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El Malcriado, Volume 1, Number 34

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 1, Number 34
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
El Malcriado
"The Voice of the Farm Worker"
IN ENGLISH,
NO. 34
IF NON-VIOLENT REVOLUTION IS NOT POSSIBLE, THEN VIOLENT REVOLUTION BECOMES INEVITABLE.”


I Published every two weoks in Spanish and English by I Farm Worker Press, Inc., P.O. Box 1060, Delano, Calif. I Office of pubIIcatlon--1224 Glenwood, Delano, Calif. Sc-I cond class postage paid at Delano, Calif. Permit appll-> at $2 a year write Box 1060, Delano, Calif.
This lasuo Is number dated ^ J gg
This newspaper is printed by unionized workers


IN THIS ISSUE:
-3
SCHENLEY i /fi*
GIVES UP -
WHO’S NEXT?
PAGE 3 Delano Grape Grower
mm? (g®sron»
WIN MONEY BY SENDING STORIES TO EL MALCRIADO PAGE 18
CONSTRUCTION BEGINS ON THE FARM WORKERS CO-OP
PAGES 12 - 13


CESAR CHAVEZ of the FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION with SIDNEY KORSHAK of SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES, INC. signing the first agreement ending the strike against Schenley.
Victory in the
Grape Strike
SCHENLEY GIVES UP
Most people had said, "You can't win. It can't be done." But now, Schenley Corporation, a giant company with $17,000,000 in profits last year and offices all over America, has been brought to its knees by the poor grape pickers of the Delano area, who have been an strike for over 7 long months._______
hi Los Angeles; on April 6, Schenley Corporation signed an agreement with Cesar Chavez of the National Farm Workers Association recognizing the NFWA as the bargaining agent for ill; its field workers. It promised to begin immediate negotiations on a written cdS* tract for its field workers, which it promised to sign within "60 days".
(Continued on page 5).
-4-


151
(CONTINUATION)
The agreement-destroyed, once and for all, the lies of the other growers about the strike. Schenley had been badly hurt by the strike and the boycott, and was eager to'sign, a contract and end the strike. Now other growers, especially DiGiorgio, the biggest of all, are j squirming like snakes, trying to escape from the FWA eagle. DiGiorgio has called for scab elections among its skeleton crew of winter employees (foremen and crew bosses).
The NFWA and AWOC have refused to attend this scab election and are demanding that Di- > Giorgio submit to free elections of their; striking employees, jf these stubborn growers had allowed free elections last August and September, all the losses and bitterness of the | strike could have been avoided.
Cesar Chavez made a speech announcing the victory and said to the cheering crowd, "After a fight like this, we are certainly not going to settle for $1.40." He then spelled out the union demands—routine conditions for industry—but revolutionary for farm workers. "When a worker gets sick and has to leave his job," Chavez said, "he's not going to get fired for it."
"As for labor contractors,". Cesar continued, "they are out. In the future there-is going to 'i be no room for them. The profession of labor contractor is a dead one."
No more will foremen be allowed to insult women workers. No worker will be fired without just cause. And most important, the FWA strikers will elect their own leaders who will sit down as equals with the Schenley bosses and negotiate wages and working conditions.
Some cried openly when the news of the historic victory was announced. "Viva Schenley, viva la victoria!" they shouted. For the first time in history, some of us have stood up a- \ gainst one of the biggest and richest corporations in the state, and have won. For the first time in history, we Mexican-American farm workers have demanded that we be treated with dignity and respect, and our demands have been met. The farm workers of Delano have made that first big step toward a living wage and the security enjoyed by other American workers. Someday, all of us must make that first big step. The Whole world has been watching the strikers of Delano to see if we can ever win against the monstrous giant cor- , porations that have treated us like slaves for so many years.
IS DIGIORGIO NEXT?
TURN THE PAGE
^«b^vw.vav.v.s,.v.,.v.va:i


VIOLENCE BY DIGIORGIO
THE VICTIM Manuel Rosas
Cesar Chavez and four vice-presidents of the Farm Workers Association walked out of a meeting with DiGiorgio Corporation officials last week after receiving a phone call reporting that a gunman hired by DiGiorgio had bashed in the head of a Delano striker after assaulting a schoolteacher on the picket line outside their Sierra Vista ranch.
Chavez and the other FWA workers had attended the meeting to try to work out an agreement to end the strike and nationwide boycott against DiGiorgio vineyards and food products: S & W FINE FOODS INDIAN RIVER produce.
Before walking out Chavez told the DiGiorgio management at the meeting in a fancy Fresno hotel, "We are not going to sit here and tlk to you while our workers in Delano are being assaulted and threatened by people who are in your pay." They left the meeting immediately and returned to Delano to find out why the assailant had not yet been jailed.
According to a dozen witnesses, Tulare County Sheriff's deputies stood by while the assault took place. The gunman had previously threatened to kill pickets while holding them . at gunpoint, and had shoved,' knocked down, and swerved his car into strikers on other occasions. On page 8 , Dolores Huerta, victim of grower brutality in several other cases, comments on the use of violence.
HIRED FOR VIOLENCE DiGLorgio’s Herschel Nunez
THE DAMSEL Ida Cousino


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iff!
"MEN ARE MEANT TO LIVE WITH OTHERS AND TO WORK FOR ONE ANOTHER’S WELFARE" j Pope John XXllI Pacen in Terris
THE NATIONAL FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION and all Delano strikers sincerely thank the people of California and the other states who have made it possible fbr us to eat during the strike. Food packages have come from as far away as Oklahoma. But we especially want to thank the people of the farm worker towns in the San Joaquin Valley—mpstreeently Wood-ville and porterville—for their help in keeping the shelves of the strike store from being empty.
But our gratitude does not make us ashamed to ask for more, since without our strike store there can be no strike.



-8-
"WE ARE THE STRIKE.”
Mrs. Dolores Huerta
VIOLENCE
Dolores Huerta: "We were picketing the produce market in Los Angeles to try to stop the grapes—the was just before Christmas—and we would go every day and picket on the loading docks. It was Peggy, and Sylvia, Lupe Anguiano and myself with Bob Marino and Rudy Reyes, and Bert Delarmente, and Johnny Rodriguez.
"The truck owners were very rough with us, kicking the girls in the legs and running the heavy steel hand trucks loaded with grapes over our feet. If the guys had tried to help us there would have been a riot and we would have all been hurt and maybe put in jail and then we wouldn't be able to stop the grapes. These pickets knew this and they just stood by and watched it happen which was very hard for them.
"The truck owners would push us off the dock which was about five feet high, time after time, every day, and we would just climb back up again. It hurt very much to have them run into you with a loaded steel dolly; it hurt much more to stand by and watch them doing it to the others.
"But except for a few, a truck owner would never do it twice, because he would be ashamed of himself. And we slowly began to win the support of all the people who were there watching these things happen, and soon there were no Delano grapes going through L. A.
"To be non-violent, you have to decide ahead of time. If most of us had not decided to be non-violent, we certainly would have lost the whole strike."


