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El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 23

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 23
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
ElMalcriado (R)
THE VOICE OF THE FAKM WORKER
in English
Volume II, Number 22' Delano3 California
February 1, 1969
Photo by Fred litis
WHAT ARE THEY HIDING?
See Page 4.


2/ELMALCRI ADO, February 1, 1969
in this issue
VASQUEZ PRAISES1 HARBOR AREA SUPPORTERS
•CREDIT UNION GROWS AND GROWS AND GROWS, page 3
• GROWERS ON THE SPOT IN POISON TRIAL, page 4
• FARM WORKERS EVICTED FOR REVEALING WASCO SLUM CONDITIONS, page 6
• BOYCOTT ESCALATION, page 8
• GUNS AND GRAPES, page 9
• LOWER YOUR WAGES FOR FUN AND PROFIT. Da?e 10
AURARIA LIBRARY
U1A701 753471*1
EL MALCRIADO can be â– purchased in bulk orders of 10 or more copies to one addresss for 7$ per copy or $1.68 per year per copy.
.EL MALCRIADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITEO FARMWORKERS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE. AFL-CIO. Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are S3.SO per year, and foreiqn, including Canada and Mexico, US $5.00. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC, AFL-CIO are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices lo- ' cated at the northwest corner of Oar-ces Hiqhway and Mettler Avenue, Oela-no, California.
Address all correspondence to: EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano. California 93215.
Second class postage paid at Delano, California 93215.
For advertising rates, contact Federico Chlvez at (805) 725-1337 or the mailing ad-ress listed above.
This article, which was squeezed out of a previous issue because of a
lack of space, was submitted to EL MALCRIADO
by UFWOC boycott representative Alfredo Vas-
quez.
BY ALFREDO VASQUEZ
I am a farm worker, and I am proud to belong to the union directed by Cesar Chavez.
I am now in charge of the office located at 523 S. Pacific, San Pedro, working with the boycott against scab grapes. I have been in the San Pedro, Long Beach, and Wilmington area for four months. I am very grateful to the people living in my area. Everyday I make some new friends, not only people in the union but other civic organizations, who are willing to help in any way they can.
Saturday, December 14, was a big day for me. On that day the toy caravan was supposed to start to Delano. All die generosity and good heartedness of the general public was shown in the way that they helped in locating and gathering the toys and other items for our Christmas toy drive.
At 340 Borad Street in Wilming-
ton is found Local 9 of the Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America. There we met to start our caravan, managed by Pat Danield and Charles S. West, representatives of this local. Fifteen of their brothers also volunteered their help in bringing the toys down to Delano. Along with this group came high school students Joe Schmidt and Steve Gomez.
When we arrived in Delano, Danield and West gave Assistant U-FWOC Director Larry Itliong a check for $448. This money was donated by die members of Local 9.
There at die Filipino Hall there were hundreds of people from different cities who had come to bring gifts for the farm worker’s children.
For me it was a very emotional experience. To find that so many people are considerate and unselfish at a time of giving.
The people in my area have been very generous with their help. They have made the work in San Pedro easier for me and yet. very effective.
My sincere appreciation goes out to you who have helped.
Viva la Causa.
Nosotros Venceremos.

EL MALCRIADO P.0. BOX 130 DELANO, CA
93215
More and more people arc finding out that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle. Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS, FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol__
ADDRESS-dom i c i1i o CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
5
1


EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969/3
LOANS TOP $182,0001
CREDIT UNION GROWS AND GROWS AND GROWS
DELANO, January 26—No dividends will be paid this year by the Farm Workers Credit Union in order to provide more funds for loans, it was decided by Credit Union members at their annual meeting today.
Chaired by brother Phillip Vera Cruz, in the absence of President Julio Hernandez, the meeting also included the annual treasurer’s report and election of officers.
Dolores Huerta, secretary, and directors Santos Chapa and Jose Serda, whose terms on the Board of Directors expired this year, were re-elected.
Other members of the board are Vice President Andy Imutan, Treasurer Cesar Chavez, and directors Richard Chavez and Manuel Chavez.
Mrs. Antonio Orendain and Marcos Rodriguez were elected to serve on the credit committee with Rudy Ahumada.
Alfonso Ovalle was elected to the supervisory committee. He will work with committee members Mrs. J. Guadalupe Murguia and Mrs. Manuel Uranday.
Mrs. Cesar Chavez, assistant treasurer, and Mrs. James Drake are in charge of the Credit Uhion office. Tony Mendez is education
chairman.
The treasurer’s report showed the Farm Workers Credit Union made a total of 270 loans during 1968, for a total of $43,950.72. Since the organization of the Credit Union, which began with $35 in savings and seven members, a total of $182,933.69 has been loaned to 874 members. There is more than $40,000 in farm workers savings on deposit with the Credit Union. Assets total more than $54,000, the roport showed.
Above: More than 500 members of the Farm Workers' Credit Onion and their families attended the annual meetihg3 held January 26 at Filipino Hall in Delano. Above Right: C. U. member Gil Flores and assistant treasurer Helen Chavez listen to the reports.
SOCIAL SECURITY CAN1 PAY MORE
WASHINGTON, D.C., January22— There is enough money in the Social Security fund to increase benefits with no increase in payroll taxes, a report by the trustees of the program revealed.
According to Bert Seidman, Social Security director of die AFL-CIO, “Congress could grant a five to six percent increase in benefits
without any increase in the Social Security tax."
The reports showed that the Social Security programs received $2.6 billion more than they paid out in benefits during 1968. The trustees estimated that the assets of the Social Security funds would increase from $28.1 billion to about $45 billion during the next five years.


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A/EL MALCRIADO, February T, 1969.
WHAT ARE THEY HIE
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oil risks in'connection m thot.'gh reasonably lit for swledge and assume oil risks cumed by Chevron under 5 <3. storage, and use of this
TRe farm worker on our cover is spraying this dangerous chemical, Thiodan Diazinon 3-2 Dust, on a field of broccoli near Indio. Photo by litis.
DELANO, December 30—“Trade secrets" and “private information* continued »• be the key words today in the second day of Superior Court hearings on whether or not officials of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee should be permitted to inspect records on the use of dangerous poisonous pesticides in Kern County.
Kern County Counsel Ralph Jordan, representing County Agricultural Commissioner Sheldon Morely, objected vigorously this afternoon to die introduction of evidence from the State Department of Public Health in this afternoon’s session, as UFWOC attorney David Aver-buck sought to show die necessity for making what he called “public records" available for inspection by the public.
According to testimony, growers and commercial pesticide applicators who use poisonous chemicals to control insects and plant dis-
eases in their fields must have permits, and must file reports on dosages, applications, and other details of their operation with the County Agricultural Commissioner.
UFWOC attorney Jerome Cohen tried last August to inspect the records on die poisons in connection with research on the danger to farm workers which may result form their use.
Cohen told EL MALCRIADO information on the danger of die pesticides to farm workers and consumers is “woefully inadequate,” and the Union had a responsability to try to protect workers.
He said that while the records in the commissioner's office are supposed to be public information Morely refused permission to see them.
Two hours after Cohen had gone to see the records, a temporary restraining order was issued by Superior Court Judge J. Kelly Steele
prohibiting Morely from divulging the contents of the reports.
The present hearings are a three-sided affair. Crop dusting companies, represented by attorney Stephen Wall, are technically the plaintiffs, while Morely, represented by County attorney Jordan, are the defendants.
Cohen, represented by Averbuck, is the third party in die suit. To courtroom observers, it is clear that plaintiffs and defendants are on die same side, while Cohen and Averbuck represent die oppo-siton.
Morely testified this morning that even though he was enjoined from making the records public, he had taken the information “in confidence, and would keep it confidential regardless of Judge Steele's temporary order, which still stands after five months.
The Commissioner told hearing
Continued on page 5
ELMALCRIADO, February 1, 1969/5
I \||Z7 Continued
I I ♦ from page **
Judge George A. Brown he was acting under instructions from die State Director of Agriculture to keep die cotent and dosage of the application of economic poisons on table and wine grapes a secret, though Assistant State Director Allen A. Lemmon testified the directives were only staff instructions and did not have die force of law.
Lemmons said he knew of “at least some" cases where farm workers had been injured by the use of pesticides and cited an incident in Delano in which 16 out of 24 grape workers had been hospitalized for Parathion poisoning. The workers had entered the field 33 days after the poisoning was applied. Fields are usually declared safe after two or three weeks, he said.
In the most heated discussion of die hearings, Averbuck attempted to introduce a summary of reports filed by doctors with the Bureau of Occupational Health of die State Public Health Department.
Though authenticated by Dr. Milby chief of die Bureau, die report was for some reason unacceptable to County attorney Jordan, who objected to its introduction. Cohen said the report listed “many, many” cases of farm workers who had been poisoned as the result of working with pesticides In the fields.
Morely told the Court “no farm workers have been injured by the application of economic poisons in Kern County to my knowledge."
Lemmon, the State Assistant Director, and a pesticides specialist, mentioned several Kern County cases later in the hearings.
Thomas C. Griffin, owner of a spraying and dusting company, testified he had abandoned the use of the pesticide TEPP (tetra-ethyl pyrophosphate) after he himself had become serlouly ill as a result of working with the chemical, but he refused to say whether other companies in the area were still using the substance.
He said releasing details of poison application to the public would re-
Cohtlnued on page 11
On January 7, UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen sent a letter to Stephen Wall, a Bakersfield attorney who represents a number of grape growers.
"The most pressing problem which faces us as of now is the ever-increasing danger to farm workers' health and safety which arises from the use of dangerous pesticides in the vineyards," Cohen wrote.
He sent along a proposal to ally in which an agreement between growers and pesticide applicators on the one handy and the Union on the other, was suggested.
The purposA: to avoid litigation on the pesticide question and provide for a cooperative effort in protecting farm workers and consumers from the dangers of deadly economic poisons, some of which are based on "nerve gases" developed by the Third German Reich for the extermination of humans.
The answer of Mr. Wall, Esquire, to Mr. Cohen's proposal, began as follows:
"This is in answer to your January 7, 1969 letter to me enclosing a copy of what you propose for agreement between the United Farm Workers Organizing Corrmitteey my clientSy and others. It is obvious either that we completely failed to communicate or else you are trying to be funny.'. .
"I understood you to say also that your only other interest in seeing these specific reports on file now was for your use In formulating some pertinent language for future use in negotiating labor contracts, hopefully. You definitely stated that you were not interested in seeing the subject reports or using any part of the contained data in connection with your-boycott effort or as the basis of filing any lawsuit or lawsuits. . .
"Your actual purpose is' clearly evident and there is not even a coincidental resemblance to the ones you expressed. But the end justifies the means in your league—right?"
"Very truly yours, Stephen E. Wall"
To this, Cohen replied on January 9,
"Let me assure you that the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee- is attempting to act reasonably and develop adequate safeguards concerning the use of economic poisons in the vineyards. We are available to meet to discuss this subject at your convenience. We hope that such a meeting will take place soon, for the delay in working out safeguards only hurts the workers and consumers."
There was no further word from Wall or the growers3 and on January 141 Cesar Chavez sent the letter which was described at length on page 3 of the January IS issue of EL MALCRIADO,
"There is one critical Issue of such overriding
CONTINUED ON PAGE 11


