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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 21

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 21
Series Title:
El Malcriado
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United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
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Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
Malcriado (lot)
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER V J
in English
Volume II, Number 21
sSSSKi"' Delano, California
January 1, 19&9


2/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969
in this issue
Grape Sales Off 19% During Holidays......................... . pi 3
Tijerina Acquitted .... p. 4 Hie Threat of Chemical Poisons..........................p. 5
A Christmas Parade for Dignity
and Justice...................p. 6
(Pictures, . ..............p. 8-9)
Non-Violence and the Draft. .p. 10
by the Editor
Hie columns of EL MALCRIADO have frequently mentioned the Inter-Agency Committee on Mexican-American Affairs, headed by Vicente T. Ximenes in Washington.
About twice a week, we get “press releases” from Mr. Ximenes telling us how much die Committee is doing for the Mexican-Americans in the United States.
OUR COVER: Marcos Munoz and his son (andthe rest of his family) have been on boycott duty for over a year. Marcos leads the boycott in Boston and New England.
To date none of these releases has mentioned La Huelga.
One thing is sure, however. The name of Vicente T. Ximenes always, but always, appears in the first paragraph.
The latest “hot" news from Ximenes is that former executive di-
Photo by Jill Krementz rector David North has resigned,
and will be succeeded by Jose A. Chacon.
“Hie Mexican - American community will always be grateful for the long hours, hard work and dedication which David North gave for the cause of justice. Much of the progress which has been made by the Mexican American is the direct result of Mr. North's work,” said Mr. Ximenes.
Hogwash, says EL MALCRIADO. Hie progress which has been made by the Mexican American is the direct result of hard work, organizing, and militancy on die part of Mexicans in the barrios and in the fields, and not by some Washington swivel chair sitter named North. Now Mr. North will be succeeded
EL HALCRIAOO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITED FARM WORKERS - ORGANIZING COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions In the United States and its possessions are $3.50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included In monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located at the northwest corner of Gar-ces Hiqhway and Mettler Avenue, Delano, Cali fornia.
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For .advertising rates, contact Federico Chavez at (805) 725*1337 or the mailing ad-res s listed above.
U1S701 7531*533,'
by Jose A. Chacon. Chacon is a graduate of West Point, and has been in the Army, die Navy, and the Air Force. He worked for an Atomic Energy Commission contractor in New Mexico. He was also head of the Public Welfare Board in New Mexico and had something to do with Cuban refugees.
Great credentials. Now the Inter-Agency Committee on Mexican-American affairs can have TWO do-nothing conferences a year in El Paso.
Credit Union Meeting:
The annual meeting of the Farm Worker Credit Union will be held in Delano on Sunday, January 26, according to Helen Chavez, manager of the Credit Union. The meeting will begin at 8:30 AM in the Filipino Hall, 1457 Glenwood Ave. After the meeting, lunch will be served. A11 members and their guests are invited.
EL MALCRIADO More and more people are finding out that a P.O. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way
‘DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle.
93215 Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS, FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English Espanol____
ADDRESS-domicilio_ CITY-ciudad________
STATE-estado
ZIP
i
I


EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/3
{FEDERAL REPORTS SHOW
GRAPE SALES OFF M DURING THE HOLIDAY
DELANO, December 26—Grape sales for the holiday season, December 5 through 26, are down 19 percent when compared with a similar period of 1966, latest reports from the U. S. Department of Agriculture reveal.
The comparison was made for the 41 major cities which account for over 60 percent of the grape market, making the impact of the grape boycott quickly apparent.
The government report also indicates that more than five million boxes of grapes remain in cold storage, unsold. Grape sales usually decline to almost nothing during January, but high cold storage inventories will probably force growers to try unloading the leftovers at lower prices.
The Produce News of December 14 described die grape market as follows: “Shipping point trading on table grapes in California is very slow. Shippers are not cleaning up their loadings and some cars are rolling unsold or consigned. There is a trend downward on prices, particularly Emperors. On 26 lb. lugs of Emperors, shippers in the Delano, California district are doing business f.o.b. mostly for $2.75-$3.00.. .a year ago at this time the Emperor market was $4...”
In other words, growers are sending loaded freight cars to the East without guarantees of sale, hoping that by die time the grapes reach Eastern markets, buyers will be
grapes to be shipped after they are sold.
Under the heading “Fresh Fruit and Vegetable National Shipping Point Trends,” the Department of Agriculture’s Market News for December 17 reported "Trading was fair for best lots, but overall was below expectations in volume for die was very slow, partly due to boycott action in some markets and partly to ample supplies available in most terminal markets.”
Commenting on die effects of die boycott so far, UFWOC Vice President Dolores Huerta told EL MALCRIADO last week, “We’ve learned a lot about how to run a boycott this year, and you can be sure that it will be much bigger and better organized next season.” “Besides,” she said, “we can continue fighting as long as it takes, because we have nothing to lose.
"The growers refuse to negotiate with the Union, leaving us no alternative but to continue the boycott. If they would agree to negotiate, we could set about building a heal-thys^rape industry together.
“You know,” she added, “we take no joy in hurting them just for the sake of damaging their businesses out of vengeance or bitterness. We want the strike and boycott to end almost as much as they do.
“Maybe we can avoid the suffering and misery of the boycott for next year. It will all be over if they
found. Hie usual practice is for agree to negotiate."
1 Henry R. 1 [afoya, Jr.
1 Life Insurance Office, 222-3727
Res, 222-7544 WM ialth Insurance
FRESNO CALIFORNIA
The sign that tells you people are working togetheri to fill their needs
You do not have to be a member to shop-come in and see how .economic
democracy works
{GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM
WORKERS FROM
The Consumer Cooperative of Berkeley


4/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, I9t>9
GROWERS GO EAST TO SPARK GRAPE SALES
Juan Flores
TIJERINA ACQUITTED
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO— Reies Lopez Tijerina was acquitted on December 13th by a New Mexico jury of six men and six women of the charges of kidnapping. The charges grew out of an incident in June, 1967, when several people tried to put District Attorney Alfonso Sanchez under “citizen's arrest” in Tierra Amarilla.
Tijerina, who acted as his own attorney, said that during the incident some followers of La Alian-za, the movement he directs, had gone to the Court House in Tierra Amarilla looking for Sanchez, who had been harrassing and arresting La Alianza’s people with die help of the state police.
Tijerina said that he was not present until someone told him that the Court House was being surrounded by police and that there was a possibility of violence.
Trying to avoid any outbreaks, he
showed up and saw someone going inside the Court House with a rifle. Tijerina said he grabbed the rifle, yelling "Stop, Stop, you are giving them die excuse to kill us all."
Some observers at the trial felt Judge Paul Larrazolo’s instructions to the jurors had a great deal to do with the acquittal. “The court instructs the jury that anyone, including a state police officer, who intentionally interferes with a lawful attempt to make a citizens arrest does so at his own peril, since the arresting citizens are entitled under the law to use whatever force is reasonably necessary to effect said citizen's arrest..."
Tijerina presented 29 witnesses on his behalf. More were ready to testify, but the judge refused to listen to other small farmers of the mountains of Tierra Amarilla who had come to testify in sup-
BUFFALO, December 8—Juan and Maree Flores, UFWOC representatives in Buffalo, report that growers and their representatives have been touring the East in an attempt to bolster their flagging reputations.
The Floreses recently met Delano grower Jack Pandol in a debate in this upstate New York city. A-cross the border in Canada, gro-dr John Giumarra met UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen in a debate that was broadcasted on TV throughout the country.
Jorge Zaragoza, boycott chairman for Cincinnati and Southern 0-hio, debated with growers Martin Zaninovich and Jack Pandol.
Superscab Jose Mendoza has returned to California after an extensive anti-Union -tour of the East and Midwest.
The growers' travels indicate spreading realization that the grape boycott has cut deeply into their sales throughout die country. In desperate moves to unload their grapes, die growers have launched expensive advertising campaigns, have slashed prices, and have pushed grapes into new markets, especially the South, to avoid the expanding boycott.
The UFW OC boycott is growing more effective, not less so, as the winter deepens.
Perhaps that explains why growers had dumped 1,228,569 tons of table grapes into the crushers of California’s wineries this season, giving up all hope of selling the grapes on the table grape market.
port of Tijerina. The prosecutor presented 18 witnesses, many of whom contradicted themselves and each other, it was reported.
After die trial, Tijerian happily said that die Alianza was going to continue fighting for the rights of the Mexican-Americans to the lands of New Mexico. They allege that many Mexican-Americans were dispossessed of their land after the Mexican War of 1846-1848.
/


EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/5
JUDGE HIDES THE DANGERS OF PESTICIDES
DELANO, December 31—Hearings on a request by crop dusting firms in die Kern County area to deny access to public records on the use of pesticides to UFWOC attorneys will be held in Bakersfield on Wednesday, January 29, according to UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen.
Cohen said after he attempted to view die records, on file in the office of Agricultural Commissioner Sheldon Morley, on August 20, Superior Court Judge J. Kelly Steele issued a restraining order prohibiting the Commissioner to show him the records. _______
the Union’s legal department is conducting a study of die possible dangers to farm workers of the numerous toxic substances used in agricultural pest control.
Union attorneys have said they have considerable evidence that the farm chemicals can be a serious health hazard to farm workers, and that die public records will show exactly which chemicals are used in die fields.
Assistant General Counsel David Averbuck, who will represent Cohen at die January 29 hearings, said he expected Steven Wall will represent the crop dusters and Kern
County Counsel Ralph Gordon will represent the Agricultural Commission.
Testimony from physicians, scientists and farm workers will be presented at the hearings, Averbuck said.
There is no guarantee, however, that if the court order barring access to the records is lifted on January 29 that the Union will then ' be able to examine die records.
Morley’s office might still deny access to die records on administrative grounds, Cohen explained., even though there is no longer a
The Threat of Chemical Poisons
ihe menace of fertilizers and other farm chemicals pose a serious threat to the health of the public in general and farm workers expecially, recently released information shows.
While officials of the United Farm Workers have continued to fight the battle for adequate protection of workers who come in contact with dangerous chemicals, scientists have been studying the effect of heavy fertilization on the water supply.
A newly-elected director of the American Association for die Advancement of Science has warned that farmers and growers in the United States are dumping 7 million tons of nitrogen compounds from chemical fertilizers into the soil each year, and that this heavy use of chemical fertilizers is polluting soil and water and posing an increasing danger to the health of inhabitants of farm areas.
The scientist. Dr. Barry Commoner, a. noteu botanist, ecologist, and director of the Center for the Biology of Natural Systems at Washington University in St. Louis, warned in a speech to fellow scientists at a convention in Dallas that “the heavily farmed areas of California probably represent the most, severe public health hazard from
nitrates originating in fertilizers."
Commoner noted that nitrates have already polluted the San Joaquin River and most streams, creeks, and sloughs in the Central Valley, and contribute to the pollution of San Francisco Bay. Some agricultural communities, specifically Delano, California, have publically warned that tap water is contaminated by a dangerously high level of nitrates and may be unsafe for babies to drink. Chemical fertilizers, and not sewage, have been proven to be die source of the contamination.
Nitrate compounds themselves are not directly dangerous, Commoner noted, but they are easily converted into nitrites "which can be dangerously poisonous to humans."
Nitrate-polluted water has caused infant outbreaks of an anemia-like disease called mehemoglobinemia, which can lead to breathing difficulties, retard mental growth, and even cause death, Commoner said.
Research has turned up dozens of cases where nitrite poisoning has already caused disease in infants â–  fed baby food vegetables that have been exposed to bacteria after their containers were opened. The bacteria quickly convert harmless .nitrates to nitrites.
1 The conclusion of Dr. Commoner’s
research is that die nitrates are a chemical menace, choking our rivers, killing our fish, polluting our drinking water, and in some counties, already endangering die health of our children.
V
To counter this menace, Commoner suggested the use of "pelletized” fertilizers that would release their nitrogen far more slowly than present chemicals do; confining fertilizer operations to periods when rain is unlikely to carry dangerous chemicals in to die water supply, and the development of new technologies to spread organic sewage effluents back on the soil as useful, safe, natural fertilizers.
The United Farm Workers has been especially concerned with the problems of chemical fertilizers, since most farm workers live in areas where the danger from nitrate poisoning is extremely high. The Union has also been concerned with the health and safety of workers. applying .these chemical fertilizers, and working in close proximity to such chemicals.
State and county officials have sought to prevent the Union fnom gaining access to information and files on the subject. Union At-tourney Jerome Cohen's requests Continued on page 14


6/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969_
A CHRISTMAS PARADE FOR DIGNITY AND JUSTICE
(Pictures on pages 8-9)
LAMONT, December 16 — More than 400 Di Giorgio workers marched down Main Street in La-mont last Saturday, December 14, during die Chamber of Commerce sponsored Christmas Parade to show the community their solidarity and desire to remain working under a Union contract despite the sale of Di Giorgio's vineyards.
Mack Lyons, UFWOC representative in Lamont (some 45 miles south of Delano) saidhehadobtained permission to enter a contingent of 100 farm workers in the Christmas parade. However, at die cry of "Join us" numerous farm workers who were standing on the sidewalks with "Viva la Huelga!" and “Viva la Union” signs entered the line of
march.
The Union banner—the black eagle on red and white—was carried at the frpnt of the group by several young girls. Several Boy Scouts and students joined in with the farm workers after having already marched in their own groups.
Afterwards, at die Lamont park a few blocks away, during a rally. Mack Lyons thanked all die participants.
Some people who had come to Delano on die Christmas caravan were also in Lamont. Among those recognized were several ministers from the Migrant Ministry and several churches and a number of Catholic priests. The Mexican A-merican Youth Organization from Union City and the Brown Berets from Richmond were also there.
The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee and EL MALCRIADO join in expressing their sympathy to organizers Lupe and Kathy Murguia on the loss of their twin infants last month. The twins were born prematurely and died soon after brirth.
A Plea for a Non Violent New Year...
GROWERS PRAISE CONTRACTS
DELANO, December 17—Representatives of Di Giorgio, Schenley, Paul Masson and Almaden recently came out in praise of. the UFWOC after the South Central Farmers’ Committee charged that the Union had brought chaos into the grape industry.
The South Central Farmers’ Committee had claimed that Di Giorgio had to sell his land at less than the appraised value because of unionization, but Di Giorgio President Max O’Neill said that the Union contract was not a factor in die Company’s sale of land. The land is being sold for about die same price estimated by government appraisers, O’Neill added.
Another charge made bytheSCFC was that 58 strikes and slowdowns at Schenley “had made an atrocity of the Union contract."
Schenley1 s attorney Sidney Kor-shack denied this and said that "wages were so low before, we felt the workers were certainly entitled to the additional money and fringe benefits."
Representatives of both companies agreed that relations with the Union had been “remarkably good."
A spokesman for Paul Masson said that they had solved all their major problems with the Union, and that "the small problems remaining are certainly not bothering diem." He added that some difficulties were to be expected in any new contract.
George Morrison, Manager of Personnel at Almaden Vineyards,
Continued on page 14
The Chemical Menace
Continued from page 5. to study public records on the use >f such chemicals were denied last summer and the Union is still denied access to the records.
Meanwhile, babies in Delano drink bottled water if their parents can afford it, and the others run a dan-gerous risk.


EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/7
The Farm Bureau
stiii Loves CAMACHO CHALLENGES COURT
Those Subsidies
KANSAS CITY, December 13— The American Farm Bureau Federation ended its convention in Kansas City with a resounding no vote to a proposal to put a ceiling of $20,000 a year on government cash payments to any single grower.
The Farm Bureau Federation has for years piously called for "free enterprise” in agriculture and demanded that the government end regulations and subsidies in farming. But when a group of small farmers who were not on the subsidy gravy train proposed that the Farm Bureau support a limit on cash subsidies to any single farmer, the big growers who control die Farm Bureau resoundingly voted diem .down.
Farm Bureau President Charles Shuman also, called on all farmers to work together to break the grape boycott and bust die Union. “Buy and eat grapes and have some on your table for Christmas,” Shuman urged delegates to the convention. And the Farm Bureau has been Joined by two other rightist groups to break the boycott, according to the California AFL-CIO News. The John Birch Society and the National Right -to- Work Committee are calling on their members to buy and eat grapes as part of their patriotic duty.
Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
'Tfcexican-
?4t£on*tcy
Fresno California
DELANO, December 31—UFWOC picket captain Epifanio Camacho will be tried on charges of malicious mischief in Delano - McFarland Justice Court on January 17, according to UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen. The charges were made on February 5, when Camacho, Cesar Chavez, and other Union members were accused of violating the provisions of an anti-strike injunction issued in August of 1967 by Bakersfield Superior Court Judge J. Kelley Steele.
David Averbuck, UFWOC Assistant Counsel, said that the trial itself will be a challenge of the constitutionality of die Justice Courts. As- die complaint was originated in die Delano-MCFarland Judicial District, Camacho will be tried by a Justice Court and not by a Municipal Court, as would have been the case if the complaint had been originated in the Bakersfield area.
Even though both courts handle misdeameanors, the disadvantages of being judged in a justice court are obvious, Averbuck said. The parties involved are not provided with a Court Reporter, andthecpurt officials do not have to be lawyers, Averbuck noted.
Since they are not generally lawyers, judges in these courts usually do not understand or have a good sense of what "proper justice” means.
Justice courts are in reality a violation of die 14th ammendment of the constitution, more specifcally, of the Equal Protection Clause, Averbuck said.
•Recent studies have shown that Justice Court Judges give ridicously high sentences. For example, in the El Centro Justice Court a boy was sent to jail for four months because he said a dirty word. It is time for the rural counties to have judges who understand proper justice.” he commented.
"These issues are so important that attorneys as far away as New
Epifanio Camacho
York City have offered their services.”
Camacho will be judged by Judge McNally of the Delano-McFarland District. "If Camacho goes to trial without equal protection of the laws, a full and detailed report will be sent to die U.S. Justice Department and to the Commission on Civil Rights,” Averbuck added.
UFWOC Wins in Oregen Trial
SALEM OREGON, December 27— Marion County District Court Judge Thomas W. Hansen declared a mis-trail in the case of Nick Jones, UFWOC organizer in Oregon, when Jones appeared in court December 26 to face a charge of vagrancy and disorderly conduct.
The charges arose out of an incident on November 27 when Jones and 27 Oregonians were arrested outside an Albertson’s Market while picketing die sale of scab grapes.
Of .the 28, 18 were children ana were released from Juvenile Center shortly after the arrests, with no charges filed.
The ten adults are accused of blocking cars entering and leaving the market, a charge Jones and the other picketers deny.
The jury was unable to reach a verdict after Jones’s trial.
The defendant said he hoped charges would be dismissed, since the inability of the jury to reach a decision showed the flimsy nature of die "evidence* produced by die District Attorney.


