
The best way to be aure you will git your MALCRIADO ls by mali, deliv-ered to your home every two weeka. Send your name and addreaa to Bos 894, Delano, Calif., and we will send you the newapaper to you for one year.
The cost is $2.00 per year, but you do not h^ve to send this now. We will send you a bili.
NAME
ADDRESS_
TOWN


CDC, THE GOVERNOR, & THE STRIKE
j The California Democratic Cbuncil, in the liveliest convention in its history, gave | an overwhelming vote of support to the Delano Grape Strike and Boycott. In a I spontaneous demonstration on Eriday night, council members raised over $5700 | in cash for the Association to continue the strike.
j In a booth manned by Bakersfield FWA members, the Association gathered tons of food to replenish the strike store, empty since the end of January. Also neaxv j ly a thousand copies of EI Malcriado were sold on Saturday alone.
The CDG wnet on record with the following recommendations: l)Strikebreaking should be made a crime, as it is in many countries; 2)The Delano Grape Strike | and Schenley boycott receive the full support of the 2,000 influential delegates;
| 3)In an investigation of all aspects of farm labor, the CDC committee recommends | full support of the NFWA in all its major policies and positions.
1 Everyone at the convention wore HUELGA buttons. Some members said it was the support of the Delano Grape Strike—agreed on by all—that kept the organiza-j. tion together in spite of its bitter feud over the controversial Vietnam war.
On Sunday Governor Brown came. His car sped into the garage entrance of the modern building and the Steel door slid shut behind him. Strikers, who had been standing for hours waiting for his arrival, made so much noise banging on the door that the governor came out to talk to them. He submitted to a barrage of •
(Him the page)
-5


CDC (Continuation)
-6-
questions from Dolores Hierta, whom he knows well from her activities years a-go f ighting for farm labor laws. Ihe big question was: What is your position on the Grape Strike? Will you help us? He did not give straight ansvers.
Later he vas trapped at a back entrance munching a bologna sandwich by crews of strikers who were determined to get some answers from the Governor. The following conversation took place. The questioner was Luis Valdez, of the Farm Workers Theater.
"WHY don*t you help us?" said Valdez.
"You*re doing pretty good by yourselves," replied the governor.
"Why donft you.ask the growers to negotiate?"
"I can*t do anything. Fm just the governor. Besides maybe Fve done something already.
"What?"
"More than you think."
Then a final question: trWhy don’t you talk to your friend DiGLorgio? (The governor and DiGiorgio are old school buddies)."
The governor didnft answer. Ife made a face and turned away, right into a ques-tion by farm worker Gilbert Rubio: "When are you coming to Delano?"
"I can’t answer you," said the governor, "Fm eating a sandwich." Choking on his bologna he slipped between two people and fled.
In spite of this conversation the governor promised to come to Delano and to take a pbsition on the strike. It was not known when this would happen.
Saturday night at the convention, the CDC held a dance in honor of the strikers. The hotels where the delegates stayed were ali required to get rid of their Schen-
(Continued on page 17)


Schenley has a give-away called the OLD CHARTER SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Every year they spend $2,000 to send three Negroes to school. They do this to convince the Negro eommunity that Schenley is a good guy, and that Negroes should buy Schenley whiskey. This year it didn’t work.
Schenley took its Ione Negro vice president, R>bert Powell, to Los Angeles, and planned a huge dinner. They invited ali the inportant I* A. Negroes to come to watch them present the $2,000. They rented a part of the expensive Statler-Hil-ton Hotel, fixed their dinner, and waited for the important Negroes to arrive.
The StatLer-E|lton has five entrances, and at each entrance there appeared the pickets of the FarmWorkers Association. When the important Negroes arrived, they found out about the strike and about the boycott. They found out that Schenley is not such a good guy.
And they refused to enter the hotel to eat Schenleyfs dinner and watch the pre-sentation. Among them was Rev. Brookins, head of the Ihited Civil Rights Com nittee of los Angeles, leader of all the Negro people. Also refusing to participate in Schenley1 s cheap publicity stunt was Dr. Goodlet, editor of the San Fran-cisco "Sun-Reporter," who was supposed to make a speech at the dinner, Dr. Ralph Richardson, chairman of the L. A. Board of Education, and Postmaster Shawi There were others, too, who would not cross the picket line.
inside^ when the food began to get cold, Schenley sent their Negro vice president Powell out to see what was the matter, He begged the Ne.gro leaders to come in. Re lied to them about the strike. He told them that Schenley had always given
â– 'v(Continued on page 15)


-8-
NOT 1930, BUT1966
Farm Workers March Through Salinas Streets; Protest 25$ an Hbur Wage
Salinas Workers Protest
A band of brave and ragged farm workers marched through the streets of Salin-as two weeks ago to let the public know that they were being forced to work for 25$ an hour. The march was a response to some of the cruelest and most in-human treatment ever to be suffered by farm workers in the state of Chlifornia. Her6 is the whole story as reported by witnesses and by the Salinas daily news-paper.
Over 300 resident Salinas farm wcrkers early in February were forced to seek help from the Welfare Department when no jobs were made available to them in the fields. The Welfare Department provided all those who "qualified” with a card good for a bovi of soup. Obtaining the card and the soup involved a four nile walk each day. The soup kitchen was not open on weekends.
Couhty officials held a meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 8 to find out vhether they


-9-
j could get work out of these men in return for the soup cards» About a hundred lof the men came to the meeting and told the officials that they wonld be glad to take jobs with the county.
Adam Itomero, a member of the National Farm Workers Association, said,
I ”We ali raised our hands at the meeting because we wanted to work, but we | didn’t know they wanted us to work for nothing.
j The jobs wre for work on the county roads. County official Tom Hudson said:
I "We're not going to let anybody go j hungry in Monterey County i have 1,200 miles of roads wmcn I need work. You fellows can put i your shoulder to the wheel and rea-i lly hit it hard. ”
j It was announced later tnat the pay | for the work was 25$ an hour, not in ! cash, but in food credits. The ! Salinas Califomian observed that j this was about one-half the wages of a baby sitter. In addition the job plan made it impossible for the farni workers to look for jobs.
Jij; , ,1. . . . . .i :• ; - ...
The men, furious at this cruel insuit, complained. The Welfare De -1 partment made it known that it cost I $10 to rent each bus for the men to I take them to work, and that there | were other expenses. Some of the | men said "TheyTre treating us as if [ we were prisoners—or worse. At I least prisoners are given tobacco I and soap. We are expected to work i on the county roads for 25$ worth of i food for each hour we work, and ! that*s ali." Romero said to re-! porters on the night before the | march, February llj "We*renot ]j! asking anything thatfs unreaso- "THE GREAT SOCIETY" in California t •
j nable. Ali we*re asking is if
I they*re going to give us work, they pay us for our work.”
The workers marched all through Salinas the next day (see photo). They car-I ried crude homemade signs saying WELFARE SIAVERY HAS .GOT TO GO; GIVE i US REAL JOBS; LET US INTD THE GREAT SOCIETY; IF YOU DON*TSEE SOME | MDNEY, HDWARE YOU GOING TO SEE HONEY?; WE WANT TO UVE LIKE i EQUAL CITTZENS, and others. Some of them were in rags, one man carried | a bedroll. .
i (Cbntinued on page 10)


-10-
(a &ctita%
Mr. Cesar Chavez,
[n the past I have been coming here to Delano to work in pruning but I know they are in strike so I will not corneto be a scab. I would like to come to be on the pictet line instead. I have met guys here that have been working with me. I told them not to come and work and they are stili here. I hope we will win, so I am with you. Give *em Hell.
Albert Medrano
Los Angeles
Dear Editor:
Do you know what theyfre using the church hall at St. Mary’s for? For the meetings of scab contractors. I think this is a disgrace to the Roman Catho-lic Church. 1 have no doubt that the Lord himself would throw them out, just like the money changers in the temple*
A supporter Delano, California
EI IV&lcriado Says: We couldn,t agree more.
SALINAS (Continuation)
They marched out of towh to the Welfare Department, where the officials stood on top of a table and made a speech to them, offering a litti e better deal now. three day*s food for one day*s work on the county roads. The men accepted.
But Romero said: ”Still no cash. We deserve some cash to buy some tobacco and razor blades. i. We*re not asking for high wages. We*re asking for the low-est wages—farm wages. ”
After the demonstration, one county official, Supervisor Ifenry said "Maybe 25 A Central labor coundl representative in Salinas said the Board of Supervisors was "making a iaughing stock out of Monterey County."
But to the men it was a very serious matter. One of the workers said "We need a union—any union. Ali ve have to do is stick together. ”
Another man pointed out: "The county isnTt the only monster of these terrible events. The growers and contractors who dump their low-cost workers into the streets as if they were pieces of rusting machinery—these are the real vil-lains."
"It doesnft have to be that way, you know" the demonstrator continued. "There are other seasonal industries and their workers are not trampled on like this.
That is because they are unionized."____________â– 
" we are small, we are weak. we should help one another4
—Kenneth I^tchen