6/EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969
FARM WORKERS EVICTED FOR REVEALING WASCO SLUM CONDITIONS
WASCO, January 23--Two farm worker families were evicted from the Wasco Labor Camp on Monday, January 20, allegedly because they permitted cameramen from KERO-TV, Bakersfield, to film the inside of their cabins.
Wasco is about 10 miles southeast of Delano.
On December 24, the Bakersfield Californian had published an article which sharply criticized conditions in the camp.
Camp Manager C. B. Roberts, who appears in the film "Huelga”, challenged the Californian’s story and called reporter Bill Bloecher a liar and the perpetrator of a hoax.
After the publicaton of the story, the Kern County Health Department investigated the camp, and Vernon S. Reichard, director of Environmental Health, gave a report.
The Wasco camp charges $45 a month rent for two-room cabins.
Victor Antu and Jose Vigil and their families were the victims of a heartless act which left them homeless in the middle of the winter.
If there is a refrigerator, the cabins cost $51 a month.
The Health Department report included the following items;
“Toilet facilities found to be in the most insanitary condition, revealing neglect or lack of maintenance. Noted dark stains, fecal matter, broken toilet seats, strong fecal odors and clogged wash basins."
“Waste water (in the laundry area) draining over the floor; water, dirt n and debris cover die floor area R where people stand and wash their • clothes.”
“No running water is provided to any of the units. Tenants are furnished with gas hot plates and these in most situations noted, provide heat also.”
“Garbage cans found to be in the most insanitary condition and many cans were dilapidated and no longer serviceable."
The garbage cans are located at
the ends of the buildings, where children play and tenants draw drink' ing water, the Californian said.
The manager, Roberts, replied that this was “better than living on a canal batik. We didn’t ask these people to come here.”
On Thursday, January 16, camp resident Victor Antu, who had talked with the KERO reporters, received the following letter from Roberts;
“We must have payment of your account by Monday, January 20th, 1969, or ask you to vacate the cabin. Your account amounts to $42..? Ten dollars of the total was for a “deposit.”
Monday came, Antu toldELMAL-criado, he could not come up with die money, and he had to move out.
Mrs. Antu’s sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Jose Vigil, also were living in the Camp. When they, too, were evicted, both families
rented a $48 shack in Wasco, where they are now living.
Both families told EL MALCRIADO that they are sure that they were evicted because they allowed the reporters to film the cabins in die camp.
Both Vigil and Antu said that they had previously arranged with camp authorities to pay the three weeks’ rent they owed as soon as they began work in the potato packing shed.
At a meeting of many camp residents on Wednesday night, January 22, many families voiced complaints about conditions and appointed spokesmen to call for further investigation.
“The Wasco Camp was built 25 years ago to meet a World War II emergency need for male farm worker shelter,” the Californian noted.


EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969/7
WISCONSIN BAN ON DDT:
Scientists Warn of Permanent Pesticide Effects
DELANO, January 2.7—Dr. Richard M. Welch, a biochemical pharmacologist at Burrough - Welcome Research Laboratories reported that die pesticide DDT may be causing changes to human sex organs and "■hormones.
Welch told an audience in Madison, Wisconsin, that after experimenting with rats to determine die effects DDT had on them, he found that the sexual mechanisms of male and female rats were altered. He added that DDT injections caused a type of false pregnancy on die females. "If one can extrapolate data from animals to man, then one can say this change in animals probably does occur in man," Welch said.
Welch added that DDT also interferes with the normal use of drugs causing die body to break down the drugs faster than it normally would.
Meanwhile, the Izaak Walton League and Citizens for Natural Resources Association filed a petition with the State Natural Resources Department calling for a ban on DDT.
In Davis, California, James O. Keith, a biologist for the federal Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, reported that the careless use of pesticides such as DDT is a threat to the very existence of wild life. The ability of peregrine falcons, for instance, to reproduce successfully, has been affected by thin-shelled eggs resulting from the adult falcon’s exposure to DDT.
In his study, Dr. Keith found that birds in contact with DDT produce eggs with thinner eggshells. These thin-shelled eggs usually break , during nesting, making die extinction of several species of birds an immediate threat unless DDT is retired from use.
Research from Keith and other biologists has shown that shell thickness for these species of birds was
consistent until 1945. From then on, as die use of DDT spread, die egg thickness averaged about 20 percent thinner.
Illinois Christians Condemn |Grape Growers
CARBONDALE, ILL—The Illinois Council of Churches voted to support the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee boycott of California table grapes at a meeting on January 17.
Of die 125 delegates present at the meeting, more than two thirds voted in favor of the boycott resolution.
Eliseo Medina is die UFW OC boycott representative for Illinois and spoke to die group before die vote was taken.
‘OdVIUQlVN 13 oq dsqyaosqns v eiuoc&q puo ftopoq 09'2$ mioH in puds ;mau6y vco aq q, uoq
GROWERS REJECT SANITATION LAWS
WASHINGTON, D.C.~The Food and Drug Administration of the Federal government proposed new regulations covering "sanitation and production practices, including die condition of plant buildings and grounds, equipment, sanitary facilities for employees, and controls in processing, packaging, and storing food products.
When the growers and packers of fruit and vegetables found they would have to keep food clean, they launched into action.
On December 20, the proposal was revised.
According to the Produce News, a produce industry trade paper known as the "Pink Sheet," “the Food and Drug Administration has EXEMPTED establishments in-volved...in the harvesting, storage, or distribution of raw agricultural commodities from (the) regulations.
“Original proposals...would have included packers and packagers of fresh fruits and vegetables, but die United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association successfully sought exemption for the industry,” die Produce News gloated.
In other words, cleanliness is quite in order- for food handlers...except for the fruit and vegetable industry.
Caveat emptor—Let the buyer beware.
NOW ALSO IN
LAMONT
11121 Main St.
LA
Bakeries
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU IN KERN COUNTY
BAKERSFIELD WASCO DELANO
630 Baker St. 1000 “Ftt St. 407-llth Ave.
323-4294 758-5774 725-9178
Egg Bread and Pastries All Kinds of Donuts Cakes for all Occasions French Bread
We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
LADKEANO UFAKXA, h«.