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10/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969
Hiring Hall NOTICE
DELANO, January 1—Both Schen-ley Industries and Perelli-Minetti will be hiring workers over the next two weeks, for die pruning operations, according to Manuel Sanchez, director of die Union Hiring Hall in Delano. Both ranches are under Union contract and all interested in working at these ranches should register immediately at die Hiring Hall at 102 Albany St. in Delano. Sanchez noted that wages at Schen-ley are $2.25 for pruning by machine and $2.10 for pruning by hand. Wages at Perelli-Minetti are based on piece-rates.
Di Giorgio Ranch in Arvin-Lamont is also hiring a few workers, according to the Union’s Lamont office. Though Di Giorgio is in the process of selling its land, the Union has demanded that until the sale is complete, all work done on die land must be under the Union contract. There is still some hope that the major buyer of the land, S. A. Camp, will honor die contract and thus avoid precipitating a major labor struggle In the fields this winter.
Prison Group Commits Itself to La Causa
SUSANVILLE, CALIFORNIA—Inmates at die California Conservation Center in Susanville, California have organized a Latin American Cultural Group and have begun publication of a small newspaper, "El Aguila."
A statement of aims and objectives in the first issue of the paper said that the purpose of the group is to set up a program for the study of Mexican and American histories, heritages, and languages.
The guiding concept of die pro-v gram, El Aguila stated, is that Mexican - American inmates can change their way of thinking as a group. Mexican-Americans who are in prison will be asked to go out and get involved, not in crime, but in Mexican-American activities.
An interesting paragraph in another article of the paper read: "We know that as ex-felons we will not have the right to vote nor will we be able to hold any public office, but as concerned Mexican-Americans we are determined to come out of prison and get politically involved at all levels."
SLAVERY IN TEXAS
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, December 13—Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, president of Notre Dame University and a member of the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights said recently that farm workers in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas lived in a situation close to "peonage."
Father Hesburgh made the statement after listening to testimony indicating that Mexican-Americans in South Texas earn about $1,500 per year and were unable to better themselves because of the opposition of rich growers and government officials.
"This sounds to me like peonage,” he said. "This is as close as you can come to slavery.”
The Texas Rio Grande Valley is one of die worst economic situations in the nation, he added.
Press reports said Texas attorney Arnulfo Guerra compared the border situation in the Valley with what would occur if Canadian workers were permitted to work in U. S. automobile factories at half the going wages.
That "wouldn’t be permitted,” Guerra said, “but it is allowed along the Mexican border.”
NON-VIOLENCE AND THE DRAFT
SAN FRANCISCO, December 30-Pat Bryan, a young organizer for the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee received a sentence of six months to four years in die federal penitentary today for refusal to register for the draft.
Bryan had a hearing during a two hour trial on November 14, in which UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez testified in his behalf, saying, "I believe he is sincere and conscientious.”
Bryan had stated in May of 1967, when refusing to register for the draft, "my conscience guides me
to not cooperate with any compulsory system which advocates killing as a method, of settling disputes.”
Bryan was an organizer for the Union in Delano and then on the boycott in Los Angeles and later St. Louis.
Another young organizer, Mark Silverman, has also refused to cooperate with the draft, and refused induction in November. "I am trying to help farm workers in this country. I will not go to kill farm workers in Viet Nam,” he told EL MALCRIADO.
Silverman worked with the Union in Bakersfield and now works with the boycott committee in New York.
One young leader in the Union, Frank Diaz of Bakersfield, a former Giumarra worker who headed the boycott in Philadelphia until last month, was recently granted conscientious objector status. Several other organizers for the Union, firm in their conviction of non-violence, have applied for C O status.
EL MALCRIADO salutes these young men who are defending their belief in non-violence.


EL MALCRvjADO, January 1, 1969/11
IBOOK REVIEW
PROFITING FROM POVERTY WITH HIRE EDUCATION
The Dirt on California: Agribusiness and the University 3 by Ann< and
Hal Draper, ISC Press, 32 pages, 35 cents.
A newly published study by Hal and Ann Draper of Berkeley describes a fantastic pattern of pro-grower, anti-labor activity on die part of the University of California and its Division of Agriculture and Agricultural Extension Services.
The University has consistently worked toward limiting the organization of farm labor unions, preventing farm workers from organizing, holding down farm wages, preventing die passage of any legislation aimed at improving working conditions and providing propaganda for various causes supported by the growers to keep farm workers in near serfdom.
These anti-labor policies cover a 50-year span, according to the Drapers, and are as blatant today as they were in the 20s and 30s. The policies have been consistently against the worker, under both the Republican and Democratic administrations, the authors assert.
At the same time, die report reveals, the University has provided growers with billions of dollars’ worth of subsidies, direct and indirect.
While the Division of Agriculture is one of the most lavishly financed and politically powerful departments in die University system, there is no service, no department, no institute or foundation in the entire University system which is concerned with serving farm workers or deals even peripherally with the problems faced by California’s half million farm workers and their families, according to the report.
In addition to describing what the Wall Street Journal once termed "a tax-paid clinic for a major industry” the Drapers outline the firmly entrenched political power of the growers in the State Univer-
sity system.
While other departments lost as much as 25 percent of their budgets in Reagan’s "austerity” program, Agriculture lost only 4 percent. The University of California spearheads the growers' "crash program” to mechanize agriculture, the Drapers report, and the program went into high gear after the bra-cero program was terminated in 1965.
Unlimited slave labor at starvation wages was no longer available, and growers demanded that the taxpayers provide them with machines to harvest crops... anything to avoid paying higher wages in order to recruit domestic workers. “No machine ever joined a Union,” die Drapers note.
In short, the evidence presented in carefully documented and annotated prose by die authors, both longtime friends of the United Farm Workers, shows the University has prostituted itself time and again for the growers, issuing false and misleading reports filled with outright lies in its efforts to convince the public of California and the United States that agriculture in this State could not survive without a miserable and poverty-stricken mass of unorganized workers to provide slave labor.
The University’s research, studies, reports and statements on agriculture are so contorted that they are little more than a gigantic whitewash for a "super-exploitative industry whose main crop is poverty,” the Drapers charge.
Of die $25 million spent by die University’s State Experiment Station in 1967, the State contributed $17 million, the Federal Government, $7 million, and "less than $1.5 million was from die industry.”
The incredible story of the non-;ompetitive licensing of patents held by UC on agricultural machinery is also detailed.
Some of die recipients of UC’s
largesse will be surprising to most readers of the report.
Copies of "The Dirt on California* are available from ISC Press, P.O. Box 910, Berkeley, California, 94701 at 35 cents plus 15 cents for postage and handling.
NEW LAWS FOR BORDER PASSES
WASHINGTON, November 28— The Federal Government has issued new regulations for visitors crossing die border from Mexico into die United States. The new entry permit will be dated and will be good for 15 days for Mexican citizens coming to the U.S. to visit, shop, or do business. It is valid only within 25 miles of the border.
The new regulations replace the "72-hour pass” which could be used within 150 miles of the border. The “72-hour pass” regulations were widely abused by people who used the pass to gain entrance to the U.S. and then got a job and remained in die country illegally. The new regulations are designed to curb this practice.
Union spokesmen were doubtful, however, that die new regulations would be any more adequately en-foreced than the old ones. And the new regulations avoid the much more serious problem of regulating die "Green Card” program. Since growers, Congressmen, Senators, Department of Justice officials, and Immigration Department officials all seem determined that the existing regulations will not be enforced, the passing of new regulations does not represent any improvement of the situation.


