Citation
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 24

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 2, Number 24
Series Title:
El Malcriado
Creator:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
Place of Publication:
Delano, CA
Publisher:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
El Malcriado wi
THE VOICE OP THE FARM WORKER \ J
in English
VoVt II, Nimher]_24 smm- Delanof California February 15 3 1969
FARMWORKERS, DAIRYMEN, GROWERS, SPRAYERS
SPEAK OUT ON POISONS P- 3, I If 15
EUROPEAN BLOCKADE ON GRAPES P. 2 3.


2/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969
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' I ONDON, February 12—British dock workers refused to unload more than 70,000 pounds of California table grapes here today, and a blockade on the scab grapes has been extended to all English, Swedish, Finnish, and Norwegian ports.
The grapes, sent to England a-board the Bahia Blanca, a Johnson Lines ship, were destined for London supermarkets.
English longshoreman, truck drivers, warehouseman, and others involved in the transportation industry, are all members of the Transport and General Workers Union (TGWU), which has more Continued on page 3.
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ELMALCRI ADO, February 15, 1969/3
Poison Trial Delayed; Now Facts Emerge
DELANO, February 15—Six months ago, Bakersfield Superior Court Judge J, Kelley Steele, a long-time farm worker foe, issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting county officials from showing public records on the use of poisonous chemicals in the fields to Union investigators.
A temporary restraining order is supposed to be just that—temporary—but months later that order is still in effect.
Farm workers continue to labor in the fields, continue to handle dangerous chemicals, and continue to dodge the sprays which issue from crop dusting airplanes and ground rigs.
Hearings on die order began January 29,. and were recessed a week later.
Dr. Thomas Milby of the State Department of Public Health had brought a report with him from Sacramento showing scores of injuries to farm workers
as a result of the use of pesticides.
Rules of evidence are tight, however, and when crop dusters' attorney Stephen Wall said he wanted to go to Sacramento to verify the reports before closing arguments were presented, a recess was granted by Judge George A. Brown until February 27.
At the conclusion of the hearings, Judge Brown will rule on whether the temporary restraining order should become a preliminary injunction or whether it should be lifted entirely.
In either case, there is little hope that Agricultural / j,j Commissioner Seldon Morley will reveal die contents of th« records in his office.
Wall, who represents the companies that apply pesticides for grape growers, said he also wants to take sworn statements from experts at the University of Calif. Dr. Robert Van den Bosch testified that in continued on page 11
EUROPEANS BLOCKADE GRAPES
Continued from page 2.
than 1,500,000 members. '
Led by Frank Cousins, the TGWU voted on December 28 to refuse to handle the scab grapes, and has led the boycott efforts in Englsand.
The Swedish Transport Workers Union passed a similar resolution on Jnauary 18, and has been joined by many other Swedish unions in backing the boycott.
An earlier cargo of scab grapes, estimated at 230,000 pounds, and bound for English and Swedish ports on the ships Brasilia and Aconcagua Valley was turned back from its original destinations. The ships finally had to dock at die German port of Hamburg, from which die scab grapes were shipped overland to Sweden. By die time they arrived, the boycott had received so much publicity that grape sales in Sweden dropped to almost nothing. The Swedish Consumer Cooperative, a long time ally of the Swedish Labor movement, which accounts for 30 per cent of retaill grocery sales, has agreed to stop buying California grapes.
UFWOC representative Elaine Elinson, a young stu-. dent living in London, has led die drive to acquaint Europeans with the sufferings of American farm workers and die reasons for the grape boycott. Miss Elinson has toured England, Sweden and other countries to build international labor solidarity for the boycott.
Since California grapes make up only five per cent of Northern European grape imports, the growing blocade has been extremely effective in convincing buyers and shippers that it is not worth the trouble involved to import scab grapes from the United States. In an interview with the “Svenska Dagbladed,” a Swedish newspaper, Johnson Lines’ Import Director Holder Nystrom said, “There will be no new orders of grapes
from the U.S.” Another major shipper has, ordered its West Coast agents to make no new bookings of California table grapes to Europe.
Northern European countries import California table grapes only during die winter months of December through March, when there is a pause in the production of die European grape harvests from Spain and Bulgaria. Miss Elinson will stay in Europe through die 1969 grape harvest to persuade European buyers to avoid purchase of California grapes.
In Delano, UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez praised Miss Elinson’s work and expressed admiration for die fine example of international labor solidarity shown by the European brother workers.
Chavez pointed out that die European blocade is only one front of UFWOC's planned international boycott battle in 1969. More than 245 million pounds of California table grapes are normally sold in foreign markets annually. Outside of North America, the United Kingdom and Scandinavia are the largest pruchasers of grapes.
At present the boycott is being extended to several countries in Latin America and Asia. The Inter-American Regional Organization of Workers, at its recent Executive Committee meeting in San Salvadore, unanimously passed a resolution in support of the UFWOC strike and boycott.
Chavez told EL MALCRIADO that “these foreign markets were the grower’s last hope to make a profit on this year’s harvest. With die help of our European friends, who really know the meaning of international worker solidarity, we are closing off that market and are coming another step closer to die victory for which we have struggled during these past three years.’