DELANO, January 25 While growers were dumping boxes of Unsold table grapes for disposal (see far right), more than 800 farmworkers and supporters met in Delano to pain a massive escalation of the grape boycott. Thirty more families will leave next week to work full time on the boycott in Midwestern, Eastern, and Southern Cities. EL MALCRI-ADO will carry an extensive report on the new boy-
A family from Coachella (left) and workers from Farmersville (above) listen to plans to escalate the boycott.
. STUDENTS PROTEST AGAINST “UNCLE SAM, THE STRIKE BREAKER”
NEW YORK, January 25—More than 500 young supporters of the California grape strike staged a demonstration today in front of the Department of Defense offices in Manhattan, in protest against Federal Government policies against farm workers.
The theme of the demonstration was to expose “Uncle Sam, die Strikebreaker,” according to Dolores Huerta, Vice President of die United Farm Workers and leader of die grape boycott in New York.
Mrs. Huerta said the Federal Government has played a major strike breaking role in die farm wprkers’ atruggle in three crucial areas.
“The Department of Defense has tremendously increased its purchases of grapes over the last two years
and die Department of Justice has twisted the Immigration laws and has refused to enforce existing regulations, thus allowing a flood of illegal strike-breakers to enter this country from Mexico.
There has been no real attempt to enforce health and safety regulations, child labor laws, or other regulations dealing with working conditions in the fields."
“We chose to demonstrate before the Defense Department offices because their purchases of grapes are the most direct tactic used by the government to break our boycott and strike, but we are also protesting the government’s other policies which deny farm workers their rights. And we are also protesting the cruel indifference of most Federal Agencies to the plight
of America's farm
Mrs. Huerta said that high and college students had organized the demonstration, and Mitehel Cohen of lege; Dorothy Silvers, a student from Long Island;
Gorden, a high school student from Queens, for their work in organizing students in support of the boycott.
Cohen expressed the views of many of the students when he stated at the rally, "We must begin to vigorously express our indignation at die government and the corporate-military structure that is now intentionally keeping people in poverty in order to enhance their own private interests."
t
EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969/9
GUNS AND GRAPES
WASHINGTON, D.C.—Purchases of grapes for shipment to Vietnam continue to rise, according to statements issued recently by die Department of Defense.
During die fiscal year from July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967, the government bought 468,000 pounds of grapes for shipment to the war-torn country.
The following year (fiscal year 1968), purchases of scab grapes totalled 555,000 pounds.
During die first quarter oi the current uscal year, purchases for Vietnam totalled 740,850 pounds.
In other words, more grapes have been shipped to Vietnam during the first three months of fiscal 1969 than were sent during an entire year in 1967 or 1968.
But die Depart.nentofDefensehas been receiving complaints from interested citizens who protest purchases by the government which â–  serve to break the boycott of die United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL^HO.
In a “fact sheet” which die Director for Food Service of the Defense Department recently sent to one such protestor, the following statement appears;
“The Department of Defense does not purchase grapes merely because they have been made more avail-
able and less expensive due to the effects of the boycott...In the interests of objective and systematic management, menu planners... should not be required to consider whether a labor dispute exists when making these decisions."
An accompanying letter said, “aldiough we appreciate your concern in this matter, we have been unable to find any evidence which would support a change of die Department of Defense policy as stated in the fact sheet.”
So that’s how it is!
Defense Department purchases of grapes for die armed services, including the grapes purchased for Vietnam are also steadily rising.
Ir. fiscal year 1966, the government bought 7.5 million pounds of grapes for $1.04 million. The following year purchases were 8.3 L million pounds, for $1.25 million.
In fiscal 1968, purchases dropped r ’ to 6.9 million pounds, but the price paid was $1.32 million.
But that’s not important either, says the fact sheet. “The total Defense Supply Agency purchases of table grapes represent less than one percent of U. S. table grape production.
“There is no records of any grape shipments to Vietnam prior to fiscal year 1967," the report notes.


EL MALCRIADO, February 1969/10____________
ARIZONA BUSINESSMEN'S PLAN:
LOWER WAGES FOR FUN i&l PROFIT
FROM THE AFL-CIO NEWS
TUCSON, ARIZONA—-Mexico's “inexhaustible inexpensive labor market” is being touted as a 30-cents-an hour gold mine for U. S. businessmen willing to invest in plants on both sides of the border.
"You don’t have to go to Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea or Japan for low cost easily trainable foreign labor,” says the official publication of DATE-Development Authority for Tucson's Expansion, which describes itself as a "nonprofit corporation representing a broad cross section of the Tucson community."
“It is available right here...along the Mexico-Arizona border for as low as 30 cents an hour in virtually inexhaustible numbers,” DATE proclaims in glowing Chamber of Commerce prose.
“Mexican labor is competitive with foreign labor—easily recruited and quickly trained and equally as productive.”
Tucson businessmen headed by J. Karl Meyer, DATE'S executive director, point to the “advantages’ of “cooperative U.S.-Mexican border operations such as low absenteeism and a proud, cheerful attitude toward work... under the Twin Plant concept.”
That concept is described in these workds;
“Components are manufactured in Tucson, assembled in Nogales, Mexico, and returned to Tucson for final inspection, packaging and shipping....Duty is imposed only on the added value of the assembly.”
TTicson is only one of the Southwest’s border towns promoting the “cheap foreign labor” concept. A-mong the first to tap the new lode was Laredo, Tex., which induced the Transitron Electronics Corp. of Wakefield, Mass., to move its non-union operations into a new plant with a small work force.
Across the border at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, within walking distance of Laredo, is a Transitron
plant with 1,400 workers, all Mexican nationals. Under die twin plant formula, Transitron may use its small U. S. work force to manufacture products and its large Mexican force to assemble them.
Wage rates in the U. S. are $1,60 an hour and up. In Nuevo Laredo the rate is reported $2,16 a day.
The U.S. plant has started work on a $1,7 million contract to make telephone cables for the Defense Dept. The contract is for a one-year period, but the Army Electronic Command awarded Transi-tronic an additional contract on its bid of $1,1 million, and the Economic Development Administration procured a grant of $28,000 in U. S. funds to “train 15 or 20 persons in the electronics field" at the Transitron plant in Laredo. A subsidiary, Phalo Corp., got the contracts and the grant.
The hands-across the border concept got a jolt, however, when the Mexican workers cast off the “proud cheerful attitude toward work” extolled by die tubthumping U. S. businessmen and stopped work for three weeks at die New Laredo plant.
The walkout was not an official strike, sanctioned by the ruling powers, but it forced Transitron to ship some of the quartz crystals used in its production processes to another company subsidiary in Kansas City, Mo. The workers finally went back when the governor of Tamaulipas state stepped in and die State Labor Board agreed to hear the dispute—over wages promised but not paid for lunch "breaks.”
Last year an AFL-CIO Executive Council subcommittee urged joint action by American and Mexican labor movements and governments to change the immigration and tariff laws. It cited unfair competition by low-wage border-iumDine plants and “green card” tourists who cross the border freely to take jobs in a-griculture, often at the expense .of union farm workers.
They’ll Sling It Elsewhere
SACRAMENTO, January 28-Planning well in advance the California Fertilizer Association decided to pull its 1971 convention out of San Francisco because the Board of Supervisors has endorsed the boycott of California table grapes.
“We will have no dealings with San Francisco hotels or with other San Francisco businesses until the official position of the city government there will have been changed to one of reason,” Association Manager Sidney Bierly wrote the Fairmont Hotel.
Meanwhile, they were really sweating it in San Francisco.
The 1968 convention in' Los Angeles pulled in a crowd of 430 people.
A New Rojas In Pittsburgh
PITTSBURGH, January 3—Albert and Elena Rojas are the proud parents of a baby girl, Shalom Christine Rojas, who was born on January 3 in Pittsburgh. Shalom was six pounds and seven ounces at birth. A1 and Elena have led the boycott of California grapes in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania since July of 1968. Previously A1 was a farm worker and Union organizer in the Delano and Bakersfield areas.
Caravan Set For Feb. 22
SAN FRANCISCO—The next food caravan to Delano from the San Francisco Bay Area will be on Saturday, February 22.
The caravan will leave from 568 47th Street, Oakland at 7 AM, and from the San Francisco Labor Temple, 2940 16th Street, at 8 AM.
For information, call 655-3256 after 7 PM.
I


EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 196*9/11
Continued from page 5 lease “trade secrets” and do damage to his business because his competitors would be able to find out his secret formulas.
He said that his company continued to perform a process called "washing grapes,” which had to be kept secret because produce buyers
should be issued, or if a writ of mandate should be served on die Agricultural Commissioner, forcing him to reveal the records.
Farm workers nearly filled the court room both days, while a cluster of crop dusters and growers joined them to listen to testimony.
The crop dusters appeared ge-
would not buy grapes which had under- nuinely worried about die possi-
gone the process.
In an off-the cuff statement during a recess, Jordan said public health and trade secrets were both important.
You have to weigh them against each other,” the rotund, white-haired Jordan said.
As the hearing closed for the second day, there was no sign of what the outcome would be.
If Judge Brown rules UFWOC has a right to see die records, it will make no Change in the situation, as Morelyhas already warned.
Should he rule that the records must be kept secret until a final decision is reached, he will cancel the present temporary res training order and replace it with a preliminary injunction, which is just about the same thing.
In that case, a new hearing will be held—this time to determine whether a final injunction, keeping the records a secret permanently.
bility of the records becoming public, while farm workers who could speak English whispered translations of the proceedings to their Spanish and Ilocano speaking brothers.
The farm workers clustered in groups in the hallways during each recess, and peppered each other with the unanswerable question;
“What are they trying to hide? Why don't they want us to know about the chemicals we work with day after day?”
EL MALCRIADO can provide no answer. There are too many secrets. Oily die chemical companies and pesticide applicators really know what they are spraying on the grapes, and their research is centered a-round damage to Willammete mites and leafhopperst
Nobody seems to know —and if they know, they won't say —what the chemicals can do to humans.
So EL MALCRIADOasks the same question: “What are they hiding?"
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5
importance that it demands immediate attention, even if other labor relations problems have to wait.
I mean the harmful effects of spraying grapes with pesticides, or economic poisons, as they are called," Chavez wrote.
"We will riot tolerate the systematic -poisoning of our people. Even if we cannot get together on other problems, we will be damned —and we should be—if we will permit human beings to sustain permanent damage to their health from economic poisons.”
There was no reply.
HERNANDEZ UNDERGOES OPERATION
CLEVELAND—Brother Julio Hernandez, in charge of the boycott in the Cleveland area, recently underwent surgery. EL MALCRIADO wishes a speedy recovery to our
far-off Vice President.
Brother Julio was the first farm worker to join Brother Chavez in his early organizing drive.
The sign that tells you people are working together to fill their needs
You do not have to be a member to shop-come in and see how economic
democracy works
GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM
WORKERS FROM
The Consumer Cooperative of Berkeley