12/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969

Letters EL MALCRIADO P.0. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 93215 •
ACTRESS TELLS OF YOUTH IN FIELDS RATS EVICTED FOR SCAB GRAPES Editor;
I greet you and wish you well.
I am now 55 years old, but remember well working in the apricot orchards in California at the age of four. My sister picked them— my mother cut them, and I pitted them in the drying sheds.
At 18, I participated in the Salinas lettuce strikes. Before then I was active in the San Francisco general strike.
When I went to Los Angeles in the early 30s—and I was in my early 20s—I naturally became involved with the struggle of the agricultural .workers from the depressed areas of the country brought into California by the Ass. Farmers and the Bank of America, to form a large labor pool that was easy to manage.
1 saw heaps of oranges covered with gasoline and set on fire and men who tried to take ONE orange shot to death.
The first objective was of course to try and alleviate die hunger, take in medical supplies, etc. The second and most important, and of course -most dangerous, was to try and organize the field and cannery workers in one union.
I do not wish to sound as if I am bragging—certainly I am not telling you anything you do not already know.
I only mean to let you know that I am with you all the way. Though 1 can do little in a practical sense for you, because as the result of a severe beating I am a semi-in-valid.
Your boycott here has been going rather well, but you have a bitter and eloquent enemy in Father Francis Fenton who is an executive member of die best organized and most powerful branch of the birch-
Dorothy Comingore t who acted-as Susan Alexander in the movie "Citizen l(ane ",
ites. And of course you know what he calls you.
But that does not matter. As a result of my work with die “Sleepy Lagoon” case and other activities I am a graduate of HUAC in ’52.
With love and gratitude for your splendid work,
Dorothy Comingore Lord's Point, Connecticut December 13,1968
Editor's note; Miss Comingore was famous as Susan Alexander in die film “Citizen Kane.”
OUR ONLY CONTACT
Dear Malcriados,
Faithfully we read your writings and look at your pictures. It is our only contact with the outside world. Keep the good work up, we miss all of you.
Viva el boycott... Viva Cesar... Seasons’ Greetings,
Elena & Al Rojas
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania December 15,1968
Enclosed is a clipping from die Dispatcher—the ILWU union newspaper. It concerns the dispute over the so-called “Rat Ship” in die port of Long Beach.
On the day that I received the Dispatcher in the mail, she came into pier 41 in San Francisco to load.
About 95 percent of the cargo she was taking on was destined for Saigon.
The second day that we were loading, there were 25-30 trucks of scab grapes waiting to be unloaded so they could be . put aboard this “Rat Ship” and sent to Saigon.
I was surprised to see so many grapes for one ship, so I went and inquired in die office as to how many grapes there actually were.
There were 314 TONS, one of die largest shipments to be made on one ship. All of these were going to Saigon, more than 18,000 cases of Scab grapes.
The name of the ship is President Taylor, American Presidents Lines. The date was December 11. Location, pier 41, San Francisco.
Thank you,
A Longshoreman
San Francisco, California
Editor's note—The President Taylor was the scene of controversy in Long Beach harbor in November when longshoremen refused to enter Hatch No. 5 because the hold was infested with rats.
The rats were cleaned out of the ship, but the scab grapes went in to take their place. Not much improvement.


EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/13

§8$
"TRUE FARM WORKER?”
Editor;
Hie purpose of this letter is to contest a "Reader’s Viewpoint* published in die Bakersfield Californian on December 18, 1968.
Though appreciative of die holiday cheer offered by Jose Mendoza, 1 can find no merit in the substance of his comments. I furthermore have been unable to verify die existence of the alleged Farm Workers Freedom to Work Association. That is, aside from the General Secretary and one or two associates, I have seen nothing to suggest that the views expressed by that writer are in any way indicative of die views of the "true farm worker" he claims to represent.
Quite the contrary, I have both felt and observed significant discontent among those who harvest the crops in the "pastures of plenty* that cover this fertile valley. This discontent as to wages, working conditions and die absence of a voice in their determination is empirically verifiable by merely engaging in conversation with the workers in the fields. A sad, but interesting fact is made apparent by such a direct encounter (though not as prevalent as in years past). Though dissatisfied with his lot, the farm worker has traditionally lacked faith and/or experience in the democratic processes, and consequently lacked the personal efficacy that is a man’s faith in his own ability to change his own situation.
This fact has always left the farmworker singing of the "power in the blood of the lamb,* and waiting for a better life, in the “long hereafter.”
How much better that he sing of the power in die unity of man, with a better "here and now* the dream he’s after.
Very truly yours,
Diana J. Chapman
Bakersfield, California December 19, 1968
Alice Tapia (left) and hunting Imutan3 two of VFWOC's best looking organizers. The Imutans now lead the boycott in Baltimore3 Maryland.
HIGH QUALITY
Gentlemen;
I certainly think that, in this age of diminishing quality of services and product, you are to be congratulated on the high quality of your merchandise, and more, notably, the vast improvement in your deliveries. Truly amazing.
Enclosed please find check for payment of your recent invoice.
Viva,
The Hirsch Co.
San Jose, California
Editor’s note—Mrs. Hirsch ordered six of our Mexican Graphic Arts calendars by telephone, and they were delivered to her door, 250 miles from our office, the same day.
We aim to please, but don’t guarantee that kind of service all the time.
THE IMUTANS WRITE
Editor;
Thank you very much for your very nice letter. It has certainly boosted our morale. Please continue to write.
We miss you all a lot. We are trying our very best to push hard on the boycott se we can go home soonest.
Your EL MALCRIADOis our most complete information of what is cooking over there—and we anticipate its arrival every time.
A Merry Christmas to you—and lots of happiness in the New Year.
Regards to all,
Andy & hunting Imutan Baltimore, Maryland December 17,1968
"WE’LL STICK WITH YOU.”
Editor:
I would like to announce die support of die Democratic Student Coalition of Nassau County for your activities.
We have been aiding your cause and will continue to do so. Yours is the cause for justice. I just wrote this letter to tell you frontline troops how much we admire your effort and your compassion for “La Causa." ’
God bless you or let you at least win the victory which will be yours. Good luck and don’t worry—we’ll stick with you.
Respectfully,
Joel Kotkin
North Woodmere, New York
Robert J. Sanohax Gun**
The only completely Mexican Mortuary In northern California
SANCHEZ-HALE MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 “B” STREET TELEPHONE 237-3532
Services available everywhere. . ,No matter where you live, our price Is the same , . .death.notices in newspapers and on the radio are .included. . . we can make arrangement* for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532


14/EL MALCR'IADO, January 1, 1969
FARM WORKERS DENIED SECURITY BENEFITS
Farm workers are among the "least likely to benefit" from Social Security, according to a recent study by Isao Fujimoto, a U.C. Davis sociologist.
Fujlmoto studied the effect of Social Security on the lives of migrant workers, and came up with some interesting findings.
Social Security deductions from pay checks are only obligatory after an employee has worked 20 days for the same employer or has earned $ 150. Many migratory farm workers do not meet this time-money requirement with a single employer, but unfailingly have some deductions made for "Social Security” by contractors or growers, Fujimoto found.
The workers are entitled to receive a refund of the amount deducted, but most are unaware of the existence of the 20-day/$150 limitation. Tie contractor is most
likely to pocket the money himself, since he is not required to submit it to the Social Security administration.
The percentage of a paycheck that is deducted for Social Security also varies according to the mood of the contractors, Fujimoto learned.
While the legal deduction is 4.2 percent of total earnings, which is added to an equal amount paid by the employer, but since many farm workers are paid in cash and are not given written pay vouchers, there is no way to check the amount actually deducted.
In order to receive retirement benefits from the Social Security program, a worker must have been employed a total of 40 three-month “quarters,” with his earnings properly reported. Countless farm workers reach retirement age only to find that their earnings were not reported on many ranches where
they worked over the years, and that they are ineligible to receive benefits.
Since he is unlikely to have written records, it is difficult or impossible for the worker to prove his eligibility.
Pesticides
Continued from page 5.
court order stopping him from allowing Cohen to examine the files.
In that case, further legal action will be initiated by die Union, Cohen said.
Growers Praise
Continued from page 6. said that "actually we have had fairly good relations with die Union since we signed our first contract in August, 1967.” Morrison added that they had negotiated with the Union because they knew die UFW OC represented die majority of the workers at their ranch. UFWOC submitted cards from a majority of workers asking that die union be their bargaining agent.
"But even if we had had an election, I’d say about 85 percent would have voted for the union,” Morrison estimated.
On noting changes since contracts with UFWOC were signed, A1 Haft of Paul Masson Vineyards pointed out that wages written into the contract guaranteed an average of $3.25 an hour, which is about 50 percent above the wage level paid before the Union came in. Tie rise has been comprable at other ranches under contract. But as Schenley official Korshak pointed out, “while wages have gone up 50 per cent it is not causing us any real economic problems."
Other major results of signing contracts, according, to growers, have been that labor contractors have been eliminated and that a health- insurance plan for the workers is being worked out.
a reminder from
CREDIT UNION...
the
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM WORKER CREDIT
SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215, OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER
BUTTOI
Large, fluorescent Red and Black buttons, $1.00 from EL MALCRIAD0, Box 130, Delano, Cal., 93215
(actual size)


•¥¥¥¥¥itfi
EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/15
EN GENERAL”
"EL ESQUIROL”
"THE GENERAL STRIKE" and "THE SCAB" (In Spanish, on a 45 rpm record)
|l Teqtro CampesinQ]
presents two of the finest songs to come out of the Delano Grape Strike, written and sung by members of the Farm Workers Teatre.
$1.00 + 25$ postage & handling• from The United Farm Workers, P.0. Box 1303 Delano, Ca. 93215
Please send me ____ copies of "Songs of the Strike" ("Huelga en General"
and "El Esquirol") by the Teatro Campesino. Enclosed is $1.25 per copy
NAME_______________________________________
ADDRESS_______________________________.
CITY STATE ZIP
Last Chance to Order Our
MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-Ame-rican artists, which have appeared as covers on "EL MALCRIADO" over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, engravings, pen-and-ink drawings. This tyoe of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and represents one of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-Ameri-can culture.
The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock.
($2.00 each plus 50$ handling 6 for $10.00 plus $1.00 handling)
Make check or money order payable to the United Farm Workers,
P. 0. Box #130, Delano, California 93215 '
Please send me _____ of your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars @ $2.00
each plus 50$ for postage and handling:
NAME_________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS ______________________________________________________________
CITY STATE ..__________ZI P
I
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥■