“11-
GESTAPO COMES TO MCFARLAND
Six weeks ago EI Malcriado ran a story on NFWA leader Epifano Camacho called "They?re Out to Get Ckmacho"» Camacho was arrested and released a number of times since tHe artide appeared. Here is a statement by his wife.
I, Salome.Camacho, hereby declare that on Friday, January 7, 1966, at 3°15 in the afternoon, there arrived at our home in McFarland, California, three men—two dressed in civilian dress and the third in a uhiform that appeared to be a policeman*s. This last person spoke Spanish and he served as an interpreter for the others in what they wanted to say to me, because I db not speak English; they showed me a metallic piate which presumably identified them as policement, then they told me they wished to talk with me for a moment.
Out of courtesy I invited them in and offered them a* seat but they did not sit down, instead they told me they had permission to search the house, but they did not Show me a single document that authorized them to do that, for which reason I thought they wanted merely to observe the things without touching anything for which reason I consented without misgiving to allow them to do that; but as soon as I saw that they began to upset everything and to get intd everything from all sides, pulling out whatever they found, strewing papers, books, boxes, clothes, turning over pillows, I felt very bad, and worse when my five year old daughter began to cry because she too was not accustomed to thing type of thing, that is, seeing persons armed with pistols searching on all sides; it was then that I wanted to protest this action but I desisted because I thought they might be imposters trying to pass as policemen, since real po-licemen do not have to behave in such a vulgar manner and they at least would have shown me some document written in Spanish so that I might understand what they were talking about and who had sent them. That is, I had deeper doubts that they were really policemen and more when I saw they were searching in the smaUest deposits, I supposed that they were searching for money Or jewelry; they also asked me for a pistol which presumably they were looking for, then they began to take pictures of everything; they photographed the head of the bed, with what objeet I do not know; and photographed a box which con-tained some cigarette packs of different brands, which are ones the Association gives to my husband so that he may give them to the men who help with the strike and who sleep in the office here in McFarland; while some were doing this, the other police-imposter was searching the garage, taking photographs of the car that was inside and examining everything; they took some things--I do not know what; I believe it was only six pruning shears, for they left me a receipt for only that. According to my husband, those shears are his pro-perty and others are the property of some men that have abandoned the work in the fields previously and that he himself has taken to work in Oxnard, California for which reason he was in charge of caring for them in addition to some clothes, and that soon those persons will retum for their things. This scene lasted until ten to four of the same afternoon. And so if those men had some document, only they knew about it because I did not see it.
—Salome Camacho- McFarland, Calif.
A month later—only last week—the courts declared this search Ulegal and ordered the seized property returned to Camacho by the police.


-12-
DIGIORGIO ANSWHIEL MALCRIADO; "We are Not i Water Thief.”
-13-
The monstrous DiGiorgio Fruit Corporation, owner of the vineyards on strike in. the Delano area, world* s large st producer of tabie grapes, has written a letter to EL MALCR3ADO. The letter, sent February 10, from San Francisco, said that DiGiorgio Corporation "does not control banks; does not receive a huge free federal han-dout, and is not a water thief1.
The letter was an answer to an artide appearing in EI Malcriado #28, called "The Water Thieves". The arti-cle contained a cartoon of DiGiorgio, and said the folio-wings
DiGiorgio Corporation receives the equivalent of $577 in government money for every acre of land that they irrigate. Now they are pretending to sell their "excess land" under government regulation which limit the a-mount of free water a grower can get.
The "Excess Land Sale" is a fraud. In the first place, it is illegal since the land under federal regulations can be sold only to people who will live on or near the land. Second, the prices are inflated. The land is supposed to be priced at its value not including the value of the water. $1500 an acre is too much.
The whole purpose of the Excess Land Iaw is to keep companies like DiGiorgio and Schenley from getting huge landholdings. The idea of the law is to make it possible for people without much money to own land.
But under the terms of this sale, a poor farmer would have to come up with $160,000 cash. DiGiorgio-con-trolled banks will never lend anyone money to buy this land, unless they agree to lease the land back to DiGiorgio.
The prize for DiGiorgio is a huge free federal handout: billions of gallons of water every year to irrigate thou-sands of acres of high paying grapes. U S. taxpayers pick up the bili for this, the biggest welfare program of them ali.
r 'his is the federal caji j osed to be for smalb water from the high area. Without it, the been pumped dry by S
The DiGiorgio Corpoi taps into the canal a 1 lano.
l whose water is sup-Kmers. The canal brings ntains into the Delano |ea would long ago have &nley*s monstrous pumps. ion (Sierra Vista Ranch)
I miles northeast of De-
The purpose of the articl the scandalous "DiGiorgio land is put up for sale at| "forced government land |
Here’s how it works: Tei the government to sell it| have federal water to irii years, water from the g<$ be reserved for small fai the lush vineyards of Siel multi-million dollar corpl project was built at the 4 the United States. The \| farmers who own less tha thousands of acres. Thel cial deal with the govern| they must sell the land ai price. Now that their til drained millions of dollaj taken it to San Francisco} want to give up the land.f
as to inform the public about jand Sale," where DiGiorgio lated prices in a so-called
I.",
ears ago DiGiorgio promised .nd in ten years if it could te their grapes. For ten fn-ment canal—supposed to »rs—has been pouring into Vista Ranch, owned by the iion. The government water inse of ali the taxpayers of ir is only supposed to go to 60 acres. DiGiorgio owns >t the water by making a spe-t. Part of the deal was that e end of ten years at a low Is up, now that they have >ut of the Delano area and tey are stili too greedy to te prices they are askingfor
the land are far higher than permitted under the Water Law.
EI A&lcriado Says: Thief.
DiGiorgio Corporation is a Wfoter
There is a statue of the king of the DiGiorgio Corporation, Joseph DiGiorgio, in San Francisco. Underneath the statue are words calling him a "great humanitarian"
If the DiGiorgio Corporation is in the humanitarian tra-dition of their founder, why then do they import huge quantities of workers from the impoverished M exi can border area to labor in their vineyards? Why do they not recognize the legitimate union of their striking em-ployees? Why do they not leave the federal water to the small farmer?
In these ways the owners of Sierra Vista Ranch have misused the people of Delano and misused the land. As long as these abuses continue, EI Malcriado will continue to report them. It will take more than a battery of high-priced lawyers to stop the truth.
DiGiorgio, save your money. Pay your farm workers a decent wage, follow government regulations, sell your excess land at just prices. If you do these things you won*t need those lawyers.


-14-
THE PEOPLE ARE ASKING...
This "Why are the County “uestion: Hospitals so Bad?”
Farm workers must use county hospitals almo st exlusively for medical care, because they caiinot afford to go to private doctors. For this reason it is important to them that the county hospital care (which is not free, as some people believe) is up to the minimum standards which human beings have a right to ex-pecto
It is pointless to list the inadequacies: the attitude of the staff that people who go there are ”not really side"; the need of the sick one to prove that he is illbo-fore care is given; the refusal by staff to care for persons obviously in needof attention; needless waiting time; impos-sibility of non-residents to receive care, etc., etc.
These things are well known by all who use these hospitals. Farm workers knowwhat their medical needs are. Early in February, health officials planned for a Feb. 5th Medical Conferende in Delano. Some observers be-lieved that something was going to really happen in the anCient dusty closet of California medical care for the needy.
But nothing has changed. The confer-ence was cancelled because it was fear-ed that farm workers would be present and would make their needs very clear-ly known. The purpose of the confer-erice was not to get a job done, but to throw a smoke screen over the whole scandalous subject.
By cancelling the conference, the officials effectively suppressed a report
which had been prepared by the FWA. The report dearly showed the unsatis-fied medical needs of the people. The conference is now to be held behind closed doors in Bakersfield. The people, apparently, are going to continue to suffer.
EI Malcriado Says: These "concerned" officials will never set up a medical program for those who need it. They are acting in bad faith.
We wish the FWA complete succe ss in its own efforts, and we salute the many doctors who have come here from as far away as 300 miles to treat patients. Let it be remembered that not one Kern County doctor has come forvard to offer his help to the cause.