4/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969
Europeans Blockade Grapes, p. 2-3 Poison Trial Delayed, p. 3 Labor Bus Hazards, p. 7 Safeway’s Scab Sales, p. 8 Texas Churches Fire Krueger, p. 10 Terrorism Against Boycotters, p. 12 New Farm Mini. Wage, p. 14 Strike in the Orchards, p. 15
gjgi
Farm Worker, is publfejred twice monthly bjf die United Farm^or~' kers Organizing Committee, AFL-C!0. Subscriptions in the Uhited States and its-possessions are $3.50 per year,^and foreign, including us $5,: Subscriptions for members of UFWOC are included in monthly dues., Editorial and business offices located at die - northwest’ comer of -aw Mettler Avenue, Delano, California* j
! .. Address all correspondence to; Ft MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215. -Second class postage paid at De-t^;‘'‘CMf0tiai; ’ ’’ ••
, For .advertising rates, contact Jaime keyes at (80S) 725-1337 or
EDtTQRS
^ welcome to repirint ma-terial from EL MALCRIADO, provided a copy is sent to us and die item' is credited "From EL iiALCRIADO—UFWOG."
Cesar if! ChavezTTWTTectorTTuFW^C . Larr/ Itliong Asst Otr., UFV/OC Aivtwua>iOre£ijij^^ I
Doug Adair.........Business Kng.
Jaime Reyes S.—...Associate Ed. Ramiro Silva ..Circulation Mng.
SUBSCRIBE TO EL MALCRIADO FOR A FRIEND
KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL INSURANCE
car... life... fire
PHONES:
Office, 485-0650 Residence, 266-1349
3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair Shopping Center Fresno, Calif. 93703
Mr. Leap will be in the UFWOC Service Center, 105 Asti, Delano, every Wednesday to serve U-nion members.
NOW ALSO IN
LAM0NT
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Bakeries
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU IN KERN COUNTY
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We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
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The only completely Mexican Mortuary In northern California
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EL MALCRIADO More and more people arc finding out that a-P.O. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way
‘DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle.
93215 Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
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ELMALCRIADO, February 15, 1969/5
So^cott “Refoontt foont t6e Tftidevzlt
GRAPES-FOR THE BIRDS
The city of Saint Paul, Minnesota decided to stop buying grapes in support of the UFWOC-led boycott, but the city fathers didn't forsee they would have problems in die municipal zoo.
The purchasing department had been buying 15 pounds of grapes every week for use in the hospitals, and an equal amount for die zoo. When the head of the purchasing department, Robert W. Beaudry, suspended all grape purchases, there were no complaints from die hospital, but the director of the zoo complained loudly.
John Fletcher said the birdies and the little monkeys would die of stomach ailments without their daily ration of die scab-picked fruit.
But Beaudry held firm. "I believe the zoo can find a substitute food for die birds and monkeys,” he said. ”If we humans can make it without grapes, I think the animals should be able to. But if the
animals must have the grapes to survive, we'll buy some for the zoo. At any rate, I would like to see the petition in writing."
Then the experts came into the picture. Dr. Walter J. Breckenridge, said raisins and plums would make an acceptable substitute, but he added a note of caution. Some animals are very selective he said. "They don’t care if ther’s a strike or not. If they need grapes, let them eat grapes."
The problem is stUll up in the air, but it seems that die animals of Saint Paul and some citizens will continue to fight for the dietary preferences of the animals.
EL MALCR1ADO wonders if grapes are always available to birds and monkeys in the natural state. We know farm workers cannot afford to buy grapes, and still manage to survive. Maybe the monkeys could learn to live on beans and rice during the winter. Or let diem eat cake.
No Grapes for Chicago
CHICAGO, January 1—"There is no interest in grapes whatsoever in Chicago," a prominent fruit and produce dealer reported in a recent interview with the Chicago Daily News. Albert Barnett, president of the Market Service Association, composed of 200 Chicago area commission merchants in the fruit and produce business, noted that California growers, as of late December, still had $15 million worth of table grapes in storage that should have been marketed before January 20. More than 50,000 boxes, worth $200,000, jam the warehouses in Chicago alone, Barnett reported.
"The boycott is successful,” Barnett said. He personally was stuck with 4,000 boxeso of California table grapes and faced a loss of $17,000 on them. Jewel Food, National Tea Company, and almost all of the supermarket chains in die Chicago area have stopped handling grapes and will not replace them. The few stores that still have grapes are handling diem like bootleg items, according to Barnett. There are no grapes on die counters, but the manager may keep a box or two of the forbidden fruit in the back room for special customers whose taste for scab grapes has not been affected by conscience or knowledge of the conditions under which the grapes were picked.
The Chicago Boycott Committee, led by Eliseo Medina, is now working on stores in the suburbs and in downstate Illinois and Indiana. And several more fulltime boycotters are heading for the Windy City to assure a successful boycott for the 1969 season.


6/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 19^9
UFWOC European representative ELAINE ELINSON (standing) meets with officers of the Swedish Building Service Employees Uniony one of many European unions supporting the grape boycott. Present are (l. to r.) Tore Nyman, V. Pestoff, S. Holst, S. Lindkvisty Roland Larsson, and Ake Johansson. (See storv. page 2-3).
SMALL FARMERS BACK BOYCOTT
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS, February 7—The Illinois Farmers Union, an organization of small farmers, voted unanimously this week to endorse tJ)e boycott of California table grapes.
President Ray Watson said ‘We are concerned about the California farm workers because we understand that they have been exploited by their employers.
The resolution passed by die annual convention of the Farmers Union praised UFWOC for opposing “die malpractices of corporation farming* and for striving "to affirm the dignity of the man who tills the soil."
"One of die advantages of corporation farming over . family farming is the employment of sea-sonl farm workers on starvation wages."
Since “the employment practices of corporation farms have demeaned
the farm workers by denying him a voice in determining working and living conditions which effect his destiny," the resolution read, “be it resolved that the Illinois Farmers Union request that die residents of Illinois refrain from purchasing California fresh table grapes..."
EL MALCRIADO’S SPECIAL PESTICIDE
We have some excellent powder for exterminating cockroaches.
Grab the roach by the second leg on the left side, and turn the leg to the right.
This will make the cockroach open his mouth to yell for help. The instant the mouth is opened, feed the powder with a little water.
If the mouth does not open, it means you are turning die wrong leg. Begin again with more care. J
TCFJTT
FOR JUSTICE
Thirteen years ago, the Deering Milliken textile company told workers at its Darlington,. South Carolina, mill, that the plant would be closed if die workers voted to join a union.
The union won the election, and Roger Milliken and the company's board of directors ordered the plant closed;
More than 500 workers lost their jobs after die 1956 election.
Last week the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the company had no right to close the plant, an action which the Court said was “at least in part the product of a desire to discourage unionism at other Deering Milliken mills."
The court ruling means that Deering Milliken will have to bargain with die Textile Workers Union of America about back pay for the fired workers and re-employment at other plants.
Back pay is expected to total several million dollars.



EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969/7
The Highway Patrol announcement "recommended" truck operators obtain a safety! inspection and windshield sticker showing that they had passed inspection "before the harvest season," but there appears to be no mandatory inspection procedure.
In urging organizations to have their members' trucks inspected for adequate “seating facilities, safety equipment and condition of mechanical eqtiipment,” die Patrol made no mention of individual growers, labor contractors, and individual truck owners, who haul a large share of the human cargo every year.
Officials of the United Farmworkers have suggested that members and other farm workers refuse to ride in any farm labor truck which does not have a Highway . patrol windshield sticker showing it has passed a safety inspection.
Fotos by George Ballis from 'Basta'
COPS warn of labor bus hazards
GETTING THERE IS HALF THE FUN
.. contractors, day hauls
SACRAMENTO, February 6—“Many farm labor vehicles are being found in such a neglected condition of repair as to make them unsafe for operation until repairs are made," the California Highway Patrol admitted today.
“No punitive enforcement action will be taken" die announcement said, if members of agricultural organizations agree to have their labor trucks inspected by the Highway Patrol.
As any farm worker can testify, the condition of most trucks used to haul human laborers is deplorable. Overloaded, aged and decrepit vehicles carry workers to the fields and back to town at night.
The California Administrative Code and the California Vehicle Code require that farm labor vehicle e-Quipment be in safe operating condition, but enforcement is spotty at best.