L
ANOTHER GROWER FALLS
Less than a week after the giant Schenley corporation gave in to the striking farm workers, another major grape grower signed an agreement with Cesar Chavez. The Christian Brothers, makers of Christian Brothers Wine, own a big winery and hundreds of acres of land in the Napa Valley (outside of the strike zone). They announced that their field workers would be protected by the N. F. W. A., and that a written contract would be signed within a few weeks.
Brother Gregory, president of Mont La Salle Vineyards, the main vineyards covered by the agreement, said, "We are prepared to formally recognize the N. F. W. A. as the organization through which social justice may be realized for our agricultur-j. al workers."
| The Christian Brothers are a Catholic religious order, and there was no strike or threat of strike' at their vineyards. But the ! field workers there need higher wages, just ^ like everywhere else. There are over 200 workers during the harvest season (and at I one time braceros were used). Like all S farm workers, they need a union to protect
I them and their rights. m
< Brother Gregory stressed that the union was -recognized voluntarily, because the j Christian Brothers knew that the workers' cause was just. As Catholics, they believ-j ed in the statement of California bishops which was issued last month in favor of | union protection for all farm workers.
[ Brother Gregory suggested that all growers j • should voluntarily start negotiations with r the FWA, before strikes start. The Christ-I ian Brothers tried to get the other growers |i in the Napa Valley to voluntarily sign a con-j tract* the other growers refused.
-9-
The Thunderbird Spreads its Wings
OXNARD—A new office of the National Farm Workers Association was officially opened this week in Oxnard. The office, designed to serve all of Ventura County, is located at 515 Cooper Road. Operated .by Ignacio Garcia, 24, it will serve all farm workers and provide the special services which are available only to members.
Information will be available here about the great Farm Worker Rally which will beheld in Oxnard next week at which Cesar Chavez will speak and the Teatro Campesino will be featured.
Also available at the 515 Cooper Road office is information about the benefits of the NFWA, which include $1, 000 life insurance^ free family services, representation with police, government and employers by the Association.
Garcia, the Oxnard FWA leader, has a long background in organizational work. He is originally from Laton, California (Fresno County).
Cesar Chavez has asked that "all Oxnard farm workers join under the symbol of the thunderbird and fight for our rights, together with our brothers throughout the state".


-10-
One week after the end of the Pilgrimage in Sacramento, farm workers from all around Delano gathered to celebrate their victory over the Schenley Corporation. There was a march through the West Side in which over 1,000 participated. (See the photograph below.) Heavy winds prevented the celebration of the outdoor Mass which was planned, but did hot prevent a group of contractors and growers from showing up to protest against the Mass and from hurling insults at the Virgin of Guadalupe. The farm workers held the rest of their rally at Filipino Hall (also see below), where Cesar Chavez spelled out what the contract with Schenley would mean. Larry Itliong, leader of the Filipinos, thanked the people for voting for him (Itliong ran ahead of all other candidates in every farm-worker precinct, and carried the West Side easily, but the ranchers still rule the east side of town and successfully elected their favorite sell-out, Frank Herrera, as new city councilman).
1000 MARCH IN DELANO


-11-
?4&&ociati(M S>xfaznct& to tUc Ttontfi
A thrilling account of the biggest farm strike since the thirties, now going on. This book, 160 pages with many photos, is one you’ll want to keep. $1.50each
Farm Worker Press i
Box 1060-Delano, Calif.
Send me _ Name __ copies of "Huelga" l
Address i
i •
Edgar Diaz runs the Farm Workers Association in Sutter and Yuba Counties, who | with the help of Chris Bergtholdt (full-time labor organizer, ex-grower, churchman)
I is building the NFWA in the Yuba City a-i rea. Diaz, born in Starr County. Texas.
; has done farm work all his life.
His first task is to extend the membership services of the .Farm Workers Association to this northern area, rather than to hold strikes or demonstrations. Nevertheless, the Sutter-Yuba NFWA held a march in Yuba City in sympathy with the Delano grape strikers.
One Yuba City member said, ’'Farm wor-| kers are beginning to hold their heads up high” because of the NFWA movement, "and they are working better because they I have pride in themselves."
A few days after the Yuba City rally, the first offer of a union contract came into the NFWA from the northern counties. This was from the Christian Brothers, wine-; grape growers in Napa County. Secret ne-; gotiations are underway for union recogni-[ tion with other growers in the north.
i •
J
HUELGA”
E. Nelson
...THE FIRST 100 DAYS OF THE GREAT DELANO GRAPE STRIKE


-13-
ffjgp
m farm worker
CO-OP
The idea of the Farm Workers Co-op began in 1963 when some members of the Association found that they could j buy good quality motor oil at 12£ a can, if they bought it together. Then they learned that almost everything costs about half as much if several families buy at the same time. They found that the profits made by stores are unnecessary.
Then they found the most important thing of all: that a co-op is a store owned by the customers, so that it sells only good-quality commodities that the customers want.
The customers can fire the employees of the co-op if they are not working properly. Every family has one vote on a all matters of importance.
Now the Co-op will become a reality. The building will be built in May and the Co-op will be fully operating before winter with an original membership of 500 families from the entire thousand-square mile area between La-mont and. Hanford.
The following services will be available to co-op members all in one location almost as soon as the building is completed: coop drugstore; credit union (formerly called the Cooperative Bank); auto parts store; servicd station for gasoline, etc.; self-service auto repair center (you use the coop's tools); medical clinic; and discount store (this will start as a buying club).
THE SELF-SERVICE AUTO REPAIR CENTER is the most interesting feature of the new Farm Workers Co-op. When your car breaks down you will be able to tow it into the garage with a co-op towbar and fix it yourself under expert advice from the co-op mechanic, using co-op tools. You will pay a small fee for this, but it will be much much less than any repair bill. You will be able to work in a well-lighted garage indoors with good tools.
This is not just an idea. Construction of the Farm Workers Co-Op will begin next month. Membership will soon be made available to all farm workers, who wiH elect directors of their own to run the operations.
u By AUTHORITY OSnPNSTITUTION and by-laws op this £ ASSOCIATION.
jr Order issuco z o <5
THIS CO-OP PASSPORT T IN THE ALL THE SE CHEATED BUY ANYT IN THE SAN CARD WILL LARS EVER CO-OP CARD EL
Secretary-Treasurer
/
- - ----- s
RSHIP CARD IS YOUR
W WAY OF BUYING.
RS CO-OP, YOU OWN
. YOU CAN'T BE
RCHARGED. YOU CAN
THE LOWEST PRICES
IN VALLEY. THE
YOU HUNDREDS OF DOL-
. HOW DO YOU GET A
AD THE NEXT ISSUE OF
D FIND.OUT,
(a tfe 'Tfanti *76e anMv&i
cuittA $5.00
SEND YOUR ANSWER AND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS TO:
’’GAME OF THE TOWNS” P.O. BOX 1060 DELANO, CALIF.
The winner of the last GAME OF THE TOWNS (EL MALCRIADO #30), was RAMON PASILLAS of Earlimart. He vas the first to correctly recognize ALLENSWORTH.