-15-
ONE OF THE SMALL MIRACLES
THAT KEEPS THE STRIKE STRONG
TOfat cd t6e 'Jt&nz
ClKdW&l
cvind $5.00
SEND YOUR ANSWER AND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS TO:
"GAME OF THE TOWNS " P.a BOX 1060 DELANO, CALIF.
Dale Warne, the chef of the National Farm Workers Association, poses in front of his oven with his two assist-ants: ALice Tapia and Ruth Trujillo. Warne, who comes from Montana and who worked previously at the W)nder-lodge in Bakersfield, is turning out deliciolis dinners by the hundreds, iii re-turn for the $5 a week which the Strike can afford to pay him.
Since the NFWA strike kitchen on Met-tler Road has been operating (abouttwo months) there have been hundreds of me ais served every day by Warne and his helpers, with poor equipment and sometimes poor ingredients. But the food always turns out well. This is another of the small miracles that keep the strike strong.
LOS ANGELES (Continuation)
a lot of money to Negroes and other oppressed people. The Negro leaders re-fused to be fooled.
So Schenley ate its dinner alone. When reporters asked, ,fWhy are there so ma-ny empty chairs around your big table?” they were told, "It’s because of the flu."


-16-
EL MALCRIADO TEUS
Stoniet tSLe “Padf
COACHELLA
Some people say that the Great Delano Grape Strike really began in May, 196^ in the little desert town of Thermal in the Coachella Valley, 300 miles south of the San Joaquin. It was there, in that first week in May, that seVeral hundred Filipino grape pickers, most of them members of the AWOC union, demanded an hourly wage of $1.40 and an incentive bonus of 25£ a box for picking the early grapes. Growers at first refused, so the workers went on strike. They were immediately joined by several hundred Mexican-American pickers. And the government, which usually gives growers handouts and helps them to b break strikes, this time remained neu-tral. Secretary of Labor Wirtz refused to import illegally braceros to break the strike. And he pointed out that $1.40 an hour is the absolute minimum that growers by law were supposed to pay local workers before they could even apply for braceros.
After ten days the growers seemed to recognize the justice of the workers1 demands. Through an impartial state conciliator, an agreement to end the strike was worked out. The ranchers agreed to pay the $1.40 an hour wage
and 25£ a box rate, and they were for-bidden to blackball the strike leaders (as McFarland rose growers did in a similar strike last year). No union con-tract was signed, but it appeared that the strike had been one.
When some of these workers in the Coachella strike migrated north to Delano in August, theyjoined with local workers to ask for the same wages that they had received in Coachella. But Delano growers refused to even discuss decent wages, so the strike vias calledin the first week of September.
Back in Coachella, abittertruthabout labor disputes arose when growers lo-wered wages again, plunging them down to $1.25 an hour.Without a union con-tract, the workers had no guarantee that their strike gains would be permar nent. But once vorkers find out how strong they are together, they never go back to the old degrading conditions. The Coachella Valley will see other strikes in the future. When they come, as with the Delano grape strike, it will be all the way for a signed union con-tract because that*s the only thing the growers will ever obey.


-17-
"We Are the Strike’
The. Delano Grape Strikers This week: RAFAEL VEGA
. (Continued from last week)
1*1 went to work for Mid-State Ihrms, because they also gave work to my wife.
I wanted to buy a small house for my family. But at the end of the picking season, Ithey gave a party for the forelady, and because my wife didn*t take part in it, Jthey ran her off. They never let her vork there again.
i! The foreman I worked for was always drunk.He couldnTt talk to anybody without [jgetting angry.One Sunday I went to teli him that I didn?t have any place to move gihe water, because I vas irrigating the vineyards, and he told me arigrily, vitii j those twisted eyes, drunk, that if I couldnTt find a place to move the%ater, then
II should go home to sleep, because he could handle the whole thing himself. He ijfired me right there and then.
i And I used to see the strikers every day, and I amdously wanted to jbin them be-fcause my conscience vas not at peace, seeing how the ranchers and the contrac-j tors had robbed us. After I lost my job, I joined the strikers. I now have three jmonths on strike, and ali my needs are satisfied. I have dothes, food,butane, jjlight, everything I really need.When I used to work for the ranchers, if I bought 'food, I couldn’t afford to pay my bilis. If I paid my bilis, I coudnft buy food. Eve-[ rything’s so expensive—at that rate, we*d all die of hunger anyway.
iThafs why we have to fight with all the pride we?ve got, and with a lot of anger, Ijuntil we defeat these conceited strangers. In twenty years in this valley, they have i made themselves millionaires. And the scabs, we have to struggle vith them too, jbecause they come from all over to steal our jobs. But I believe in this cause jjwe*re fighting and in God who will not abandon us.
pfy only solution is to fight for the well-being of my children, because that?s the i only thing I can give them, liberty, the future, so they won*t exploit them the jway theyfve exploited me. I don’t have anything else to give them. ” * i
|CDC (Continuation)
ley iiquors. All of these things were only posslble because of tireless work by CDC officials. The following are named MEN OF THE MONTH by EI Malcriado: Willie Brown, George Ballis, Roy Greenaway, Si Casady, Jerry Hili, Mike Sny-der. These are a few of the CDC people that made the convention not only lively
i but a huge help for the strike. The Ihrm Workers Association was also given a Igreat deal of assistance by the Bakersfield CSO, especially Richard and Lucy Alvarez, David Borciaga, Hank and Esther Martinez, Ray and Hortencia Solis, and Juan Govea, among others. Taking care of the Farm Workers Association booth were Bakersfield members, including the Mejia and Zaragoza families, Alejandro Maldonado, Jesus Gaona, and Jesus Bernal; also the Chavez and Padi-lla girls from Delano and Julio and Fina Hernandez of Cbrcoran, managers of the strike store. The food was transported thtough the generosity of lorenzo Hernandez and his truck. A greater success than this convention would be hard to imagine.


-18.
Boycott Grows!
Tony Orendain of Hanford flew to Chicago last Thursday to coordinate efforts to stop the sale of Schenley products. Among die groups doing the work of the boycott in Chicago are the United Packinghouse Wor-kers, the Retail and Wholesale Department Store Employees, the American Fe-deration of Teachers, the American News-paper Guild, and the Textile Workers of America» x
i
19-
Sal Gonzales of Delano, the boycott representative here, is planning the great Boston Grape Party. He spoke about the strike to a group of 100 mihisters last Wednesday, and has been given support by most commu-nity leaders./^ ^
Schenley has without success threatened legal action against Steve Allen for his strike and boycott support. Schenley has also hired public relations experts here to plan activities against the boycott, like "Instant Cocktail Parties" an many press conferences. But the Farm W>rkers Association has its own "instant pickets. ” ________________
50,000 government employees have just pledged their support of the boycott and will not buy Schenley products. This ison-ly the beginning.
Cesar Chavez will speak this week here to Catholic and Pro-testant church leaders from ali over the U S» Then he will talk with government officials.
The first support in this a-rea has come from the Catholic Church in the form of money. Picketing of super-markets is about to begin.