8/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969
Safeway’s
Scab
o
Sal es Provoke Consumer Boycott
See Pledge Card, p. 11
LOS ANGELES, February 14—Safeway Stores, the nation’s largest buyer of California table grapes, has become the target of a major consumer boycott, according to United Farm Workers Director Cesar Chavez. Safeway Stores, Inc., with 2,172 stores and sales of $3.36 billion in 1967, is the second largest chain store in the nation.
The nation’s largest chain, "A & P" has indicated increasing compliance with the boycott in many areas. Many other chain stores have also removed themselves from the dispute by refusing to handle grapes.
Safeway, by continuing large purchases of California table grapes, has placed itself squarely in the middle middle of the grape strike and boycott.
According to UFWOC spokesmen, Safeway annually buys more than 250 car lots of grapes worth over $1 million from one grower, Giumarra Vineyards, alone. UFWOC researchers estimated total Safeway purchases of grapes at several million dollars.
The boycott of Safeway will be nationwide and will include stores in British Colombia, Alberta, and Manitoba, Canada. Special efforts will be made in the Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Los Angeles areas, where one-third of Safeway’s stores are located. There will be an extensive program of consumer education on die grape strike and boycott, and on Safeway’s role in sustaining the growers and preventing negotiations between growers and workers. Consumers will also be asked to sign petitions, which will be sent to Safeway, which pledge:
“We, the undersigned support the striking grape workers in their non-violent efforts to organize, to win recognition, and to bargain with their employers. "Because of the growers’ consistent refusal to negotiate, grape workers have been forced to boycott all California table grapes. Various small chain stores and independent food markets in California and elsewhere are giving their support to grape workers by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest chain store in the state, has consistently supported the growers by continuing to buy table grapes picked by strikebreakers.
“Therefore, we the undersigned will not shop at Safeway Stores until Safeway makes a public announcement they will not handle California table grapes for the duration of the boycott.
“It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not to handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore assuring a prompt end to the dispute.
The pledge petitions will be turned over to Safeway management. It is hoped that the petitions, in addition to the picketing, will help convince Safeway that consumers would rather shop elsewhere than shop at a store which is so blatently siding with die growers.
EL MALCRIADO., February 15, 1969/9
{NO, January 12—California grape growers are | wised to spray their grape vines with sodium ii a chemical insecticide used to control “black ]j' on Thompson Seedless grapes.
Lynn, Fresno County farm advisor noted that should obtain permits from their county stare commissioners for both purchase and ap-:ji of the poison.
(chemical contains die deadly poison arsenic.
IGROWERS VS GROWERS
PROPANIL THREAT
SACRAMENTO, February 13—The State of California has banned the use of the deadly weed-killer propanil in Glenn, Colusa, Butte, Yuba, and Placer Counties, and in parts of Sutter and Yolo Counties, effective February 13, according to a decree issued last month.
The ban was the result of a petition by prune producers, almond growers, and others, who claimed that the herbicide, used extensively by rice growers in these areas, was endangering their prune crops.
State Director of Agriculture Richard Lyng said that the propanil problem will be reviewed again next year. “We recognize that propanil is a valuable aid to rice growers," he said, “and we regret the necessity of placing these extensive restrictions on its use.”
The controls were passed after a series of hearings, in which the prune and almond growers complained that propanil, when sprayed by airplanes on rice fields, drifted over the neighboring orchards and caused extensive damage to blossoms and fruit.
TULARE, February 13—The State Board of Agriculture turned its attention to the grape boycott and problems of pesticides in a public meeting at die Tulare County Fair Grounds today (see accompanying story on die Board’s consideration of pesticides). Board President Allan Grant—who is also president of the California Farm Bureau—and other board members made their position plain by inviting Delano grape grape growers Martin Zaninovich and Jack Pandol to report on the strike and boycott. No representative of the Union was invited.
Both Pandol and Zaninovich assured die Board that no strike existed and that the boycott had no effect. But Pandol described in worried terms die need of
ATE AG. BOARD
WORRIES OVER BOYCOTT
of growers to seek markets abroad, especially in Viet-Nam.
Pandol noted grapes sold for as high as $1 a pound in Viet Nam and that California growers were collecting $3.60 a lug for diem. While denying that die boycott had any effect, Pandol stated flatly that “boycotts should be discouraged or legislated against.” The most perceptive comment made by Pandol was that “once markets are lost, they may never be regained.”
Zaninovich was also bitter in his denunciation of ' the Union for launching a strike—that didn’t exist—
and promoting a boycott—which had no effect. He too called for laws to outlaw strikes and boycotts, but admitted that someone had felt the pressure of the boycott. “Whenever a grower is denied a given market, he must look elsewhere. This is where some growers have felt the direct impact of the boycott,” Zaninovich said.
Lionel Steinberg, millionaire grape grower from Coachella rnd one of the few “liberals” on the Board, noted that he considered it "shortsighted” for the Board to pretend that no strike exists and that the boycott is ineffective. Almost all of Steinberg's workers walked out on strike last June after he had refused to hold elections or negotiate with die Union.
The strike was certified as of June 20. Steinberg also seemed to resent the fact that the rice growers and dairy farmers and others on the Board were calling for a “Fight to the death" against the Union, since it was he and other grape growers that did all the fighting and were faced with a catastrophic loss of their 1969 crop.
Another sane note was introduced when Board member John Garabedian of Fresno read a personal letter to him from the Vice President of TOPCO, a produce wholesaler who buys fruit and vegetables for 25 independent chains. The produce buyer closed his letter, which discussed the increasing pressure on the chain stores throughout die country, by pleading, ‘John, the retail food chains throughout the country are begging California agriculture for a solution for the grape boycott before the 1969 grape season.’
EL MALCRIADO SAYS: The solution is no farther away than your telephone, Mr. Grower. Call 725-1314 in Delano, California, and ask for Cesar Chavez.


__—110/EL MALCRI ADO, February 15, 1969
__â– MlU/tLITl
NEWS FROM THE VALLEY
TEXAS CHURCHES FIRE KRUEGER
PHARR, TEXAS, February 7—Rev. Ed Krueger and his wife Tina, who were fired by die Migrant Ministry of the Texas Council of Churches last week, have announced that they will stay in the Rio Grande Valley and continue to fight for justice for farm workers. The United Church of Christ minister said, “We are not bitter. We still have a lot of faith. We can support ourselves by working in the carrots, the onions, the grapefruit. We will stay here."
Krueger and his wife, the former Tina Guevara of Crystal City, had moved to the Valley in the winter of 1966 to help farm workers. Both had been migrant workers themselves. They soon gained the displeasure of the local power structure by'defending the right of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee to organize a farm workers’ union. The Union was at that time organizing melon pickers in the Valley.
They gained national attention on the night of May 26, 1967, when they along with two dozen others, mostly Union members, were seized, slapped, kicked, Mrs. Krueger's arm twisted behind her back and her dress ripped, arrested and thrown in jail by a herd of Texas Rangers. The Texas Council of Churches filed a law suit against the Rangers in behalf of the Kruegers. Now, because of political pressure, the Council says it wants to drop the suit. When the Kruegers refused to sign a statement exonerating the Rangers, they were fired.
Meanwhile, the firing of Rev. Krueger has caused a nationwide feeling of revulsion and disgust against the Texas Council of Churches and its owners. A special committee headed by the director of the National Council of Churches' Spanish American Ministries, Dr. Alfonso Rodriguez of New York, will visit the Valley and investigate the firing. Mexican
American groups throughout Texas and the Southwest have launched vigorous protests. Spokesmen for die Union called the firing “disgusting—a cynical political move to silence one of the few voices in South Texas speaking out in favor of justice for farm workers."
Leader of die move to silence Krueger was Dr. Harold Kilpatrick, executive director of the Council, who stated, “We feel its time to quit fighting city hall, the court house, the school board, and organizing against the establishment. It’s time to develop communications with these people and work with them."
Kilpatrick said, in relation to the law suit against the Texas Rangers, “We feel the purposes for which the suit was filed have been accomplished...At the proper time, we expect to announce a compromise and withdraw." Kilpatrick denied that the Council’s demand that Krueger drop the law suit was the specific reason for his firing.
Krueger said that on three occasions Kilpatrick had “strongly reccommended" that he and Tina sign the statement releasing die Rangers of all blame in the incident. “To approach a thing like this with a feeling of forgiveness is one thing—but you can’t change history and say nothing was done wrong," Krueger stated.
Krueger said that the power structure had also objected to his testifying before die Advisoy Commission on Civil Rights, the Senated Subcommittee on Migratory Labor, die Crusade Against Poverty’s investigation of hunger in Texas, and other state and private investigations looking into poverty in South Texas. Krueger has also been active in helping die Colonias del Valle, an association of groups from numerous barrios throughout the Valley which work on self-help and community improvement projects.
REV. EDGAR KRUEGER "Biblical justice is biased in
favor of the poor and powerless"
SLAVE LABOR RELATIONS ACT
SACRAMENTO, January 30—Grape grower John Giumarra Jr. of the Giumarra Fruit Corporation called for a law similar to the National Labor Relations Act that would, among other things, outlaw strikes at harvest time, provide for “cooling-off periods" when workers would be forced by court order to continue working after going on strike, and require farm workers’ unions to post bonds to ensure that crops would not spoil. The fantastic plan was presented in a recent speech to the California Tomato Growers Association in Sacramento.
Giumarra also called for unemployment insurance for farm workers paid for by the workers and the federl government but not by the growers, according to a report in the Fresno Bee.


EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969/11
SPIRO T. AGNEW GOBBLES GRAPES
BALTIMORE—Grapes were a featured delicacy when Vice President Spiro T. Agnew (who?) through his inaugural bash for hangers-on and political buddies last month.
UFWOC Vice President Andy Imutan commented,
"Serving grapes at die Vice President's inaugural ball shows how much die new administration cares about die forgotten people.*
How then can we expect die resolution of urban problems when die government doesn’t care about the rural poor."
Serving grapes at die ball makes a joke out of the legitimate aspirations of our people,” Imutan said.
Clarke Langrall, who was in charge of planning the celebration, said Imutan’s accusations were ridiculous. “They are absurd,” he said._ "How are we supposed to know die grapes were from California.
We can’t check the pedigree of every grape we buy.
The grapes could have been from Madagascar for all we care," Langrall said.______________________
Poison Trial...
continued from page 3
his opinion die use of pesticides was leading agriculture onto a treadmill, and that he recommended other kinds of insect control. He said experiments with cotton had shown in some instances that fields which were not treated with insecticides actually produced more cotton than similar fields where die "pests” were eliminated by chemical means.
Wall wants testimony from other experts.
The crop dusters maintain that the formulas they use are trade secrets, and that it would ruin their businesses if the nature of the poisons they use were revealed to the public. UFWOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen is demanding the right to see the records so that the Union can take steps to protect workers it represents.
Wall and County Counsel Ralph Jordan have tried to show in the hearings that the Union has some in-cidious purpose in wanting to inspect the records, but just what that ulterior plan is supposed to be remains unclear.
Nevertheless, one crop duster said that 80 per cent of the men who mixed the chemicals for use were off the job at some time during last year because they had suffered effects from handling the stuff.
Thomas Griffin said he stopped applying the chemical TEPP when he himself became extremely ill because of contact with spray mists. Griffin operates a ground-rig spraying company in Kern County.
ARIZONA BANS DDT PESTICIDE
Earlier this month, the State of Arizona forbade farmers in that state the use of the chemical pesticide DDT, because of complaints from dairy and cattle
owners that the presence of DDT in cattlefeed was endangering animals and consumers of milk.
Of 80 wimesses who testified on the proposed ban before the Arizona State Pesticide Control Board, only two opposed banning die chemical from farms in the State.
The Arizona Farm Bureau also opposed the use of DDT, according to published reports.
Meanwhile growers and public officials continue to claim that there is little danger to farm workers and consumers from the use of insecticides such as parathion, malathion and TEPP.
SIGN THE PLEDGE
We, the undersigned support the striking grape workers in their non-violent efforts to organize, to win recognition, and to bargain with their employers. Because of the growers’ consistent refusal to negotiate, grape workers have been forced to boycott all California table grapes. Various small chain stores and food markets are giving their support to grape workers by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest chain store in die state, has consistently supported the growers by continuing to buy table grapes picked by strikebreakers. Therefore, we the undersigned will not shop at Safeway Stores until Safeway makes a public announcement they will not handle California table grapes for the duration of the boycott. It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not to handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore assuring a prompt end to the dispute.
NAME_____________________- â–  ___________
ADDRESS .....
CITY ; STATE ZIP


,12/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969
MARCHING ACROSS THE USA':;;:5f!i
DELANO, February 5— At least two dozen new fulltime boycott offices will be opened across the nation by mid-February, according to UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez, who has announced a major escalation of the boycott on California table grapes.
In his announcement, Chavez said die new Nixon administration would be unlikely to stop die flood of strikebreakers being imported from Mexico.
“Nixon may even try to revive the bracero program," Chavez warned. “We can be sure that Nixon will attempt to help the growers recruit strikebreakers and aid the growers in other ways. Our only remaining weapon is the boycott.
"We have learned from experience that the boycott can stop the sale of California table grapes through the use of consumer education and political and economic pressure from the local community,” Chavez said.
“Growers have sought to avoid the effects of the boycott by developing new markets, especially in the South,” Chavez said, “but even there, response to die boycott has been good. The Union plans to expand
boycott efforts in the South during die next few months. Several farm worker families have already moved to the area to set up the boycott campaign in Southern cities."
A series of regional planning sessions andconfer-ences have been planned to prepare the ground for confronting the first shipments of Coachella Valley grapes in early May. Strategy conferences are planned for Atlanta, South Bend, Albany, Des Moines, Seattle and Dallas during coming weeks.
“The time has come for workers and growers to sit down and negotiate," Chavez said once again.
“But if they want to fight us again in 1969, they will find us better prepared and more determined than ever." he concluded.
TERROR TACTICS AGAINST BOYCOTTER
Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Chavez are friends of La Huelga. Reuben is a student of biochemistry, and supports his family by working on die docks. He is an active member of die ILWU. Pat works on the Bay Area boycott campaign almost full time. They have a two-year-old son.
Since Reuben and Pat Chavez began working with the boycott, they've had flower pots hurled through their windows. Their house has been smeared with eggs and smashed grapes. Bags of rotting grapes have been left on their doorstep.
While they participated in a march in Lamont— a march in support of die Di Giorgio workers who feared loss of dieir Union contract when the company announced die sale of die ranch—somebody wreaked havoc with the transmission of the Chavez's car.
One of the flower pots smashed through the window of their house while Mrs. Chavez was talking to a reporter.
On another occasion, a pot came through the window and just missed striking her mother in the head.
San Leandro Mayor Jack Maltester has said the city will not tolerate such acts of violence, but so far there have been no arrests.
The Mayor, Chief Rogers of die Police Department, and City Manager Wes McClure visited die Chavezes last Saturday, after 92 people walked from their house to a local church to protest die harassment that they are suffering.
Police Captain W. O. Rosaaen told EL MALCRIADO that the cops have no information on who has been harassing the Chavezes. He said 'close patrol' had
been ordered for the house, but that only meant cruising squad cars were told to take special notice of die Chavez house.
The harassment also included threatening and obscene calls, Mrs. Chavez said. Their phone number has been changed once, and may have to be changed again.
She told EL MALCRIADO she and her husband have no idea who is responsible for the acts committed against diem, but she noted that the harassment began soon after they were followed home from a boycott picket line by an unidentified individual.
The picket line had been marked that day by the presence of a counter-picket line from a ‘neo-Nazi’ organization, Chavez said.
Capt. Rosaaen said there was no connection between recent arrests of neo-Nazis in the Bay Area and what has been happening at die Chavez home.
'They'll have to burn us out before we'll move,’ Chavez siad. “I had to quit school to stay home evenings with my wife and baby. It's hard to remain nonviolent under these conditions, but we will not arm ourselves."
(Chavez, who is 31, is not related to UFWOC Director Cesar Chavez, though he thinks his last name may account for his having been singled out by whoever it is that hates boycotters enough to terrorize them.)
Recently; somebody shot a pellet gun through die window of boycott headquarters in nearby Oakland.
And that’s die way life is in the Bay Area these days.
Viva la Causa!!


EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969/13
Letters

Recently newspapers and magazines in Sweden have been carrying information about the terrible hardship die poor farm workers in California have to face.
It is for us impossible to believe that it can be necessary for a group of workers in a wealthy nation like the U.S. to be forced to living conditions hardly any better than one can observe in extremely poor underdeveloped countries in Africa.
During a visit to the U.S. in May I personally had die chance to learn from various trade unionists with personal experience that the information we receive here is no exaggeration.
We are a small Union, consisting of workers occupied with heating, cleaning and repairing apartment houses. Thus we have no direct contact with farm workers in Sweden.
Yet we feel compelled to make some contribution—even though it will be only a token one. But we hope to prove that your situation is observed with sympathy around the world and thus serve as a moral encouragement. Perhaps also as an inducement for other unions. Use the amount in accordance with your judgment.
Please convey to your colleagues and to your members as well as would be members our most warmhearted greetings and our sincere hope the situation shall change to the better as the power of the United Farm Workers Union grows to the extent that exploitation and humiliation of die workers no longer is possible. A check for $500 is enclosed.
Yours fraternally,
E. Tore Nyman, Fastighetsanstalldas
Forbund,
Stockholm, Sweden,
January 7,1969
On Non Violence
Editor:
...The very basis of non-violence in the spirit of love and in truth that you have founded your Huelga movement must lead to small farm cooperatives. The practice of Ahim-sa, harmlessness, is the only salvation of humanity.
Tolstory, Ghandi, Martin Luther King and others have given us a pattern of living simply, creatively and nobly.
The founders of die Catholic Worker movement are proving that the human heart will respond to die needs of people.
Abe Zwickel, D.C. Hemet, California February 6, 1969
EL MALCRIADO P.0. Box 130 Delano,. Ca. 93215
Send It To Dad
Editor:
This is to let you know that I have been enjoying reading EL MALCRIADO and I have always discussed it with my father, who lives in Red Rock, Texas, and he is also interested in EL MALCRIADO.
Since I live here in California and have the pleasure of buying it in stores, I am ordering a subscription for my father so he will also be informed of what is happening here in California. Red Rock is a small community close to Austin.
Thank you very much.
Mrs. Janie Garcia Earlimart, California
Just published:
THE DIRT ON CALIFORNIA
AGRIBUSINESS AND THE UNIVERSITY
by Anne & Hal Draper
THIS 32 PAGE BOOKLET DETAILS:
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*WH0 BENEFITS from uc.'s Farm INVENTIONS.
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From EL MALCRIADO review, January 1, 1969:
"The evidence, presented in carefully documented and annotated prose by the authors, both long time friends of the United Farm Workers, shows that the University has prostituted itself time and again for die growers, issuing false and misleading reports..."
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14/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969
SLOW road to riches
NEW FARM MINI. WAGE
WASHINGTON, D.C., February 1— The federal minimum wage for farm workers went up to a lavish $1.30 per hour this month, though the law applies only to workers on farms which sell their produce in interstate commerce.
California has no minimum wage for men, so farm workers who are employed on smaller farms do not necessarily receive even that.
Farm workers in Texas and the rest of the South, as well as in other areas of the country, still earn less than $1.30 an hour.
Though enforcement of minimum wage laws in agriculture is notoriously lax, a worker who did earn $L30 an hour, and who worked 40 hours every week, 52 weeks a year—a highly unlikely situation— would earn the magnificent wage of $2,704 for the year, less Social Security, disability insurance deductions, and income tax.
A worker who is covered by the miminum wage can demand back wages to February 1 if he received less than $1.30 an hour since then. That is, if he can get a lawyer or get through the procedures of a Labor Commissioner's hearing on his own.
Meanwhile, California growers still resist payment of the $1.65 minimum for women, which was set by the State Industrial Welfare Commission to go into effect on February I, 1968. Growers stalled enforcement of the $1.65 minimum in the courts for months, and it is believed many workers never managed to get their retroactive payments after the law finally went into effect.
Many growers in California simply ignore the regulation, 14 months after it went into effect.
The California Departmentof Employment notified growers recently it will no longer fill orders for adult male or female workers unless wages offered are higher than $1.65 an hour* Though the minimum wage rule applies only to women, the Ci-
vil Rights Act forbids the hiring of men and women to do the same job at different rates of pay.
So the law says farmers covered by federal laws must pay $L30, and farmers who are covered by state laws must pay $L65. Workers report that few growers pay more than $1.40 or $1.50.
Only those workers covered by die United Farm Workers contracts can expect to earn $2 or more per hour on a regular basis. For the others, unionization seems the only way to improve their condition.
Viva la Causa!

Viva la Causa Y
El Progreso
fauntcty 'WCexicOAt-Attt&U&ut
Attorney
Fresno California

SISK ON. "HIGH” FARM WAGE
DOS PALOS, February 6—Congressman Bernie Sisk of Fresno County has criticized die “high wages" that California farmers have to pay farm workers, and says that such high wages put California growers at a disadvantage when selling their goods in competition with growers from other states.
In a speech to Dos Palos and West Fresno County growers here last night, the Decomcatic congressman said, “We have been caught with die highest agriculture rate in the country and we’re at a competitional disadvantage.”
Sisk went on to say, *1 am certain we all agree any farmer is willing to pay a reasonable price for labor whether it be a $1.65, $2.00, or $2.50f if he can realize income from his product to justify the wage and still leave him something at the end of the year to tak home.”
EL MALCRIADO SAYS: “We” don’t agree with Sisk that farmers are all willing to pay reasonable wages.
The last 70 years of near-slave-labor wages and conditions that proved the farmer will pay the lowest : wage that he can get away with paying. Wages have risen slightly in the last few years because of pressure from the Union and because of the end of the bracero program, not because of any increased generosity on the part of the farmers. Only when legislation is passed giving farm workers equal rights with other workers, legislations which Bernie Sisk has opposed, and only when the Union has signed contracts with growers which commit them in writing to "reasonable wages” and decent conditions, can workers expect a fair shake from the growers.
But obviously Congressman Sisk is more concerned with the "competitive disadvantage ” of the growers than with the still abysmally low wages of the workers.