-14-
Pilgrimage
One of the biggest crowds ever to jam into the park in front of the state capitol at Sacramento was present on Easter Sunday for the great finale of the Pilgrimage by the strikers along 320 miles of highway between Delano and the capital.
The long line of marchers increased in length every day until the original group of sixty marchers leaving Delano made a procession so long that it took over an hour to cross the Tower Bridge into Sacramento. Police estimated the crowd at "8,000 to 10,000". Outstanding speeches were given by Epifano Camacho, farm worker from McFarland, and Chris Hartmire, director of the California Migrant Ministry. The final days of the march received publicity throughout the United States. "Newsweek", with a circulation in the millions, said, "Last week, the parade to the Capitol turned into a triumphal march—the first real breakthrough by farm workers in the long history of U.S. organized labor... The steps of Chavez’ strikers will set up echoes for the future."
The picture show the first of the marchers crossing the Tower Bridge into the cily, and the Virgin of Guadalupe finally arrived at the Capitol after a month’s journey. The future, for the Virgin and her half million California farm workers, looked very goo**


t&e boycott t20a& 'Ti/ott
-15-
This is the story of how Schenley Corporation, with thousands of acres of grapes around Delano, was brought to its knees by the Farm Workers Association who entered the strike with only $85 in the bank and only two paid employees (Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta).
Many people have given their own ideas about how this was done. Some said that it was the BOSTON GRAPE PARTY which broke Schenley. This occurred when Sal Gonzales of Delano went 3,000 miles to Boston to dump scab grapes into Boston Harbor in imitation of American revolutionaries of 200 years ago, who dumped tea into the harbor to protest against "the ranchers of 1773"—British tyrants. Police grabbed Gonzales on the same charges that they had against the early Americans: "dumping that is injurious to public health." But Schenley heard that people 3,000 miles from California cared about the workers here and would not buy Schenley products.
Other people said that it was the thousands and thousands of pledge cards sent to Schenley which finally made this giant give in to the tiny Farm Workers Association. So many people made these pledges that Schenley had to put extra people to work in their San Francisco offices to handle the stacks of cards that were coming in. This was admitted in a letter from Vice-President Woolsey to a Schenley stockholder who was our secret agent.
Another secret agent for the farm workers who was an office employee in Schenley's New York headquarters (we cannot reveal their name) let the union know exactly how much money was being spent for advertising to fight the boycott. Finally they decided that it just wasn't worth it, the agent said.
The real heroes, however, are in Delano on the picket line. They collected hundreds of sign-up cards from workers who walked out on Schenley. They braved the artificial dust storms, the insults of contractors, foremen and police, and the long hours spent calling to the scabs to come out. So many scabs came out that Schenley could not face another sea-son against the pickets.
Or perhaps it was the valiant San Francisco lawyer who quietly visited a different bar every night, convincing each bartender not to serve Schenley products.
Perhaps the boycott was won by the eight or ten huelguistas who left Delano in January in their old cars for the eastern United States, without money in their pockets, heading into the freezing weather of the East to stop Schenley.
To sum up, the strike against Schenley was won by each person who helped make it possible. Every worker who walked out of Schenley's fields, every picket, every organizer deserves credit for this great victory, as much as the brave pilgrims who walked to Sacramento and the thousands of farm workers and city people who have fed and clothed the strikers during these seven long months.


-16-
fdett&U to t&i Sditwi
To Whom This May Concern? You YOUR, sand Especially mr general Public Of Calif; And other States as well No one knows any better than this father of four small boys and four smalTgirls. at my first entrance to calif; from glendeale ari-zona. 1940 june first, a .painter by trade, but unsofisian work at any craft to properly sup ort them and a wife, had to resort to cotton picking after having worked in the quake wreck of brawley until it became so hot that construction was forced to hault until cooler weather begain living in a maga-tory tent until early fall we came to delano calif; in quest of cotton to pick.
We could’nt even get a vacant house on a ranch to live in as we wished to pick cotton week ends with the children and we the week through. as many vacant houses as their were . at that time our force was too small to pick enough cotton they wanted all grown ups to ocupy a house we were forced to buy a trailor house with no chasses or wheels to live in. on the Bob williams farm at pond-ham to live in all winter. 9 people in a' twelve by fourteen trailor house plywood all winter of 1940. and the farmers were getting more releif at that time than many poor familys were . from the government they are all grown up now and on their own and scattered as bad as the twelve tribes of Isreal were after the death of our saviour. jesus christ our lord. Shirley is dead Abeautiful auborn at the age of five . slayn by hit and run driver in long beach calif, in fron of our would be home that was vacated byj aps who went toconsantration camp at the beginning of world war two no one else would rent it it was so badly abused and beat up but we had to rent it at twenty five a month, as I worked at doiig-las air craft, the alley for a front yard, shirley was slayn by hit and rim driver as she came down the steps, no one will remember our first night near delano. we were two poor to rent a cabin . and eat to so we spent our first in a fresh mown al-
falfa field... (These recollections continue | for many more paragraphs and are follow'-' 1 ed by a long poem. Then:)
is
Enclosed please find a check for five dol- j, lars i’m sure it won’t bounce for there are j three more dollars in iny account, it is for | the strike fund i guess i know what it is all | about.
Wm Mercer Palo Alto
Dear Editor:
Recently my husband and 1 obtained a mem- l bership in the Consumer’s Cooperative (Co-op) in the name of Cesar Chavez (with | his consent) and the NFWA. The member | number is 47947. Would you please publish this in the next issue of "El Malcria- j do!’? We are telling people about the num- , | ber here in order that they use it when bitying at the co-op. Then at the end of the I year the NFWA will receive a check the ar J mount of which will be determined on the j basis of the amount of purchases.
Carlos & Kathy Fernandez Berkeley, California
I
Dear Sirs,
It is not surprising that, within 24 hours' \ after Louis Lucas, Earlimart grape grow- j er, /threatened that ranchers were going to take the law into their own hands (Bee,
April 20), a DiGiorgo private cop viciously ; shoved a woman picket to the ground, and then, wielding a heavy club, bashed in the skull of a Mexican-American who had come | to assist the roughed-up lady picket. The . Delano area growers have no one to blame but themselve for their reputation as violent, bestial, uncivilized clods, practising labor relations in the tradition of Simon Legree.
Douglass Adair Delano, California


/"uTyoo m strong eMu^fWwSh
\0 sffevy jwvlw Strong
PLOUGH TO tinm THAT ROW BEFORE you y^VE A DRW A- OFW£EBR .-2—
^rP^vTs


-18-
EL MALCRIADO will pay from $1 to $25 for news items which you send to us if we use them in the paper, plus $1 or more for every picture of yours that we use.
In this new contest you can write your own: news stories about growers and labor contractors, strikes and strikers, farm workers and foremen, demonstrations, organizing events, important social events, information about labor cases against employers, trouble with welfare and hospital officials, safely on the job, new work methods, serious job accidents, new machines, stories about work in strange crops like dates, stories about strikes many years ago which you witnessed, information about police brutality,- unjust government action, or news from any FWA office or other farm worker union or cooperative association.
If you can’t write either Spanish or English, have your children write it for you. Write clearly on large paper. Send your news to Box 1060, Delano, California 93215. IF WE PRINT IT, WE WILL SEND YOU YOUR MONEY. This -is a contest that anybody can win! All you need is a 5£ stamp. The contest is open until June 15, 1966, but send your article NOW.
NEW HOUSES FOR WOODVILLE
WOODVILLE—The tenants of the Woodville camp have voted on new housing which has been offered them. They have been offered 100 homes (and another hundred at Linnell Camp near Visalia) at $60 a month. They have refused to accept these homes unless the rent is lowered to $45, because farm wages do not permit $60 rent per month without extreme sacrifice. The federal
government is on the side of the farm workers, and says the $60 rent is too high. Un less the Tulare Housing Authority makes the rent lower, the farm workers will prevent them from building the houses.
While they are waiting for the new houses, thfe tenants will live in what we call "Governor Brown’s packing crates”, which are 50£ a night, temporary housing which looks like the picture at the left.
The ’’packing crates” are popular because of the low rent, and they are certainly no worse than the present tin dwellings.
Unless an agreement is reached with the Housing Authority on the new houses, the tenants will cripple the Housing Authority and start their own private housing organization.