THERE’S MUSIC IN THE CREDIT UNIONI
The second annual meeting of the Farm Vforkers Credit Union was held a week ago Sunday. Credit Union members from as far away as Huron attended. SANTOS CHAPA and MANUEL URAN-DAY were elected to the Board of Dir-ectors. DOIX)RES HUERTA was re-elected.
The front table at the annual meeting of the Farm Workers Credit U-nion held at the American Legion Hali in Delano. Left to right: Her-nandez, Chavez, Yniguez, Richard Chavez, Padilla, Navarro. Whenthe meeting got dull, they brought in mu-sicians and there was dancing.
PEDRO HERNANDEZ of Corcoran was elected a new member of the credit committee. This committee decides which of the members will receive loans. The supervisory committee re-elected TONY MENDEZ and elected E-LISED MEDINA.This committee guards the savings of the members.
There was no menudo like last year. Instead a band played lively music and the children of ULLIE VASQCJE Z, TE-RESA CEBALLOS and JUAN AGUIRRE entertained the members with Spanish dancing.
A SCAB REPORT
activities to report.
The leader, Frank Herrera, is running for city council. This notorious labor contractor is being supported by the growers, police, and their servants on ] the east side of Delano. Herrera is not j being supported by the people. He is not expected to win.
FRANK THE FINK
The scab union, lacking members and a legitimate purpose, has had to resort to activities such as: obtaining recog-nition from the Delano Chanfoer of Com-merce; receiving its incorporation pa-pers back from Sacramento; and har-rassing Steve Allen at a recent press conference. There have been no other
The scab union (called Kem-Tulare Independent Phrm Workers) is holding meetings and telling the people that un- !' less they sign and pay they will not be I permitted to work for the labor oontrao-J tors when work opens up in the various 1 crops in a few months.
But the people can?t be fooled. The scab union has not been able to produce a.ny membership. It is run by the KKK-Citizens for Facts, an anti-strike pro-grower group with only five members: all growers or labor contractors.


z
Back Issues Now Available!
-21-
* BiMoMa *; = ■.■^•I - . ■
!VM|^
l /Sh? Jhgr \ ftmsm
iJulfi! irvA.fc.KM.. I
; «saLl,!1 1 i8§8S&li
wmmSm
EI Malcriado has become the nation’s leading newspaper on farm labor, and old issues are now valuable collectors* items. The Farm Worker Press has a few complete editions on file, for sale to libraries and collectors at $100 for the complete set (#1 through #30 in Spanish and #17 through #30 in EngLish). For those who would like a represen-tative sample of back issues, a set of 8 different issues is available for $1. Get the real story on the days leading up to and £ollowing the first weeks of the strike, on the Phrm Workers*
Ma,ss, the now famous photos of gro-wer brutality in action, the great. march in Delano, and many other fea-tures. Send $1 to ”Back Issues", EI Malcriado, PO Box 1060, Delano.
Think of tho Futwro
SAVE
FARM WORKERS CREDIT ON»N
oclano. cauA p. o. mm M


tos im uras
* * * * *War is good for business. But itTs not good for farmworkers. Dur-ing World War n, the growers used the "war emergency" as an excuse to bring in thousands of braceros from Mexico. The reason they gave was that the grapes and the olives and the lettuce were "critical foods” needed in the war effort. Meanwhile some of their own sons were able to avoid the draft through agricultural exemptions. It is important to remember these things because the U. S. is again in a state of war.
The bitter stupidity of Delano area growers may set off a complete investigation of Caiifomiars agricultural industry and labor laws, a prominent stockholder in Schenley Cbrporation warned last week. When California* s legislature is reap-portioned this year, City taxpayers may rebel at the huge handouts, tax evasions and unfair laws which benefit some of the state*s big ranchers and hurt the small farmers and farm workers. If the legislature elected in 1966 passes minimum wage, collective bargaining, and other such laws, such as Hawaii has for farm workers, it will be largely the resuit of Deiano*s growers, and the publicity they have given to the inhuman way they treat their workers.
The Association has one man who is travelling around California, selling an i-dea. His idea is the Farm Workers Co-op. In April EI Malcriado will print a special series of articles explaining what has already been done and what is planned. It is an ambitious project which is already well underway.
Like all the projects of the Farm Workers Association, the co-op must be self-supporting. The co-op representative badly needs some kind person to give him a gasoline credit card to use for his Volkswagen. If you can help with this essentia! project, please write Cesar Chavez, Farm Workers Co-op, Box 1060, Delano, California.
News from San Jose indicates increasing success of the boycott. Bob Barron re-ports cooperation from most Stores, picketing of a few uncooperative ones, se-veral program on X V. with San Jose Chairman Ed Mercado explaining the strike and boycott. Joe Graham has started a door-to-door informational campaign, and and is being aided by volunteers from local civil rights groups, the Young Chris-tian Movernent, church and Mexican-American groups, and other workers, It is tHousands of honest hard-working people like these, explaining the truth, that help sustain the strike and block the growers1 lies.


HUELGA: The First Hundred Days of the Great Delano Grape Strike by Eugene Nelson; published by Farm Worker Press, Inc., Itelano, Calif.
160 pages, illustrated. $1.50_____________________________________________ -
Nelson, the author, served as a picket captaln early in the strike. He is also the son of a Modesto area grape grower.
If that fact alone isnft enough to make you want to read the book, here are a few of the chapter tities: THE DO VE SEASON IN DELANO; WH) IS CESAR CHAVEZ, DISPOTO & COMPANY; THE DUSTY BISHOP; POVERTY AND POLTITCS; THE GHOST OF JACK LONDON.
No ordinary union would ever permit such a book to be published. It certainly is not an official version. But the Farm Workers Association is no ordinary union. With the publication of this book there are no longer any secrets. If it is ciear from the book that Rev. Jim Drake cannot teli a cotton field from a vineyard, it is also ciear(on the other hand) that the brothers Dispoto are hard-ly less than monsters.
The book does a better job at showing the roots of the Delano conflict than any-thing that has been printed. It is a book that will permanently silence those who profit from lying about this strike. And it’s easy to read. Ebn't pick it up un-less you have about four hours of free time ahead of you, because you wonft want to put it down until you are finished.
Of course the book is not all good. More than one reader has wondered why the author makes such a big deal out of the helpful but not essential work done by a few outside volunteers while hardly men-tioning some of the farm workers at the very center of the strike itself.
The book is only available in English. It vtould be very thoughtful if someone would offer to finance its publication in Spanish, as it is now being translated.
It will not
be available in Stores until mail orders are caught up.
Send in the coupon at the right with $1.50.
“UIICI •••THE FIRST 100 DAYS
nUtLuA OF THE GREAT
by E. Nelson DELANO GRAPE STRIKE
A thrilling account of the biggest farm strike since the thirties, now going on. This book, 160 pages with many photos, is one you'11 want to keep. $1.50:each
Farm Worker Press Box 1060-Delano, Calif.
Send me____copies of "Huelga"
Name ________________________
Address


netura ‘Reguaa te*: ffUBTW J>7-SrofU Organization U. 1 Postogo
RAID
Ddano, Callf^
Pfmlt No.tL2U
DONT BUY SCHENLEY’$!
Since September 8, 1965, 4500 Mexican American, Filipino and Negro farm workers have been on strike against 35 Delano, Califomia grape growers. The workers are represented by the National Farm Workers As sociation (independent) and«the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (ASE-CIQ). ;'The strike is handled through a joint'strike committee of the unions. *
Schenley's# the biggest Corporation in the area (with almost 5,000 acres), with 1965 profits of $17,000,000, sometimes pays its workers as low as30$ an hojir. Hundreds of its workers have gone on strike.
Schenley has refused the offers of the Califomia Conciliatipn Service, ministers, and civic groups to promote discus sion between the strikers and the growers.
Because farm workers have no assistance from the govemment to help bring about mediation of their strike they are dependent upon the general public to pressure growers to sit down at the table and discuss wages and conditions.
So we ask for your help through a boycott of Schenley products and through yoiir letters to Vice President James E. Woolsey, Schenley Industries, 45 Second Street, San Francisco, Califomia.
DO NOT BUY;
Any Schenley product, including
WHISKEY, BOURBON, AND SOOTCH CUTTY SARK I.W.HARPER
ROMA AND CRESTA BLANCA WINE
ANCIENT AGE j.W. DANT
DEWAR*S ”WHITE LABEL'
Also:
Dewaifs ,,Ancestor”
Ne Plus Ultra
Long John
O. F. C. Canadian
MacNaughton Canadian
Schenley Reserve
Melrose Rare George Dickel
Red Satin old
Golden Wedding old Charter
Three Feathers Echo Spring
BEWARE—most table grapes^ow on the market, and almost ali Enperors, are Scab Grapes. Look for the se labeis 1
LBL, Sweet Cluster, Heri-j
tage, Arra, Miss Bute, Supersweet, Lindy, etter Test, Quality, Sno-Boy, Jovista, Flamingo, MC Extra, ScQtsman, Roxie, Treas-ure, Steady, Camelot, Zora, Alila, Bonophil, Tudor, Tuxedo Parie, Royal Delano, Royal K, Radovich, Sall-n-Ann, Trocha, Gee Jay, Verko, Jindy, Rodes, Cashmere, 3 Brothers, PBI, Marlin, Spring* time, Highlands, Vinland, MC, Blue River, PIA, Silver Xnight, Silver King, Columbine, Antone’s Quality, Prosperi ty, Honey ee. Carie, Hi Style, Louis IV, Better Test, A and A, Steele, Blue Flag, Jovista, Kenney, Jr., Del-Vin, Mr. KK, Diamond S, Ali American, Tbomas, New Yorker, Banquet, Rennie Boy, Moses, Vines Best, Delano King, EI Toro, Delano Gold, Sun Best, Sun* view, Slerra Moon, Motheris, Mary-Jo, Eariy Mart, VBZ.________


