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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 22

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 22
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
THE VOICE OF THE FARM WORKER
, ______________________ in English
Volume II, Number 22 Delano, California January 15, 1969
Jose Guadalupe Posada
ECONOMIC POISONS
A THREAT TO WORKERS AND CONSUMERS


in this issue
£L MALCRIADO, The Voice of Che Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITEO FARM WORKERS ORGAN IZI Nr, COMMITTEE, AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the Uni ted States and its possessions are $3-50 per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located at the northwest corner of G»r-ces Hiqhway and Mettler Avenue, Delano, California.
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIAOQ, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 23215.
For advertising rates, con-, - rhavez at (805)
Aukaria LIBRARy
1 El Malcriado says |
Texas Students are Vic-
torious p. 7
Hospital Segregation is
Challenged p. 8
Puerto Ricans Fight the
"Blood Tax" p. 9
Reagan Hedges on Anti-
Strike Law p. 10
Growers Ignore Sanita-
tion Laws p. 11
EL MALCRIADO can be
purchased in bulk orders
of 10 or more copies to
one address, for 79 per
copy or $1.68 per copy. per year

7534701
Reynaldo de la Cruz, a former UFWOC organizer and leader of a recent protest demonstration against unemployment in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, sharply criticized the Freedom Newspapers chain in a January 6 press release.
“The so-called FreedomNewspa-pers of the Valley have not sought to lie up to their slogans of freedom and liberty,” de la Cruz said.
Freedom Newspapers are published in several states. The home paper is the Santa Ana Register, located in die heart of Orange County. Hie Register opposes public education and even public POLICE forces as being socialistic.
In the Rio Grande Valley, die chain controls die Brwonsville Herald, the Valley Morning Star, published in Harlingen, and the McAllen Evening Monitor.
All three papers have consistently opposed attempt to organize Texas workers into labor Unions. Freedom papers had great praise for the Texas Rangers at a time when others were reporting the brutal use of strong-arm tactics by the Rangers to break a strike of farm workers at La Casita Farms in Rio Grande City.
The Valley Morning Star lias been known to claim that there was a shortage of farm workers in the Valley, requiring die importation of thousands of workers from Mexico. Unemployment in the area is notoriously chronic.
When de la Cruz led his demonstration in McAllen, protesting unemployment conditions in the Valley, the Monitor carried die headline “Farm Union Agitator Presents 23 demands" and then accused de la Cruz of using "purple prose.”
The editor of EL MALCRIADO once worked for a few months as a reporter-photographer for the Daily Star - Progress, a Freedom paper published in the northern part of Orarige County.
I remember being told by the city editor to take a picture of the host clergyman and the visiting preacher at an inter-faith service in die little town of Brea.
The picture was scheduled to run in the center of page one, but when the paper appeared on die street, the photo I had taken was curiously absent.
The editor dien proceeded to bawl me out for having submitted the photo I had turned in. “We can’t run that picture on page one,” she said. “The community would never accept it.”
Her meaning was clear. The host clergyman was the local Rabbi (incidentally a MALCRIADO subscriber), and the visiting preacher was a Baptist whose name, I-think, was Rev. Caldwell.
He was black.
No, Freedom Newspapers would never publish a picture that die "community would not accept.”
Freedom, hell.
EL MALCRIADO P.O. BOX 130 DELANO, CA 93215
More and more people are finding out that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
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II
EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/3
1 1
rowjers Spurn Negotiations on Poisons
DELANO, January 16 — A special meeting of 250 boycott organizers and community leaders from all over California has been scheduled for Saturday, January 25, to consider escalation of the boycott and concern over the use of economic poisons in
• the vineyards.
The meeting was called after grape growers refused to reply to j a recent letter sent out' by Ce-j sar Chavez to the Southern Cen-!] tral Farmers Commission, the California Grape and Tree F League, and die Desert Grape I League.
Chavez's letter, calling once a-gain for negotiations with die growers to avoid escalation of die boycott during the coming season, said,
'There is one critical issue of such overriding importance that it j demands immediate attention, even if other labor relations problems have to wait. I mean the harmful effects of spraying grapes with pesticides, or economic poisons, as they are called. We have recently become more aware of this problem through an increasing number of cases coming into our clinic."
“We will not tolerate the systematic posisoning of our people. Even if we cannot get togedier on odier problems, we will be damned—and we should be—if we will permit human beings to sustain permanent damage to their health from economic posions."
Chavez said Union representatives would be willing to meet with the growers on the sole issue of pesticides, even if the growers are "not prepared to begin full-scale collective bargaining at present.”
Growers, however, did not reply to the letter. '
Chavez told EL MALCRIADO there was no intention on the part of the Union to abandon its drive . for collective bargaining agreements with California’s table grape growers, but that Union officials were unanimous in their belief that the question of economic poisons
used in the vineyards was the most dangerous problem faced by farm workers.
“The increasing number of children reporting to our clinic after having eaten table grapes in the fields where their parents were
Five-year-old picker lies in a pail after suffering severe attack of dysentery.
National Child Labor Committee
working frightens all of us,” Chavez said.
"The dangers of chemical pesticides to those who cultivate and consume grapes must be faced.”
Chavez said he had hoped talks on the subject of the poisons might lead to further negotiations on o-ther questions of importance but that the refusal of die growers to answer the letter meant the U-nion had no choice but to prepare for a third season of active boycott organization.
He said he had called the Jan-nuary 25 meeting to consider die escalation of die boycott and die con-
cern of the Union about the dangerous chemicals used on table grapes.
UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen recently was denied access to public records on the use of the poisons by the Kern County Agricultural Commissioner.
UFWOC researchers have also been denied access to public State records on the use of pesticides in Fresno, Tulare and Riverside counties.
Research on the use of die poisons has shown diat many of die chemicals used for insect and disease control in the vineyards were similar to those developed by Nazi Germany for extermination of humans.
“There is talk at both federal and state levels of farm labor legislation. If we cannot agree on wages, hours and working conditions—ar at the very minimum even talk about die most important issue of all, which is the protection of human life from the dangers of economic poisons—then how can we ever agree on legislation? What alternatives do you have? You won’t be able to break our Union or stop our boycott. So if you won’t negotiate with us, the only route open to you will be repressive legislation which the American people will not accept,” the letter concluded.
Court Hearing on Poisons
DELANO, December 31 — Court iearings on die dangers of pesticides will he held in Bakersfield on January 29 by Judge Walter Osborn of the Superior Court as part of a suit filed by UFWOC attorneys in which the Union demands its right to see die public records kept by the Kern County Agricultural Commission on pesticides.
UFWOC Attorney Jerome Cohen tried unsuccessfully to see those Continued on patfc £
\


VEL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969
NEGOTIATIONS AT Dl GIORGIO
LAMONT, January 10—UFWOC’s contract with the Dl Giorgio Fruit Company is due to . come up for re-negotiations, according to La-mont Representative Mack Lyons, and the Union has notified the company that improvements in wages and fringe benefits will be requested when negotiations open in April.
In the meantime, Lyons said, die question of whom to negotiate with is still up in the air.
If Di Giorgio still owns the land, the Union will ask for changes in the contract to keep Di Giorgio wages and benefits comparative with those received by workers under Union contract at Schenley, Almaden, and Gallo Vineyards.
Lyons noted that Di Giorgio has announced its intentions to sell all the land covered by the contract, but that the sale may not be completed for some time.
"Under the present contract, we must notify the company 90 days
in advance, if 'â– % want to begin negotiations on jny changes to be made in the contract," Lyons said.
“If they still own the ranch at that time, or are operating the ranch for a new owner, we will want to negotiate certain changes in the contract. If die sale has been completed, we hope to negotiate a new contract with the new owners,” Lyons stated.
In spite of die uncertainty caused by Di Giorgio's intention to sell, more than 250 pruners continue working under Union contract there. The work force is expected to reach 300 by the end of January, Lyons said.
The asparagus harvest will begin around March 1, and a sizeable work force will be needed for that harvest and for thinning plums, which is done in April. Lyons remains hopeful that the major buyer of the land, reported to be S. A. Camp Farms of Shafter, will recognize
the contract and that the transfer of the property will be smooth and without any harmful effects on the workers or the harvests.
A related contract, between Di Giorgio Fruit Corporation and Earl Fruit Company and the United Peanut Shelling Workers Local #3037, will also be due for renewal in April.
Local #3037 represents the workers in two of Di Giorgio's packing sheds. Sue Newton, Tommy Dollums, and Bruce Dollums will represent die workers in die negotiations, aided by Irwin de Shettler, farm labor coordinator of the AFL-CIO. De Shettler said Di Giorgio has not indicated any plans to sell the packing sheds. The contract covering die shed workers affects about 20 peanut shed employees and, at die height of die fruit harvest, up to 250 workers in die fruit shed.
Viva la Cau$p Y
El Progreso
(Z&tvtteMf.
a
Tttexic**-
rfmvti&ut
Fresno California


EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/5
COURT TO HEAR FACTS ON POISONS
Continued from page 3
records on pesticides on August 20, 1968, as part of a study the Union was conducting on the toxic effects these chemicals have on farm workers. At that time he was denied the right to examine these files when Judge J. Kelly Steele issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting Cohen’s examination of the public records.
After the injunction was issued, UFWOC attorneys filed suit against the Kern County Agricultural Commissioner, Sheldon Morly, and the Kern County Superior Court.
Doctors, scientists and farm wo-kers will render their testimony at the hearings, and the farm workers will testify as to injuries that they have received from die poisonous pesticides.
Steven Wall will represent die crop .dusters at the hearings. Ralph Gordon, county council for the Agriculture Commission will represent
the Commission. UFWOC attorneys and farm workers will argue for die workers and victims of poisoning and injuries..
David Averbuck, UFWOC attorney, said that die "basic argument of the Dust Sprayers is in effect
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA— With the endorsement of die democratic Farm Labor Party (DFL) and the senate of the Archdiocese of St. Paul-Minneapolis, the boycott of California Table grapes in Minneapolis and other cities in Minnesota continues to receive strong support from the community.
At a recent boycott committee press conference in Minneapolis, chairman Warren Spannaus of the Minnesota DFL said, "The Minnesota DFL is in full simpathy with die
that their economic well-being is more important than die dangers caused by pesticides to farm workers and grape-pickers." He added that the Agriculture Commission sided with the crop dusters in argue-ing die same thing.
efforts of Cesar Chavez and the Me-xican-American and Filipino farm workers in California to organize themselves for bargaining purposes. I hope all DFLers and all Minnesotans will join in actively supporting their efforts, including the boycott of California grapes."
Father William Cantwell of St. Lawrence parish, Minneapolis, said that the senate of die Archdiocese of St. Paul-Minneapolis supported the boycott. "Now we are asking people to put tiieir bodies on die line," he said.
MINNESOTANS SUPPORT BOYCOTT
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6/EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969
Delano. Employees Seek Raise
DELANO, December 13—The employees of the city of Delano, represented by the Kern County Employees Association, have filed requests for salary hikes and improved fringe benefits, it was reported this week.
Fred Ward, an official of the Association, said the city employees have requested a wage increase of 2-1/2 percent, plus improved sick leave benefits, longer vacations and a review of Delano's pension plan.
Ward said a few city employees who are required to stand by in their homes for possibly emergency duty presently receive no pay at all, though they cannot leave their homes or entertain friends. He said the Association is asking for $5 per shift payment for workers on stand-by duty.
Ward said the city granted a pay increase of 2-1/2 percent on July 1, but that the cost of living index has risen 4.8 percent during the previous year. He said a pay increase retroactive to January 1 would bring employees' earnings up to their real value during mid-1967 in terms of the cost of living.
Delano’s pension plan provides “meager’’ benefits in comparison with those provided by most California cities, Ward said. About 76 precent of the cities in California contract with the State for retirement programs, which results in much better benefits. Delano is among die 24 percent which nandle their pension plans indepent-ly of the State.
City Manager Gerald Minford declined to comment on the Association’s demands, but said the matter would go before die CityCouncil on Monday night, January 20. He said he would not make any recommendations to the Council on the substance of die demands, but that he would advise councilmen on procedures.
Ward said the County Employees Association was an “unaffiliated" labor union." Police Captain A1 Es-

JfSTiCd
pinoza, who is also reportedly a partner in a farm labor contracting firm and a produce trucking company, heads the Delano City employees section of the County
PROSPERITY? Prosperity 3 something the workers never had3 is something the growers may loose. It's time to negotiate to end the stirike and boycott3 and guarantee through contracts that workers and growers alike share the prosperity of the grape industry.
a reminder from the CREDIT UNION...
ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM WORKER CREDITuNION?
SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONEY ASIDE DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY TO SPEND DURING THE WINTER.
COME IN TODAY, AND FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE MONEY AND PLAN FOR THE FUTURE.
FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P.O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFORNIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER
105 Asti St.j Delano3 Ca.


EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/7
NEWS FROM THE VALLEY
Elsa Students Victorious!
ELSA, TEXAS—31 Mexican American students expelled from Elsa-Edcouch High School (Rio Grande Valley, Texas) were readmitted to school after Judge Reynaldo Garza of the Federal District Court in Brownsville determined recently that die expulsion of die students was unconstitutional.
In mid November last year some 150 Mexican-American students prepared a list of demands to present to die school board. The students walked out of school after their demands were not considered by school officials. At that time, 99 of the participating students were suspended and 31 were expelled.
The ruling by Judge Garza declared that the school board regulations prohibiting demonstrations on campus is unconstitutional, ordered the board to re-admit the expelled students, and ruled that the expulsion must be removed from the students' records, and that actual and nominal damages be paid by the board.
The majority of the students participating in the walkout were Mexican-Americans. They had charged the school administration with discrimination and had received support in their efforts from State Sen. Joe Bernal of San Antonio and the Catholic Church in the Rio Grande Valley, which moved to accept many of the expelled students into Catholic schools.
Attorneys from the Mexican-A-merican Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALD) filed a suit against die school board immediately after die expulsion, seeking reinstatement of the expelled students and die payment of damages.
Gerald Lopez, staff attorney for die MALD commented "all we wanted
Continued on yage 24
TEXANS PROTEST POVERTY
MCALLEN, TEXAS—More than 50 farm workers from Rio Grande City staged a demonstration in front of the MCAllen office of the Texas Employment Commission recently, to protest the chronic unemployment which farm workers who live in the Lower Rio Grande Valley suffer.
Reynaldo de la Cruz, a farmworker leader from Rio Grande City, read a list of 23 demands which he hopes would solve the situation if acted upon by the Employment Commission. De la Cruz said that "1969 offers no future (for the farm workers) but the repeated seasonal employment, migration and pathetically poor wages."
Richard Stolle, manager of the McAllen office of the Texas Employment Commission, admitted after the demonstration that the unemployment rate in the Valley is greater than anywhere else in Texas. He added that his office would release a statement after they received the demands from die demonstrators.
!n the meantime, rallies were held or planned in other towns in Texas. In Brownsville, some 50 farm workers attended a rally at which “grape boycott" literature was distributed.
Salomin S. Marroquin, acquisition officer of die Federal Urban Renewal Agency in Mission, commented recently on the farm workers economical condition in the Valley.
"They make enough money during their summer's work up north to come back to the Valley and live comfortably," he said, "without working for the remaining seven or eight months of the year—much as the winter tourists who come down here every winter from Minnesota and Iowa.
Farm workers seemed to think otherwise. One UFWOC member
Reynaldo de la Cruz
pointed out that, according to die 1960 census, almost a third of die 3,339 families living in Starr County, near the southern tip of the state, had annual incomes of less than $1,000. About 70 percent earned less than the $3,000 “poverty point” for a family of four, and the average per capita income in i960 was $534 for county residents.
Male Texans of Mexican descent have completed an average of 6.7 years of school. In California, the average is 10.8 years of schooling.
Five years ago, wages in Texas hovered around 40 cents an hour. Today they are usually around $1 an hour.


8/EL MALCRIADO, January. 15, 19^9
HOSPITAL SEGREGATION CHALLENGED
VISALIA, January 7—Tax-
supported hospitals which formerly refused to admit Medi-Cal patients will no longer be allowed to do so, as die result of a January 7 decision of Tulare County Superior Court Judge Leonard Ginsberg.
Farm worker and UFWOC member Eluterio P. Loredo, 59, of Poplar, had filed suit againstdie Sierra View Hospical District after he was refused admissson to the District Hospital in Porterville because the cost of his care was to be paid by die Medi-Cal program.
The hospital had previously announced it would refuse to admit some Medi-Cal patients, and would refuse to perform any but emergency surgery for Medi-Cal patients under 65. The reason; to allow admission to those in need of Medi-Cal because they were poor would create “a flood of patients.”
Judge Ginsberg's ruling declared that tax-supported hospitals may not discriminate against any segment of the public in their admission policies.
According to Loredo’s physician, Dr. David Brooks of the Salud Clinic in Woodville, die decision may be important in “desegregating” many local hospitals which now discriminate against the poor.
“In die past,” Dr. Brooks said, “physicians in many local hospital districts were unable to continue caring for their patients once they were hospitalized.
“While a physician might care for a welfare patient in his office, if a local hospital refused to admit him because of poverty, the doctor had no choice but to send the patient to a county hospital and a different physician,” he explained.
Attorney Gary Bellow, who represented Loredo, was hopeful that the case would have far-reaching effects throughout California. “It is public policy,” Bellow said, “to admit rich and poor children alike to schools in their own school districts, but it is still common practice to send
poor patients outside their own local hospital districts to distant, overcrowded county hospitals.
"The Loredo decision states clearly that the sick have a right to be treated in their own community hospitals, regardless of whether the patient, the government, or a private insurance carrier will pay the bill," Bellow said.
“It is an important step in the effort to provide equal health care to all citizens."
For years hospitals claimed that they could not admit indigent patients because there was no one to pay for the care.
When Medi-Cal, a Federal-State program, provided medical services for die poor, many local hospitals claimed admitting patients under the program would over-crowd their facilities.
Some observers wondered “Overcrowd the facilities for whom?”
“Obviously for those who could afford to pay from their own funds,” was the answer.
The Loredo decision may mean that the well-off can no longer be “protected” from over-crowding by the poor. In the San Joaquin Valley, the “poor” are generally farm workers.
Mrs. Dolores Huerta, the leader of the grape boycott in Hew York.
New York Boycott Plans Total Victory
NEW YORK, January 10—Only one major supermarket chain continues to sell grapes in New York City, according to Dolores Huerta, ufwoc vice President and director of die boycott in New York since late 1967. "All the chains are clean, except for Gristedes Markets,” Mrs. Huerta reported. “At least 22 major chains, involving hundreds of stores, have stopped selling grapes because of the lack of demand or because of pressure from their customers.”
Mrs. Huerta said that there is still work to do in Yonkers, Westchester and in New Jersey. Small independent stores and fruit stands are also handling gr apes, she noted, but the main work of the boycott committee in New York for the next three months will be to build an inter - locking bommunity - based boycott structure in every neighborhood of the huge city, in preparation for the 1969 harvest.
“We are beginning to build neighborhood coalitions in each of the five boroughs, in every major neighborhood,” Mrs. Huerta explained. “During January we have been concentrating on building student groups, especially in the high schools and universities. Students here are very militant and socially conscious. We hope that by May, when the first grapes are shipped from Arizona and Coachella, that we will have student ‘watchdog’ committees checking every store, market, fruit stand and delicatessen in the city.”
“In February and March we will be concentrating on political clubs and church groups. We will organize by neighborhoods and will build coalitions of church groups, liberals, students, and labor in every neighborhood. The wonderful work that labor did in supporting our boycott this year will thus be backed up by local boycott committees when the growers try to unload their 1969 harvest. We are talking about a city where more than 8,000,000 Continued on page 12