-19-
HARLEM HAGEN THE STRIKEBREAKER
Congressman Harlan Hagan of Hanford is at it again, acting like a strikebreaker, trying to help the growers and defeat the strike.
He recently sent out a fake "questionnaire” (at taxpayers' expense) to everyone ,in the Delano area who has a post office box. This includes all the growers, foremen, and contractors, but does not include workers who live in the camps , or migrants who rent housing in town. The questionnaire was in English only.
All farm workers who receive this questionnaire are warned not to sign it, as the names may be used for blacklisting and discrimination.
The questionnaire asks the growers and contractors, "How much do you pay your workers?", so the growers can repeat their same old lies about how rich their workers
are. It asks the growers if they would be willing to hold elections; with only scabs allowed to vote (that is what DiGiorgio wants) Congressman Hagan is still swallowing the growers'lies. He still doesn't believe that there is a grape strike. This week Hagan will have a meeting with his friends, grower Martin Zaninovitch of Delano and Joseph Brosmer of Fresno, to discuss how to break the strike and keep farm workers poor.
EL MALCRIADO SAYS: Congressman Hagan, we invite you to attend the rallies of farm workers and see for yourself the hundreds of real, live workers who have stayed with the strike through 7 months of the struggle. Compare the 1000 farm workers who attended the victory rally in Delano last Sunday, to the half-dozen scab workers that show up at the Scab Union meetings.
Ask Schenley Corporation if there was a strike!
Congressman Harlen Hagan has a new partner, but the two are singing the same old broken record and dancing to the ranchers' tune. The Congressman has been joined by State Senator Hugh Burns of Fresno, long an enemy of labor unions and poor people. The "Burns Committee" will soon be spreading the same kinds of rumors and lies for which Hagen is "'rf famous, trying to smear the Farmworkers Association, the srtkie, and the Mexican-Americans of this state.


-20-
THOUGHTS ABOUT THE PILGRIMAGE
Some people have been asking us why the governor of the State of California did not come out to receive us when we finished our pilgrimage in Sacramento on April 10.
We didn't make our pilgrimage in order to get protection from the government. This march on Sacramento was made with the idea of showing the whole world the misery in which the ranchers of this great.state'hold their field workers.
We as Mexicans are not used to begging or crying for help to the governments— and especially when we know that what we are demanding is the just reward for our own work.
We in our pilgrimage brought the Virgin of Guadalupe and carried her for those three hundred miles so that the people who came out to greet us would know that we had not lost faith that our little virgin could bring us justice.
In much the same way, many years ago a leader called Nezahulcoyot, told the Aztec tribe that they would undertake a march toward the south and in that march the children would become old and the old people would die along the road, but that their sons would arrive at a place, where in the middle of a lake they would come upon an eagle eating a snake. This was to be the place where they would build a great nation.
All these things happened exactly as this prophet or leader told them, and today we have the great city of Mexico.
Again, today, a leader told us, "We will go, we will walk 300 miles looking for justice and we will carry the Virgin of Guadalupe so that our path will be illuminated, and so that we will be defended from our enemies who would put themselves against us.
It was because of this that we were brought to the finish with so much success. We think that if the governor preferred to spend the holidays with his family during the finale of our pilgrimage, that our great success was worth much more than the good wishes of any fat official.
(by our correspondent in HANFORD)







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EL CORRIDO DE DELANO—LALO GUERRERO HAS RECORDED THIS STIRRING SONG WHICH TELLS THE STORY OF TIDE STRIKE, THE PILGRIMAGE AND THE WHOLE MOVEMENT. A REGULAR COMMERCIAL 45 RPM RECORDING, IT IS AVAILABLE AT YOUR RECORD STORE OR FOR $1 IN CASH TO PO BOX 1060, DELANO. IF YOU CAN SELL TWO ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTIONS AT $2 EACH TO EL MALCRIADO, THE RECORD IS YOURS FOR NOTHING. SEND US THE NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF THE SUBSCRIPTIONS AND $2 FOR EACH ONE. WE WILL SEND YOU THE RECORD FREE.
THE FIVE DOLLAR CLUB—"WE HAVE FORMED A GROUP OF APPROXIMATELY TWENTY MEMBERS EACH OF WHICH HAS PLEDGED $5 A MONTH FOR THE BALANCE OF YOUR STRIKE. WHILE MOST OF US ARE LONGSHOREMEN, OTHERS ARE LAWYERS OR MEN OF THE TRADES." THIS LETTER CAME WITH 26 SIGNATURES AND $130 FROM SAN FRANCISCO. IN LARGE LETTERS AT THE BOTTOM IT READS: "AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL." AS A REPLY THE FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION HAS STATED THAT "THERE IS NO UNION THAT HAS DONE MORE TO HELP US THAN THE INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN’S UNION". A BRAVER GROUP OF MEN HAS NEVER EXISTED THAN THESE DOCK WORKERS WHO HAVE HELPED US WITHOUT A THOUGHT TO THEIR OWN WELL-BEING.
MISSING PERSONS DEPARTMENTS 1) Albert Perkins, California farm worker, please write your mother, Jessie Perkins, 2102 Bagby, Apt. 4, Houston, Texas. 2) "Jesse, please come home. The children are sick. Love, A.B., Tulare." (These notices are free. Send them to Box 1060, Delano, California.)
THE TRIUMPHANT RETURN FROM SACRAMENTO WAS MET WITH A GIGANTIC BARBECUE IN MEMORIAL PARK, FINANCED BY MANY PROMINENT CITIZENS OF DELANO. EL MALCRIADO ESPECIALLY SALUTES MR. JONES KONG, OWNER OF THE FOOD CENTER, FOR HIS GENEROUS CONTRIBUTION WHICH MADE IT POSSIBLE FOR THE BEER TO FLOW FREELY AT THIS FIESTA, AND THE RUBALCAVA BAKERY OF HANFORD AND BAKERSFIELD, WHO DONATED 100 DOZEN TORTILLAS.
vm
Send this coupon to EL MALCRIADO, BOX 1060 DELANO, CALIFORNIA
The best way to be sure you will get your MALCRIADO is by mail, delivered to your home every two weeks. Send your name and address to Bos 1060, Delano, Calif., and we will send you the newspaper to you for one year.
The cost is $2.00 per year, but you do not have to send this now. We will send you a bill.
NAME______________________
ADDRESS
TOWN
ZIP