16/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 19&9
§1
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Discount Dept Store
918 Main st. DELANO across from: the Post Office
to N} w â– HM H
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JANUARY IS BARGAIN MONTH
1 Prices Slashed to lowest-tver Biscounts! J
Open SUNDAYSaTlS*
Visit BEE’S here in DELANO
918 MAIN — ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE
ALSO IN:
COACHELLA STOCKTON TRACY INDIO
l


Full Text

PAGE 1

in English

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.2/El MALCRIADD, January 1, 1969 in this issue I El Malcriado says I Grape Sales Off I9% During H o li-days •••••••• , •••• p; 3 Tijerina Acquitted .••• p. 4 The Threat of Chemical Poisons •••••••••••••• p. 5 A Christmas Parade for Dignity and Justice. • . . . • • . . p. 6 (Picrures, .••••••••• p. 8-9) Non-Violence and the Draft , .p. 10 OUR COVER: Mar>cos Munoz and his son (and the :r>est of his famiZy! have been on boycott duty for> over a year>. Maroos leads the boycott in Boston and New England. Photo by JiLL Krementz EL AALCRIAOO, Tlo.e of the F.10rm \lorker, is publishe.d twice MCo'lthly by the UNITED FAIIIIWORKERS. ORr.ANIZINr. COIUIITHE, AFLCIO. Subscriptions in tM United Sutu •nd its poHessiO<>s otre $3.50.per yur, .11nd foreiqn, in C•n:aoda .11nd t'.exico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for,.rnbers ofUF\10(, AFLCIO •re inchtded In II'Qnthly duu. Edltori.1l .ll'ld busir.ess offiC:!l$ lo C.Ited •t the nort"""=H cornerorr..,rc:es and Mettler Avenue, Oel.lno,talifornia. Address all c:orresp<,>ndenc:e to: H KALCRIA()O,Post0ffice6o>t.1)0,Deli1-.n.o,talifor1\i.I'J)215. Second c lass postage paid at Oelano, California 93215, For ,advert is 1 ng rates, contact Federico Chavez at (805) 725 .. 133 7 or the maili ng adress listed above. by the Editor The columns of EL MALCRIADO have frequently mentioned the InterAgency Committee on Mexican American Affairs, headed by Vi cente T. Ximenes in Washingmn. About r-vice a week, we get "press releases" from Mr. Ximenes tel.ling us how much the Committee is doing for the Mexican-Americans in the United States. To date none of these releases has mentioned La Huelga. Qle thing is sure, however. The name of Vicente T. Ximenes always, but always, appears in the first paragraph. The latest new s from Ximcnes is that former execu tiv e di rector David North has resigned, and will be succeeded by jose A. Chacon . •n1e Mexican -American community will always be grateful for the long hours, hard work and dedi cation which Dav id North gave for tl1c cause of justice • . Much of the progress which has been made by the Mexican American is the di rect result of Mr. North's work,• sa id Mr. Ximenes. Hogwash , says EL MALCRIAOO. TI1e progress which has been made by the Mexican American i s the direct result of hard work, organiz in g , and militancy on the part of Mexicans in the barrios and i.n the -----------' fields, and not by some Washington sw ivel chair sitter named North. Now Mr. N orth will be succeeded by jose A. Chacon. Chacon is a graduate of West Point, and has been in the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force. He worked for an Atomic Energy Commission contractor in New Mexico . He was also of the PUblic Welfare Board in New Mexico andhadsomething to do with Cuban refugees. Great credentials. Now the Inter-Agency Committee on Mexican American affairs can have TWO do-nothin g a year in El Paso. Credit Union Meeting , T he annual meeting of the F arm Worker Credit Union w i 1 1 be he 1 d in De I a no on Sunday, January 26 , according to Helen Chavez, manager of the Credit Union. The meeting w i l l begin at 8: 30 AM i n the F i 1 i pi no Hall, 1457 Glenwood Ave. After the meeting, lunch w i I I be served. A 11 members and their guests are invited. EL MALCRIADO p,o. BOX 130 ' DELANO, CA 932"15 More and more peopl e arc finding out that a subscription to EL MAtCRIADO is the best way to keep up with t h e farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon FILL OUT THJS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS , FOR A ONEYEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY rwo WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. NAHEnombre ___________ Eng lish _ Espanol_ ADDRESS-domicilio'---------------CITY-ciudad STATE-estado ZIP __

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! I I I i l I I l ! I i I I I ! i E L MALCRIAOO, J anuary 1, . 1969(3 !FEDERAL REPORTS SHOW .GRAPE SALES OFF DURING THE HOLlO A Y DELANO, December 26--Grape grapes to be shipped after they are sales for the ho liday season, De-sold. cember 5 through 26, are down 19 percent when compared with a simi lar period of 1 966 , latest reports from the U. S. Department of Ag riculture reveal. The comparison was made for lhe 41 major cities which account !or over 60 percent of the grape market, making the impact of the grapE:_ boycott quickly apparent. The government report also i ndicates that more than five mill i on Under the heading "Fresh Fruit and Vegetable National Shi pping Point Trends , • the Department of Agri culture's Market News for De cember 17 reported "Tradi ng was fair for best lots, but overall was below expectations in volume for the was very slow, partly due to bOy cott action in some markets and part ly to ample supplies available in most termi nal markets. • boxes of grapes remainincoldstor• Commenting on the effects of the age, unsold. Grape sales usually boycott so far, UFWOC Vice Pre-decline to almost nothing during sident Dolores HuertatoldELMAL-january, but high cold storage inCR IADO last wee k, "We've learned ventories will probably force a lot about how to run a boycott growers to try unloading the le f t -this year, and you can be sure ove r s at lower prices. that it will be much bigger and The Produce News of December better organized next season." 14 described the grape market as she said, "we can con-f ollows: "Shipping poin t a-ading on tinue fighting as lo n g as it takes, table grapes in California is very because we have nothing to lose. slow. Shippers are not cleaning up "Tile growers refuse to negotiate their loadings and some cars are with the Union, leaving us no al-rolling unsold or consigned . There ternative but to continue the boycott. is a a-end downward on prices, par-If they would agree to negotia te, ticularly Emperors. On 26 lb . lugs we cou ld set abou t bu11ding a heal-of Emperors, shippers in the Deth}<:.,rape industry together . lano, California district are doin g "You she added, "we take business f.o.b. mostly for $2.75no joy i n hurting d1em just for the $3.00 •.• a year ago at this time the sake of damaging their businesses Emperor market was $4 ••• " out of vengeanc e or bitterness. W e In other words, growers are send-want the sa-ike and boycott to end i ng loaded freight cars to the East a lmost as much as they do. w i thout guarantees of sale, hoping "Maybe we can avoid the suffering that by the time the grapes reach and misery of the boycott for next Eastern markets, buy e r s will be year. It will all be over if they found. The usual practice i s for agree to FRESNO CALIFORNIA _The s ign that tells you people are working together! to fill' their needs You do not have to be a member to shop-come in and see how .. ,economic democracy works : GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM , WORKERS f ' ROM The Consumer Cooperative ' :c;reer-keley

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4/EL MALCRIADO, January 1 , 19b9 GROWERS GO EAST TO SPARK GRAPE SALES TIJERINA ACQUITTED ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICDReies Lopez Tijerina was acquitted on December 13th by a New Mexico jury of six men and six women of the charge!! of kidnapping. The charges grev: out of an incident in june, 1967, when several people tried to put District Attorney Alfonso Sanchez under "citizen's ar rest" in Tierra Amarilla. Tijerina, who acted as his own attorney, said that during the incident some followers of La Alianza, the movement he directs, had gone to the Court in Tierra Amarilla looking for Sanchez , who had been harrassing and arresting La Alianza's people with the help of the state police. Tijeri na said that he was not present until someone told him that the Court House was being surrounded by police and that there was a possibility of v iolence. Trying to avoid any outbreaks, he showed up and saw someone going inside the Court House with a rifle. Tijerina said he grabbed the rifle, yelling "Stop, Stop , you are giving them the excuse to kill us all." Some observers at the rri al felt judge Paul Larrazolo's instructions to the jurors had a great dea l to do with the acquittal. "The court instructs the jury that anyone, including a state police officer, who intentionally interferes with a law ful attempt to make a ci .:izens arrest does so at his own peril, since the arresting citizens are entitled under the Jaw to use whatever force is reasonably necessary to effect said citizen's arrest ••• Tijerina presented 29 wimesses on his behalf . More were ready to testify, but the judge refused to listen to other small farmers of the mountains o f Tierra Amarilla who had come to testify in sup ' BUFFALO, December 8--juan and Maree Flores, UFW OC representatives in Buffalo, report that growers and their representatives have been touring the East in an attempt to bolster their flagging reputations. The Floreses recently met Delano grower Jack Pando ! in a debate in this upstate New York city. Across the borqer in Canada, gro E!r john Giumarra met UFW OC: attorney jerome Cohen in a debate that was broadcastedon 'IV through-out the country. jorge Zaragoza, boycott chairman for Cincinnati and Southern o h io, debated with growers Martin Zanino v ich and J ack Pando!. Superscab jose Mendoza has returned to California after an extensive anti-Union .[our of the East and Midwest. The growers' travels indicate spreading realization that the grape boycott has cut deeply into their sales throughout the country. In desperate moves to unload their grapes, the growers have launched expensive advertising campaigns, have slashed prices, and have pushed grapes into new markets, especially the South, to avoid the expanding boycott. The U FW OC boycott is growing more effective, not less so, as the winter deepens. Perhaps that explains why growers had dumped 1,228,569 tons of table grapes into the crushers of California' s wineries this season, giving up all hope of selling the grapes on the table grape market. port of Tijerina. The prosecutor presented 18 wimesses, many of whom contradicted themselves and each other, it was reported. After the trial, Tijerian happily said that the Alianza was going to continue fighting for the rights of the Mexican-Americans to the lands of New Mexico. They allege that many Mexican -Americans were dispossessed of their land after the Mexican War of 1846-1848,