EL MALCRIADO, Janua'ry 15, 1969/9
BOYCOTT VICTORIES IN H GEORGIA!
UFWOC representative Luis Me-lendrez working incoordination with the Atlanta Committee to Support the Farm workers, The Concerned Clergy and Afl-CIO Region six has succeeded in getting the five major chains in Atlanta to stop selling California grapes. These chains, Colonial, Big Apple, A&P, Kroger, and Winn-Dixie, account for 78 % of that city’s grape sales. Two of the chains have removed grapes in a four-state area.
This represents a major breakthrough for the grape boycott in the South where the growers have been dumping their grapes in order to avoid the successful UFWOC boycott in northern cities. Active boycott committees are operating in Miami,
New Orleans, Nashville, Louisville and other major southern cities.
The victory is due mainly to pressure brought by individual consumers and by numerous organizations of local stature and prestige who supported the boycott and entered into direct negotiations with top management of the stores. The concerned Clergy is a group of 43 white and black, Jewish, Catholic and Pro te stan Clergymen dedicated to fighting racism and exploitation.
The Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Father Mullroy are the leaders of this group
Rev. King said he undertook the grape boycott as a personal calling because of the mutual admiration • that existed between his son
and Cesar Chavez, die non-violent leader of the UFW.
Some of the organizations which comprise die Atlanta Committee » support die Farm Workers are: the Southern Regional Council, Kennedy Action Group, Southside Atlanta Health Dept., die faculty of E-mory University. The Atlanta committee is coordinated by Mrs. Becky Becker, an Atlanta housewife.
In Atlanta and throughout the South people have responded to the call for help on die boycott. Many Southerners know the plight of the migrant worker first hand. To them, active support for the boycott is one way of bringing closer the day when there will be social justice for all farm workers.
Puerto Ricans fight ’’Blood Tax”
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO, January 3—More than 100 Puerto Ricans who were scheduled to go on trial beginning November 12 for refusing induction into the United States Army, have had their trials indefinitely postponed.
Jose del Carmen Garcia Miranda, the first of die draft resistors to be tried, was acquitted on November 18 in San Juan.
After die acquittal was announced, Federal attorneys filed an appeal with die First Circuit Court in Boston, and the trials of the remaining men who refused induction were postponed pending die outcome of die appeal, according to a report from Thomas Dorney of the Puerto Rican Peace Center.
Citizens of Puerto Rico cannot vote for President, nor do they have representation in the Congress of the United States, but they are subject to the draft.
Dorney said Garcia Miranda was acquitted on a technicality, after defense attorney Michael Standard introduced evidence to show that
Garcia had been issued his induction order out of turn.
Colonel Luis Torres Massa, head of die Selective Service System, in Puerto Rico, later denied that Garcia's local board had violated die rules of procedure, and that “incorrect” information had been presented at the trial, Dorney reported.
“Many Puerto Rican induction refusers are C.O.s primarily for political reasons. They want independence for Puerto Rico, and they
argue impressively that die application of the draft law to Puerto Rico is illegal on five distinct counts,” Dorney’s announcement said.
Some have called die drafting of Puerto Ricans a “blood tax,” referring to the fact that die doctrine of no taxation without representation
protects them from paying income taxes to the United States government, but Puerto Ricans still are liable for military service for a country which does not allow them to vote.


10/EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969
CONFUSION IN SACRAMENTO
REAGAN HEDGES ON ANTI-STRIKE LAW
SACRAMENTO, January 10— California Governor Ronald Reagan and his top farm advisors contradicted each other repeatedly during the first week of January on die question of farm labor legislation, leaving behind confusion and uncertainty as to what their real plans were. And as the State Legislature got deeper into the session, it seemed doubtful that any farm labor legislation would even come to a vote, let alone reach die Governor’s desk for signature.
The Governor and his grower friends want to do something to counter the increasingly effective boycott of California grapes, launched by die United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, but die Governor and his friends seemed unsure whether to try to fight the boycott and die Union with new, anti-Union legislation, or whether to continue with the traditional means of busting unions, with cops, court injunctions, economic pressure on the local workers, and importation of scabs from Mexico.
Reagan stated in his annual State of the State message, "It is my intention to seek and support legislation in the area of farm labor-jnanagement relations." He further stated, "Agriculture...is still our state's Number 1 industry... It is to be expected that we should lead the way in agricultural labor relations policies. If we don't, we may soon be forced to march to yet another federal drum beat."
According to reports from Sacramento, Reagan seemed to be contemplating some kind of legislation to outlaw strikes during the harvest. Such a law would have the same effect for farm workers as a bill prohibiting auto workers’ strikes during working hours. Some growers are calling for legislation simply to outlaw any boycott of agricultural products, without any exceptions.
Reagan and some "liberal" agri-
cultural experts contemplated, as a sop to the workers, an elaborate collective bargaining clause providing for rigged representational elections. Because of the nature of a migratory and seasonal labor force, time limits and eligibility requirements, which a law could easily rig against farm workers, are the key to guaranteeing fair elections.
Some growers seem to favor a law allowing elections which would also include long delays between the petitioning for an election and the actual vote, during which time the grower could fire union sympathizers and hire anti-union workers or hire easily intimidated green carders from Mexico. Growers have also suggested that any new legislation include “cooling off" periods, during which the grower could complete his harvest and send his workers back to Texas or Mexico. Any of these delaying tactics could enable the grower to postpone indefinitely bargaining with the Union, even after the Union won an election.
By January 10, Reagan seemed to have dropped plans for pushing such legisltaion, and his advisor Earl Coke assured the grower-dominated State Board of Agriculture that Reagan had no present intention of presenting or endorsing any farm labor legislation. Coke said, in direct contradiction to Reagan's T. V. speech, that the Governor would prefer legislation at the national level. Reagan will definitely not present any farm-labor bills this session, Coke said.
Alan Grant, President of the Cali-
fornia Farm Bureau Federation and Chairman of the State Board of Agriculture, said that die Farm Bureau is still working on legislative proposals relating to farm labor. These will probably be straight union-busting proposals, since Grant has become a major spokesman for die most rabidly anti-Union and reactionary growers in the state.
While Reagan and his grower friends proposed and then denied proposing legislation on the subject, State Senator Walter Stiern, a moderate Democrat representing Kern County, announced that he was ending his own efforts to intor-duce legislation on collective bargaining for farm workers. Stiem's bill would have set up procedures for union representation'elections, which local growers have been u-
Continued on page 14
SI LA RAZA NO PARA A NIXON, MIXON APLASTARA A LA RAZA
UNLESS LA RAZA STOPS NIXON NIXON WILL STOMP LA RAZA
Nixon Poster
INAUGURATION SPECIAL: Andy Zermeno's famous campaign poster of Nixon, almost 3 feet by 2 feet, in limited quantities. $1.75 + 25$ postage and handling from El Malovi-ado3 Box ISO3 Delano aCa.


EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/11
Growers Ignore Sanitation Laws
DELANO, January 15—Disregard for health and safety laws, sanitation and public decency on die part of California grape growers is described in a study submitted to EL MALCRIADO by UFWOC Attorney Jerome Cohen.
The study, made by a team of investigators, was concerned primarily with Health and Safety Codes Sections 5454.20 and 3700, industrial Commission Order 14-68, and Labor Code Section 2441 which require toilets to be provided within walking distance for workers in the fields, and requires hand washing facilities, drinking water, and sanitary cups and other minimum facilities which any decent and humane employer would provide.
*"Ihe growers claim that California farm workers are protected by more laws than farm workers in any other state," Cohen observed. “This is a lie since Hawaii is die only state that has not legislated gross discrimination against farm workers. But what few laws California has passed to protect the field workers are never enforced and compliance is based on the whim of the growers. Very few of die local growers pay any attention to the ' laws.”
The study found numerous violations of the law on the part of Midstate Horticultural Company, Jack Pandol Ranch, Vincent B. Zanino-
Egg Bread and Pastries All Kinds of Donuts Cakes for all Occasions French Bread
vich Ranch, Anton Caratan Ranch, Milan Caratan Ranch, Bianco Farms, Mossesian Ranch, Sabovich Ranch, Dulzich Ranch,Lammanuzzi & Pantaleo Ranch, Lucas and Sons Ranch, Jack Radovich Ranch ando-thers.
The study concludes, "This limited check of grape vineyards in Kern and TUlare Counties clearly reveals on going, continuing, deliberate, massive violations of the legal protections which die State of California has provided for farmworkers and consumers."
Following are some of die cases cited:
On December 27, 1968, Midstate Horticultural Company, a large corporation grape grower near Delano was forcing crews to work in fields where there were no toilets or water facilities. On January 6, three crews including women were pruning in other fields owned by Midstate where there were no toilets or handwashing facilities a-vailable for two of these crews. For the third crew, there were only four walls of plywood over a small hole in the ground, and there was no toilet paper (only newspaper); the door would notclose. There were several women in each of these crews Again, on January 3, there were three
We have a large Selection of Spanieh Magazinesy Books, and Records.
In August of 1966 El Malcriado published an article and cartoon relating to labor relations involving the lettuce grower, Bud Antle, in Salinas and in the Imperial Valley of California. At the time of those publications of the National Farm Workers Organizing Committee, afl-CIO, had a dispute with die Union which represented Bud Antle, Inc.'s farm workers; However, the National Farm Workers Association did not have, and never has had, any labor dispute or strike against Bud Antle. El Malcriado and its publishers sincerely regret any unfavorable or derogatory implications against Bud Antle, Inc., or its President Lester V. Bud Antle, which may have resulted from the publications. El Malcriado has no knowledge that Bud Ande's farm workers are treated unfairly or dishonesdy."
Poison Conscious
Everybody seems to be worried about poisons these days. This sign at a Kern County Dump near Delano warns growers not to dump poisons without permission.
Continued on page 12
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12/EL MALCR1AD0, January 15, 1969
"215 adults and children working. . _________________no toilets or washing facilities”
This worker is priming grapes near Delano, California. Many workers wear such face guards in surri-mer and winter, to guard against chemical spraying and dusting which can endanger eyes, mouth, and skin. ______________________
New York Boycott
Continued. from page 8
people live, so we will need the help of all these groups to keep New York clean of scab grapes.”
Mrs. Huerta explained that once again this year they would try to convince store owners not to carry grapes. Delegations of local people will call on store owners in advance of the harvest and ask diem not to carry grapes. The student committee will check stores frequently to see if the scab products appear. As soon as grapes
are discovered, the neighborhoou boycott committee will go into action, appealing to the store owner to remove the grapes and appealing to shoppers to shun them. Picket lines will be mobilized around stubborn stores to warn potential customers of die danger.
“We plan to cut grape sales in New York to zero," Mrs. Huerta said. "The grape boycott of 1969 will make die boycott of 1968 look like ring-around-the-rosy."
Continued from page 11
crews in Midstate’s fields, totaling 72 to 80 primers, and there were no toilets or handwashing facilities available. Only one of the crews had drinking water and there were no individual drinking cups.
On the Jack Pandol Ranch, there were no toilets for crews pruning grapes on December 27, again on December 30, when between 40 and 60 men were in the fields..
In Vincent B. Zaninovich’s vineyards where two large crews were working, the fields had no toilets or handwashing facilities on December 27, December 30, and December 31. In another Zaninovich field, a 25 man crew had a 20 minute walk to the nearest toilet facilities. In another Zaninovich field, two crews of approximately 200 men were pruning with no toilets or handwashing facilities on January 2, January 3, and January 6.
In Anton Cara tan’s fields, there were forty men pruning with no toilets on December 27, and on December 30 there were seventy people pruning with no toilets or handwashing facilities.
At Bianco farms violations on December 30 and 31 were found in numerous fields.
In William Mossesian’s vineyards, there were no toilets or handwash -ing facilities available for more than one hundred workers on December 30 and 31.
At Sabovich ranch, violations were found on I>ccember 30 and 31 en-volving at least 8 crews of workers.
At Dulzich Ranch, 215 adults and children were working with no toilets or handwashing facilities available on January 2 and 3 and 6.



EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/13

Letters EL MALCRIADO P.0. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 93215
1 1 iitttitlllltlilll
The boss needs help...
I’m sorry...
Editor:
Though it has been attacked for its efforts in organizing farm laborers into a collective body, the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee is showing signs of success by surviving these attacks and whether opposing forces like it or not, it is here to stay. Its primary objective is higher pay. Through contracts with understanding growers such as Schenley,
Di Giorgio, and others, field workers are getting no less than $1.75 hourly pay, while other growers who continue to denounce the union have been forced to hike their pay because of it.
For example Giumarra is now paying his workers $1.50 an hour plus suposedly a 74 bonus on every vine pruned. Though I heard the minimum wage law is around $1.65 an hour, after working 9 hours out in the cold, 1 received a gross pay of $13.50. They somehow neglected to include the bonus. This pay greatly contradicts the 2 to 3 dollars' an hour brag of many so-called experts on the real farm workers' situation. But $1.50 is a lot better than the prior pay of $1.40 an hour.
Working out on one of Giumarra's farms an incident occurred which I would like to bring out to the pbu-lic. After having been instructed crew leaders went around each woker asking for donations, in order that a recently deceased daughter of one of die bosses mayreceive a proper funeral. For being the nation’s highest paid field workers and having so many so-called protective laws such as workman's compensation, disability insurance, wage-collection law, and others, it seems a great shame that a field boss would have
to ask for such financial aid. If anybody’s pay out in the fields is equal to or greater than the 2 or 3 dollars an hour brag it’s the field bosses’.
What this incident reflects is in fact a poor way of propagandizing on the part of Giumarra Corp. They can now proudly announce that upon hearing of the tragedy that befell one of their-beloved bosses, the workers rushed to his aid. What wonderful boss - employee relations must exist. The hard truth is that no one had heard of their boss’s misfortune due to the fact that they scarcely leave their company-provided trucks long enough to directly speak to any of the field workers. They give their orders through die crew leaders. Upon hearing of their bosses’ misfortune very few, mostly old men who probably no longer have families to support made anything of a donation.
VIVA LA CAUSA Arturo Borrego Bakersfield, California January 10,1969
After 30 years...
Editor:
Enclosed is my check for $5 to be used in the furtherance of your struggle for Union recognition.
After 30 years in die ranks of organized labor, as rank and file local officar, organizer, and business representative, I am concerned whenever and wherever labor is fighting for recognition and better wages and conditions. Best wishes. Fraternally yours,
Ole L. Bacon
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Gentlemen:
l' inadvertently crossed one of your picket lines at the Gemco store on Riverside Boulevard in Sacramento.
I am embarrassed, sorry, and ashamed, and I have written to Gemco telling them how I felt and protesting their selling grapes while so many of their customers are Mexican-Americans or members of u-nions.
I spent $5.60 in the store. Enclosed is my check for this amount. Use it in the fight for the rights of farm workers.
Viva la Huelga,
Viva la Causa,
Alan Pritchard Sacramento, California January 10,1969
Anonymous...
COMMUNIST Agitation and Organizing Comm. UFWOC.
WRONG!
Maybe Viva La Raza. But La Revolution, No.
If not liking things here, go back to where came from, or to any place if better. Don’t appreciate how good really do have it here. Know.
Of course, you just looking for excuse cause trouble.
(Unsigned)
Brother, most of us were born here.
Some people call the Southwest "occupied Mexico."
Glad you're reading EL MALCRIADO, though. Ed.


14/EL MALCRIAOO, January 15, 1969
GETTING RICH IN MICH
LABOR LAW
Continued from page 10
Of a recent sampling of migrant farm workers employed in Michigan fruit and vegetable cultivation, one half were Mexican-Americans, a U.S. Department of Labor report showed recently.
The report said the remaining half of the workers were about e-venly divided between Negroes and southern whites, the report said.
More than half the workers were more than 41 years old, and eight percent of them were GO or older.
The report said hot water was provided on six percent of the farms visited, and that the typical farm provided one outdoor water tap for two or three family cabins.
A few provided showers and some kind of laundry facilities. Sixty percent had no refrigeration available for migrant families.
"Providing these 'extras’ is one of the devices farmers use for securing and keeping their help," the report said.
The statistics showed that more than 38 percent of the Mexican-Americans had begun farmwork by the age of 14, while only 12 percent of the Negroes and about 20 percent of the southern whites had started work so young.
Ninety-five percent of the Mex-ican-Americans interviewed were born in Texas, and 72 percent of the Negroes and 80 percent of the
Students...
Continued from page 7 to do was get the kids back in school.” A school regulation promulgated by the trustees on November 4 which had expulsion as a penalty for students invloved in any demonstration on the school campus "limited the first amendment rights of the plaintiffs," according to Judge Garza. The Judge called die regulations "unconstitutional on their face and invalid" and ordered them revoked.
whites were born in the southern •states.
Negroes showed die highest educational attainment, with 28 percent having completed die tendi .grade. Only six percent of die Mexican-Americans had got that far in school.
Ninety percent of the Negroes, 80 percent of the Mexican-Amer-icans, and 50 percent of die whites intended to return home in time for their children to register for school.
We have on occasion mentioned in die columns of EL MALCRIADO die name of our rival newspaper in Delano, that galloping gem of American journalism, the Record.
A couple of weeks ago, in a brilliant move to bring modern design and reportage to the San Joaquin Valley, the Record started a front page column called “Strike Briefs.”
Somebody didn’t like the title,
nanimous' in rejecting, and it would have outlawed strikes at harvest, which the union finds totally unacceptable.
On January 8, in his statement announcing that he was dropping his proposals, Stiern said, “The overwhelming response to the tentative bill is, in one word, negative.”
though; some people in Delano still claim there is no strike.
So in subsequent issues, die column was retitled “Farm Labor Briefs."
Sounds like a new kind of underwear for the workingman.
The Record’s masdiead carries :the motto "Only Twice-a-Week Newspaper Serving Northern Kern and Southern Tulare Counties.” Probably true...and REAL impressive.
Robert J. Sanchez Ouner
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
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Mr. Leap will be in the UFWOC Service Center, 105 Asti, Delano, every Wednesday to serve U-nion members.
A QUICK SWITCH IN BRIEFS


EN GENERAL”
"EL ESQUIROL"
"THE GENERAL STRIKE" and "THE SCAB" (In Spanish, on a 45 rpm record)
El Teatro
presents two of the finest songs to come out of the Delano Grape Strike, written and sung by members of the Farm Workers Teatre.
$1.00 + 25 Campesina
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MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR
This beautiful calendar employs twelve great works by Mexican and Mexican-Ame-rican artists, which have appeared as covers on ”EL MALCRIADO" over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, engravings, pen-and-ink drawings. This type of art was an outgrowth of the Mexicanivj Revolution (1910-1920) and represents f one of the outstanding expressions of Revolutionary Art .from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-Ameri-can culture. ($2.00 each plus 50$- handling
The calendar is 9 x 18, red ink on 6 for $10.00 plus $1.00 handling) ochre stock.
Make check or money order payable to the United Farm Workers, P. 0. Box #130, Delano, California 93215
Please send me _____of your Mexican Graphic Arts Calendars @ $2.00
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Full Text

PAGE 1

in English Jose Guadalupe Posada ECONOMIC POISONS A THREAT TO WORKERS AND CONSUMERS

PAGE 2

in this issue Texas Students are Vic torious p. 7 'Hospital Segregation is ChaUenged p. 8 Puer.to Ricans Fight the ''Blood Taxn p. 9 Reagan Hedges on Anti Strike Law p. 10 Growers Ignore Sanita tion Laws p . 11 E L MALCRIA D O can be purchased in bulk orders o f 10 ox> more copies to one address, for 7 per copy or $1. 68 per year per copy . El HALCRIAOO, The Voice of the F;ocm Worker, pub I i shed twice monthly by the UNITED FAR.HI/ORKERS ORr,ANIZINf; COHiiiTH. Afl-CIO. Subscriptions in the United.State s and its possessio"• areSl.SOpcr year,andforeiqn, includinqCanadaand H e xico,US$5.00. Subscriptions for.,embers ofUfiiOC, Afl-CIO;oreincluded in monthly dues. Editorialandbusir.ess officeslocatedatthenorthwestcornerofr.ar ces Hiqhway <>nd Hettler Avenue, no,Californ;a. Addre55 all correspondence to: EL 1'\ALCR!AOQ,Po•tOfficeBox 130,0el...no,Californi
PAGE 3