Full Text

PAGE 2

-2El Mal.crlad Farm Press, Inc., P.O. Box 1060, Delano, Calif. Office of publlcation--10:1. Albany, Delano, Callf. Se cond class postage paid at Delano, Callf. Petmlt appllation pendinq, To subscribe at $2 a year or to submit news telephone 25-9908 or write to P.O. Box 1060. #30 2-28-66 YOU MOVE YOU MUST 'LET US KNOW YOUR NEW AD;DRESS,----' EDITORIAL: HUNGER ... FOR JUSTICE The realities of a strike are sometilres very hard. Silq:lly, After six months., people get tired, and the road ahead seems very long and very painful . Why won't they understand, these ranchers, these contractors, these scabs that we are only fighting for the well-being of everyone? Why is it so hard to have jus tice, so that all men may live with di g nity and free and at peace? Why must there be so rrany people that live only to oppress and to abuse others, to twist the truth, to tell lies and to do what they do, only because they feel like it? These are questions that trouble us deeply at the end of another day, when we're weary and tired of having travelled across two counties talking to scabs, to poor people like ourselves who were brought here from very far away--from Mexico, Texas and Calexico--o nly to break this strike; people so poor that they don ' t have even enough money to pack their things and leave the strike area, as all are wont to do, so they \\On't bother us. They are not at fault, The guilty ones are the ranchers and the contractors who ' do not want this strike to win, becauSe justice would take away all the profits they draw from the misery of their workers. But in spite of how hard this strike has been, the resistance these thieves, . these vampires, have given us only makes us stronger. It inspires us to head out to the fields again every morning, with new dedication and new heart. We : will go on fighting harder than ever before, because now we have tasted of the ' dignity of free mm who know how to claim their rights. If the ranchers and the i contractors have imposed many hungers on us, they have now imposed a hunger ' for justice • .And this is why we shall win this strike. U18701 7534688

PAGE 3

. -3-IN THIS ISSUE: The Strike Reaches the Governor ... Page 5 Salinas Farnf Workers Stand Up fo r Their Rights Page 7 "Why are the County Hospitals so Bad?" Page 14 The Boycott Covers the Nation Page 20 J

PAGE 4

-4-The Biggest "Esquirol" , of Them All Esquirol ES-KEE-ROLE a squirrel. As used in strikes against ;; California ranchers, the word means !.:' .. scab or strikebreaker. In any _language "" it is' one of the strongest words possiit.: . ble to use against another person. i . ..Thw' is Lewis Rosensteil, president of 11;. Schenley Industries, v.hose wife bought $50,-000 worth of clothing in just one store, who could spend $1,000 a day ( and not run out of money for a thousand 1 years, who sometimes pays his field. workers 30 an hour. (See El Malcn ad6 #29, pageB}.This is the man who l. '. will not sit at the table with the Farm 'M>rkers Association and agree to pay a just v.age. LARRY ITLIONG IS RUNNING Larry Itliong, leader of the Filipine strikers (AWOC) has registered as a candidate for city council. 'The picture sho\\5 cesar Chavez signing his nomination papers. 'The "Delano called him "'The People's Candidate." El Malcriado predicts that he will win. From the AFL -CIO Convention " Resolved : 'That this convention pledges its full support and solidarity behind the struggle of the workers on strike against the growers around Delano, California, and we call upon all affiliates of the AFL-CIO to extend both moral and financial support to these workers, who have been the victims of inhuman exploitation, in order to help them win their struggle for a full e r .reasure of economic and social justice." Send thts coupon to EL MALCRIADO, BOX 1060 DELANO, CALIFORNIA The best way to be sure you will set your MALCRIADO 111 by mall, dellv ,. ered tD your home BYBI'J two weeU. Send your and address to 894, Delano, CalU., and we wlU , send you the newspaper to you for one vear. The cost ls $2. 00 per year, but you do not hll,ve to send this oow. WG will send you a bill. NAME. ________________ __ TOWN. ________________ __

PAGE 5

The California Lemocratic Cbuncil, in the liveliest convention .in its history, gave an overwhelming vote of support to the Lelano Grape strike and Boycott. In a spontaneous demonstration on Friday night, council members raised over $5700 .,, in cash for the Association to continue the strike. In a booth manned by Bakersfield FWA members, the Association gathered tom; of food to replenish the strike store, enpty since the end of January. Also nearly a thousand copies of El Malcriado were sold on Saturday alone. The CDC wnet on record with the following recommendations: !)strikebreaking , should be made a as it is in many countries; 2)The Delano Grape Strike and Schenley boycott receive the full support of the 2, 000 influential delegates; 3 )In an investigation of all aspects of farm labor, the CDC committee recommends full support of the NFW A in all its major policies and positions. Everyone at the convention wore HUELGA buttons. Some members said it :Was. the support of the Lelano Grape Strike--agreed on by all--that kept the organiz.ation together in spite of its bitte:t' feud over the controversial Vietnam war. On Sunday Governor Brown came. His c:;usped into the garage entrance of the modern building and the steel door slid shut behind him. Strikers, who ' had been standing for hours waiting for his arrival, made so much noise banging on :the door that the governor came out to talk to them. He submitted to a barragl!
PAGE 6

-6-CDC (Continuation) questions from Dolores lherta, whom he knows v.ell from her activities years a go fighting . for farm labor laws. The big question was: What is your position on the Grape Strike? Will you help us? He did not give straight ansv.ers; Later he v.as trapped at a back entrance munching a bologna sandwich by crews of strikers who were determined to get sotre answers from the Governor. The following conversation took place. The questioner was Luis Valde . z, of the Farm Workers Theater. "WHY don't you help us?" said Valdez • ..,You're doing pretty good by yourselves," replied the governor. you ask the growers to negotiate?" "I can't.do anything. I ' m just the governor . Besides maybe I've done something already. "What? " "More than you think. " Then a final question: "Why don't you talk to .Your friend Di
PAGE 7

-'1-Schenley has a give-away called the OLD CHARTER SQIOLARSHIP FUND. Every year they spend $2, 000 to send three Negroes to school. They do this to con vince the Negro community that Schenley is a good guy, and that Negroes should buy Schenley whiskey . This year it didn't work. Schenley took its lone Negro vice president, Ibbert Powell, to Los Angeles, and planned a huge dinner. They invited all the i.nportant LA. Negroes to come to watch them present the $2, 000. They rented a part of the expensive Statler-Hilton Hotel, fixed their dinner, and waited for the important Negroes to arrive. The has five entrances, and at each entrance there appeared the pickets of the Farm Workers Association. When the important Negroes arrived, they found out about the strike and about the boycott. They found out that Schen ley is not such a good guy. And they refused to enter the hotel to eat Schenley's dinner and watch the presentation. Among them was Rev. Brookins, head of the lhited Civil Rights Com mittee of los Angeles , leader of all the Negro people. Also "refusing to partici, , pate in Schenley's cheap publicity stunt was Dr. Goodlet, editor of the San Fran-.. <;isco "Sun-Reporter," who was supposed to make a speech at the dinner, Dr. i v Ralph Richardson, chairman of the L. A. Board of Educati on, and Postmaster [if 'Shaw. There were others, too, who. would not cross the picket line. !V Inside, when the food began to get cold, Schenley sent their Negro vice president Powell out to see what was the matter. He begged the Negro leaders to coine in. He lied to them about the strike. H e told them that Schenley had always given (Continued on page 15)