12/EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969
iiif
Letters Sinai EL MALCRIADO P.0. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 93215
This County Will Bel Informed...
Editor;
Enclosed you will find a photo of some of the fellows in the Mar-tinez-Pittsburg-Concord area who are dedicated to seeing this grape boycott through to its victorious end. We got off to a slow start here in Contra Costa County this year but we pledge to you that this county is going to be well informed of the boycott of California table grapes in the year 1969.
Labor is magnificently behind the boycott not only morally and financially, but what is more important—with bodies on the picket line!
I only wish that you could have witnessed the wonderful turn-out of labor, church groups and Mexican- Americans at the recent hearing before the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors.
For once I saw the John Birch Society and growers with their Uncle Tamales, out numbered. Labor had' requested the Supervisors to
endorse the boycott and of course these "representatives of the people," although each expressed his personal sympathy for the plight of the farm worker, felt they could not endorse the boycott because "it was strictly a labor-management issue.”
The importance of these hearings was that these elected officials were finally backed into a corner out of which they could not weasel.
They were forced to vote on a moral issue involving the labor movement and labor’s perennial enemy, the right wing in the form of the John Birchers.
We did not get die endorsement.
But we did get an issue that should certainly become a central point when some of these "elected officials” come to labor and Mexican American groups next election.
Ray Martinez Concord, California December 31,1968
I Shall Do As Much As I Can...!
Editor and Brothers;
I have met and have had your representative Jorge Zaragoza and his family at my home of the Christmas holidays.
I am very impressed by this man’s courage to come three-quarters of die way across the United States to Cincinnati.
He and his family are most pleasant. I have been enlightened on your Cause very much by him.
I shall do as much as I can to help him in his struggle in the boycott in the Cincinnati area. I am also a member of a Union and recognize die importance of your winning your rights. I am proud to call Jorge Zaragoza my brother!
God bless you and your Cause. Sincerely,
Edmund Kuderer Cincinnati, Ohio December 31,1968
Brothers picket g
â– ilil
Cano, Naoe, Perez, Martinez, and Villava in Contra Costa
UFWOC:
It was so very kind and thoughtful of you folks to send me those beautiful flowers while I was in the hospital. I want you to know that having good friends thinking of you helps a great deal.
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Hilda Kircher
Washington, D.C.
January 22, 1969
Thanks for the Flowers...


1969/13
Praise for Elsa Students A Critic of
Editor;
All of us can learn a lesson in sincere racial pride and self-respect from the-students of Elsa-Edcouch High School, who have die courage to demand that die inhuman and degrading treatment we have been subjected to for 123 years be stopped.
We have been treated worse than other racial groups. In many instances there were cafes and rest rooms marked colored and white, and Chicanos were not permitted to use either one.
We should also be thakful for men like Mr. Joe Bernal and attorney Robert Sanchez, who did not run and hide as most of our leaders and professional men have done in the past when confronted with an issue like this.
Every person of Mexican extraction should be 100 percent for these brave students.
TTiey have proven that sincere
We Have Hope...
Editor;
To you, to Cesar Chavez, and to all who have worked and are working on the grape boycott, and who Jfre working for the farm worker, jrou are doing great work!
we have been working on the boycott here in St. Louis, but things aren’t progressing too rapidly. I know it is slow though, and that many people have been sweating and working for years to bring about effective change.
We have to have much hope and courage to continue this revolution. Know that I, and many others, are behind you 100 percent. Enclosed is my subscription fee to EL MAL-CRIADO. I am anxious to receive it regularly.
Gratefully,
Sister Ruth Shy, S.L.
St. Louis January 19,1969
racial pride and self-respect go beyond yelling “Viva Mexico" and "Be proud of being a Mexican* twice a year, on May 5 and September 16, and at die same time surrendering our divine dignity and self-respect by submitting to daily degradation in every way of life.
John Nidnal Dallas, Texas
At 82, for the ’’People”
Editor:
Note that my subscription has run out with the January 15th issue.
I am enclosing four one dollar bills for renewal “EL MALCRI-ADO."
I have been an interested reader of all issues.
I am pleased that the little magazine has survived, and I can see it is gaining in more ways than one.
1 have been wishing to come over to Delano and visit your head quarters, and get acquainted with you in person—and I expect to carry out this wish before too many months.
1 am wondering if most of the original workers are still with you?
I entertained some of them (Mr. Adair, for one) here at my little home in the early days;
For many, many years I have been in sympathy with the “people”, but I am not quite as able to take part as in days gone by. I am 82 years of age now,- but I am just as interested as ever.
You have a truely noble leader in Cesar Chavez. My wish for him is to take care of his health.
My very best wishes for your continued success.
Sincerely,
B. Johnson Woodlake, California January 25, 1969
Church & State
UFWOC:
$5.0.0. enclosed.
This ends our pledges.
The reason is because the UFWOC has no active organization against the draft and militarising, which is so related to the power the wealthy elite has over poor people, besides draining off die yound men away from the struggle here at home.
Also, we are really turned off by the association of the Farm Workers with the Catholic Church (or any church, for that matter) which makes a big public show while continuing to oppress poor people all over the world.
Sorry, but that's the way we feel.
Ruth Glasgow San Francisco, California
Mrs. Glasgow; Cesar Chavez recently said, “I consier die economic exploitation of man the most effective kind of violence yet devised."
We have tried, in the pages of EL MALCRIADO, to make our position clear on the question of violence.
If UFWOC tends to be a “one-issue” organization, it is because we are locked in a non-violent struggle for our existence as a union. When we have gained some measure of victory, we will be free to expand our activities into other areas, as the members’ interest directs.
On die question of Church affiliations, we can only say that the vast majority of our members are Roman Catholics, though there are many members of other faiths who play an active part in the leadership of the Union.
We are sorry you feel you can no longer assist us, and thank you for your support up to now. -• The Editor!
mm

i


1A/EL MALCR1 ADO, February 1, 1969
UFWOC CHARGE:
Giumarra Truckers Ignore Safety Laws
DELANO, January 12—The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee is contemplating filing an appeal with the California State Supreme Court to overturn a decision made by die Public Utilities Commission (PUC) which exempts Giumarra Vineyards Corporations and its foremen and truck drivers from safety standards and other regulations in transporting its workers to die fields.
According to UFWOC Attorney David Averbuck, die PUC had refused to reopen the case, and the Union would' have to go to court to overturn what he described as "an erroneous and politically inspired decision.”
UFWOC had charged that foremen for the Giumarra Vineyards Corp. fail to obtain permits and meet safety standards and other regulations in transporting their workers.
The first hearing on the charges, before PUC examiner Mooney in Bakersfield on September 17 and 18, was referred to die State Commission in San Francisco. The State Commission, after sitting on die case for two and a half months (or until the harvest season was over) announced in mid-December that it was dismissing the case.
"The decision was a rotten political decision,” Averbuck said. "The grounds for dismissing die case were that these foremen were not covered by the law, because they did not receive compensation for transporting die workers. Yet die Commissioners’ decision stated directly (on page 6) that ’all the foremen are compensated’ and then on page 12 stated, ’the transportation is not for compensation.”
Averbuck explained that the foremen are paid by Giumarra to transport the workers to the fields, and are thus definitely "compensated” for the transportation and covered under the law. Furthermore, they operate on a year-round basis, he
said, and are thus not exempt under die clause of the law which exempts those who "occassionally” transport workers.
Since die PUC refused to rectify this decision on rehearing, it will be up to the courts of this state to chastise them,” Averbuck
warned.
“We will take it to the Supreme Court if necessary. This is an open-and-shut case. Those foremen are covered by the law and are failing to abide by its regulations,” the attorney concluded.
SI KAPATID NA GALAPORT AY NASA PAGAMUTAN
DELANO, Enero 27—Ang kapa-tid na Martin Galaport na ipinasok sa Delano Hospital ay inilipat sa Manor Convalescent Hospital ng Visalia . Si kapatid na Galaport ay na-sa ika-82 na gulang. Ang kanyang kalagayan ay hindi naman malubha ngunit nangangailangan ng pahinga at mabuting pangangalaga ng kata-wan sanhi sa kanyang kagulangan. Ito ay batay sa ulat ni Dr. Josef Heilman ng Delano.
MARTIN GALAPORT HOSPITALIZED
DELANO, January 27—Brother Martin Galaport, who was hospitalized on Friday, has been transferred to die Manor Convalescent Hospital in Visalia.
Brother Galaport, who is 82, was not in serious danger, according to Dr. Josef Heilman of Delano, but needed rest and care because of his age.
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EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969/15
Mma
WEST SIDE GETS BURNED
DELANO, January 27—If you live on the west side of Delano, your chances of having a loss from fire are almost three times as great as they are on the east side, ac~ , cording to a report issued today by Delano Fire Chief Carl J. Green.
Green, who is asking the City Council to build a fire station on the west side of the tracks, said that the value of property on each side of town is about the same, but that fire losses were almost three times as great on the west side.
According to records for the period 1965-1967, fire losses on the west side were $150,909. On the east side, where the total valuation is slightly higher, losses were only $54,227.
Green said that part of die problem is that fire engines have to
cross the tracks to get to the west side, and when a train is parked across the crossings, as frequently happens during evening hours, firemen have to go all die way across town to get across.
Green 1 said that die delays are “at times serious.”
Hie Highway 99 freeway is also a problem in reporting to fires on the west side, Green’s report noted. “Because of die limited cross overs at the freeway, our response time to certain areas is increased by 30 seconds to two minutes. Under certain conditions, this delay could result in serious loss of life and property."
Describing die west side, which is largely inhabited by farm workers, Green said that there are “many poorly constructed structures...old wood frame dwellings, sheds and commercial occupancies.”
Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
- * fftexicoH-
s4#o**tey
Fresno California


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Full Text

PAGE 1

_in English VoZwne II, Number .z_.z _ DeLano, CaLifornia February 1, 1969 _ Photo by Fred IZtis . WHAT ARE THEY HIDING? See Page 4.