'EL MALCR I ADO, January 15, 1999/3 rowers Spurn Negotiations on Poisons DELANO, January 16 A special meeting of 250 boycott organizers and communit y leaders from all over California has been scheduled for Saturday, January to consider escalation of the boycott and concern over the use of economic poisons in the vineyards. used in the vineyards was the most The meeting was called after dangerOus problem faced by farm grape growers refused to reply to a recent letter sent out by Cesar Chavez to the Southern Cenrral Farmers Commission, the California Grape and Tree F League, and the Desert Grape League . Chavez's letter, calling once again for negotiations with the growers to avo id escalation of the cott during the coming season, said, ere is one critical issu e of such overriding importance that it demands immediate attention, even if other labor relations problems have to wait. I mean the harmful effects of spraying grapes with pesticides, or economic poisons, as they are called. We have recently become more aware of this problem tflrough an increasing number of cases coming into our clinic. • "We will not tolerate the systematic posisoning of our people. Even if we cannot get togetl1er on other problems, we will be dam ned --and we should be--H we will workers. "The increasing number of children reporting to our clinic after having eaten table grapes in the fields where their parents were cern of the Union about the da'nger ous chemicals used on table grapes. UFWOC General Counsel jerome Cohen recently was denied access to public records on the use of the poisons by the Kern Coun ty Agricultural Commissioner. UFW OC researchers have also been denied access to public State records on the use of pesticides in Fresno, Tulare and Riverside counties. Research on the use o f the poisons has shown that many o f the chemicals used for insect and disease control in the vineyards were similar to those develored by Nazi Germany for extermination of huftThere is talk at both federal and state levels of farm labor legislation. J[ we cannot agree on wages , hours and working conditions -ar at tl1e very minimum even talk about the most important issue or all, which is the protect ion of human life from the dangers of economic poisons--then how can we ever agree on leg islation? What alternatives do you have? You won't be able to break our Union or stop our boycott. So if you won't negotiate with us, the only route open to you will be repressive legislation which tl1e American people will not accept," the letter concluded. permit human be ings to sustain -Five-year-old picker l ies in a pail after permanent damage to their health suffering severe attock of dysentery. from econom ic posions." Nat1ona t Ch•ttl labOr Commutee .. ----------Chavez said Union representatives would be willing to meet w ith the growers on tl1e sole issue of pesticides, even if the growers are "not prepared to begin fullscale collectiv e bargaining at present." Growers, however , did not reply to the letter. Chavez told EL MALCRIADO there was no intention on the part of the Union to abandon its drive for collective bargaining agree ments with California's table grape growers, but that Union officials were unanimous in their belief tl1at the question of economic poisons working frightens all of us," Q1a vez said, "The dangers of chemical pesticides w those who cultivate and consume grapes mustbe faced." Chavez said he had hoped talks on the subject of the poisons might lead to further negotiations on other questions of importance but that the refusal of the growers to answer the letter meant the U nion had no choice but to prepare for a third season of active boycott organization. He said he had called the Jan nuary 25 meeting to consider tlJcescalat ion of the boycott and tl1e con-Court Hearing on Poisons DELANO, December 31--Court earings on the dangers of pestiides will he held in Bakersfield on January 29 by Judge Walter Osborn of tl1e Superior Court as part o f a suit filed by UFWOC attorneys in which the Union demands its right to see the public records kept by the Kern County Agricultural Commission on pesticides. UFWOC Attorney Jerome Cohen tried unsuccessfully to sec these Continued on paw f-

PAGE 4

4/E L MALCR I ADD, January" I 5, I 969 NEGOTIATIONS AT Dl GIORGIO january 10UFWOC's in advance, if . c want to begin contract with the Di Giorgi o Fruit negotiations on -"'lY changes to be Company is due to .come up for made in the contract; Lyons said. renegotiations, according to La"If they still own the ranch at mont Representative Mack Lyons, that time, or are ope r a ti ng the ranch and the Union has notified the com-for a n ew owner, we will wan t to pany that improvements in wages negotiate cen ain changes in the and fringe benefits will be reques-contract. If the sale has been com-ted when negotiations open in April, pleted, we hope ro negotiate a new In the meantime, Lyons said, the contract with the n ew owners," Lyons question of whom to negotiat e with stated. is still up in the air. In spite of the uncertainty caused If Di Giorgio still owns the land, by 01 Giorgio's intention to sell, the Union will ask for changes in more than 250 pruners continue warthe conn-act to keep Di Gio r gio k in g under Union conn-act there. wages and benefits comparativ e with The work force is expected to reach those received by workers under 300 by the er.d of january, Lyons Union contract at SChenley, A l maden, said. and Gallo Vineyards. The asparagus harvest will begin Lyons noted tha t Oi Giorgio has around March 1, and a s i zeab le work announced its intentions to sell all force will be needed for that har-the land covered by the contract, vest and for thinning plums, which but that the sale may not be comis done in April. L yons remains pleted for some time. hopef u l rhat the major buyer of the '"Under the present contract, we land, reported to be S . A. Cam p must notHy the company 90 days Farms of Shafter, will r ecognize Women soroting potatoes in the Di Giorogio Packf-ng Shed near Lamont . the contract and that the transfer of the property will be smooth and without any harmful effects on the workers or the harvests. A related contract, between Di Giorgio Fruit Corporation and Earl Fruit Company and the United Peanut She llin g Workers Local #3037 , will also be due for renewal in April. Local #3037 represents the wor kers in two of Di Giorgio's packin g sheds. Sue Newton, Tommy Dollums, and Bruce Dollums will represent the workers in the negotiations, aided by Irwin de Shettler, farm labor coordinator of the AFL-CIO. De Shettler sai d Di Giorgio has not indicated any plans to sell the packing sheds. The conn-act covering th e shed workers affects about 20 peanut shed employees and, at the height of the fruit harvest, up to 250 workers in the fruit shed. {3tUP&te4f! al 4 1/teueeueFresno California

PAGE 5

EL HALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/5 COURT TO HEAR FACTS ON POISONS Continued fmm page 3 records on pesticides on August 20. 1%8, as part of a study the Union was conducti n g on the toxic effects these chemicals have on farm workers . At that time he was denied the right to examine these files when Judge ). Kelly Stee l e issued a temporary restraini ng order pro hibi ti n g C ohen's examination oflhe public records. After the injunction was issued, UFWOC attorneys Ciled suit against the Kern County Agricultural Com missioner, 9-teldon Marly, and the Kern County Superior Court. Doctors, scientists and farm wokers will render their testimony at the hearings, and the farm workers will testify as to i njuries that they have received from the poisono u s pes t icides. S teven Wa ll will represem the crop,dusters at the hearings . Ralph Gordon, county council for the Agriculture Commission will represent the Commission. UFWOC attorneys that their economic well-being is and farm workers will argue for the more important than the dangers workers and victims o f poisonin g caused b y pesticides to farm wor-and injuries.. kers and grape-pickers." He added David Averbuck, UFWOC attor-that the Agriculture Commission ney, s aid that the •basic argument si'ded with thecropdustersinargue -of the Dust Sprayers is in effect ing the same thing. MINNE S OTANS SUPPORT BOYCOTT MINNEAPOLIS, Mfi'lNESOTA-efforts of Cesar Chavez and the Me-With the endorsement of the demo-xican -American and F ilipino farm era tic Farm Labor Party (DFL) and workers in California to organize the senate of the Archdiocese of themsel ves for bargaining purposes. St. Pa ul -Minneapo li s , the bOycott 1 hope all DFt..er s and all M inne-of California T a b l e grapes in M in sotans will j oin in actively supportneapolis and other cities in Min-ing their efforts , including the boynesota continues ro receive strong cott of California grapes." support from the community. Father William Cantwell of St . Lawrence parish, M inneapolis, said At a recent bOycott committee that the senate of the A rchdiocese press conference in Minneapolis, of St. Paul-Minneapolis supported chairman Warren SJ>'lnnaus of the the boycott. "Now we are aski ng Minnesota DFL said, •The Minnesota peop l e to put their bodies on the DPL is in full s lmpathy with the liM," he sai d . Buttons! (actual size) a\V4 'apes, Zapata button, 50 or>der> fmm: EL MALCRIADO, PO BOX 130, Delano, California 9321 5 name address _ ____________ _ cit y state zip __ _

PAGE 6

6/EL MALCRI ADO, January 15, 1 969 Delano . Employees Seek Raise DELANO, December 1 3--Theempinoza, who is also reportedly a ployees of the city o f Delano, repartner in a farm labOr contract-presented by the Kern County Em-ing firm and a produc e trucking ployees Association , have filed recompany , head s the Delano City Quests for salary h i kes and im-employees section of the County proved fringe bene fits, it was re-ported this week. Fred Ward, an official of the Association, said the city employees have reques ted a wage inc rease of 2 1/2 percent, plus improved sick leave benefits, longe r vacations and a review of Delano ' s pension plan. Ward said a cew city employees who are required to stand by in their homes for possi bly duty presently receive no pay at all, though they cannot leave their homes or entertain friends. He said the Association is asking for $5 per shift payment for workers on stand-by duty . Ward said the city granted a pay increase of 2-1/2 percent on Ju l y I, b ut that the cost of living index has risen 4.8 percent during the previous year. He said a pay increase retroactive to January 1 would bring employees' earnings up to their real value during mid -1967 in terms of the cosr of living. Delano's pension plan provides •meager" benefits in comparison with those pro v ided by most Cal ifornia cities, Ward said. AbOut 76 prkent of the cities in Cali fornia contract with the Sta te for retirement programs, which results in much better benefits. Del ano is among the 24 percent which nandle their pension plans indepent l y of the State. City Manager Gerald Minford declined to comment on the Asso ciation' s demands, but said the matter would go before the City Council on lvlonday night, January 20. He said he woul d not make any recom m endations to the Council on the substance of the demands, but that he would advise councilmen on pro-cedures, Ward said the COunty Employees Association was an • unaHUiated" labor union." Po lice Captain AI EsPROSPERITY? Prosperity, something workers nev er had, is something the growers may Zdose. It's time to negotiate to end the strike and boycott, and guarantee through contracts that workers and growers aZike sha !'e the p1'0spe!'ity of the gmpe indust1'y . a reminder from the CREDIT UNION •.. ARE YOU A MEMBER OF THE FARM \I'ORKER CREDIT SMART SAVERS, WHO PUT MONE Y AS I DE OUR I NG THE SUMMER MONTHS, NOW HAVE EXTRA MONEY T O SPEND DURING THE WINTER. COME IN T ODAY, MONEY AND PLAN . . AND FI N O OUT HOW YOU CAN SAVE FOR THE FUTURE. FARM WORKERS CREDIT UNION P . O BOX 894 DELANO, CALIFOR .NIA 93215 OFFICES AT THE SERVICE CENTER 105 Asti St., Delano, Ca.