PAGE 8

-8. .NO':r 1930, BUT 1966 . Fl!.rin Workers March Through Salinas Streets; Protest an lbur Wage Workers Protest A rend of brave and ragged farm workers marched through the streets of Salin as two weeks ago to let the public know that they were being forced to work for an hour . The march was a response to some of the cruelest and most inhuman tr. eatment ever to be suffered by farm workers in the state of Cilifornia. HerE!''is the whole story as reported by witnesses and by the Salinas daily news paper. Over 300 resident Salinas farm wcrkers early in February were forced to seek help from the Welfare Department when no jobs were made available to them in the fields. The Welfare Department provided all those who "qualified" with a card good for a bowl of soup. Obtaining the card and the soup involved a four mile walk each day. The soup kitchen was not open on weekends. Couhty officials held a meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 8 to find out wit ether they

PAGE 9

I -9l could 'get work out of these men in return for the soup cards. About a hundred . 1 of the men came to the meeting and told the officials that they would be glad to 1 take jobs with the county. I . . .\Adam Ibmero, a member of the National Farm Workers Association, said, l "We all raised our hands at the meeting because we wanted to work, but we ididn't know tney wanted us to for nothing. [ The jobs were for wrk on the county roads. County official Tom lfudson said: ! i "We're not going to let anybody go i hungry in Monterey County J have 1, 200 miles of roads wru.cn 1 i need work. You fellows can put . 1 your shoulder to the wheel and . i lly hit it hard. " / I n was announced later tnat the pay i for the work was an hour, not in ! cash, but in food credits. The i Salinas Californian observed that ! this was about one-haJf the wages of I ' a baby sitter. In addition the job plan made it impossible for the farm workers to look for jobs. i I The men, furious at this cruel in-/ suit, complained. The Welfare Del partment made it kno'M! that it cost , I $10 to rent each bus for the men to , take them to work, and that there i were other expenses. Some of the i men said "They're treating us as if i we were prisoners--or worse. At 1 least prisoners are given tobacco I and soap. We are expected to work 1 on the county roads for worth of 1 food for each hour we work, and I that's all." Romero said to reI porters on the night before the I narch, February 11; "We're not i asking anything that's unreaso i nable. All we're asking is if "THE GREAT SO. CIE'IY" in .. ,_; I they're goipg to give us wrk, they pay us for our work." I ' The workers marched all through Salinas the next day (see photo) , They carried crude homemade signs saying WELFARE SIA VERY HAS . GOT TO GO; GIVE I US REAL JOBS; LET US IN'IO THE GREAT SOCIETY; IF YOU DON'T SEE SOME. ' I M)NEY, IDWARE YOU GOING TO SEE HONEY?; WE WANT TO LIVE LIKE .. 1 EQUAL CITIZENS, and others. Some of them were in rags, one nan carrieq 1 . a bedroll. . (Qmtinued on page 10) . ! ' I

PAGE 10

-10-Mr. Cesar Chavez, In the past I have been coming here to Delano to work in pruning but I know they are in strike so I will not come t o be a scab. I would like to come to be on the picl
PAGE 11

-11GESTAPO COMES TO MCFARLAND Six weeks ago El Malcriado ran a story on NFWA leader Epifano Camacho called "They're Out to Get Cll.macho". Camacho was arrested and released a number of times since the article appeared. Here is a statemmt by his wife. I, Salome. Camacho, hereby declare that on Friday, January 7, 1966, at 3 :15 in the afternoon, there arrived at our home in McFarland, California, three men--two dressed in civilian dress and the third in a uniform that appeared to be a policeman's. This last person spoke Spanish and he served as an interpreter for the others in \\hat they wanted to say to me, because I db not speak English; they showed me a metallic plate which presumably identified them '1 as policement, then they told me they wished to talk with me for a moment. Out of courtesy l invited them in and offered them a seat but they did not sit down, instead they told me they had permission to search the house, but they did not show me a single document that authorized them to do that, for which reason I thought they wanted merely to observe the things without . touching anything for which reason I consented without misgiving to allow them to do that; but as soon as I saw that they began to upset everything and to get into everything from all sides, pulling out whatever they found, strewing papers, books, boxes, clothes, turning over pillows, I felt very bad, and wrse when • my five year old daughter began to cry because she too was not accustomed to thing type of thing, that is, seeing persons armed with pistols searching on all sides; it was then that I wanted to protest this action but I desisted because 1 thought they might be imposters trying to pass as policemen, since real policemen do not have to behave in such a vulgar manner and they at' least would have shown me some document written in Spanish so that I might understand what they were talking about and mo had sent them. That is, I had deeper doubts that they were really policemen and more when I saw they \\ere searching in the smallest deposits, I supposed that they were searching for money or jewelry; they also asked me for a pistol which presumably they were looking for, then they began to take pictures of everything; they photographed the head of the bed, with what object I do not know; and photographed a box which contained some cigarette packs of different brands, which are ones the Association gives to my husband so that he may give them to the men who help with the strike and who sleep in the office here in M::Farland; while some were doing this, the other police-imposter was searching the garage, taking photographs of the car that was inside and examining everything; they took some things--I do not know what; I believe it was only six pruning shears, for they left me a receipt for only that. According to my husband, those shears are his property and others are the property of some men that have abandoned the wrk in the fields previously and that he himself has taken to work in Oxnard, California for which reason he v.as in charge of caring for them in addition to some clothes, and that soon those persons will return for their things. This scene lasted until ten to four of the same afternoon. And so if those men had some document, only they knew about it because I did not see it. --Salome Camacho-McFarland, Calif. A month late:r---only last week--the courts declared this search illegal and ordered the seiz_ed property returned to Camacho by the police. :;

PAGE 12

-12DIGIORGIO ANSW HWeare Not EL MALCRIADO: -13-ater Thief." The monstrous DiGiorgio Fruit Corporation, . owner of the vineyards on strike in. the Do!lano area, world's largest producer of table grapes, has written a letter to EL MALCRIADO. The letter, sent February 10, from San Francisco, said that UGiorgio Corporation "does not control banks; does not receive a huge free federal han . dout, and is not a v.ater thief". The letter was an answer to an article appearing in El Ml.lcriado 1128, called "The Water Thieves" . The article contained a cartoon of DiGiorgio, and said the follo wing : DiGiorgio Corporation receives the equivalent of $577 in government money for every acre of land that they irrigate. Now they are pretending to sell their "excess land" under government regulation which limit the amount of free water a grower can get. The "Excess Land Sale" is a fraud. In the first place, it is illegal since the land under federal regulations can be sold . only to people who will live on or near the land . Second, the prices are inflated. The land is supposed to be priced at its value not including the value of the water. $1500 an acre is too much. The whole purpose of the Excess Land law is to keep companies like DiGiorgio and Schenley from getting huge landholdings. The idea of the law is to make it possible for people without much money to own land . But under the terms of this sale, a poor farmer would have to come up with $160, 000 cash. DiGiorgiocontrolled banks will never lend anyone money to buy this land, unless they agree to lease the land back to DiGiorgio. The prize for DiGiorgio is a huge free federal handout: billions of gallons of v.ater every year to irrigate thousands of acres of high paying grapes. U s . taxpayers pick up the bill for this, the biggest welfare program of them aU. ' his is the federal 1 osed to be for " 'ater from the area. Without been pumped dry _. v:.-> " J! :' the land are far higher than permitted under the Water Law. El Ml.lcriado Says ; DiGiorgio Corporation is a Water Thief. * * There is a statue of the king of the DiGiorgio Corporation, Joseph DiGiorgio, in San Francisco. Underneath the statue are words calling him a "great humanitarian." If the DiGiorgio Corporation is in the humanitarian tradition of their founder, why then do they ilqlort huge quantities of workers from the impoverished Mexican border area to labor in their vineyards? Why do they not recognize the legitimate union of their striking employees? Why do they not leave the federal water to the 'ears ago DiGiorgio promised small farmer? . . ' !lld in ten years if it could In these ways the owners of Sierra VIsta Ranch have , te their grapes. For ten misused the people of and misuse_ d the rnment canal--supposed to long as these abuses continue, El Malcnado wtll conti, lrs--has been pouring into nue to report them. It will take more than a battery of ; Vista Ranch, owned by the high-priced lawyers to stop the truth. tion. The government v.ater nse of all the taxpayers of r is only supposed to go to , 60 acres. DiGiorgio ov.ns >t the water by making a spe . t. Part of the deal v.as that DiGiorgio, save your money. Pay your farm workers a decent wage, follow government regulations, sell your excess land at just prices. If you do these things you won't need those lawyers. they must sell the end of ten years at a low price. Now that their ls up, now that they. have drained millions of mt of the Delano area and taken San Franciscdj tey are still too greedy to want to g.ve up the te prices they are asking for .