EL MALCRIADO, february 15, 1969/15.
GROWER BLASTS PESTICIDES “FRAUD”
TULARE, February 13—The State Board of Agriculture today called for a thorough Investigation of false and misleading labels on chemical pesticides, herbicides, and chemical fertilizer products. Dr. Francisco Bravo, Los Angeles physician who owns a ranch in the Imperial Valley and is a member of the Board, introduced the resolution calling for the investigation of labeling, and also for a study of pricing and profits for the chemical companies. Bravo suggested regulation of the chemical industry, similar to that of the drug industry, to protect die farmer, the farm worker, and the consumer.
Dr. Bravo accused the chemical companies of outright fraud in labeling their fertilizer and pesticide products, and noted that there is inadequate knowledge of die problem and inadequate research being done on the immediate and long range results of use of these products. ‘I understand 700 or 800 persons per year are injured from these chemicals," Dr. Bravo noted. "The mortality rate is high, and 40 to 50 per cent of those injured or killed are Spanish sur-named.” Because of the lack of concern on die part of the chemical industry for the short and long range effects of these products, Dr. Bravo accused them of sponsoring "chemical warfare, not only on the bad bugs, but also on die good bugs and human beings.” Bravo said that chemical companies had failed to regulate themselves and there were totally inadequate laws regulating them. "They have no responsibility to the public,” he noted, "except to collect die money, and they've done a lot of that! Farmers are spending millions of dollars for these products and are not getting die expected results.”
Dr. Bravo said that his preliminary investigations showed that there was considerable price gauging and "possible collusion” among chemical companies to fix profits. He noted one common chemical pesticide cost 1.6 f to produce and then was sold to farmers for 51 with over 3000 per cent profit for die chemical company.
Bravo's resolution followed testimony by Dr. Harry Spires of the State Department of Agriculture, who noted that California uses more pesticides than any other state. In liscensing these pesticides for public use, Spires admitted, "We do not make tests of our own. We take the word of the chemical companies."
On the key issue of chemical residues left on plants and fruit and vegetables, which may remain on the fruit for weeks and perhaps months, Spires stated, "These tests are more * happenings' than 'tests' as such." The consumer may wonder when a 'test' is 'not a test as such.' Tests for residues are on a casual basis, with no regular proceedures for testing fruit and produce before they are marketed.
Dr. Bravo pointed out that over the last 15 years, with die Kefauver investigations and public concern
about the problem, the public was now a little better protected from die drug industry than in die past. "We've done it in the drug industry, with all die human variables, and I diink we should do it here," Bravo concluded.
Final testimony at the Board meeting was by Dr. J. E. Swift o f die University of California Extension Service, who noted that the Extension Service does research on pesticides and 'recommends' for or against use of certain brands, but such recommendations have no legal status. Deadly Dieldrin and Aldrin pesticides “were eliminated from our reccommenda-tions three years ago,” Swift noted, but are still being sold and used. When Board Member Ernest Hatch, a rice grower from Oroville, stated emphatically these chemicals were no longer in use, a local grower in the audience rose to correct Hatch, and stated that he knew of many cases where both chemicals were still employed.
STRIKE IN THE ORCHARDS
MCFARLAND, February II—About 50 farm workers employed by R & L Farms, a Me Far land-based grower of almonds, citrus, peaches, and other crops, walked off die job yesterday in protest over wages and working conditions.
An official of the company was notified by tele- • gram that the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee represented the firm's agricultural employees, and that the Union was requesting recognition and negotiation of a contract.
Strike leaders said that the workers walked out of the almond orchards after their demand for wages originally promised diem by die company was rebuffed.
A spokesman said that the men had been promised $1.65 for pruning almond trees, but were receiving only $1.50 per hour.
He also said the workers were later offered die $1.65 wage, but that they refused until they had the protection of a full Union contract.
Attempts by Union officials to reach the employers were unsuccessful today. UFWOC Vice President Gilbert Padilla and Secretary-Treasurer Antonio Oren-dain were named to advise the workers in their -strike action.
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Full Text

PAGE 1

DAIRYMEN, GROWERS, SPRAYERS SPEAK OUT ON POISONS p_. 3, 8, 11, 15 BLOCKADE ON GRAPES P. 2 3.

PAGE 2

2/EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969 ' 'THE NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON 'THIS PAGE ARE FRa-1 SWEI:N AND TELl. OF EUROPE'S GROo/ING SUPPORT FOR 'THE GRAPE BOYCOTT (See sto""Y below and on next page!. I ONDON, February 1.2-British dock workers refused to unlood more than 70,000 pounds of Cali fornia table grapes here today, and a blockade on the scab grapes has been extended to all English, Swedish, Finnish, and Norwegian ports . The grapes, sent to England a boord the Bahia Blanca, a Johnson l ines ship, were destined for l On don supermarkets. English longshoreman; truck drivers, warehouseman , and others involved in the trans\)ortation industry, are all members of the Transport and General Workers Union (TGWU), which has more Continued on J.

PAGE 3

EL MALCRIADO, February 15, 1969/3 Poison Trial Delayed; Emerge DELANO, February 15--Six months ago, Bakersfield Superior Court judge J, Kelley Stee l e , a long-time farm worker foe, issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting county official s from showing public record s on the use of poisonous chemicals in the field s to Union investigators. A temporary resttaining order i s sup posed to be just !:hat--temporary--but months later that order is still in effect. Farm workerS continue to l abor in the fields, continue to handle dangerous chemicals, and continue to dod ge the sprays which issue from crop dusting airplanes a nd ground rigs. Hearings on the order began January 29, . and were recessed a week later. Dr. Th omas Milby of the State Department of Public Health had brought a report with him from Sacra men[O s howin g Scores o f injuries to farm workers as a result of the use of pesticides. Rules of evidence are tight, however, and when crop dusters' attorney Stephen Wall .sai d he wanted to go to Sacramento to verify the reports before c losing arguments were presented, a r .ecess was granted by Judge George A. Brown until February 27. At the conclusion of the hearings, Judge Brown will r u le on whether the temporary restraining order should beCom e a preliminary injunction or whether it should be Jilted entirely. In either case, there i s little hope that Agricultural ' Comm issioner Seldon Morley will reveal the of thf records in his office. Wall, who represents CCJ:mpanies that apply pesticides for grape growers, said he a lso wants to take sworn statements f ro m experts at the University of Calif. Dr. Robert Van den Bosch testified that in continuea on page 11 EUROPEANS BLOCKADE GRAPES Continued from page 2. than 1,500,000 me _mbers. Led by Frank Cousins, the TGWU voted on December 28 to refuse to handle the scab grapes, and has led l:he boycott efror[S in EnglsanCt. The Swedish Transport Workers Union passed a similar resolution on Jnauary 18, and has been joined by many other Swedish unions in backing the boycott . An earlier cargo of scab grape-1i, estimated at 230,000 pounds, and bound for English and Swedish ports on the ships Brasilia and Aconcagua Valley was turned back from its original destinations. The sh ip s finally had to dock at the German port of Hamburg, from which the scab grapes were shipped overland to Swede n. By the time they arrived, the boycott had receive
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in this issue Europeans Blockade G r apes , p. 2 3 Poison Trial Delayed, p . 3 Labor Bus Hazards , p . 7 Safeway' s Scab Sales , p. 8 Texas Churches Fire p.IO Terrorism Against Boycotters, p.l2 New Farm Mini. Wage, p. 14 Strike in the Orchards, p. 15 SUBSCRIBE TO EL MALCRIAD FOR A FRIEND KENNETH J. LEAP GENERAL car .•• life ... fire PHONES: Office, 485-0650 Res i 3222 East Mayfair Blvd. Mayfair Shopping Center Fresno, Calif. 93703 Mr. Leap wilz." be in the UFWOC SeMJice Center, 105 A"sti, Delano , every Wednesday to aewe U nion members. We have a targe Se l.ection of Spanish MagaBooks , and Rec ords. The only completely Mexican Hortuary in northern California SANCHEZ-HALL MORTUARY F'RESNC 1022 "B" STREET 237:1:1 Services avaliable everywhere, • ,No mat .. ter where you I tve, our price Is the same , • • death.notlces In newspapers and on the radio are Included! , • can make arrangements for every econ0111lc situation 7'etsphons: 23?-3532 EL MALCRIADO p .o. BOX 130 'DELANO, CA 93215 More and more people arc finding out that a subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker strugsle. Don't be left in this coupon FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH I 3 . SO TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY .TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. CITY