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EL HALCR I ADD, Janua 1 969/7 NEWS FROM THE VALLEY Victorious! ELSA , TEXAS--31 Mexican Ame rican students expelled from ElsaEdcouc h High School (Rio Grande V a lley, Texas) were readmitted to schoo l aft e r judg e Reynaldo Garza of the Federal District Court in Brownsv1lle determined recently that lhe expulsion of the srudents was unconstirutional, I n mid Nov .ember last year some 150 Mexican-American srudents pre pared, a list of demands to pre sent to the school board. The students walked outofschoolafrertheir demands were not considered by schoo l officials. At that time , 99 of lhe participating students were suspended and 31 were expelled. The ruling by judge Garzade<:Iar ed that the schoo l board regulations prohibitin g demonstrations on cam pus is Wtconstirutlonal, ordered the bOard to re-adJ11it the expelled stud ents, and ruled that the expulsion must be r emoved from lhe sruden t s ' records, and that actual and nominal d amages be paid by the board. The majoritY of the sruden t s participating in the walkout were M e xican -Americans. They ha d charged the school administration with dis c rimination and had received suppo r t in their efforts fro m State Sen . Joe Bernal of San Antonio and the Catholic Church 1n the Rio Grande Valley , which moved to accept man y of the expe lled srudents into Catholic scho o ls. Attorneys from the Mexican A m erican Legal Defense an d Educa tio n Fund (MALO) filed a suit against the school board immediately after the expul s i o n, seeking reinstatement of the expe11ed students and the pay ment of damages. Gerald Lopez, staff attorney for the MALO comme nted •au we wanted Continued. on page 1 4 TEXANS PROTEST POVERTY McALLEN, TEXAS--More than 50 farm workers from Rio Gr ande Cicy s taged a demonstration in front of the McAll en office of the Texas Employment Commission recently, to protest the chronic unemployment which farm workers who live in the Lower Rio Grande Valley suffer. Reynaldo de la Cruz, a farm worker leader from Rio Grande C icy, read a li s t of 23 demands which he hopes would solve the s irua tion if acted upon by the Em p loymen t Commission. De la Cruz said that "1969 offers no future (for the farm workers) but the repeated seasona l employment , migration and p athetica ll y poor wages." Richard Stolle, man ager of the McAllen office of the Texas Employ ment Commission, admitted after the demonstration that the unemploy ment rate in the Valley is greater than anywhere else in Texas. H e added that his omce woul d release a statement after they received the demands flom the demon-strators. !n the mP.antime, rallies were held or p l anned in othe r towns in Texas. In Brownsville, some 50 farm workers attended a rall y at which "grape boycott" literarure was distributed. Salomin S. Marroquin, acquisition officer of the Federal Urban Re newal Agency in Miss i on, COfl)mented recently on the farm workers economica l condition in the Valley. "They make enough money during th.eir summer's work u p north to come back to the Valley and live comfortably , .. he said, "without working for the remaining seven or eight months of the year-m u ch as the winter t ourists who come down here every winter from Minnesota and Iowa . Farm workers seemed to think otherwise. Ole UFW OC member pointed out that , according to the 1960 census, almost a third of the 3,339 fam ilie s living in Starr County , near the southern tip of the s t a t e , had annual income s of less than $ 1,000 . About 70 percent earned less than the $3, 000 "povercy point• for a fam ily of four , and the average per capita income in 1960 was $534 for councy residents. Male Texan s of Mexican descent h ave compl e ted an a verage of 6 . 7 yea r s of school. I n California, the average is 10.8 years of schooling. Five years ago , wages in Texas hove red a r ound 40 cents an hour. Today they are usually around $ 1 an hour.

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MALCR I ADD, Janua. ry . 15, 1969 HOSPITAL SEGREGATION CHALLENGED New York Boycott Plans To tal V ictory january 7 --Tax-supported hospitals which formerly refused to admit Medi-Cal patients will no l onger be allowed to do so, . as the result of a January 7 de cision of Tulare County Superior Court Ju dge Leonard Ginsberg . Farm worker and UFWOC member Eluterio P. Loredo, 59, of Poplar, had filed suit against the Sierra View Hospical District after he was re fused admissson to the District Hospit a l in Porterville because the cost of his care was to be paid by the Medi-Cal pr.ogram. The hospita l had previous l y ann ounced it would refuse ro admit some Medi-cal patients, and would refuse to perform any but emer gency surgery for Medi-Cal patients under 65 . The reason: to allow admission to those in need of Medi1Cal because they were poor would create "a flood of patients. " judge Ginsberg's ruling declared that tax-supported hospitals may not discriminate against any segment of the public in their admission policies. According to Loredo's physician, Dr. David Brooks of the SaludCiinic in Woodville , the decision may be important in "desegregating" many local hospitals which nowdiscrimin-ate against the poor . •rn ihe past," Dr. Brook s said, "physicians in many local hospital districts were unable to continue caring for their patients once they were hospitalized . •while a physician might care for a welfare patient in his office, if a local hospital refused to admit him because of povercy, the doctor had no choice but to send the patient to a county hospital and a different physician,'" he explained. Attorney Gary Bellow, who represented Loredo, was hopeful that the case would have far-reaching effects throughout _ California. "'It is p ublic poor patients outside their own local NEW YORK, JanuarY 10--0nly hospital districts to distant, over-one major supermarket chain con-crowded county hospitals. tinues to sell grapes in New York "The Loredo decision states City, according to Dolores Huerta, clearly that the sick have a right ufwoc vice President and director to treated in tl1eir own community of the boycott in New York since hosp i ta ls, regardless of w h ed1e r late 1967. "All the chains are the patient, the government , or a clean, except for Gristedes privat e insurance carrier will pay Mrs. Huerta reported. the bill,-Bellow said. "At least 22 major chains, involving •It is an important step in the hillldreds of stores, have stopped effort to provide equal health care selling grapes of the lack to all of demand or because of pressure For years hospitals claimed that from their customers." they couldnotadmitindigentpatients Mrs. Huerta that there is beCause there was no One to pay still work to do in Yonkers, West-for the care. chester and in New Jersey. Sma ll When tvlcdi-Cal, a Federal-State independent stores and fruit stands program, provided medical services are also handling grapes, she noted, for the poor, many local hospitals but the main work .of the boycott claimed admitting patients under the committee in New York for the next program would over-crowd their fa-three months will be to build an cilities. inter locking bommlUlity -based Some observers wondered "Over boycott structure in every neighbOr-crowd the facilities for hood of the huge cicy, in prepara"Clw i ous l y for d1ose who could don for the 1969 harvest. afford to pay from their own we are beginning t o build neighwas the answer. borhood coalitions in eachofthefive The Loredo decision may mean bOroughs, in every major neighthat the well off can no longer be bOrhood, Mrs. Huerta explained. from over-crowding by "During january we have been con-the poor. In the San joaquin centratlng on building srudent Valley , the are generally groups , especially in the high schools and universities. Students here are very mUitantand sociall y conscious. We hope that by May, when the first grapes are sh ipped from Arizona and Coachella, that we will have srudent •watchdog' committees checking every store, market, fruit stand and delicatessen in the "In February and March we will be concentrating on political clubs and c h urch groups . We will organize by neighborhoods and will bu il d coalitions of church groups, liberals, students, and labor in every borhood. The wonderful work that la bor did in supporting our boycott thitl year will thus be backed up by local bOycott committees when policy," Bellow said, "'to admit rich the growers try to unload their and poor children alike to schools Mrs. Do 'lares the 1 969 harvest. We are talking about in their own school districts, but "Leader of the grape boy -a ciry where more than 8,000.000 it is sO U common practice to send cott in New York. Continued on page 12