0?o&cC Dolta/i id itHfanCatt?’/
You can help the Delano strikers. Whenever you go to the market, put some Di-• Giorgio products in your shopping basket. Then, at the checkstand, demand that they be removed from your grocery bag, and explain to the. clerk why you simply canNOT buy either S & W FINE FOODS or Indian River produce.
Ask them to remove these products from their shelves. (Warning: Shop-ins are legal only when you have enough money with you to pay for everything).
To advertise, display, sell, buy or use DiGiorgio Products is an offense against all the farm workers of California! We need your help in bringing this giant to the bargaining table.
INDIAN RIVER and Blue Flag Blue Parrot Broadway C & T Premium Dougherty Golden Peak Hi-Color MacGills
Verbena ___
S & W FINE FOOD Treesweet White Rose Redi-Tea Pique Premier Sun Vista Foods Sunny land Jolly Farmer
FARM WORKER PRESS* INC* P.0. BOX 1060 DELANO* CALIFORNIA


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SoMEDAY; BOY, vov'tL vvi-IERE I AM {IIEII, 11-it:N you'LL kNew W\-IAT IT IS LikE To HAVt f3b. s ' ' OUR COVER: The words of John F. Kennedy, who will always be our president, are inscribed forever in the hearts of all men who work on th e land, from Donna, Texas, to Yakima, Washington. This newspaper is printed by unionized workers

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IN THIS ISSUE: SCHENLEY GIVES UP WHO'S NEXT?. I J ack Pando!, . PAGE 3 D e l ano Grape Growe r WIN MONEY BY SENDING STORIES TO EL MALCRIADO PAGE 18 PAGE 8-9 1XJ CONSTRUCTION BEGINS ON 1 THE FARM WORKERS CO-OP PAGES 1213'

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CESAR CBAVEZ of the FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION with SIDNEY KORSHAK of SCHENLEY INDUSTRIES , INC. signing the first agreement ending the strike against Schenley. Victory tn the Grape Strike: SCHENLEY GIVES UP Most people had said , "You can't win. It can't be done . " But now, Schen ley Corporation, a giant company with $17,000,00'0 in profits last year and offices all over America, has be e n brought to its knees by the poor grape pickers of the Delano area, who have been on strik e for over 7 l ong months. jn Los Angeles on April 6 , Schenley Corporation signed an agreement with Cesar Chavez of the National Farm.Workers Association recognizing the NFWA as the bargaining agent for all its field workers. It promised to begin immediate negotiations Qn a written con : for its field workers, which it promised to sign "60 da y s " . (Continued on page 5) -4-

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-5Schenley (CONTINUATION) The agreement-destroyed, once and for all, the lies of the other growers about the strike. Schenley had been badly hurtlly the strike and the boycott, and was eager to sign, a contract and e nd the strike. Now other growers, especially DiGiorgio, the biggest of all, are squirming like snakes, trying to escape from the FW A eagle, DiGiorgio has called fqr scab elections among its skeleton Crew of winter employe;es (foremen and crew bosses). The NFWA and AWOC have refused to attend this scab election and are demanding that Di-' B Giorgio sUbmit t o free elections of their, striking employees. If thes. e stubborn growers _ , l._ ...... =-_. ::'; _ . , : the union demands--routine conditions for industry--but revolutionary for farm workers. . "When a worker gets sick and has to leave his job," Chavez said, "he's not going to get fired for it. " ' "As for labor contractors,". Cesar continued, "they are out. In the future there is going to be no room for them. The profession of labor contractor is a d e ad one. 11 • • No more will foremen be allowed to insult women worke r s . No worker will be fired without just cause . And most important, the FWA strike r s will elect their own leaders who will sit down as equals with the Schenley bosses and negotiate wages and world.ng conditions. Some cried openly when the news of the historic victory was annmmced . "Viva Schenley, '\ viva la victoria!" they shouted. For the first time in history, some of us have stood up a-\ gainst on e of the biggest and richest corporations in the state, and have won . For the first time in hi story, we Mexican-American farn:t workers have deinimded that we be treated with dignity and respect, and our demands have been met. The farm workers of nelano have made that first big step toward a living wage and the security enjoyed by other Amer ican workers. Someday, all of us must make that first big step. T h e who l e world has been watchin g the strikers of D elano to see if we can ever win against the monstrous giant corporations that have treated us like s laves for so many years. IS DIGIORGIO NEXT? TURN THE PAGE

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VIOLENCE BY DIGIORGIO -6-Cesar Chavez and four vice-presidents of the Farm Workers Association walked out of a meeting with DiGiorgio Corporation officials last week after receiving a phone call reporting that a gunman hired by DiGiorgio had bashed i n the head of a :Oelano striker after as saulting a schoolteacher on the picket line outside their Sierra Vista ranch. Chavez and the other FWA workers had attended the meeting to try to work out an agreement to end the strike and nationwide boycott against DiGiorgio vineyards and food products: S & W FINE FOODS INDIAN RIVER produce. Before walking out Chavez told the DiGiorgio management at the meeting in a fancy Fresno hotel, "We are not g . oing to Sit here all.d tlk to you our workers in Delano are being and threatened by people who are in you r pay. 11 They left the meeting immediate ly and returned to Delano to find out why the assailant had not yet been jailed. According to a dozen witnesses, Tulare County Sheriff1 s deputies stood by while the assault took place. The gunman had previously threatened to kill pickets while holding them at gunpoint, and had shoved, knocked down, and swerved his car into strikers on other occasions. On page 8 , Dolores Huerta, victim of grower brutality in several other cases, comments on the use of violencE>
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-7-"MEN ARE MEANT TO LIVE WITH OTHERS AND TO WORK FOR ONE ANOTHER'S WELFARE"' Pope J obn XXIII Pacen in Terris THE NATIONAL FARM WOR;KERS ASSOCIATION and all Delano strikers sincerely thank the peopie of Califor nia and the other states who have made it possible for us to eat during the strike. Food packages have come from as far away as Oklahoma. But we especially want to thank the people of the farm worker towns in the San Joaquin Valley--mostrecentlyWoodville and porterville--for their help in keeping the shelves of the strike store from being empty. But our gratitude dOes not make us ashamed to ask for more, since without our strike store there can be no I I I I I I strike. :llllllllllllltiiiiiiiiiiiiiHII1111111111111111111111111111111111111111.111111111UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!III

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-8-''WE ARE THE STRIKE." Mrs. Dolores 'Huerta. VIOLENCE Dolores Huerta: 11We were picketing the produce market in Los Angeles to try to stop the grapes--the was just before Christmas--and we wou ld go every day and picket on the loa ding docks. It was Peggy, and Sy l via, Lupe Anguiano and myself with Bob Marino and Rudy Reyes, and Bert Delarmente, and Johnny Rodriguez. "The truck owners were very rough with us, kicking the girls in the legs and running the heavy steel hand trucks loaded with grapes over our feet. If the guys had tried to help u s there would have been a riot and we would have all been hurt and maybe put in jail and then we wouldn't be able to stop the grapes. These pickets knew this and they just stood by and watched it happen which was very hard for them. "The truck owners wou l d push us off, the dock whi ch was about five feet high, time after time, every day, and we would just climb back up again. It hurt very much to have them run into you with a loaded s teel dolly; it hurt much more to stand by and watch them doing it to the others. "But except for a few, a truck owner would never do it twice, because he would be ashamed of himself. And we s l owly began to win the support of all the people who were there watching these things happen, and soon there were no Delano grapes going through L . A. 11To be non-violent, you have to decide ahead of time. If most of us had not decided to be non-vio lent, we certainly would have lost the whole strike. "