PAGE 2

2/EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969 in this issue I •CREDIT UNION GROWS AND GROWS AND GROWS, page 3 •GROWERS 00 TilE SPOT IN POI SQ'I TRIAL, page 4 • FARM WORKERS EVICTED FOR REVEALING WASCO SLUM COO DITIONS, page 6 • BOYCOIT ESC: ALATION, page 8 o 'GUNS AND GRAPES, page 9 • ' LOWER YOUR WAGES FOR FUN AND PROFIT . oarre TO U187D1 7534719 EL MALCRIADO can b ; purahased in buZ.k orders of 10 or more aopies to one addr>ess, for 7 per copy or $1.68 per year per copy. ,EL AAlCRIAOCl, The Voiee of the Worker, is published twice monthly by the UNITE(} fARIIWrlRKERS ORt.ANIZIN!; (iOIIHITTEE,AfLCICl. Subscriptionsin the United its pone .. ions $3.50 per year, 11nd foreiqn, in eludi'l'lq Canada 1\eJ
PAGE 3

CREDIT UNION GROWS AND GROWS AND GROWS DELANO, january 26--No divi-chairman. dends will be paid this year by The treasurer's report showed the the Farm Workers Credit Union Farm Workers Credit Union made in order to provide more funds for a total of 270 loans during 1968, loans, it was decided by Credit for a total of $43,950 .72. Since Union members at their annual the organization of the Credit Union, meeting today. which began with $35 in savings Chaired by brother Phillip Vera and seven members, a total of Cruz, in the absence of President $182,933.69 has been loaned to 874 julio Hernandez, the meeting also members. TI1ere is more !han included the aruma! treasurer's re$40,000 in farm workers savings on port and election of officers. deposit with the C redit Union. As-Dolores Huerta, secretary, and sets total more than $54,000, the directors Santos Chapa and jose roport showed. Serda, whose terms on the Board of Directors expired thisyear,were Above: More than 500 members of the Farm Workers' re-elected. Credit Union and their famil-ies attended the annual. Other members of the board are meetii1g, held January 26 at Filipino Hall in Delano. Vice PresidentAndyimutan,Trea-Above Right: C . U. member Gil FZ.ores and assistant surer Cesar Chavez, and directors treasurer Helen Chavez listen to the reports. Ri:;.ct .. SECURITY dANI PAY MORE Rodriguez were elected to serve SOCIAL on the credit committee with Rudy Ahumada. ' WASHINGTQ'I', D.C.,january22--without any increase in the Social Alfonso Ovalle was elected to the There i s enough money in the Security tax." supervisory committee. He will Social Security fund to increase The reports showed that the So-work with committee members Mrs. benefits with no increase in pay-cial Security programs received j. Guadalupe Murguia and Mrs. Man!-oil taxes, a report by the trustees $2.6 billion more than they paid out uel Uranday. of the program revealed. in benefits during 1968. The trus-Mrs. Cesar Chavez, assistant According to Bert Se idman, So-tees estimated that the assets of treasurer, and Mrs. james Drake cial Security director of the AFL-the Social security funds would in-are in charge of the Credit Union CIO, •congress could grant a five crease from $28.1 billion to about office. Tony Mendez is education to six percent increase in benefits $45 billionduringthenextfiveyears.

PAGE 4

4/EL MALCRIADO, February '1, 1969, Th'e farm worker on our cover is spraying this dangerous chemicat, Thiodan Diazinon 3 2 Dust, on a fieZd of broccoU near> Indio. Photo by I It is. DELANO, December 30 --•Trade eases in their fields must have prohibiting Merely from divulging secrets" and "private information" continued to be the key words today in the second day of Superior Court hearings on ' whether or not officials of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee should be per-mitted to inspect records on the use of dangerous poisonous pesti cides in Kern County. Kern Councy Counsel Ralph jordan, representing County Agric ultural Commissioner She ldon Merely, ob jected vigorously this afternoon to introduction of evidence fro m the State Department o f Public Health in this afternoon's session, as UFWOC attorney David Averb uck sought to shOw the necessity for making what he called •public records" availab l e for inspection by the public. According co testimony, growers and commercial pesticide applicators who use poisonous chemicals to co'ntrol insects and plant dis-permits, and must file reports on dosages, applications, and other d e tails of their operation with the Counry Agricultural Commiss ion er. UFWOC attorney jerome Cohen tried last August to inspect the records on the poisons in connecli.on with research on the danger to farm workers whi ch mayresu. lt form their Cohen told EL MALCRIADO in forma tion on the danger of the pesticides to farm workers and con sumers is "woe fully inadequate," and the Union had a responsability to try to protect workers. H e said that while the records in the commissioner's office are supposed to be public information Morely refused permission to see them. Two hours after Cohen had gone co see the records, a temporary restraining order was issued by Superior Court judge j. Kelly Stee le the contents of the reports. TI1e present hearings are a three s id ed aflair. Crop dusting companies, represented by attorney Ste phen Wall, are technically the plain tiffs, while Morely , represented by Counry attorney Jordan, are the defendants. Cohen, represented by A verbuck, i s the third party in the suit. To courtroom observers, it is clear t hat plaintiffs and defendants are on the same side, while Cohen and Averbuck represent the oppo-s iton. More ly testified this morning that even though he was enjoined from making the records public, he had taken the information "in confidence,'" and would keep it confidential regardless of Judge Steele's temporary order, which still stands after five months . The Commissioner told hearing Continued on pag e 5 under instructions from the State Director of Agriculture to keep the cotent and dosage of the appli cation of economic poisons on table and wine grapes a secret, though Assistant State Director Allen A. Lemmon testified the di.rectiveS were only staff instructions and did not have the force of law. Lemri1ons Said he knew of "at least some• cases where farm work had been injured by the use of pesticides and cited an incident in Delano in which 16 out of 24 grape workers had been hospitalized for Parathion poisoning. 'The work ers had entered lhe field 33 days a fter the poisoning was applied. Fields are usually declared safe a fter two or lhree weeks, he said. In the most heated discussion of the hearings, Averbuck attempted to introduce a summary of reports filed b y doctors with the Bureau of OCcupational Health of the State Public Health Department. Though authenticated by Dr. Milby chief of the Bureau, the report was for some reason unacceptable to County attorney Jordan, who objected to its introduction. Cohen said the report listed "many, many• cases of farm workers who had been poisoned as the result of working with pesticides in the f ields.Morely told the Court •no farm workers have been injured by the application of economic poisons in Kern County to my knowledge .'" Lemmon, the State Assistant Di recwr, and a pesticides specialist, mentioned several Kern County cases later in the hearings. Thomas c. Griffin, owner of a spraying and dusting company, testified he had abandoned the use of the pesticide TEPP (tetra-ethyl pyrophosphate) after he himself had become seriouly ill as a result of working with the chemical, but he refused to saywhetherothercompanles in the area were still using the substance. He said releasing details of poison application to the ptc would re. c oht I nued on . page 11 EL MALCRIADO, .February 1, 1969/5 On January 7, UFWOC f Coun.se 1 Je :orne Cohen sent a letter to Stephen Wall, a Bakersf1eld at,torney who represents a nurilber of grape growers. "T . he most pressing problem which faces us as of now is the ever-increasing danger to farm workers1 health and safety which arise"s from the use of dangerous pesticides in the vineyards," Cohen sent along a proposal to . . '1ll, in which an agt'eement bettyeen growers and app Ziaators
PAGE 5