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EL MALCRIADO, Januaty 15, 1969/9 BOYCOTT VICTORIES .IN GEORGIA! UFWOC representative Luis MeNew Orleans, Nashville, Louisville lendrez working in coordination with and other major southern cities. the Atlanta Committee to Support The victory is due mainly to pres-the Farm workers, The Concerned sure brought by individual consum-Clergy and Region six has ers and by numerous organizations succeeded in getting the five major of local starure and prestige who chains in Atlanta to stop selling supported the boycott and entered California grapes. These chains, into direct negotiations with top Colonial, Big Apple, A&P, Kroger, management of the stores. The conand Winn-Dixie, account for 78 % cerned Clergy is a group of 43 of that city's grape sales. Two of white and black, jewish, Catho lic the chains have removed grapes in and Protestan Clergymen dedicated a four-state area. to fighting racism and exploitation. This represents a major break-The Rev. Martin Luther King, through for the grape boycott in the Sr. and South where the growers have been ers of this group dumping their grapes in order to Rev . King said he undertook the avoid the successfulUFWOCboycott grape boycott as a personal call in northern cities. Active boycott ing because of the mutual admira-comminees are operating in Miami, tion. that existed between his son and Cesar Chavez, the leader of the UFW. Some of the organizations which comprise the Atlanta Committee to support the Farm Workers are! the Southern Regional Council, nedy Action Group, Southside Atlan ta Health Dept., the faculty of Emory University . The Atlanta committee is coordinated by lvtrs. Becky Becker, an Atlanta housew i fe. In Atlanta and throughout the South people have responded to the call for help on the boycott. Many Southerners know the plight of the migrant worker first hand. To them, active support for the boycott is one way of bringing closer the day when there will be social justice for all farm workers. Puerto Ricans Fight "Blood Tax" SAN JUAN, PUERTO R ICO, JanuGarcia had bee!1 issued his induction ary 3--More than 100 Puerto Ri-order out of turn. cans who were scheduled to go on Colon el Luis Torres Massa, head trial beginning November 12 for of the Selective Service System , refusing induction into the United i n Puerto Rico, later denied that States Army, have had their trials Garcia's local boardhadviolate.dthe indefinitely postponed. rules of procedure, and that "injose del Carmen Garcia Miranda, correct" information had been prel:he first of the draft resistors to sented at the trial, Dorney be tried, was acquitted on November ported. 18 in San juan. After the acquittal was announced, Federal attorneys filed an appeal with the First Circuit Court in Boston, and the trials of the remaining men who refused induction were postponed pending the outcome of the appeal, according to a report from Thomas Dorney of the Puerto Rican Peace Center. Citizens o f Puerto Rico cannot vote for President. nor do they have representation in the Congress of the United States, but they are subject to the draft. D::>rney said Garcia Miranda was "Many Puerto Rican inductionre-acquitted on a technicality, after fusers are C.O.s primarily for podefense attorney M ichae l Standard litical reasons. They want inde introduced evidence to show that pendence for l'uerto Rico, and they argue impressive ly !hat the appli cation of !:he draft law to Puerto Rico is illega l on five distinct counts ," Dorney's announcement said . Some have called the drafting of Puerto Ricans a "blood referring to the fact that the doctrine of no taxation without representation protects them from paying income taxes to the United States governmen.:, but Puerto Ricans still are liable for military set vice for a country which does not allow t lK'lll

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10/EL MALCRlAOO, January 15, 1969 CONFUSION IN SACRAMENTO REAGAN. HEDGES ON ANTI-STHiiKIE LAW SACRAMENTO, january 10--culrural experts contemplated, as a fornia Farm Bureau Federation and California Governor Ronald Reagan sop to the workers, an elaborate Chairman of the State Board of and his top farm advisors contra-collective bargaining clause pro-Agriculture, said that the Farm dieted each other repeatedly during viding for rigged representational Bureau is still working on legis-the first wee k of january on the elections. Because of the nature Iative proposals relating to farm question of farm labOr legislation, of a migratory and seasonal labor labor. These will probably be leav in g behind confusion and uncer-force, time limits and eligibility straight union-busting proposals, tainty as to what their real plans requirements, which a Jaw could since Grant has become a major were. And as the State Legis -easily rig against farm workers, spokesman for die most rabidly lature goc deeper into the session, are the key to guaranteeing fair anti Union and reactionary growers it seemed doubtful th8.t any farm labor legislation would even come to a vote, let alone reach the Governor's desk for signature. The Governor and his grower friends wan e to do something to counter the increasingly effective boycott of California grapes, launched by the United Farm Wor . kers Organizing Committee , but the Governor and his friends seemed unsure whether to try to fight the boycott and the Union wid\ new, anti-Union legislation, or whether to petitioning for an election and the continu e with the traditional means acrual vote , during which time the of busting unions , with cops, court injunctions, economic pressure on the local workers, and importation of scabs from Mexico . Reagan stated in his annual State of the State message, "It is my intention to seek and support legislation in the area of farm Jabor-Jllanagement relations." He furlher stated, "Agriculrure ••. is still our s tate's Number I industry ... It is to be expected that we should lead the way in agricultural labor relations policies. If we don't, we may soon be forced to march to yet another federal drum beat." According to reports .from Sacramento, Reagan seemed to be contemplating some kind of legislation to outlaw strikes during the harvest. Such a law would have the same effect for farm workers as a bill prohibiting auto workers' strikes durin g working hours. Some growers are calling for legislation simply to outlaw anY boycott of agricultural products, without any exceptions. Reagan and some •liberal" agrigrower could fire union sympa thizers and hire anti-union workers or hire easily intimidated green carders from Mexico. Growers have also suggested that any new legislation includ e . "cooling off" periods, during which the growe r could complete his harvest and send his workers back to Texas or Mexico. Any of these delaying tactics could enabl e the grower to postpone indefini tely bargaining with the Union, even after the Union won an election. By J anuary 10, Reagan seemed to have dropped plan s for pushing such Iegisltaion, and his advisor Earl Coke assured the growerdominated Sta!e Soard of Agriculture tha t Reagan had no present in!ention of presenting or endorsing any farm labor legislation. Cok:e said, in direct contradiction to Rea gan's T.V. !!peech , that the Governo r would prefer legislation at the na tional level. Reagan will defin itel y not present any fal""m-labor bills this session, Coke said. Alan Grant, Pres idem of the Call-in the sta!e. While Reagan and his grower friends proposed and then denied proposing legislation on the subject, State Senator Walter Stiern, a moderate Democra t representing Kern County, announced !hat he was ending his own efforts to intorduce legi !!lation on collective bargaining for farm workers. Stiern's bill w ou ld have set up procedures for union representation elections, which local growers have been u Continued o _ n page 14 UNLESS LA RAZA STOPS NIXON _I'!IXON STOt.\P !A RAZA Nixon Poster INAUGURATION SPECIA L : A nd y Zermeno1 s famous campaign poster of Nixo n , almost 3 feet by 2 feet, in limited quantities. $ 1.75 + 25 postage and handlin g from EZ. MaZ.criado, Box 1:30, DeZ.ano, Ca.

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EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/11 DELANO, january I S--Disregard v ich Ranch , Anton Caratan Ranch, for hea lth and safety l aws , sanitaMilan Caratan Ranch , Bianco tion and public decency on the part Farms, Mossesi a n Ranch, Sabovich of Cali fornia grape growers is des-Ranch, Dulzich Ranch,Lammanuzzi cribed in a srudy subm itted to & Pantaleo Ranch, Lucas and Sons EL MALCRIADO by UFWOC AtRanch , jack Radovich Ranch ando-torney jerome Cohen. thers. The study, made by a team of The srudy concludes, •This limited investigators, was concerned pri-check of grape vineyards in Kern marily with HealthandSafetyCodes and Tulare Counties clearly reveals Sections 5 454. 20 and 3700, industrial on going , continuing, deliberate, Commission Order 14-68, and La -massive violations of the legal pro-ber Code Section 2441 which re-tections which the State of Calquire toilets to be provided within ifornia has provi ded for farm work walk in g distance for workers in the fields, and requires hand washing facilities, drinking water, and sani tary cups and other minimum faci lities which any decent and humane employer would provide. •The growers claim lhat California farm workers are protected by more l aws than farm wor kers in any other state, • Cohen observed. •This is a lie since Hawaii is the only srare that has not legislated gross discrimination against farm workers. But what few laws Calif ornia has passed to protect the field workers are never enforced and compliance is based on the whim of the growers. Very few of the local growers pay any attention to the "lawS . " The srudy found numerous violations of the law on the part of Mid state Horticulrural Company, Jack Pandol Ranch , Vincent B. Zanino-ers a nd consumers." Following are some of the cases cited: On December 27, 1968, M id state Horticulrural Company , a large corporation grape grower near Del a -no was forcing crews to work in fields where !here were no toilets or water facilities. On january 6 , three crews including women were pruning i n olher fields owned by Midstate where there were no toi lets or handwashing facilities a vailable for two of these crews. For the third crew, there were only four walls of over a small hole in the ground, and there was no toilet paper (only newspaper); the door would not close. several women in each o f these crews Again , on January 3, there were three Continued on page 12 MEXICANA Egg Bread and Paet"l'ies AU Ki"flde of Do"flute Cakes fo"l' aZZ. Oeeasions FreMh Bread We have a 1.arge Se lectio"fl of Spanish MagaBooks, and Rec O"t'ds. In AUgust of 1966 El Malcriado published an article and cartoon relating to labor relations involving the Ietruce ' grower, Bud Antle, in Salinas and jn lhe Imperial Valley of Californi a . A t the time of those publications o f the National F arm Workers Organizing Committee, afi C IO, had a dispute wilh the Union which represented Bud Antle, tnc. • s farm However, the Nationa l Farm Workers Association di d not have, and never has had, any labor dispute or strike against B u d Antle. El Malcriado and its publishers sincerely regret any unfavorab l e or derogatory implications against Bud Antle, Inc.,or its President Lester V. Bud Antle, which may have resul ted from the pub-lications. El Malcriado h a s no knowledge that Bud Antle's farm workers are treated unfairly or dishonestly."' Poison Conscious Eve1'ifbody seems to be worr-ied about poisons these days. This sign at a Kem County Dwnp ne De Zano warns growers n._ot to dW1lfl poisons without permission.