PAGE 5

MALCRIADO, January ) , 1969/5. JUDGE HIDES THE DANGERS OF PESTICIDES DELANO, December a request by crop dusting firms in the Kern Cou nty area to deny access to public records on the use _ of pesticides to UFNOC at torneys will be held in Bakersfield on Wednesday, january 29, according to UFWOC General Counsel jerome Cohen. Cohen said after he attempted to view the records, on file in the office o f AgricUltural Commiss ioner Sheldon Morley, on August 20, SIJ... perior Court judge J. Kelly Steele issued a restraining order proh ibiting the Comm issioner to show the legal department i s conductin g a study of tlle possible dangers to farm workers of the numerous toxic substaru:es used in agricultural pest control . Union attorneys have said they ha v e conside r ab l e evi dence that the farm chemicals can be a serious health hazard to farm workers, and that the public recoi-ds will show exactly which chemicals are used in the fields. Assistant General Counsel David . A verbuck, who will represent Co hen at the January 29 hearings, sai d he . expected Steve n Wall will ' . County Ralph Gordon will represent theAgriculturalCommis-sion. Testimony from physicians, scie ntists and farm workers. w1ll be presented at the hearings,Averbuck said. There is no guarantee, howe ver, that if the court order barring ac cess to the records is lifted on January 29 that the Union will then be able to examine the records. Morley's office might still deny accress to the records on administrative grounds , Cohen explained., even though there is no longer a The Threat of Chemical Poisons ' other farm chemicals pose a seri ous tllreat to the health of tile pub lic in general and farm workers expecially, recently released infor mation shows . While officials of the United F arm Workers have continued to fight the battle for adequate protection of workers who come in contact with dan gerous chemicals, scientists h ave been srud ying the effect of heavy fertilization on the water supp ly. A new l y e lected director of the American Assoc iation for the Ad vancement of Science has warned that farmers and growers in the United States are dumping 7 million tons of nitrogen compound s from chemical fertilizers into the soil each year, and that this heavy use of chemical fertilizers is pollu t in g soil and water and posing an in creasing danger to the health of inhabitant S of farm areas. The scientist, Dr. Barry Com moner, a . note .. botanist, ecologist, and director of the Center for !he Biology of NaruralSystems at Wash ington University in St. Louis, warned in a speech to fellow scien tists at "a convention in Dallas that •me hea vily farmed areas of California probably represent the most. severe publlc he alth hazard fro m g g Commoner noted !hat nitrates have already polluted the San Jo a quin R i ver and most streams, creeks, and s loughs in the Central Valley, and contribute to the pollu tion of San Francisco Bay. Some agriculrural communities, specifically Delano, Ca lifornia, have publically warned that tap water is contaminated by a dangerously high level of nitrates and may be unsaf e for bab ies to drink. Chemical fertllizE!rs, and not sewage , have been proven t o be the sow-ce of the contamination. Nitrate compou nds themselves are not directly dange r ous, Com moner noted, but they are easily converted into nitrites "'which can be dangerously poisonous to humans, " Nitrate-polluted water has caused in fant outbreaks of an anemia-like disease called mehemoglobinemia , which can lead to b ["eathing diffi culties, retard menta l growth, and even cause death , Commoner said. Research has rurned up dozens of cases where nitrite poisoning has already caused disease in infants fed baby food vege t ables that have been exposed to bacteri a after their containers were opened. The bac teria quickly con vert harmless ,nitrates to nitrites. • The conclusionofDr.Commoner's a chemical menace, choking our rivers , killing our fish, Polluting our drinking Water, and in some counties, already endangering the health of our children. to counter thi s menace, Com moner suggested the use of •pel letized• fertilizers that would re lease their nitrogen far more slowly than present chemicals do; con fining fertilizer operations to periods when rain is unlikely to. carry dangerous chemicals in to the water supply, and the development of new t echno l og ies to spread or ganic sewage effluents back on the soil as useful, safe, natural fer-tilizers. The United Farm Workers has been especially concerned with the problems of chemical fertilizers, since mos t farm workers li ve in areas where the danger from nitrate poisoning is extremely high. 'The Union has also been concerned w ith the hea lth and safety of workers . applying .these chemical fertilizers, and working in close proximity to such chemicals, State and county officials have sought to prevent the Union fr.om gaining access to information and files on the subject. Union At tourney Jerome Cohen's requests Continued on page 14

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6/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969 A CHRISTMAS PARADE FOR DIGNITY AND JUSTICE (Pictures on pages 8-9) LAMOOT, December 1 6 --More than 400 Oi Giorgio workers marched down Main Street in Lamont last Saturday, December 14, during the Chamber of Commerce Parade to show the community their solidarity and desire to remain working under a Union contract despite the sale of DiGiorgio's vineyards. Mack Lyons, UFWCX::representa tive in Lamont (Some 45 miles south of Delano) saldhehadobtained permission to enter a contingent of 100 farm worker s in the Christmas parade. However, at the cry of • J oin us" numerous farm workers who were stand in g on the sidewalks with •vtva Ia Huelga l • and •vtva la Union " signs entered the line of The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee and El MALCRIADO join in expressing their sympath y to organizers Lupe and Kathy Murgui a on the loss of their twin infants last month. T he born prema -died soon af-Egg Bread and Pastries Alt Kinds of Donuts Cakes for at! Occasions Prench 81"8ad march. The Union banner--the black eagle on red and carried at the frpn_t of lhe group by several young girls. Several Boy Scouts anc! students joined in with the farm workers after having already m_arched in their own groups. Afterwards, at the Lamont park a blocks away, during a rally, Mack Lyons thanked all the parti-cipanrs . Some people who had come to Delano ori the Christmas caravan were also in LamOnt . Among those recognized were ministers from the Migrant Ministry and sev eral churches and a number of Catholic priests. The Mexican A merican Youth Organ ization from Union City an d the Brown Beret s from Richmond were also there. A PZ.ea fot' a Non Violent New Year •.• We have a t.arge Selec tion of Spanish Uagazinel11 Boob, _ and Rec orda. .. aaa. .... : . 1-GROWERS PRAISE CONTRACT! $ DELANO, DeCember 17--Representatives or Di Giorgio, Schenley, Paul Masson and Almaden recently came out in praise o( !he UFWOC after the South Central Farmers' Committee charged that the Union had brought chaos into the graJ)e industry. The SoUih Central Farmers' Committee had claimed that DiGiorgio had to sell his land at less than the appraised value because of unionization, but oi Giorgio President Max O'Neill said th3.t the Union contract was not a factor in the Company's sale of land. The land is being sold for about the same priceestimatedbygovernment appraisers, O'Neill added. Another charge made bytheSC:FC was that 58 strikes and slowdowns at Schen le y •had made an atrocity of the Union contract." Schenley's anorney Sidney Korshack denied 'this and said that •wages were so low before, we felt the workers were certainly entitled to the additional money and fringe benefits." RepresentativesofbOth companies agreed that relations with the Union ' had been •remarkably good." A spokesman for Paul Masson said that they had solved all their major problems with the Union, and that •me small problems remaining are certainl y no t bothering them." He added that some difficulties were to be expected in any new contract. George Morrison, Manager of Personnel at Almaden Vineyards, Continued on page 14 The Chemical Mena' c l e Continued from page s: to study public records on the use >f such chemicals were denied last summer and !he tmion is still denied access to the records. Meanwhile, babies inDelanodrink bottled water if their parents can afford it, and the others run a dan. gerous" risk.