6/EL MALCRIADD, February 1, 1 969 F .ARM WORKERS EVICTED. FOR REVEALING WASCO, january 23-Two farm worker families were evicted from the Was co Labor Camp on Monday, January 20, allegedly because they permitted cameramen from KERD TV , Bakersfield, to film the inside of thei r cabins, Wasco is about 10 miles south east of Delano. On December 24, the Bakersfield Californian had published an article which sharply criticized conditions in the camp. Camp Manager C. B. Roberts, who appears i n the film "Huelga", challenged the Californian's story and called reporter Bill Bloecher a liar and the perpetrator of a hoax, After the publicaton or d1e story, the Kern County Health Department investigated the camp, and Vernon S. Reichard, director o f Environ-mentalHealth,gaveareport. Victor Ant u a nd Jose Vigil and their families were The Wasco camp charges $45 a the victims of a heartless act which left them rrionth rent for two room bi home less in the middle of the winter. I f there is a ______ ....,. _______________ _ bins cost $51 a month. the ends of the buildings, where The Health Department report in-children play and tenants draw drink eluded the following items: ing water, the Californian said. "Toilet' facilities found to be in The manager , Roberts, re-the insanitary condition, plied that this was "better than revealing neglect or lack of in g on a canal bank. We didn't tena nce. Noted dark stains , feca l ask these people to come here." matter, broken toilet seats, s tron g On Thursday, january 16, camp fecal odors and clogged wash ba-resident Victor Anru, who had talked sins." w ith the KERO reporters, received •waste water (in the laundry area) the following letter from Roberts: draining over the floor; dirt rJ •we must have payment of your and debris cover the noor area R account by Monday, january 20th , where people stand and wash their , 1969, or ask you to vacate theca-clothes. bin . Your account amounts to$42 •• "No rUnn ing water is provided to Ten dollars of the total was for any of the units. Tenants are fura "deposit." nished with gas hot plates and these Monday came, Antu told ELMAL in most siruations noted, provide criado, he cou l d not come up heat with the money, and he had to move rented a $48 shack in Wasco, where they are now living. Both families told EL MALCRJADO that they are sure that they were evicted because they . allowed the reporters to film the cabins in the camp. B oth Vigil and Anru said that they h a d previously arranged with camp authorities to pay the three weeks' rent they owed as soon as they began work in the potato packing shed . At a meeting of many camp residents on Wednesday night, january 22, many families voiced complaints abou t . conditions and ap pointed spokesmen to call for further in ves tigation. •The Wasco Camp was built 25 years ago to meet a World War "Garbage cans found to be in the most insanitary condition and many cans were dilapidated and no longer serviceable ... Mrs. Antu's sister and brotherII emergency need for male farm in-law, Mr. and Mrs. jose Vigil, worker shelter," the Californian no -also were living in the Camp. When ted . The garbage cans are loc ated at they, too, were evicted, b oth families

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E L MALCR I ADO, February I , 1969/7 WISCONSIN BAN ON DDT: Scientists Warn of Permanent Pesticide Effect's DELANO, January 2.7Dr. Richard M , Welch, a biochemical pharmacologist at Burrough -Welcome Research Laboratories reported that the pesticide DDT may be causin g changes to human sex organs and normones. Welch told an audience in Madi son, Wisconsin, that . afte r 'expert . menting wilh rats to determine the effects DDT had on them, he found that the sexual mechanisms of male and female rats were altered, He added tha t DDT injections cau sed a type of false pregnancy on the females. •If one can extrapolate data from anima l s to man , then one can say this change in animals probably does occur in man." Welch said. Welch added that DDT also interferes with the normal use of drugs causing the body to break down lf1e drugs faster than i t normaiiywould. Meanwhile, the Izaak Walton League and Citizens for Narural Resources Association filed a pe tition with the State Natural Re sources Department calling for a ban on DDT. In Davis, California, James 0. consistent until 194S. From then on, as the use of DDT spread, the egg thickness averaged about 20 percent thinner. Illinois Christians Condemn !Grape Growers CARBa-.IDALE, ILL--The Illinois Council of Churches voted to sup port the United Farm Workers Or ganizing Comm ittee boycott of Cali fornia table grapes at a meetin g on january 17. Of the 125 delegates present at the meeting , more than two thirds voted i n favor of the boycon resolution. Eliseo Medina is the UFWOC boycott representative for Illinois and spo ke to the group before the vote was taken. oanli:J7VN 1a o-:;. .Ieq""}.x.osqns v awooaq puv OS"$ ut puas / r1au8!i uv aq + 1 uoa GROWERS REJECT SANITATION LAWS WASHINGTON, D.C. --The Food and Drug Administration of the Federal government proposed new r egu lations covering "sanitation and pro duct i on practices, inc ludin g the.con dition of plant buildings and grounds, eQuipment, sanitary facilities for employees, and controls in processing, packaging, and storing food products. When the growers and packers of fruit and vegetables found they would have to keep food clean, they launched into action. On December 20, the proposal was revised. Accordin g to the Produce News , a produce industry trade paper known as the "Pink Sheer," "the Food and Drug Administration has EXEMPTED establishment s inv olved ••• in the harvesting, storage, or distribution of raw agriculrural commod ities from (the) regulations. "Original proposals •.• would have included packers and packagers of fresh fruits and vegetables , but the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association successfully sought exemp tion for the industry/ the Pro duce News g loated. In other words, cleanliness is quitE in order for food handlers ... except for the fruit and vege table industry. Caveat emptor--Let the buyer beware. Keith, a biologist for the federal Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, reported that the careless use of pesticides such as DDT is a threat to the very existence of wild life. The ability of peregrine fal cons, for instance, to reproduce suc cessfully, has been affec ted by thin shelled eggs resulting from the adult falcon's exposure to DDT . NOW ALSO IN M(XICANA I n his srudy, Or. Keith fotmd that birds in contact with DDT produce eggs with thinner eggshells. These thin-shelled eggs usually break , during nesting, making the exti nction of several species of birds an immediate threat unless DDT i s retired from use. Research from Keith and other biologists has shown that shell thick ness for these species of birds was Egg Bread and Pastries Alt. Kinds of Donuts Cakes foro alt. Occasions French BNad have a large Se lec t:on of Spanish Uagaa"t-nes# Books# and Rec:or>ds.

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.8/EL MALCRIADD, February 1, 1 969 &4eataitOH DELANO, January 25 --Whil e growers were dumping boxes of unso 1 d tab 1 e grapes Tor d i sposa I (see fd1' right), mor e than 800 farm worker s and supporter s met in Delano to pai n a massive escalati on of the grape boycott. Thi r t y mor e fami lies will leave next week to work full time on the boycott in Midwestern, Easte r n , and Southern Cities. EL MALCR 1ADO will carry an extensive report on the new,boy cott centers in the next issue of the A family from Coaahe Ua !left) a:nd workers from Far>mersville (above) lis ten to plans to esaal.ate the boyaott. STUDENTS PROTEST AGAINST "UNCLE SAM, THE STRIKE BREAKER" NEW YORK, January 25--More than 500 young supporters of the Californi; grape strike staged a demonstration today in .front of the Depar[ment or Defense offices i n Manhattan , in protest agai nst Federal Go vernment policies against farm workers. and the Department of justice has twisted the Immigration l aws and has refused to enforce existing r e gulations, thus allowing a flood of illegal strike-breakers to emer this country from Mexico. The r e has been no real attempt w enforce healdl and safecy regu-The theme of the demonstration l a tions, child l abor laws, or other Queens, for their work in orgawas to expose "Uncl e Sam , the regulations dea li ng with workin g nizin g students in support of the Strikebreaker, " according to Dolo conditions in the boycou. res Huerta, Vice President of the "We chose to demonstrate before Cohen expressed the views of United Farm workers and leader the Defense offices be many of the students when he stated of the grape boycott in N ew York. cause their purchases of grapes at the must begin to Mrs. Huerta said d 1 e Federal are the most direct tactic used vigorously \express our indignati on Government has played a major by the government to break our boyar the government and the corpo-strike breakin g rol e In the farm cott and strike, but we are a lso rate-military structure that is now wprkers' atruggle in three crucial protesting the government's other intentionally keeping people in po-areas. policies which deny farm workers verty in order to enhance their own "The Department of Defense has their rights. And we are also pro-private interests." tremendously increased its purcha-testing the cruel indiffe r ence of , ses of grapes over the last two years most Federal Agencies to the plight WASHINGTON, D.C.--Purchases of grapes for shipment to Viemam cont i nue to rise, according to stat e ments issued recen tly by the De partment of Defense . During the fiscal year from j uly 1, 1966 to june 30, 1967, the government ]Jought 468 , 000 pounds of grapes for shipment to the war torn country . TI1e followin g year (fiscal year !968), purchases Of SCab grapes towllcd 555,000 pounds . During the firs t quarter of d1e I n a "fact sheet" which d1e Direc tor for Food Service of the Defense Department recently sent to one such protestor, the following state ment appears: "The Department of Defense does not purchase grapes merely because they have been made more a vail-ab l e and less expensi ve due to the effects of the boycott ••• In the i n terests of objective and systematic management, menu p lanners ••• should not be required to consider whed1c r a labOr dispute exists when making these decisions." .An accompanying letter said, "'alt hough we appreciate your con cern in thi s matter, we have been unable to find any el'ide;ce which would support a c hange of d1e Department of Defense policy as s tated in the fact So that's how it is! Defense Department purchases of grapes for the armed ser v ice s , in cluding the grapes purchased for Viemam are also_ steadily rising. I n fiscal yea r 1966 , the govern menr bOught 7.5 million pounds of grapes for $1.04 million, The fol lowing year purchases were 8 . 3 million pounds, for $1.25 million . I n fiscal 1968, purchases dropped to 6 . 9 million pounds , but the price paid was $1.32 million . But that's not important either, says lhe facr_, sheet. "The total Defense Supply Agency purchases of table grapes represent less than one percent of U. S. table grape production. "'There is no records of any grape shipments to Vietnam prior to fis cal year 1967, " the report notes.