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12/EL MALCR1 ADD, January 15, 1969 "215 adults and children working. no toilets or washing facilities" This woY'kero is pruning grapes near Delano , CalifoPnia. Many TJorokers wear such face guards in sun;mer a:td winter, to guard against chemical spraying and dusting lJ..lhioh can endange r eyes, mouth , an d skin. New Yor k Boycott Continued from page 8 people live, so we will need the help of a ll these groups to keep New Yor-k clean of sca b Mrs . Huert a expla ined tha t once aga in this year they would try t o convi nce store owners not to carry grapes. Oelegation s of l oc al people will call on store owners in vance of the harvest and ask them not to carry g rapes. TI1 e student commitree will check sto res frequently to see if the scab pro duCt!' appear. A s soo n as grapes discovered, the nc i g hborho ou boycott committee will go int o action, appealin g to the store owne r to remove the grapes and a p pealing to s hoppers to s h u n them. Picket line s \rill be mobilized around born s tores to warn potent ial tamers o f the danger. p la n to cut grape sales in New York to Mrs . • Huerr a said . ..The grape b<>ycon of 1969 will make the boyco tt of 1968 l ook lik e Continued from page 11 c rews in Mids tate' s fields, tota l ing 72 to 80 pruners, and there were no toilets or facilities available. Only one of the cre ws had drin kin g water and there were no i ndividua l drinking cups. On the j ack Pan do! Ranch, there were no t oilers for crews prunin g grapes on Decembe r 27, again on December 30, when between 40 a nd 60 men were Jn the fields •• In Vincent B . Zanino\ich's vine yards where two large crews we r e work ing, the fie lds had no toilets or handwashin g facilities on Decem ber 27, December30,andDecember '31. In another Zan inovich field, a 25 man crew had a 20 minure walk to the nearest toilet faciliti es. I n another Zaninovic h fie l d, two crews of a p prox i mately 200 men were pruning w ith . no toilets or handwa sh in g facilities on January 2 , january 3, and January 6. I n Anton Caratan's fields, there were forty me n pru nin g w ith n o toi • Jets on December 27, and on December 30 the r e were seventy pco p i e prunin g with no toilers or hand washing facilities . At B i anco far • n:. viola ti o n s o n December 30 and 31 we r e found in numerous Helds. I n W ill iam Mosscsian's v ineyards, there wer e no t o il e t s or handw ash in g facilitie s ava ila.Ulc for more tllan ope hundred workers o n December 30 and 31. At Sabov ich ranch, vio lati o n s were found on December 30 a.nd 31 en .. volving: a.t least 8 crews o f work ers. At Dulzich Hanch, 215 adults and children were working w itll no toi-

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EL MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969/13 1 Letters Iii I The boss needs help ... Editor: to ask for such financial aid . H EL MALCR I ADO P.O. Box 130 .. D elano, Ca. 93215 I'm sorry .. . Though it has been attacked for anybody's pay out in the fields is Gentlemen: its efforts in organizing farm Iaequal to or greater than the 2 borers into a collective body, the t:ni or 3 dollars an hour brag it's ted Farm Workers Organizing Comthe field bosses'. mittee is s h owing signs of success by surviving these attacks and whether opposing forces like it or not, it is here to stay. Its primary objective is fligher pay . Through contracts with understanding growers such as Schenley , DiGiorgio, and others, field workers are getting no less than $ 1 .75 hourly pay , while other growers who cont inue to denounce the union have been forced to h ik e their p ay be-cause of it. For example Giumarra is now paying his $1.50 an hour plus suposealy a '2 bonus on every vine pruned. Though I heard the minimum wage Jaw is around $1.65 an hour, after working 9 hour s out in the co l d, 1 received a gross pay of $ 1 3 . 50. They somehow ne glected to include the bonus. Thi s pay greatly contradicts the 2 to 3 dollars an hour brag of many so-called expens on the real farm workers' s iruatlon. But $ 1 .50 is a lot better than the prior pay of$1 .40 an hour. Worki ng out on one O(Giumarra's farms an Incident occurred which 1 would like to bring out t o the pbu lic. After h aving been instructed crew leaders wen t around each woker asking for donations, in order that a recently deceased daughter of one of the bOsses may receive a pro per funera l . For being the nation's highest paid fie l d workers and having so many so-called protective l aws such as workman ' s compensation, disability insurance, wage-coflec tion l aw, and others,itseemsagreat shame that a field bOss would have What this inciden t reflects i s in fact a poor way of propagandizing on the part of Giumarra Corp. They c an now proudly announce that upon hearing of the tragedy that befell one of theio..:beloved bosses, lhe workers rushed to his aid, What wonderful boss employee relat ions must exist. The hard truth is that n o o ne had heard of their boss' s misforrune due to fact that they scarcely leave their company provided trucks l ong enough to di rectly speak to any of the field workers. They give their orders through the crew leaders, Upon hearing o f their bosses' misfortune very few, mostly old men who pro bably no longer have families to suppor t ma de anything of a donation. VIVA LA CAUSA A:r>tu:r>o Bo:r>rego Bakersfield, Ca lifornia j anuary 10, 1969 After 30 years ... Editor: Enclosed is my check for S5 to be used in the furtherance of your struggle for Union recognition. Afte r 30 years in the ranks of organized labor, as rank and file local officar, organizer, nnd business representati ve, 1 am con cerned whenever and whei:-ever labor Is fighting for recognition and better wages and conditions, Best wishes . Fraternally yours, Ole L. Baaon Minneapolis, Minnesota I• inadvertently crossed one of your picket lines at the Gemco store on RiversiQe Boulevard in Sacra-I am embarrassed, sorry, and ashamed, and I have written w Gemco telling them how I felt and protesting their selling grapes while so many of their customers are Me xican-Americans o r memberSi o f u nions. 1 spent $5.60 in the store. Enclosed is my check for thiS amount.. Use it in the fight for the rights o f farr.1 workers. Viva Ia Hue lga. Viva Ia Causa, Pri tahard Sacramento , California January IO, 1969 Anonymous ... COMMUNI ST Agitation and Organizing Comm. UFVVOC, WRCNG! Maybe Viva La Raza. But La Revolution, No. If not liking things here, go back to whe r e came f r om . or to any plac2 if better . Don't appreciate how good really do have it here. Know. or course, you just looking for excuse cause trouble. (Unsigned) B rother, most of us were born here. Som e peop 1 e ca 11 the Southwest ''occupied Mex ico.'' G l ad you're reading EL MALCRIADO, t hough. Ed. ::::::::: ==::. ========== ;mmrmmmmmm;mr;;@

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MALCRIADO, January 15, 1969 LABOR LAW GETTING RICH IN MICH. Continued from page 10 Of a recent sampling of migrant farm workers emPloyed in Michigan fruit and vegetable cultivation, one half were Mexican-Americans, a U.S . Department of Labor report showed .recently. The report said the remaining half o f the workers were a:Jout venly divided between Negroes and southern white s , the report said, provided on siA percent o f ;:h e farms visited, and that L1e typicai farm provided one outdoor water tap fo' r two or three f amily caj)ins, A few provided showers some kind of laundry facilio:ies. Sixty percent had no refrigeration avail-able for lies . :;: of curing om page to do was get the kids back in school." A school regulation promulgated by the trustees onNovember4which had expulsion as a penalty for stu dents loved in any demonstration on the school campus "limited the first amendment rights of the plain tiffs," according to judge Garza. The judge called the regulations "unconstitutional on their face and and ordered them revoked. whites were born in t h e sout C 1ern • s t a te s . Negroes showed the highest educational attainment, with 2.8 per cent having completed the tenth Only six percent of the M exican Americans had got t hat far in sch ool. Ninety percent o f t h e Negroes, 80 percent of the : :Jex'ica:J A mer, icans, and 50 percent o f the w h ites intended to re<.urn home in t i me for their children to register for s chool. nanimous in reject in g , and it would have outlawed strikes at harvest, which the union finds totally unacceptable. On january 8, in his statement anno _ uncing that he was dropping his proposals, Stiern said, "Tl1e overwhelming res ponse to the tentative bill is, in on e word, negative." PBI A QUICK SWITCH ' IN BRIEFS We have on occasion mentioned though; some people in Delano still in the columns of EL claim there is no strike. the name of our rival newspaper So in subsequent issues, tile col-in Delano, that galloping gem of umn was ret!tled Labor American journalism, tile Record. Briefs." Sounds like a new kind of A couple o f weeks ago , in a wear for the workingman. brilliant move to i.Jring modern .de-The Record' s masthead carri!3S sign and reportage to t ! 1e san ,the motto joaquin Valley, the Record started Newspaper Serving Northern Kern a front page column called "Strike and Southern Tulare Counties." Probably true •.. and REAL impres-Somebody didn' t like tbe title, sive. i-. . -Robezot J. Sanch8a '""'''" The only compl _etely Hexican Mortuary in northern California SANCHEZ,HALL MORTUARY 1022 "B" STREET . ServiCes aval iable everywhere. .No matter where you live, our price Is the same ••• death.notlces In newspapers and on the radio are •• we can make arrangements for every economic situation TBlephone 23'1-3S32 KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE car ... life .. , fire PHONES: Office, 485-0650 Res i 2 66-1349 3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair ShOpping Center Fresno, Ca 1 if. 93703 Mr>. Leap will be in the UFWOC Servioe Center>, 105 ASti, De lana, every Wednesday to serve U nion membeps.

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"HUELGA EN GENERAL" "EL ESQUIROL" 11THE GENERAL STRI KE11 and 11THE SCAB11 lin Spanish, on a 45 rpm record) El Teatro Campesino p resents two of the finest songs to come out of t h e Delano Grape Strike, written and sung by members of the Farm W o rkers Teatre. $1. 00 + 25 postage & handling• from The United Farm P. 0. Box 130, Ca. 93215 Please send me copies of."Songs Strike" ("Huelga en General" and "El EsquiroVJ by the Teatro Campesino. Enclosed is $1.25 per copy NAME l::"""r"J CITY S T A T E ZIP ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,, .. ,, ... ... ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ..... . Last Chance to Order Our MEXICAN GRAPHIC ARTS 1969 CALENDAR This beautiful calendar employs twelve g r ea t works by Mexican and Mexican-American artists, which have appeared as covers on 11EL MALCRIA0011 over the last three years. All are in the graphic art tradition of Mexico, woodcuts, en9rav ings, pen-and-ink drawings. This tyee of art was an outgrowth of the Mexican w Revolution ( 1 9 10-1920) and represents f one of the outstanding express!ons of Revolutionary Art .from Mexico. It remains very much a part of Mexican-American cui ture. The cal endar i s 9 x 18, red ink on ochre stock. 1$2. 00 eaah plus 50 . handling 6 for $10.00 plus $1.00 handling) Make check or money order payable to the United F a r m Workers, p. 0. Box #130. Delano, California 93215 Please send me of your Mexioan Graphio Arts Calendars @ $2. 00 eaah plus 50 for postage and handling: NAME--------------------------------------------------ADDRESS ----------:-:=-:--------------CITY____ STATE ZIP

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v . ozcoc < '"C M :.0 ::ocn r.-: 02 0 o r t"" 0 , , "' "' 0 0 , , 0 N h 0 r. Discount Dept. Store Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office MONEY .. JANUARY IS BARGAIN MONTH All Prices Slashed to lowest -fver , , Discounts! 0 SUNDAYS every day pen till 9 at night Visit BEE'S here in DELANO 918 MAIN ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE , ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON TRACY INDIO