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EL HALCRIADD, January 1, 1969/7 The Farm Bureau Sti lll loves Those Subsidie1 s CAMACHO CHALLENGES COURT KANSAS CITY, December 13Th e American Farm Bureau Federati on ended its conven tion in Kansas City with a resoun ding no vote to a proposal to put a ceiling of $20, 000 a year on government cash paym ents to an y sing l e grower. The Farm Bureau Federat i o n has for years piously called for •tree enterprise" i n agriculrure and dem an ded tha t the government end regula tions and subsidies in farm ing. But when a group o f small fa r me r s who were not on the sub sidy gravy train proposed that the Farm Bureau support a limit on cash subsidies to any single farmer, DE LANO, December 31-UFWCX::: picke t capmin Epifanio Cama cho w ilJ be tried on charges of maliciou s mischief in Delano MCFarland justice Court on january 17, .according to UFWOC attorney jerome Cohen . The charges were made on February 5, when Camacho, Cesar Chavez , and other Unio n members were accused of v iolating the provisions of an anti strike injunction issued in Augus t of 1967 by Bakers rleld Superior Court judge j. Kelley S teele. Davi d A verbuc k , U F W DC As sistant Counsel, said that the trial itself will be a challenge of the const i tutionality of the justice the big growers who control the Farm court s , As the complaint was Bureau resounding l y voted them origina ted in the Delano -McFarland . d own . judicial District, Camacho will be Farm Bureau President Charles tried by a justice Court and not Shuman also. called o n all farmers by a Municipal Court, as would to work together to the grape have been the case i f the com-boycott and bust the Union. •Buy plaint had been origina ted i n the and eat grapes and have some on aakersfield area. your tab l e for Christmas : Shuman Even though bOth courts handle urged delegates to the convention. misdeameanors , the d i sadvantages A n d the Farm Bureau has been of being judg ed in a justice court jOined by two other rightist groups are obvious, Averbuck said. Th e to break the boycott, according to p arties i nvol ved are not provid ed the California AFL-CIO News . The with a Court Reporter, andthec9urt j ohn BirCh SOciety and th e National officials do not have to be lawyers, Right-to-Wor k Committee are Averbuck noted. calling on their members to buy Since they are n o t generally law-and eat grapes as part of thei r pa-yers, judges in these courts usually triotic duty. do not understand or have a good Viva Ia Causa y El Progreso f!tUVtte41f 6/ 4 "iiteUe41eFresno California sense of what -proper justice" means. justice courts are in reality a v i o lation of the 14th ammendment of the constitution, more specifcally, of the Equal Protection Clause, A verbuck said. '"Recent studies have shown tha t justice Court judges g i veridicous l y high sentences. For example, in the El Centro justice Court a boy was sent to jail for four month s because he said a dirty word. It t's time for th e rural countie S to have judges who understand proper j u stice." he commented. "These issues are so important th a t attorneys as far away as N ew ' 1"": ( /I \\, Epifani o . Camac h o York City h ave offered their ser vices." C amacho will be judged by judge McNa lly of the Delano-McFarland District. '"If Camacho goes to trial without equal protection of the l aws , a full and detailed report will be sent to the U.S . jus tic e Department and to the Commission on Civil Averbuck added . UF'WOCWins in Oregen Ti'i'al SALEM Dec ember 27MariO n County D is-:rict Court judge Thomas W. Hansen declared a mis trail in the case of Ni ck UFWOC organize r in Oregon, when J one s appeared in court December 26 to face a charge of vagra ncy a nd disorderly conduce. The charges arose out of an in c ident on November 27 when jones and 27 Oregonian S were arreste d outside an Albertson's Marketwhile picketin g the sale of scab grapes. Of .the 28, 18 we r e children ana were released from juvenile Center shortly after the arrests, with no charges filed. Th e ten adults are accused of b lockin g cars entering and leaving the market, a char ge jones a nd the other picketers deny. Th e jury was unable to reach a verdict after jones's tria}. The defendant said he hoped charges would be dismissed, s inc e the inability o f the jury to reach a dec ision showed the flimsy n aru r e of the "evidence" produced by the District Attorn ey.

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8/EL .. MALCRIApO, J anuary I, 1969 EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/9 THE PARADE IN LAMONT (See story, Page 6) Photos by Geronomo Choootate

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10/EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969 . Prison Group I NOTICE I Commits Itself SLAVERY IN TEXAS I DELANO, january 1--Both Schen f f ley Industries and Perel11-Minetti f I will be hiring workers over the next I to La Causa SAN ANTCX'liO, TEXAS, December two weeks, for the prunin g opera-13-Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, ftions, according to Manuel Sanchez, f SUSANVILLE, CALIFORNIA --Inpresident of Notre Dame University fdirecror of the Union Hirin g Hall t mates at the California Conse r va and a member of the U. S. Comlin Delano. Both ranches are unde r 1 tion Center in SUsanville, California mission onCivilRightssaidrecently Union contract and all interested have organized a Latin American tha t far m workers in theRioGra ilde fin working at lhese ranches shou ld f Cultural Group and have begun pubValley of T e xa s li ved in a situation 'register immediately at the Hiring f lication of a small newspaper , •EI close to •peonage . " I Hall at 102 Albany St . in Delano. Aguila. " Father Hesburgh made the state-Sanchez noted tha t wages at SchenA statementofa imsandobjectives ment after listening to testimony ltey are $2 . 25 forpruningbymachine in the first issue of the paper said indic ating that Mexican Americans ' and $2.10 for pruning by hand . Wages that the pur pose of the group is to in South Texas earn abOut $1, 500 t are based on f Di GiorgioRanchin.Arvin Lam ont heritages, a nd languages. of ric h growers and government t thi: to me like peona ge , • I flee. Though Di Giorgio i s in the MexicanAmerican inmates can he said. •Thts is as close as you f process of sell ing its land, the Union change their way of thinking as a can come to slavery." I h 1 5 8 ' 00dmempl•entdee, d81th1 awtoruknudo-lne the 0nsathle0 group. Mexican-Americans who
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EL MALCR{!\00, January 1, 1969/11 !BOOK REV ! I ! E ! W PROFITING FROM POVERTY WITH HIRE EDUCATION The Dirt on Califorrnia: sity system. largesse will be surprising to most Agribusiness and the University) by Ann • and Hal Draper, ISC Press, 32 pages, cents. While other departments lose as readers of the report. muCh as 25 percent of their budCopies of gets in Reagan's "austerityN proare available from ISC Press, P.O. gram, Agriculrure lost only 4 per-Box 910, Berkeley, California, 94701 A newly published swdy by Hal and Ann Draper of describes a fantastic pattern of pro-cent, The University of California at 3 5 cents plus 15 cents for postage spearheads the growers' •crash proand handling. gram" ro mechanize agriculture, the grower, anti-labor activity on the Drapers report, and the program part of the University of California went into high gear after the bra-and its Division of Agriculture and cero program was terminated in Agricultural Extension Services. 196!?. The University has consistently Unlimite d slave labor at starvation worked toward limiting the organi-wages was no longer a"ailable, and zation of farm labor unions, pre-growers demanded that the tax-venting farm workers from organi-payers provide them with machines zing, holding down farm wages, pre-to harvest crops ••• anything to avoid venting the passage of any paying higher wages in order to re-tion aimed at improving Working con cruit domestic workers. "No rnaditions and providing propaganda for various causes supported by the growers to keep farm workers in near serfdom. These policies cover a 50-year span, according to the Drapers, and are as blatant today as they were in the 20s and 30s. The policies have been consistently against the worker, under both the Republican and Democratic administrations, the authors assert. At the same time, the report reveals, the University has provided growers with billions of dollars' worth of subsidies, direct' and indirect. While the Division of Agriculture is one of the most lavishly financed and politic
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12/EL MALCR I ADO, January 1, .1969 ACTRESS TELLS OF YOUTH IN F IELDS Dear Friends and Fellow Worker s: I greet you and wish you well. I am now 55 years old, but re member well working in the apri cot orchards in Cal ifornia at the age of.four. Myslscerpickedthem-my mother cut them, and I pitted them in the drying sheds. At 18, I participated in the sa linas letmce strikes. Before then I was active in the San F r anc i sco general strike. When I went to Los Angeles in the early 30s-and 1 was in my early 20s--I naturally became invol ved With the struggle of the agriculrural . workers f r om the depressed areas of the country brought into Cali fornia by the Ass. Farmers and the . Bank of America, to form a large labor pool that was easy to manage. I saw heap s of oranges covered with gasoline and set on fire and men who tried to take CNE orange shot ro death . The first objective was of course to try and allevi ate the hunger .. take in medical supplies, etc. The and most important, and of course ,most dangerous, was to try and organize the field and cannery workers in one uni on. I do not wish to SOillld as if I a m bragging -certainly I am not tellin g you anything yOu do notalready know. 1 only mean to let you know that I am with you all the way. Though I can do little in a practical sense for you, because as the result. of a severe beating I am a semi-invalid. Your boycott h e r e has been going "Citizen ites. And of course you know what he call s you. But that does not matter. As a result of m y work with the •sleepy L agoo n" case and other activities 1 am a graduate of HUAC in ' 52. With lo v e and gratitude for your s pl endid work , Dorothy Comingore Lord's Point, Connecticut Decembe r 13, 1968 Editor's note: Miss Com in gore was famous as Susan Alexander in the rtlm " Citizen Kane." OUR ONLY CONTACT Dear Malcriados, Faithfully we read your writings and look at your pictures. I t is our onl y contact w ith the outsi de Keep the good work up, RATS EVICTE D .FOR SCAB GRAPES Editor: Enclosed is a clipping from the Dispatcher--the ILWU union news p ape r . It concerns the dispute over the so-ca lled • Rat Ship'" in the port of Long Beach . CAl the day I received !he Dispatcher in the mail, she came into pier 41 in San Francisco to load. About 95 percent of the cargo she was tak ing on was destined for Saigon. The seCond day that we were l oad ing, there were 25-30 trucks of scab grape s waiting to be unloaded so they could be . put abOard this "Rat Ship " sent to Saigon . I was s urprised to see so many grapes for one ship, so I went and inquired in the o ffice as to how many grapes the r e actua lly wer e . There were 314 TeNS, one of the largest shipments to be made on one ship. All, of these were going to &iigon , more than 18,000 cases o f Scab grapes. The name of the shi p is Pres ident Taylor, American Presidents Unes. The date was December 11. Location, pier 41, San Francisco. Tha nk yo u , A Longshoreman San Francisco, California l:::ditor's note-The President Taylor was lite scene of controversy i n Long Beach harbOr in November when longshoremen refused to enter Hatch No. 5 because the hold -was infested with r a t s .