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EL MALCRIADO, February I; 1969/10 ARIZONA BUSINESSMEN'S PLAN: LOWER. WAGES FOR FUN' 1&1 PROFIT FROM THE AFL -CIO NEWS TUCSON, ARlZONA--Mexico's "inexhaustible inexpensive labor market" is being touted as a SO cents-an hour gold mine for u. S. businessmen willing to invest in plants on both sides of the bor-der. •you don't have to go to Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea or japan for low co;>st easily trainable foreign labor," says the official publication of DATE-Development profit corporation representing a broad cross section of the Tucson community." •rt is available right here •• ,along the MexicoArizona border for as low as 30 cents an hour in virtua lly inexhaustible numbers," DATE proclaims in glowing Chamber of Commerce 'prose. "MeXican labor is competitive with foreign labor--easily recruited and quickly trained and equally as pro Tucson businessmen headed by j. Karl Meyer , DATE's executive director, point to the "advantages' of •cooperative U.S.-Mexican border operations such as low absenteeism and proud, cheerful attirude toward work ••. under the 1\vin Plant concePt." That concept is described in these workds: "'. Components are manufactured in Thcson, assembled in Nogales, Mexico, and returned to Thcson for final inspection, packa ging and shipping •••• Duty is imposed only on the added value of the assembly." Thcson is only one of the South west's border towns promoting the "'cheap foreign labor" concept. Among the first to tap the new lod e was Laredo, Tex., which induced the Transitron Electronics Corp. of wakefield, Mass., to move its non-union operations into a new plant with a small work force. Across the border at Nuevo La-formula, Transitron may use its small U. S. work force to manu facture products and its large Mexican force to assemble them. Wage rates in the U. S. are $1,60 an hour and up. In Nuevo La redo the rate is reported $2,16 a day. The U.S. plant has started work on a $1,7 million contract to make telephone cables for the Defense Dept. The contract is for a oneyear period, but the Army Elec tronic Command awarded Transitronic an additional contract on its bid of $1,1 million, and the Economic Development Administration procured a grant of $28,000 in U. S. funds to "train 15 or 20 per sons in the electronics field" at the Transitron plant in Laredo. A subsidiary, Phalo Corp., got the contracts and the grant. The hands-across the border concept got a jolt, however, when the Mexican workers cast off the "proud cheerful attitude toward work" ex tolled by the tubthumping U. S. businessmen and stopped work for three weeks at the New Laredo plant. The walkout was not an official strike, sanctioned by the ruling po wers, but it forced Transitron to ship some of the quartz crystals used in its production to another company subsidiary in Kansas City, Mo. The workers fi nally went back when the governor of Tamaulipas state stepped in and the State Labor Board agreed to hear the dispute--over wages pro mised but not paid for lunch "breaks." Last year an AFL-CIO Executive Council subcommittee urged joint action by American and Mexican labor movements and governments to change the immigration and tariff laws. It cited unfair competition by low-wage border-iumoing olants and "green card" tourists who cross the border freely to take "jobs in a-redo, Mexico, within walking dis-griculture, . often ac the expense cance of Laredo, is a Transitron .of union farm workers. They'll Sling It Elsewhere SACRAMENTO, january 28Planning well in advance the Cal ifornia Fertilizer Association decided to pull its 1971 convention out of San Francisco because the Board of Supervisors has endorsed the boycott of California table grapes. •we will have no dealings with san Francisco hotels or with other San Francisco businesses until the official position of the city government there will have been changed to one of reason," Association ager Sidney Bierly wrote the Fair mont Hotel. Meanwhile, theywerereallysweating it in san Francisco. The 1968 convention in " Los Angeles pulled in a crowd of 430 people. 1 A New Rojas : In Pittsburgh PITTSBURGH, january 3--Albert and Elena Rojas are the proud parents of a baby girl, Shalom Christine Rojas, who was born on january 3 in Pittsburgh. Shalom was six pounds and seven ounces at birth. AI and Elena have led the boycott of California grapes in Pittsburgh and Western Penn sylvania since july of 1968. Pre viously AI was a farm worker and Union organizer in the Delano and Bakersfield areas. _..-; ______ Caravan Set l For Feb. 22 SAN FRANCISCo--The next food caravan to Delano from the San Francisco Bay Area will be on Sarurday, February 22. The caravan will leave from 568 47th Street, Oakland at 7 AM. and from the San Francisco Labor ple, 2940 16th Street, at 8 AM. For infoqnation, call 655-3256 after 7 PM.

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EL MALCRIADO, F eb ruary 1 , 1969/1 1 Continued from page 5 shou ld be issued, or if a writ lease •trade secrets" and do da-of mandate should be served on the mage to h i s business because his Agricu lrural Commissioner, forcing competitors would be ab l e to find him t o revea l lhe records. out hi s secret form ulas. Farm workers nearly filled the He said that his company con ticourt room both days, whil e a clus-nued to perform a process called te r of crop dusters and growers •washing grapes," which had to be joined them t o listen to testimony. kept secret because produce buyers The crop dusters appeared gewould not buy grapes which had under-nuinely worried about the possigone the process. bility of the records becoming pu-In an off-the cuff statement du-blic, while farm workers who could ring a recess, jordan said public speak English whispered transla-health and trade secrets were both tions of the proceedings co their important. Spanish and Il ocano speaking broth-You have to weigh them against each ocher , " the rotund, white-haired The farm workers clustered in Jordan said. groups in the hallways during each As the hearing closed for the se-recess, and peppered each other cond day , there was no sign of what with the unanswerable question ; the outcome would be. •what are they trying oo hide? If Judge Brown rules UFWOC Why don't they want us to know has a right to se,e the records, abou t me chemicals we work with i r will make no change in the siday afrer day?" tuarion , asMorelyhasalreadywarnE L MALCRIADO can provide no ed, answer. There are too many secrets. Should he rule that the records Onl y the chemical companies and must be kept secret until a final pesticide applicators really know decision is reached, he will canwhat theyaresprayingonthegrapes, eel the present cemporaryrestrain-and their research is centered a in g order and replace it with a round damage to W illammete mites preliminary injunction, which i s just and abou t the same thing. Nobody s eems ro know --and if In that case, a new hearing will they know, they won' t say --what be held--this time to determine the chemica l s can do to humans. whether a final injunction, keeping So EL MALCRI ADQasks the same the records a secret permanently , question: •what are they hiding?• CONTINUED FRQ'l PAGE 5 importance that it demands immediate attention, even if other labor relati o n s p robl ems hav e to wait. I mean the harmful effects o f spraying grapes w ith pesticides, or econom i c po isons, as they are called," Chavez wrote. "We riot tolerate the systematic pois oning of our people. Even if we cannot get together on other problems , we will be damned and we shouZd be-if we wilZ permit human beings to sustain permanent damage to their health from eoonomia poisons. 11 T he r e was no reply. HERNANDEZ UNDERGOES OPERATION CLEVELAND --Brothe_r julio Her-far-off Vice President. nandez, in charge of the boycott Brother Julio was the first farm in the Cleveland area, recently un-worker to join Brother Chavez in his derwent surgery. EL MALCRIADO early organizing drive. wisheS a speedy recovery ro our The sign that tells you people are working together to fill their needs You do not have to be a member to shop-come in and see how economic democracy works GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM WORKERS FROM The Consumer Cooperative of Berkeley

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12/EL MALCRIADO, February 1, 1969 I Letters This County W"1ll B-1 I f d n orme .•. Editor: Enclosed you will find a photo of some of the fellows in the Martinez-Pittsburg-Concord area who are dedicated to seeing this grape boycott through to its victorious end. We got off to a slow start here in Contra Costa Counry thi s year but we pledge to you that this county is going to be well informed of the boycott of California table grapes in the year 1969. Labor is magnificently behind the endorse the boycott and of course these '"representatives of the peo ple. • although each expressed his pe rsonal sympathy for the plight of the farm worker • felt they could not endorse the bOycott because "it was strictl y a labOr -manage-ment issue." The importance of these hearings was that these elected officials were finally backed into a corner out of which they could not weasel. They were forced to vote on a moral issue involving ' the labor boycott not only morally and linan-movement and l abor ' s perennialen-cially. but what is more import-emy, the right wing in the form of ant--with bodies on the picket l ine! the john Birchers. I only wish that you could ha ve We did not get the endorsement. wimessed the wonderful rurn-out But we did get an issue that EL MALCR I ADO P.O. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 9321 5 I Shall Do As Much As I Can ... j' I' Editor and Brothers: 11 I have met and have had your representative jorge Zaragoza and i his family at my mas holidays. . I am very impressed by this ' man ' s courage tocomethree-quartj ers of the way across the United j States to Cincinnati. 1 He and his family are most pleasant. I have been enlightened on your Cause very much by him. I shall do as much as I can to help him in his struggle in the boy con in the Cincinnati area. I am also a member of a Union and ! recognize the importance of your of labOr, church groups and Mexshould certainly beCome a central winning your rights. I am proud ican-Americans at the recent hear-point when some of these "elected to call jorge Zaragoza my broth-ing before the Contra Costa Counofficials,. come to labor and Mex-er! ty Board of Supervisors. ican American groups next elec-God bless you and your Cause. For once I saw the john Birch tion. Sincerely, Sociecy and growers with their UncRay Martlnez EdmWld Kuderer le Tamales, out numbered. Labor Concord, CaHfornla Cincinnati, Ohio had ' requested the Supervisors to December 31, 1968 December 31. 1968 Thanks for the1 Flowers ... UFWOC: It was so very kind and thought ful of you folks to send me those beautiful !lowers while I was ln the hospital. I want you to know that having good friends thinklng of you helps a great deal. Thank you. Sin cerel y , Hilda Kircher