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ANOTHER GROWER F A L L S than a week after the giant Schenley corporation gave in to the stt i:dng . farm workers, another major grape grower sign. ed an agreement with Cesar Chavez. The Christian Brothers, makers of Christian Brothers Wine, own a big winery and hun tlreds of acres of land in the Napa Valley (outside of the strike zone) . They announced that their field workers would be protectedbytheN.F.W.A., andthatawritten contract would be signed few weeks. Brother Gregory, president of IVIont La Salle Vineyards, the main vineyards covered by the said, "We are prepared to formally recognize theN. F. W.A. as the Organization through which social justice ffiay be realized for our agricultural workers. n Th e Christian Brothers are a Catholic _re ligious order, and there was no strike or threat of strike' at their vineyards. But the field workers there need higher wages, just else. There are over 200 workers during the harvest season (and at one time braceros were used). Like all farm worke:rs , they need a union to protect them and their rights. Brothe r Gregory stressed that the rmion was .recognized voluntarily, because the Christian Brothers knew tha t the workers' cause was just. As Catholics, they belieV e d in the statement of California bishops which was issued last month in favor of union protection for all farm workers. Brother Gregory suggested that all growers Should voluntarily start negotiations with the FWA, before strikes start. The Christian Brothers tried to get the other growers in Napa Valley to voluntarily sign a contract., the other growers refused. -9Jhe Thunderbird Spreads its Wings OXNARD--A new office of the National Farm Workers Association was officiall y opened this week in Oxnard. The office, designed to serve all of County, is located at 515 Cooper Road. Operated. _ by Ignacio ,; Garcia, 24, it will serve all farm workers and provide the special services which are available only to members. Information will be available here about the great Farm Worker Rally which will beheld in Oxnard next week at which Cesar Chavez will speak and the Teatro Campesino will be featured. Also available at the 5 15 Cooper Road of'' fice is information about the benefits of the WH NFWA, which include $1,000 life insuranc'e, free family services, representation with police, government a'nd employers by the Association. Garcia, the Oxnard FW A leader, has a l ong backgrotmd in organizational work. He is originally from Laton, California (Fresno CoWlty). Cesar Chavez has asked that "all Oxnard farm workers join under the symbol of the thWldePbird and fight for our rights, together with our brothers throughout the state" .

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-10-' ';: :.;: 1000 MARCH IN One week after the end of the Pilgrimage in Sacramento, farm workers from all arotmd , Delano gathered to celebrate their victory over the Schenley Corporation. There was a march through the West Side in which over 1,000 participated. (See the photograph below.) Heavy winds prevented the celebration of the outdoor Mass which was planned, but did not prevent a group of contractors and grOwers from showing up to protest against the Mass and from hurling insults at the Virgin of Guadaltj.pe. The farm workers held the rest of their rally at Filipino Hall (also see below), where Cesar Chavez spelled out what the contract with Schenley would mean. Larry Itliong, leader of the Filipinos, thanked the people for voting for him (Itliong ran ahead of all other candidates in every farm-worker precinct, and carried the West Side easily, but the ranchers still ruie the east side' of town and .successfully elected their favorite sell-out, Frank Herrera, as new city cotmcilman) .

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:-. . 'i!\:o. . FARM WORKER 6 CO-OP The idea of the Farm Workers Co-op began in 196 3 w hen some members of the Association found that they could 1 buy good quality motor oil at a can, if they bought it togeth er. Then they learned t hat almost everything costs about half as much if several families buy at th e same time, They found that the profits made by stores "'l'e unnecessary. Then they found the most important thing of all: that a co-op is a store owned by the customers, so that it sells only good-quality commodities that the customers want. The customers can fire th e employees of the co-op if they are not worJdng properJy . Every fami l y has one vote on a all matters of importance . ' ' Now the Co-op will become a reality. The building will be built in May and the Co-op will be fully operating before wint e r with an original membership of 500 families from the entire thousand-square mile area bet\veen Lamont and . Hanford. The folloWing services will be avai labl e to co-op members all in one location almost as soon as the building i s completed: coop drugstore; credit union (formerly called the Cooperf\tive Bank); auto parts store; servicd station for gasoline, etc . ; self-service auto repair center (you use the coop's tools); medical clinic; and discount store (thi s will start as a buying club) . THE SELF-SERVICE AUTO REPAffi CENTER is the most interesting f e ature of the new Farm Workers Co-op. When your car breaks d own you will be able to tow it into the garage with a co-op towbar and fix it yourself under expert advice from the co-op mechanic, using co-op tools. You will pay a small fee for this, but it will be much much less than any repair bill. You will be able to work in a well-ligh ted garage indoors with good tools . This is not just an idea. Construction of th e Farm Workers Co-op will begin next month. Membership will soon be made availab l e to all farm workers, who will elect directors of their own to qperations. m:B+"'A1. FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION I ' DELANO CALIFORNIA ISSUED TO: YOUR YOU CAN'T BE YOU CAN THE LOWEST PRICES THE CARD WILL DOL-HOW DO YOU GET A CO-OP NEXT ISSUE OF OUT. -13u tie SEND YOUR ANSWER AND YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS TO: "GAME OF THE TOWNS" P . o . rox to6o Dt:LANO, CALIF. The winner of the last GAME OF THE TOWNS (EL MALCRIADO # 30), was RAMeN PASILLAS of Earlimart. He \\aS the first to correctly recognize ALLENSWORTH .

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-14-Pilgrimage One of the biggest crowds ever to jam into the park in front of the state CaPitol at Sacra mento was present on Easter Sunday for the great finale of the Pilgrimage by the strikers along 32. 0 miles of highway between D e l ano and the CaPital. The long line of marchers increased in length every day until the original group of sixty marchers leaving De l ano made a procession so long that it took over an h our to cross th e Tower Bridge into Sacramento . Police estimated the crowd at "8. ,000 t o 10 ,000 ". Outs tandin g speeches were given by Epifalio Camacho, farm worker from McFarland, and Chris Hartmire, director of the California Migrant Ministry. The final days o f the march received publicity throughout the United States . 11NewsWeek11, :m,th a circulation in th e millions, said, "Last week, the parade to the Capitol turned into a triwnphal march--the first real breakthrough by farm workers in the l ong history of u . s . organized labor ... The steps of Chavez' strikers will set up echoes for th e future . " The picture ; how th e first of the marchers crossing th e Tower Bridge into the city, and the Virgin o f Guadal up e finally arrived at the CaPitol after a month ' s ]o\lrney. The .future, for th e Virgin and her half million California farm workers, l ooked very gont'J