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EL MALCRIADO, January 1, 1969/13 ' "TRUE FARM' WORKER?" Ediro r : The purpose of this letter is to contest a "Reader' s & . lished in the Bakersfield Californian . on December 1 8 , 1968. --Th ough appreciative of the holiday cheer offered by Jose Mendoza , l can find no merit in the substance of his comments. I furthermore have been unable to verify the exis .. tence of the alleged Farm Workers Freedom to Wor k Association . That is, aside from the General Secretary and one or two associates, I have seen nothing to suggest that the views expressed by that writer are in any way indicative of the views of the "true farm worker" he claims W represent. Quite the contrary, I have bOth fe l t and s ignificantdiscon,AUoe Tapia !Zeft! and Lwning ImutanJ two of UFWOC 's best Zoo king organizers. The " Imutan s now Zead the boyoott in BaZtimore J Ma:ryZand. HIGH QUALITY Gentlemen : tent among those who harvest the I certainly think that, in this age crops in the •pastures of p l e nty" of diminishing quality of services lhat cover this (ertile valley. This discontent as to wage,s, worldngcon ditions and the absence of a voice in their determination is empirically verifiable by merely engaging in con versation with the workers in the fields. A sad, but interesting fact made apparent by such a direct encowuer (though not as prevalent as in years past). Though dissatisfied with his lot, the farm and product, you are to be congrarulated on the high quality of your merchandise, and more. notab ly, the vast improvement in your de-liveries. Truly amazing. Enclosed please find check for payment of your recent invoice. Viva, The Ri:r>sah cc:. San Jose, California ' fHE IMUTANS WR,ITE Editor: .Thank you very much for your very nice letter. It has certainly boosted our morale. Please con . tinue to write. We miss you all a lot. We are trying our very best to push hard the bOycott se we can go soonest . Your EL MALCRIADOisourmost complete informa tion of what is cooking over there--and we anticipate i t s arriva l every time. A Merry Christmas to you-and lots of happiness in the New Year. Regards to a ll, j-Andy & L ,wnir;g Imftan Baltimore, Maryland December 17, 1968 "WE'LL STICK WITH YOU." Editor: I would like to announce the support of the Democratic Srudent Coalition of Nassau County for your activities. W e have been ai d ing your cause an d will continue to do so. Yours is the cause for justice. I just Wrote this letter to . tell you front line troops how much we admire your effort your compassion for worker has traditionally lacked faith Editor's note--Mrs. Hirsch or"La Causa. andfor experience i n the democratic dered six of our Mexican Graphic God bless you or let you at least processes, and consequently lacked the personal efficacy that is a man's faith in his own ability to change his own siruation. This fac t hasalwaysleftthefarm w .orker singing of the •power in the blood of the lamb," and waiting for a better life . in the here How much better that he sing of the power in Ole unity of man, with a better "here and now" the dream he's after. Very truly yours, Diana J . Chapman Bakersfield, California December 1 9, _ i968 Arts calendars by telephone, and win the vic tory which will be yours. they were delivered to her door, Good luck and don't worry--we'll 250 miles from our office, the same stick w ith you. day. Respectfully , We aim to please, but don't guaran-Joel Kotkin tee that kind of service all the time. North New York Q WD The only completely Hexlcan Hortuary I n northern Cal ifornia SANCHEZHAll MORTUARY FRESNO 1022 " B " STREET Services aval iable everywhere , . ,No mat ter Where yOu live, our price Is the same , .• death.notlces In newspapers and on the r•dlo .Included: , • we c•n make situation

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;'i 14/EL MALCKIAOO, January 1, 196 . 9 FARM WORKERS DENIED SECURITY BENEFITS Farm are among the likely to pocket the money himself, they worked over the years, and that .. least likely to from Social since he is not required to they are ineligible to receive Security, to a recent study mit it to !he Social Security ad-fits. by !sao Fujimoto, a U.C. Davis so-ministtation. Since he istmlikelyrohavewritten ciologisr. The percentage of a paycheck that records, it is difficult or impossible Fujimoto studied the effec t of Sois deducted for Social Security also for the worker to prove his eli:!: cial Security on the lives o .fmigram varies according to lhe mood of the gibility. workers, and came up wilh some interesting findings. Social Security deductions from pay checks are only obligatory after an employee has worked 20 days for the sameemployerorhasearned $150. Many m igratory farm workers "\ ' but unfailingly have some deductions ' made for "Social Security" by contractors or growers, Fujimoto found. The workers are entitled to re ceive a refund of the amoUnt deducted, but most are unaware of the existence of the 20-dayj$150 limita tion . TI1e contractor is most contractors, Fujimoto learned. While the legal deduction is 4.2 percent of total earnings, is added to an equal amount paid by the employer, but since many farm workers are paid in cash and are not given written pay vouchers, there is no way to check the amount acrually deducted. In order to receive retirement benefits from the Social Security program, a worker must have been employed a total of 40 three-month "'quarters," with his earnings pro per IY reported. Countless farm workers reach retirement age only to fiad that their earnings were not reported on manyrancheswhere a reminder from the CREDIT UNION ... ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM \'KJRIom page 6. said that "acrually we have had fairly good relations with the Union since we signed our first contract in August, 1967." Morrison added that they had negotiated with the Union because theyknewtheUFWOC represented the majorityoftheworkers at their ranch. UFWOC submitted cards from a majorityofwor. kers asking that the union be their bargaining agent. •sut even if we had an election, I'd say about 85 percent would have voted for the union." Morrison estimated. On noting changes since contracts with UFWOC were signed, AI Haft of Paul Masson Vineyards pointed out that wages written into the contract guaranteed an average of $3.25 an hour, which is about SO percent above the wage level paid before the Union came in. The rise has been comprable at other ranches under contract. But as Schenley official Korshak pointed out, "while wages have gone up 50 per cent it is not causing us any real economic problems." Other major results of signing contracts, according, to growers. have been that labor contractors have been eliminated and that a health insurance plari for the workers is being worked out.

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EL MALCRIADD, January 1, 1969/15 "'HUELGA EN GENERAL" "EL ESQUIROL" 11THE GENERAL STRI KE11 and 11THE SCAB11 (In Spanish, on a 45 rpm record) El Teatro Campesino presents two of the finest songs to come out of the De 1 a no Grape Strike, written and sung by members of the Farm Workers Teatre. $1. 00 + 25 postage & handLing • , i• from The United FaPm Workers , P. 0. Box 130, Delano, Ca. 93215 Please send me copies of.11Songs Ot the Strike" ("Huelga en General" and ,El Esquiropt) by the Teatro Campesino. Enclosed is $1.25 per copy c I TY S T ATE ZIP ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• last Chance to Order Our MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-American artists, which have appeared as covers on 11EL MALCRIAD011 over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, enqrav i ngs, pen-and-ink drawings. This tyoe of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and represents one of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art .from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-American cui ture. The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock. ($2. 00 each plus 50 hqndling 6 for $10.00 plus $1.00 handling) Make check or money order payab I e to the United Farm Workers, P. D. Box # 13 D , Delano, California 93215-. PZease send me ___ of your Mexican Graphic Ar>ts CaZendar>s @ $2. 00 each plus 50 fM postage and handling: NAME CITY ___ _ STATE ZIP

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f6/EL M A LCRIADO, Januar y 1, 1 969 q !3' ;:), I D .r--,/-'-'rt' j:<_N , .._ -;Is:> '2'1 . Discount Dept. Store . :zcoFJ .,..,., r-1 ::c :;:otllr-1 oz 0• 0 .... t"" r-1 0 ;; "' "' 0 0 "' • 0 "' H 0 ['l Main st. DELANO across from the Post 'Office ,'i'"' MONEY 5,.-a .. JANUARY IS BARGAIN MONTH All Prices Slashed to lowest -her Discounts! Open SUNDAYS Visit BEE'S here . in DELANO 918 MAIN • ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON TRACY [ INDIO )