PAGE 13

-14-THE PEOPLE ARE ASKING ... This "Why are the County . week's H "t I 8 d?" question: OSPI _ a s so a . Farm workers nust use COWlty hospitals almost exlusively for medical care, because they cannot afford to go to private ' d 6ctors. For this reason it is important to them that the COWlty hospital care (which is not free, as some people believe) is up to the minimum standards which human beings have a right to expect. It is pointless to list the inadequacies: the attitude of the staff that people who go there are "not really sick"; the need of the sick one to prove that he . is ill be fore is given; the refusal by staff to care. for persons obviously in need of attention; needless waiting time; impo& s lbility of non-residents to receive care, etc., etc. which had been prepared by the FWA. The report clearly showed the unsatisfied medical needs of the people. The conference is now to be held behind closed doors in Bakersfield. 'The people, apparently, are goin g to continue to suffer. These things are well known by all who use these' hospitals. Farm workers know what their medical needs are. E.arly in February, health officials planned for a Feb. 5th Medical Confe in Delano. Some observers be lieved that something was going to really in the ancient dusty closet of Californta medical care for the needy. E.l Malcriado Says: These "concerned'' But nothing has changed. The confer-officials will never set up a medical ence was cancelled because it was fea.I'program for those who need it. They ed that farm workers would be present are acting in bad faith. and. would make their needs very clear ly known. The purpose of the confer" ertce was not to get a job done, but to throw a smoke screen over the whole scandalous subject. By cancelling the conference, the officials effectively suppressed a report We wish the FWA complete success in its own efforts, and we salute the many doctors who have come here from as far away as 300 miles to treat patients. Let it be remembered that not one Kern CoWlty doctor has come forv.ard to offer his help to the cause.

PAGE 14

-15ONE OF THE SMALL MIRACLES THAT KEEPS THE STRIKE STRONG 7 iu 7 fJNt;7 SEND YOUR ANSWER AND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS TO: "GAME OF THE TOWNS" P.o. rox 10so Di!:LANO, CALIF. LOS ANGELES (Continuation) Dale Warne,' the chef of the National Farm Workers Association, poses in front of his oven with his two assistants: Alice Tapia and Ruth Trujillo. Warne who comes from Montana and who previously at the Wonder lodge in Bakersfield, isJurning d& licious dinners by the hup.dreds,_,!n return for the $5 a week which the Strike can afford to pay him. '" Since the NFWA strike kitchen on tier Road has been operating (abol!t two tmnths) there have been hundreds of rreals served every day by Warne and his helpers, with poor equipment and sometimes poor ingredients. But the food always turns out well. This iS another of the small miracles that keep the strike strong. a lot of moneyto Negroes and other oppressed people. . The Negro leaders refused to be fooled. So Schenley ate its dinner alone. When reporters asked, "Why are there soma ny empty chairs around your big table?" they were told, "It's because of the flu."

PAGE 15

-16-EL NIALCRIADO TELLS SttJ!Ue4 t1k il'ewr COACHELLA and a box rate, and . they were forbidden to blackball the strike leaders (as McFarland rose growers did in a similar strike last year). No uni p n con tract was signed, but it appeared that the strike had been one. Some people say that the Great Delano Grape Strike really began in May, 196[\ in the little desert town of Thermal in the Coachella Valley, 300 miles south of the San Joaquin. It was there, in that first week in May, that several hundred Filipino grape pickers, most of them memqers of the AWOC union, demanded When soine of these workers in the Co-an hourly wage of $1.40 and an incen-achella strike migrated north to Delano tive bonus of a box for picking the in August, they_joinedwithlocal workers early grapes. Grov.ers at first refused, to ask for the same wages that they had so the workers went on strike. They , received in Coachella. But Delano gro were immediately joined by several hunwers refused to even discuss dece(lt dred Mexican-American pickers. And wages, so the strike \\liS called in the the governmel\t, which usually gives first week of Septembe ,r. grov.ers handouts and helps them to & break strikes, this time remained neu-Back in Coachella, abittertruthabout tral. Secretary of Labor Wirtz refused labor disputes arose when growers lo-to import illegally braceros to break wered wages again, plunging them down the strike. And he pointed out that $1.40 to $1. 25 an hour . Without a union con-an hour is the absolute minimum that tract, the worke:r:s had no guarantee grov.ers by lawweresupposed to pay that their strike gains would be perma.' local workers before they could even nent. But once \\Orkers find out how ' apply for braceros. strong they are together, they never go After ten days the growers seemed to recognize the justice of the workers' demands. Through an impartial state conciliator, an agreement to end the strike was worked out . The ranchers agreed to pay the $1. 40 an hour wage back to the old degrading conditions. The Coachella Valley will see other strikes in the future. When they come, as with the Delano grape strike, it will be all the way for a signed union contract because that's the only thing the grov.ers will ever obey.

PAGE 16

r I I i l Are the -17I The . Delano Grape Strikers j This week: RAFAEL VEGA (Continued from last week) : j"I went to work for Mid-State Farms, because they also gave work to my wife. 1I wanted to buy a small house for my family. &tat the end of the picking season, j they gave a party for the forelady. , and because my wife didn't take part in it, n they ran her off. They never let her W>rk there again. i l j i The foreman I worked for was always drunk. Hl couldn't talk to anybody without 1 getting angry. One Sunday I went to tell him that I didn't have any place to mdve I ' the water, because I \\aS irrigating the vineyards, and he told me angrily, with jthose twisted eyes, drunk, that if I couldn't find a place to move the'Water, t!fun i1I should go home to sleep, because he could handle the whole thing himself. He i •fired me right there and then. [ l And I used to see the strikers every day, and I anxiously wanted them bel icause my mnscience \\aS not at peace, seeing how the ranchers and the contrac ' •tors had robbed us. After I lost my job, I joined the strikers. I now have three I months on strike, and all my needs are satisfied. I have clothes, food, butane, l l light, everything I really need. When I used to work for the ranchers, if I bought [ food, I couldn't afford to pay my bills. If I paid my bills, I coudn't buy food. Eve : rything' s so expensive--at that rate, we • d all die of hunger anyway . . , ! That's why we have to fight with all the pride we've got, and with a lot of anger, IJ until we defeat these conceited strangers. In twenty years in this valley, they have 1rmde themselves millionaires. And the scabs, we have to struggle with them too, "because they come from all over to steal our jobs. But I believe in this cause 1 we're fighting and in ilid who will not abandon us. I l !My only solution is to fight for the well-being of my children, because that's the [ , only thing I can give them, liberty, the future, so they won't exploit them the 1 way they've exploited me. I don't have anything else to give them." I I i1CDC(Continuation) . _ [ley liquors. All of these things were only possible because of tireless work by I CDC officials. The following are named MEN OF THE MONTH by El Malcriado: Willie Brown, George Ballis, Roy Greenaway, Si Casady, Jerry Hill, Mike Sny der. These are a few of the CDC people that made the convention not only lively but a huge help for the strike. The Farm Workers Association was also given a great deal of assistance by the Bakersfield CSO, especially Richard and Lucy 'Alvarez, David Borciaga, Hank and Esther Martinez, Ray and Hortencia Solis, and Juan Govea, among others. Taking care of the Farm Workers Association booth were Bakersfield !lllmbers, including the Mejia and Zaragoza families, !Alejandro Maldonado, Jesus Gaona, and Jesus Bernal; also the Chavez and Padi lla girls from Delano and Julio and Fina Hernandez of
PAGE 17

-18-The first support in this area has come from the Catholic Church in the form of m:mey. Picketing of super rmrkets is about to begin. Grows! Tony Orendain of Hanford flew to Chicago last Thursday to coordinate efforts to sto the sale of Schenley products. Among the groups doing the work of the boycott in Chicago are the United Packinghouse Wor kers, the Retail and Wholesale Departstore Employees, the American Federation of Teachers, the American News paper Giild, and the Textile Workers of America. -19Sal Gonzales of Delano, the boycott representative here, is planning the great Boston Grape Party. He spoke about the strike to a group of 100 miriisters last Wednesday, and has been given support by most community leaders. Cesar Chavez will speak this week here to Catholic and Pr testant church leaders from all over the U S . Then he will talk with government officials.