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-15 -This is the story of how Schenley Corporation, with thousands of acres of grapes_ around Delano, was brought to its knees by the Farm Workers Association who entered the strike ' with only $85 in the bank and only two paid employees (Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta). Many people have given their own ideas about how this was done . Some said that it was the BOSTON GRAPE PARTY which broke Schenley. This occurred when Sal Gonzales of Delano went 3,000 miles to Boston to dt,tmp scab grapes into Boston Harbor in imitation of American revolutionaries of 200 years ago, who dumped tea into the harbor to protest against 11the ranchers of 177311--British tyr,ants. 'Police grabbed Gonzales on the same charges that they had against the early Americans: "dumping that is injurious to public health." But Schenley heard that people 3,000 m!les from California cared about the workers here and would not buy Schenley products. Other people said that it was the thousands and thousands of pledge cards sent to Schenley which finally made this giant give in to the tiny Farm Workers Association. So many people made these pledges that Schenley had to put extra people to work in their San Francisco offices to handle the stacks of cards that were coming in. This was admitted in a letter ! from Vice-President Woolsey to a Schenley stockholder who was our secret agent. Another secret agent for the farm workers who was an office employee in Schenley's New York headquarters (we carmot reveal their name} let the union know exactly how much money was being spent for advertising tv fight the boycott. Finally they decided that \t just wasn't worth it, the agent said. The real heroes, however, are in Delano on the picket line. They collected hundreds of sign-up cards from workers who walked out on Schenley. They braved the artificial dust storms, the insults of contractors, foremen and and the long hours spent calling to the scabs to come out . So many scabs came out that Schenley could not face another season against the pickets. Or perhaps it was the valiant San Francisco lawy e r who quietly visited a different bar every night, convincing each bartender not to serve SChenley products. Perhaps the boycott was won by the eigh t or ten huelguistas who left in January in their old cars for the eastern United States, without money in their pockets, heading into the freezing weather of the East to stop Schenley. To sum up, the strike against Schenley was won by each person who helped make it possible. Every worker who walked out of Schenley's fields, every picket, every organize!-de_: serves credit for this great victory, as much as the brave pilgrims who walked to Sacra mento and the thousands of farm workers and city people who have fed and clothed the str> kers during these seven long months.

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-16. To Whom This May Concern? You YOUR. sand Especially mr general Public Of Calif; And other States as well No one knows any better than tliis father of four small boys and four small' girls. at my first entrance to calif; from g lendeale arizona. 1 940 june first. afainte r b y trade. but unsofisian work at any craft to properly suport them and a wife. had to resort to cotton picking after having worked in th e quake wreck of brawle y until it became so hot that constructio n was forced to hault until cooler weather begain living in a magatory tent until early fall we came to d e lano calif; in quest of cotton to pick . We could'nt even get a house on a ranch to live in as we wished to pick cotton week erids with the c hildren and we the week thiough as many vacant houses as their were . a t that tim e our force was too small to pick eno ugh cotton they wanted all grown tWS to ocupy a house we were forced to buy a trailer house w ith no chasses or wheels to live in. on the Bob williams farm at ham to live in all winter . 9 people in a twelve by fourteen trailer house p"lywood all winter of 1940. and the farmer:; were getting more releif at that time than many poor familys were . from the government they are all grown up now and on their own and scattered as bad as the twelve tribes of Isreal were after the death of our saviour. christ our lord. Shirley is dead Abeautiful auborn at the age of five . s l ayn lly hit and run driver in l ong beach calif. in froD. of our would be hom e that was va cated byj'aps who went toconsantration camp at the beginning of world war two no one else would rent it it was so badly abu sed and beat up but we had to rent it at twenty five a month. as I worked at doUg las air craft. the alley for a front yard. shirley was slayn by hit and run driver as she down the steps. no one will re member our first night neal: delano. we were two poor to rent a cabin . and eat to so we spen t our first in a fresh mown al-falfa field ... (These recollections continue , for many more paragraphs and are J ed by a long poem. Then:) ! I I Enclosed please find a check for five dollars i'm sure it won't for there are j three more dollars in my account. it i s for j the strike fund i guess i know what it is all about. Dear Editor: Wm Mercer Palo Alto Recently my husband and I obtained a membership in the . Consumer's Cooperative (Co-op) in the name of Ces!'l" Chavez (with his consent) and the NFW A The member number is 47947; Would you please pub-lish this in "t.'he";ext issue of 11El Mal6ria do"? We are telling people about the num ber here in order that they use it when buying at the co-op. Then at the end of the year the NFWA will receive a check the :r mount of which will b e determined on the basis of the amount of purchases . Dear Sirs, Carlos & Kathy Fernandez Berkeley, Califorl;lia It is not surprising that, within 24 hours after Louis Lucas, Earlimart grape grov.o er, threaten e d that ranchers were going to take the law Into their own hand s (Bee, April 20), a DiGiorgo private cop viciously shoved a woman picket to the ground, and then, wie ldin g a heavy club, bashed in the s kull of a Mexican-American who had come to assist the roughed-up lady picket. The Delano area growers have nO on e to blame but thems e lv e for their reputation as viol e nt, bestial, tmcivilized clod s , practising labor relations in the tradition of Simon Legree. Douglass Adiur Delano,

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\ F you Ar?E STRONG ENOUG/.1 To MARCI-l -ro SACRAMrvro .... TI-IN YaJ ARE SiRoN& ' .ENOUGH_ TO f:INISI/ TI-IAT R9W BEFoRE you A PRINk OF w . FASTER, BOY/

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-18-EL MALCRIADO will pay from $1 to $25 for news items which you send to us if we use , them in the paper, plus $1 or for every picture of yours that we use. In this new contest you can write your own: news stories about growers labor contrac tors, strikes and strikers, farm workers and foremen, demonstrations, organizing events, important soci3J. events, information about l abor cases against employers, troubl e with welfare and hospital officials, safety on th e job, new work methods, serious job accidents, new machines, stories about work " in strange crops like dates, stories about strikes many ago which you witnessed, information about police brutality,. unjust government ac ti,on, or news from ' any FWA office or other farm worker union or cooperative associatiOn. If you can 't write either Spanish or English , h ave your childr e n write it for you. Write clearly on .large paper. S end your news to Bo x 1060, pelano, California IF WE PRINT IT, WE WILL SEND YOU YOUR MONEY . This ..is a contest that anybody can win! All you need is a stamp. The contest is open until June 15, 196 6, but send your article NOW. . -NEW HOUSES FOR WOODVILLE WOODVILLE--The t enants of the Woodville qamp have voted on new housing which has been offered . tl1em. They have been offered 100 homes (and another hundred at Linnell Camp near Visalia) at $60 a month. They have refused to accept these homes unless the rent is l owered to $45, because farm wages do not permit $60 rent per month witl_lout extreme sacrifice. The federal . government is on th e side of the farm workers, and says the $60 rent is too hi gh. Unless the Tu1are !busing Authority makes the rent lower, the farm worke'rs will prevent them from building the houses. While they are waiting for the new houses; the tenants will live in v.hat we .callJ'Governor B;rown's packing . crates", which are a night, temporary housing which looks like the picture at the left. The "packing crates" are popular because of the low rent, and they are certainly no worse than th e present tin dwellings. Unless an agreement is reached with the Housing Authority on the new houses, the tenants will cripple the Housin g Au thority and start their own private housing organization;