PAGE 5

E L MALCRIADD, February 15, 1969/5 7sed of 200 Chicago area commission merchants in the fruit and produce business, noted that California growers, as of late Dece mbe r , still had $15 million worth of table grapes i n storage that should have been marketed before january. 20. More than 50, 000 bOxes , wortll $200,000 , jam the ware houses in C hicago alone, Barnett reported. " The bOycott is successful," Barnett said. He personally was stuck with 4,000 bOxeso of California table grapes and faced a loss of $17,000 on them. j ewel Food, National Tea Company, and almost all of the supermarket chains in the Chicago area have stopped handling grapes and will not replace them. The few store s that S till have grapes are handling them like bootleg items , according to Barnett. There are n o grapes on the counters, but the manager may keep a bOx or two of the forbidden fruit in the back room for special customers whose taste for scab grapes has not been a(fected by conscience or knowled ge of the condi:tions under wnich the grapes were picked. The Chicago Boyc ott Committee, led by Eliseo Medina, is now working on stores in the suburbs and in downstare Illinois and Indiana. And several more full time are heading for the Windy City to assure a successful boycott for the I%9 season. HATM YE N A WHOL E C ITY IIEA,EO IH E . UIL FUIT OF A lAD HE S I OO

PAGE 6

European r>e!Jr>ese>na""'e the SWedish Bui Service Employees Union , one of many Eur opean unions sup porting the grape boycott. Present are {l, to r . ) Tore Nyman, V. Pestoff, S. HoZ.st, S . Lindkvist, RoZ.and Larsson and Ake Johansson . (See stor a e 2 -SMALL FARMERS BACK BOYCOTT SPRINGF I ELD , ILLINOIS , Febru ary 7--TIJC Illinoi s Farmers Union, an organ iz ation of sma ll farmers, vote d unan i mous l y this week to endorse tl)e boycott of C3 lifornia c a b le graJX!s . President R a y Warson said 'We are concerned about d1e Ca l iform a farm workers because we under stand that d 1ey have been exp l oited by d1eir employers. 1l1e resolut ion passed by d1e aruJ.Ual convention of the Fa rmers Union praised UFWOC: for opposing "dt e m a lpract ices of corporation farming " and for stri v i ng •to af firm the dignity of the man w h o tills the soil." "One of the advantages of corporation farming ove r , family farmin g is d 1 e emplo yment o f season! farm workers on star vation wages. " Since " the emp loyment practices o f corporation farmshavedemeaned dte farm workers by denyin g him a voice in d e terminin g working and living conditions which effect his de stiny , " the resolu tion read, "be it resolved !hat the Illi nois Farmer s Union request d1at the residents of Illinois refrain from purchasing California fresh table grapes ••• " EL MALCRIADO'S SPECIAL PESTICIDE We have sorrie exce ll ent powder for extermi n ating cockroaches. Grab the r oach by the second leg on the left side, and rur n the leg to rhe right. This will make . the coc;kroach open his mouth t
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15, 1969/7 lNG THERE IS HALF THE FUN February 6--"Many farm labor vebeing found in such a condition as to make them unsafe for operation until announcement said, if members of agricultural organiagree to have their labor trucks inspected Highway Patrol. any farm worker can testify, the condition of trucks used to haul human laborers is deplorOverloaded, aged and decrepit carry to the fields and back to town at night. . .. contractors, day hauls . . . Th e Highway Patrol announcemen t truck operators obtain a safetyi inspection and windshield sticker that they had passed inspection "before the harvest season, H but there appears to be no mandatory inspection procedure. In urging organizations to have their members' trucks inspected for adequate "seating facilities, safety equipment and condition of mechanica l the Patrol made no mention ofindividualgrowers,laborconcractors, and individual truck owners, who haul a large share of the human cargo ev ery y ear. Officials of . the United Farm Workers hav e suggested that members and other farm workers refuse to ride in any farm labor .truck which does not have a Highway Patrol windshield sticker showing it has passe d a safety inspection. Fotos by George Sallis from 'Basra'

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. . ... Safeway's Scab Sales Provoke Consumer Boycott See CaT'd, p . . 11 1969 LOS ANGELES, February 144Safeway StOres, the nation's largest buyer of California table grapes, has beCome the target of a major consumer boycott, ac4 cording to United Farm Workers Director Cesar Cha4 vez . Safeway Stores, Inc., with 2,172 stores and sales of $3.36 b illion in 1967, is the second largest chain store in the nation. The nation's largest chain, • A & has indicated increasing compliance with the bOycott !n many areas. Many other chain stores have also removed themselves from the dispute by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, by continuing large purchases of California table grapes, has placed itself squarely in the middle middle of the grape strike and boycott. According to UFWCX::: spokesmen, Safeway annually buys more than 250 car lots of grapes worth over $1 million from one grower, Giumarra Vineyards , alone . UFWCX::: researchers estimated total Safeway purchases of grapes at several million dollars. The boycou of Safeway w111 be nationwide and will include stores in British Colombia, Alberta , and Manitoba, Canada. Special efforts will be made in the washington, D.C., San Francisco, and Los An4 geles areas, where one4third of Safeway's stores are located. There will be an extensive program of consumer education on the grape strike and bOy con, and on Safeway's role in sustaining the growers and preventing negotiations between growers and workers. Consumers will also be asked to s ign petitions, which will be sent to Safeway , which pledge : •we, the undersigned support the striking grape workers in thei r non-violent efforts to organize, to win recognition, and to bargain with their employers. "Because of tlle growers' consistent refusal to nego tiate, grape workers have been forced to boycott all California table grapes. Variou s small chain stores and independent food markets in Californ i a and else where are g iving their support to grape by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest chain store in the state, has consistemly supported the growers by continuing to buy table grapes picked by strikebreakers. •Therefore, we the undersigned will not shop at Safeway Stores until Safeway makes a public aMounce ment they will not handle California table grapes for the duration of the boycotL •It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not to handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore assuring a prompt end to the dispute . The pledge petitions w111 be turned over to Safeway management. It is hoped that the petitions, in addition to the pick eting , will he l p convince Safeway that sumers would rather shop elsewhere than shop at a store which is so blatently siding with the growers. -, culture rurned its attention to the grape boycott and problems of pesticides in a public meeting at the Tulare County Fair Grounds today (see accompany ing story on the Board's consideration of pesticides) . Board President Allan Grant--who is also president of the California Farm Bureau--and other board mem bers made their position plain by inviting Delano grape grape growers Martin Zaninovich and jack Pan do! to report on the s _trike and boycott. No representa tive of the Union was invited. Both Pando! and Zaninovich assured the Board that no strike existed and that d1e boycott had no effect. But Pando! described in worried terms the need of BOARD WORRIES VER BOYCOTT 1969/9 THREAT SACRAMENTO, February 13--The State of California has banned the usc of the deadly weed-killer propanil in Glenn, Colusa, Butte, Yuba, and Placer Counties, and in parts of Sutter and Yolo Counties, effective February 13. according to a decree issued last month . The ban was the result of a petition by prune producers. almond growers, and others, who claimed that the herbicide. used extensively by rice growers in these areas, was endangering their prune crops. State Director of Agriculture Richard Lyng said that the propanil probl .em will be reviewed again next year. •we recognize that propanil is a valuable aid to rice growe rs." he said1 •and we regret the necessity of placing these extensive restrictions on its The contro' Is were passed after a series of hearings, in which the prune and almond growers complained that propanil, when sprayed by airplanes on rice fields, drifted over the neighboring orchards and caused exto blossoms and fruit. He but adm itted that someone had felt the pressure of the boycott. •whenever a grower is denied a given market, he must look: elsewhere. This is where some growers have felt the direct impact of the boycott, • Zaninovich said. Uone l Ste inberg, millionaire grape grower from Coa chella :-nd one of the few •liberals" on the Board , noted that he considered it "shortsighted" for the Board to pretend that no strike exists and that the boycott is IDeffective. A lmost all of Steinberg's workers walked out on strike last June after he had refused to hold elections or negotiate with the Union. The strike was certified as of june 20. Ste inberg also seemed to resent the fact that the rice growers and dairy farmers and others on the Board were calling for a •Fight to the death" against the Union, since it was he and other grape growers that did a ll the fight in g and were faced with a catastrophic loss of their 1969 crop. Another sane note was introduced when Board member j ohn Garabedian of Fresno read a personal letter to him from the Vice President o f TOPCO, a produce of growers to seek markets abroad, especially in wholesaler who buys fruit and vegetables for 25 Nam . independent chains. The produce buyer closed his Pando! noted grapes sold for as high as $1 a pound letter, which discussed !he increasing pressure on the in VietNam and that California growers were collecting chain stores throughout the country, by pleading,' john, $3.60 a lug for them . While denying that the boycott the retail food chains throughout the country are had any effect, Pando! stated flatly that "boycotts begging California agriculrure for a solution for the should be discouraged or legislated The grape boycott before the 1969 _ grape season.' most perceptive comment made by Pando! was that • once markets are lost, they may never be regained." E L MALCRIADO SAYS: The solution Is no farther Zaninovich was also bitter in his denunciation of away than your telephone, Mr. Grower. Call 725the Union for launching a strike-that didn't exist--1314 in Delano , California, and ask for Cesar Chavez •