PAGE 18

THERE'S MUSIC IN THE CREDIT UNIONI The front table at the annual meeting of the Farm Workers Credit U nion held at the American Legion Hall in Delano. Left to right: Hernandez; Chavez, Yniguez, Richard Chavez, Padilla, Navarro. Whenthe meeting got dull, they brought in mu sicians and there was dancing. A SCAB REPORT FRANK THE FINK The scab union, lacking members and a legitimate purpose, has had to resort activities sue!) as: obtaining recogfrom the Delano Chani>er of Com merce; receiving its incorporation papers back from Sacramento; and harrassing steve Allen at a recent press have been no other The second annual meeting of the Farm \\brkers Credit Union was held a week ago Sunday. Credit Union members from as far away as Huron attended. SANTOS CHAPA and MANUEL URAN DAY were elected to the Board of Directors. OOLORES HUERTA was reelected. PEDRO HERNANDEZ of Corcoran was elected a new member of the credit committee. This committee decides which of the members will receive loans. The supervisory committee re elected TONY MENDEZ and elected ELISID MEDINA. This committee guards the savingsof the members. There was no menudo like last year. Instead a band played lively music and the children of 'llLLIE VAS'lJE z, TE RESA CEBALLOS and JUAN AGUIRRE entertained the members with Spanish dancing. activities to report. The leader, Frank Herrera, is running for city council. This notorious labor contractor is being supported by the gro'Mlrs, police, and their servants on the east side of Delano. Herrera is not . being supported by the people. He is not expected to win. The scab union (called Kern-Tulare Independent Farm Workers) is holding meetings and telling the people that unless they sign and pay they will not be i permitted to work for the labor contrao tors when work opens . up in the various 1 crops in a few months . But the people can' t be fooled. The scab union has not been able to produce membership. It is run by the KKKCitizens for Facts, an anti-strike pro gro'Mlr group with only five members: all or labor

PAGE 19

! v t I Back Issues Now Available! I ! l El Malcriado has become the nation •s leadin g newspaper on farm labor, . and old issues are now valuable collectors' items. The Farm Worker Press has a few complete editions on file, for sale to libraries and collectors at $100 for the complete set (ill through #30 in Spanishandil1 7throughi130 in English). For those who would like a tative sample of back issues, a set of 8 different issues is available for $1. Get the real story on the days leading up to and following the first weeks of the strike, on the Farm Workers' Mass, the now famous photos of grower brutality in action, the greaL march in and many other features. Send $ 1 to "Back Issues", El Malcriado, PO Ebx 1060, Delano. il 1 Dec., 1964 . 1 -21-Think of the Future PAlM WOIICIIS CMDIT UN0H .......... ... _ ..

PAGE 20

* * * * *War is good for business. fut it's not good for farm workers. Dur mg World Warn, the growers used the "war emergency" as an excuse to bring in thousands of braceros from Mexico. The reason they gave was that the grapes and the olives and the lettuce were "critical foods" needed in the war effort. Meanwhile some of their own sons were able to avoid the draft through agricultural exemptions. It is important to remember these things because the J,J. S. is again in a state of war • ... J.::J The bitter stupidity of Delano area growers may set off a complete investigation of California's 'agricultural industry and labor laws, . a prominent stockholder in Schenley O:>rporation warned last week. When .California's legislature is reapportioned this year, city taxpayers lllLY rebel at the huge handouts, tax eviiSions arid unfair laws which benefit some of the state's big ranchers and hurt the small fl\Xmers and farm \\Orkers. If the legislature elected in 1966 passes minimum wage, collective bargaining, and other such laws, such as Hawaii has for farm w .orkers, it will be largely the result of Delano's growers, and the publicity they have given to the inhuman way they treat their workers. The Association has one man who is travelling around California, selling an idea. His idea is the Farm Workers Co-op . In April El Malcriado will print a . special' series of articles explaining what has already been done and \\hat is planned . It is an ambitious project which is already well underv.ay. Like all the projects of the Farm Workers Association, the co-op must be selfsupporting. The co-op representative badly needs some kind person to give him a gasoline credit card to use for his Volkswagen. If you can help with this essential project, please write Cesar Chavez, Farm Workers Co-op, Box 1060, Delano, California . I i I I News from San Jose indicates increasing success of the boycott . Bob Barron reI ports cooperation from =st stores, picketing of a few uncooperative ones, several program on 'I. V. with San Jose Chairman El:l Mercado explaining the strike I and boycott. Joe Graham has started a door-to-door informational campaign, and ! and is being aided by volunteers from local civil. rights groups, the Young Chris;I tian Movement, church and Mexican American groups, and other \\Orkers . It is thousands of honest hard-working people like these, explaining the truth, that . 1 help sustain the strike and block the growers' lies. i !

PAGE 21

HUELGA: The First Hundred Days of the Great I::elano Grape strike . by Eugene Nelson; published by Farm Worker Press, Inc., I::elano, Calif. 160 pages, illustrated. $1. 50 -23-Nelson, the author, served as a picket captain early in the strike • . He is also the son of a Modesto area grape grov.er. If that fact alone isn •t enough to make you want to read the book, here are a few of the chapter titles: TilE OOVE SEASON IN DELANO ; WID IS CESAR CHAVEZ, DISIOTO & COMPANY; THE DUS'IY BISHOP; POVERTY AND POLITICS; THE GHOSTOFJACK LONDON. No ordinary union would ever permit such a book to be published. It certainly is not an official version. fut the Farm Workers Association is no ordinary union. With the publication of this book there are no longer any secrets. If it is clear from the book that Rev. Jim Drake cannot tell a cotton field from a vineyard, it is also clear( on the other hand) that the brothers Dispoto are hardly less than monsters. The book does a better job at shov4ng the roots of the I::elano conflict than any thing that has been printed. It is a book that will permanently silence those who profit from lying about this strike. And it's easy to read. Dm't pick it up unless you have about four hours of free time ahead of you, because you won't want to put it down until you are finished. Of course the book is not all good . More than one reader has wondered why the author makes such a big deal out of the helpful but not essential work done by a few outside volunteers while hardly mentioning some of the farm workers at the very center of the strike itself. The book is only available in English. It \\Ould be very thoughtful if someone would offer to finance its publication in Spanish, as it is now being translated. It will not be available in stores until mail orders are caught up. Send in the coupon at the right with $1. 50. UHUELGA" by E. Nelson . .. THE FIRST 100 DAYS OF THE GREAT DELANO GRAPE STRIKE A thrilling account of the biggest farm strike since the thirties, now going on. This book, 160pages withmanyphotos, is one you'll want to keep. $1.50:each !, Send me _ copies of "Iiuelga" !, Name 1 AddreSs I I ! .............................................................................................................

PAGE 22

DON'T BUY since September 8, 1965 , 4500 Mexican Filipino and Negro farm workers have been on strike against 35 Delano, California grape growers. The workers are represented by the National Farm Workers. Association (independent) and,,the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee •'The strike is handled through a joint • strike committee of the unions • . Schenley's, the biggest corporation in the area almost 5,000 ; .with 1965 profits of $17,000,000, sometimes pays its workers as low as 30 an hour. Hundreds of its workers have gone on strike. Schenley has refused the offers of the California Conciliation Service, ministers, and ciyic groups to promote discussion between the and the growers o e farm workers have no assistance from the government to help bring about m•'alatl .on of their strike they are dependent upon the general public to pressure to sit down at the table and discuss wages and conditions. So we ask for your help through a boycott of Schenley products and through your letters to Vice President James E. Woolsey, Schenley Industries, 45 Second Street, Francisco; California. DO NOT BUY: AnySchenleyproduct, WHISKEY, IOURBON, AND SIamond S, All .AmerJ.ean. Thomas, lliew Yorker, Rennie Moses, Vines Best, Delano King , El Sun Best Sun-Sierra VBZ.'