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.EL MALCRIADD, February 1, 1969/13 Praise for Elsa Stude . nts Editor: racial pride and self-respect go All o f us can learn a lesson in beyond yelling "Viva Mexico• and sincere racial pride and self-respect "Be proud of being a Mexican• twice . from the . stur;lents of Elsa-Edcouch a year, on May 5 and September A Critic of Church & State High SChool, who havethecourageto 16, and at the same time surrendUFWOC: demand that the inhuman and de-ering our divine dignity and self$5.0 .0. enclosed. grading treatment wehavebeensub-respect by submitting to daily de-This ends our pledges. jected to for 123 years be stopped. gradation in every way of life. The reason isbecausetheUF\VOC We have been treated worse than john Nidnal has no active organization against other racial groups. In many in-Dallas, Texas the draft and militarising, which is seances there were cafes and rest rooms marked colored and white, and Chicanos were not permitted to use either one. We should also be thakful for men like Mr. joe Bernal and attorney Robert Sanchez, who did not run At 82, for the "People" so related to the power the elite has over poor be _sides draining off the yound i"nen away from the struggle here at home . Als . o, we are really rurned off by the association of the Farm Workers with the Catholic Church and hide as most of our leaders Editor: (or any church, for that matter) and professional men ha ve done Note that my subscription has run which makes ct big public show while in the past when confron te d with out with the January 15th issue. continuing to oppress poor people an issue like this. I am enclosing four one dollar all over the world. Every person of Mexican extrac-bills for renewal oJ "EL MALCRISorey, but that's the way we fee l. tion Should be 100 percent for these ADO." Ruth Glasgow Or ave srudents. I have been an interested reader san California They have proven that sincere of all issues. I We Have Hope ... I Editor, To you, to Cesar Chavez, and to all who have worked and are work ing on tJ,e grape boycott, and who ne working for the farm worker, tou are doing great work! we have been working on the boycott here ip. St. Louis, but things aren't progressing too I know it is slow though, and that many people have been sweating and working for years to bring about effective change. We have to haVe much hope and courage to continue this revolution. Know that I, and many others, are behind you 100 percent. Enclosed is my subscription fee to EL MAL CRIADO. I ain anxious to receive it regularly, Gratefully, Sister Shy, S.L. St. Louis january 19, 1969 I am pleased that the little magar..Jrs, Glasgow: Cesar Chavez re-zine ha s sunived, and I can see cently said, "I consier theeconom-it is in more ways than one. I have bee n wishing to come over to Delano and visit your head quarters, and get acquainted with you in person--and I expect to carry out this wish before too many months. I am wondering i f most of the original workers are still with you? I entertained some of them (Mr. Adair, for one) here at my little home in the early dayso For many, many years I have been in sympathy with the "people", but I am not quite as able to take part as in days gone by. I am 82 years of age now, but I am just as interested as ever. You have a o-uely noble leader in Cesar Chavez. My wish for him is to take care of his health, My very best wishes for your continued success. Sincerely, B. john;on Woodlake, California January 25, 1969 ic exploi ration of man the most ef fect iv e kind of violence yet We have o-ied, in the pages of EL to make our po sition clear on the question of violence. If UFWOC tend::; to be a "oneissue" organization, it is because we are l ocked m a non -vio lent struggle for our existence ns a union. When we have gained some measure of victory, we will be free . to expand 01.1r activities into other areas, as the members' interest directs, On the question of Church af filiations, we cnn only sny that the vast majority of our members are Roman Catholics, though there are many member's of other faiths who play an active part in the leader-ship of the Union. We are sorry you feel you can no longer assist us, and thank you for your support up to now. The

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14/EL MALCRIAOO, February 1, 1969 UFWOC CHARGE: Giumarra Truckers Ignore Safety Laws DELANO, january 12--The United said, and are thus not exempt under warned. Farm Workers Organizing Com-the clause of the law which exempts "We will take it to the SUpreme Court if necessary. This is an caSe. Those foremen are covered by the law and are failing to abide by its regulations," the attorney concluded. mittee is contemplating filing those who •occassionally" transport appeal with the California State workers. Supreme Court to overturn a decision Since the POC refused to rectimade by the Public Utilities Com-fy this decision on rehearing, it mission (PUC) which exempts Giu-will be up to the courts of this marra Vineyards Corporations and its foremen and truck drivers from safety standards and other regulations in transporting its workers to the fields. According to UFWCX::: Attorney David Averbuck, the POC had refu se d to reopen the case, and the Union would ' have to go to court to overturn what he described as "an erroneous 'a nd politically spired UFW OC had charged that foremen . for the Giumarra Vineyards Corp. fail to obtain permits and meet safety standards and other regu lations in transporting their The first hearing on the charges, before PUC examiner Mooney in Bakersfield on September 17 and 18, was referred to the State Com mission in San Francisco. The State Commission, after sitting on the case for two and a half months (or until the harvest season was over) announced in mid-December that it was dismissing the case. "The decision was a rotten tical A verbuck said. "The grounds for dismissing the case were that these foremen were not covered by the law, because they did not receive compensation for transporting the workers. Yet the Commissioners' decision stated rectly (on page 6) that 'all the foremen are compensated' and then on page 12 stated, 'the tation is not for compensation.'' A verbuck explained that the men are paid by Giumarra to port the workers to the fields, and are thus definitely for the transportation and covered under the law. Furthermore, they operate on a basis, he state to chastise them," Averbuck Sl KAPATID NA GALAPORT AY NASA PAGAMUTAN MARTIN GALAPORT HOSPITALIZED DELANO, Enero 27--Ang kapa-DELANO, January 27--Brother tid na Martin Galaport na ipinasok Martin Galaport, who was hospital-sa Delano Hospital ay inilipat sa ized on Friday, has been transferred Manor Convalescent Hospital ng Vito the Manor Convalescent Hospital salia. Si kapatid na Galaport ay na in Visalia. sa ika-82 na gulang. Ang kanyang Brother Galaport, who is 82, was kalagayan ay hindi naman malubha not in serious danger, according to ngunit nangangailangan ng pahinga Dr. Josef Heilman of Delano , but at mabuting pangangalaga ng kata-needed rest and care because of wan sanhi sa kanyang kagulangan. his age. Ito ay batay sa ulat ni Or. Josef Heilman ng Delano . FRESNO The only completely Hexlcan Mortuary In northern California SANCHEZ-HALL MORTUARY F"R:ESNO 1022 "B" STREET TELEPHONE; 237 Services available everywhere •• ,No tet Where you live, our price Is the same • . .death. notIces In newspapers and on the radio are Included . • , • can make arrangements for every 'economic situation Te1.6phone 237-3532 CALIFORNIA

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EL MALCRI A D D " February I , 1969/1 5 WESt SIDE GETS BURNED DELANO, january 27--If you li ve cross the tracks to get to the west on the west s id e of De l ano , your side, and when a train J s parked chances o f having a loss from fire across the crossings, as are almost three time s as great happens during evening hours, fireas they are on the east side, ac-. men ha v e to go all the way across cording to a report issued today wwn to get across. b y Delano Fire Chief Carl J. Green' said that the delays are Green, "at times serious." Green, who i s asking the City The Highway 99 freeway is also a Council to build a fire station on problem in reporting to fires on the west side of the tracks, said the west side, Green's report no-that the value of property on each ted . •secause of the limited cross of toWn is about the same, overs at the freeway , our response bu t that fire losses were almost time to certain areas is increased three times as great on the west . b y 30 seconds to t\VO minutes. Under side. certain conditions, this delay could According t o records for the result in serious loss of life and period 1965-1967, fire losses on the property." west sule were $150, 909, On the Describing the west side, which is east side, where the total v a l uation largely inha bi ted by farm workers , is s lighdy higher, losses were on l y Green said that there are " many $54,227. poorly constructed strucrures •.• old Green said lhat part of the pro-wood frame dwellings, sheds and blem is that fire engines have to commercial occupancies . " ,....,.. • ...,.. ••• Y'ill V iva Ia Causa . y El Progreso . a ,4t L Fresno Califo rn i a posieRsi .. P.os'i[iis! .. New Poster In R .ed,l VIVA [A--White, and Black, RVOLUCION 18" X 25" OnZy $1. 50, +25 postage & handUng City ----.,-------'State -.,..---Zip __ _

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[]3[[ Discount Dept. Store 918 Main st. DELANO across from the Post Office t:J, ',l (f) r ; • J :-; .; ; .. .:. ' " J r -. ; ,,, : ] ("'_: . -(_) t .... r c ; _ _ ::._; 0 : 0 .. ,0 0 r-1 Shop for Your Favorite Valentine AT BEES Children's Clothing, All Sizes . Dresses, Pants, Shirts, ret tltt, .. L0e4t Open SUNDAYS Visit BEE'S here in DELANO 918 MAIN --ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE ALSO IN: COACHELLA STOCKTON TRACY INDIO j '