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-19HARLEM HAGEN THE STRIKEBREAKER Congressman Harlan Hagan of Hanford is at it again, acting like a strikebreaker, trying to help the growers and defeat the strike. H e recently sent out a Jake "questionnaire" (at taxpayers ' expense) to everyone , in the Delano area who has a po s t office box . This includes all th e growers, foremen, and con tractors, but does not include workers who live in the camps , or migrants who rent housing in t own . The questionnaire was in English only. All farm workers w ho receive t his questi on naire are warned not to sign it, as th e names may be used for blacklis tin:g and discrimination. The questimmaire asks the growers and contractors, "How much do you pay your workers?", so the growers can repeat their same o l d lies about ho w rich their workers are. It asks the growers if they wouid be willing to hold electio ns; with oilly scabs allowed t o vote (that is what DiGiorgio wants) Congressman H agan i s still swallowing the growers 'lies. H e still doesn't believe t hat there is a grape strike. Thi s week Hag an w ill have a meeting with hi s friends, grower Martin Zan inovitch of D e l ano and Joseph Bros mer of Fresno, t o discus-15 how to break th e strike an d keep farm workers poor. EL MALCRIADO SAYS: Congressman H agan, we in vite yo u t o a ttend the rallies of farm workers and see for yourself the hundreds of real, live.worker s w h o have stayed with th e strike through 7 mo nth s of the struggle. Compare the 1000 farm workers wQ.o a ttended the victory r ally in Delano last SW1day, to the half d o zen scab workers that s how u p at the Scab U nion meetings. Ask Schenley Corporation if there was a strike! • r -rl Congressman Har l en Hagan has a new partner, but the two are singing the same old broken record and dancing to the ranchers' tun e . The Cong ressman has been joined by State Senator Hugh Burn s of Fresno, l ong an enemy of labor tmion s and poor peopl e . The "Burns Committee" will soon be spreading the same kinds of rumors and lies for which Hagen is famous, trying to smear the Farm Workers Association, the srtkie, and the Mexican-Americans of this state.

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-20THOUGHTS ABOUT THE PILGRIMAGE Some people have been asking us why the governor of the State of California did not come out to receive us when we finished our in Sacramento on Apri!IO. We didn't make our in order to get protection from the government. This march on Sacramento was made with the idea of showing the whole world the misery in which the ranchers of this great state' hold their field workers. We as Mexicans are not used to begging or crying for help to the governments-and especially when we know that what we are demanding is the just reward for our own work. We in our pilgrimage brought the Virgin of Guadalupe and carried her for those three htmdred miles so that the people who came out to greet us would know that we had not lost f3.ith that our little virgin could bring us justice. In much the same way, many years ago a leader called Nezahulcoyot, told the Aztec tribe that they would undertake a march toward the south and in that march the children would become old and the old people would die along the road, but that their sons would arrive at a place, where in the middle of a lake they would come upon an eagle eating a snake. This was to be the place where they would _build a great nation. All these things happened exactly as this prophet or leader told them, and today we have the great city of Mexico. Again, today, a leader told us, "We will go, we will walk 300 miles looking for justice and we will carry the Virgin of Guadalupe so that our path will be illuminated, and so that we will be defended from our enemieswho would put themselves against us. It was because of this that we were brought to the finish with so much success. We think that if the governor preferred to spend the holidays with his family during the finale of our pilgrimage, that our great success was worth much more than the good wishes nf any fat official. (by our correspondent in HANFORD)

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-22Y!D!I !D@'ii' u.mm' EL CORRIDO DE DELANO--LALO GUERRERO HAS RECORDED THrn STIRRING SONG WffiCH TELLS THE STORY OF T!IE STRIKE, THE PILGRIMAGE AND THE WHOLE MOVEMENT , A REGULAR COMMERCIAL 45 RPM RECORDING, IT ,IS AVAILABLE AT YOUR RECORD STORE OR FOR $1 IN CASH TO PO BOX 1060, DELANO . IF YOU CAN . SELL TWO ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTIONS AT $2 EACH TO EL MALCRIA:OO, THERE-. CORD IS YOURS FOR NOTHING. SEND US THE NAMES Alj"D ADDRESSES OF THE SUBSCRIPTIONS AND $2 FOR EACH ONE. WE WILL SEND YOU THE RECORD FREE. THE FIVE DOLLAR CLUB--"WE HAVE FORMED A GROUP OF APPROXlMA TELY TWENTY MEMBERS EACH OF WffiCH HAS PLEDGED $5 A MONTH FOR THE BALANCE OF YOUR STRIKE. WHILE MOST OF US ARE LONGSHOREMEN, OTHERS ARE LAW YERS OR MEN OF THE TRADES." THIS LETTER CAME WITH 26 SIGNATURES AND $130 FROM SAN FRANCISCO . IN LARGE LETTERS AT THE BOTTOM IT READS:" AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN I NJURY TO ALL."ASAREPLY.THEFARMWOR KERS ASSOCIATION HAS STATED THAT "THERE IS NO UNION THAT HAS DONE MORE TO HELP US THAN THE INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S UNION" . A BRAVER GROUP OF MEN HAS NEVER EXISTED THAN THESE DOCK WORKERS WHO HAVE HELPED US WITHOUT A THOUGHT TO THEm OWN WELL-BEING. MISSING PERSONS DEP AR TMEN'I: 1) Albert Perkins, California farm worker, please write your mother, Jessie Perldns, 2 102 Bagby, Apt . 4, Houston, Texas. 2) 11Jesse, please come home. The children are sick. Love, A. B . , Tulare . 11 (These notices are free. Send them to Box 1060, Delano, California.) THE TRIUMPHANT RETURN FROM SACRAMENTO WAS MET WITH A GIGANTIC BARBE CUE IN MEMORIAL PARK, FINANCED BY MANY PROMINENT CIT IZENS OF DEUNO. EL MALCRIADO ESPECIALLY SALUTES MR . JONES KONG, OWNER OF THE FOOD FOR HIS GENEROUS CONTRIBUTION WffiCH MADE IT POSSIBLE FOR THE BEER TO FLOW FREELY AT THIS FIESTA, AND THE RUBALCAVA BAKERY OF HAN FORD AND BAKERSFIELD, WHO DONATED 100 DOZEN TORTILLAS . DELANO, CALIFORNIA you a bUl. \111111 . The best way to be sure you wW pt your MALCRIADO 111 by mAll, deUv• ADDRESS ered to your home every two weeU. --------Send your and address to Box TOWN 1060,D e lano, Calif., .and we will ----------! . aend rou the to you for ZIP !, one year. . , "-------------------------------:---------------------------------------------------------------------------

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DON'T BUY Dl GIOR'GIO 'I 'JOt 7:Jotteve t4 You can help the Delano strike rs. Whenev;er you go to the market, put some Di. Giorgio product s in your shopping basket. Then, at the che ckstand, demand that they be removed from your grocery bag, and el