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NEWS FROM THE VALLEY CHURCHES FIRE PHARR, TEXAS, February Ed Krueger and his wife Tina, who were fired by the Migrant Ministry of the Texas CoUncil of Churches last week, have announced that they will stay in the Rio Grande Val ley and continue to fight for justice for farm workers. The United Church of Christ minis'ter said, "We are not bitter. We still have a lot of faith. We can support ourselves by working in the carrots, the onions, the grapefruit. We will stay here . • " Krueger and his wife, the former Tina Guevara of Crystal City, had moved to the Valley in the winter of 1966 to help farm workers. Both had been migrant workers themselves. They soon gained the displeasure of the local power structure by defending the right of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee to organize a farm workers' union. The Union was at that time organizing melon pickers in the Valley. They gained national attention on the night of May 26, 1967, when they along with two dozen others, mostly Union members, were seized, slapped, kicked, Mrs. Krueger's arm twisted behind her back and her dress ripped, arrested and thrown in jail by a herd of Texas Rangers. The Texas Council of Churches filed a law suit against the Rangers in behalf of the Kruegers. Now, because of political pressure, the Council says it wants to drop the sui t, When the Kruegers refused to sign a Statement exonerating the Ran gers, they were fired. /\:'lean while, the firing of Rev. Krueger has caused a nationwide fee ling of revul sion and disgust against the Texas Council of Churches and its owners. A special committee headed by the director of the National of Churches' Spanish American Ministries, Dr • . AlfonsO Rodriguez o f New York, will visit the and investigate the firing. Mexican American groups throughout Texas and the Southwest have launched vigoi-ous protests. Spokesmen for the Union called the firing "disgusting--a cynical political move to silence one of the few voices in South Texas speaking out in favor of justice for farm workers." Leader of the move to silence Krueger was Dr. Harold Kilpatrick, executive director of the Council, who seated, •we feel its time to quit fighting city hall, the court house, the school board, and organizing against the establishment. It's time to develop communications with these people and work with them." Kilpatrick said, in relation to the law suit against the Texas Rangers, "We feel the purposes for which the suit was filed have been accomplished ••• At the proper time, we expect co announce a compromise and withdraw. • Kilpatrick denied that the Council's demand that Krueger drop the law suit was the specific reason for his firing. Krueger said that on three occasions Kilpatrick had "strongly reccommended" that he and Tina sign the statement releasing the Rangers of all blame in the incident. "To approach a thing like this with a feeling of forgiveness one thing--but you c3.n't change history and say nothing was done wrong," Krueger stated. Krueger said that the power structure )]ad . also objected to his testifying before the Advisoy Com mission on Civil Rights, the Senated Subcommittee on Migratory Labor, the Crusade Against Poverty's investigation of hunger in Texas, and other state and pri vate investigations looking into poverty in South Texas. Krueger has also been active in helping the Colonias del Valle, an association of groups from numerous barrios throughout the Valley which work on . self help and community irilprovement projects. ''Bi bl ical justice is biased in favor of The poor and powerless'' SlAVE lABOR RElATIONS ACT SACRAMENTO, January 30--Grape grower john Giumarra Jr. of the Giumarra Fruit Corporation called for a law similar to the National Labor Re lations Act tha t would, among other things, outlaw strikes at harvest time, provide for "cooling-off periods" when workers would be forced by court order to continue working after going on strike, and require farm workers' unions to post bonds to ensure that crops would not spoil . The fantastic plan was pre sented in a recent speech to the California Tomato Growers Association in sacramento. Giumarra also called for unemployment insurance for farm workers paid for by the workers and the federl government but not by the growers, according to a report in the Fresno Bee.

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I EL M/ILCRIADD, February 15, 1969/11 AGNEW GOBBLES GRAPES BALTIMORE--Grapes were a featured delicacy when Vice President Spiro T. Agnew (who?) through his inaUgural baSh for hangers-on and political buddies la s t month. UFWOC Vice President Andy lmutan commented, • Serving grapes at the Vice President's inaugural ball shows how much the new administration cares about the forgotten people ... How then can we expect the resolutlon of urban problems when the government doesn't care about the rural poor. • Serving grapes at the bal1 makes a joke out of the legitimate aspirations of our people," Imutan said. Clarke Langrall, who was in charge of planning the celebration, said J m utan' s accusations were ridiculous. • The y are absurd." he said._ "How are we s uppo se d to know the grapes were from California. We can't check the pedigree of every grape we buy. The grapes could have been from Madagasca r for all said. Tria I. . . . con tinuea rrom page his opinion the use of pesticides was lead in g agri culrure onto a treadmill, and that he recommended other kinds of insect control. He said experiments with cotton had shown in some instances that fields Which were not treated with insec ticides actually produced more cotton than similar fields where the •pests• were elfminated by chemical means. Wall wants testimony from other experts. The crop dusters maintain that the formulas they use are trade secrets, and that it would ruin their businesses if the nature of the poisons they use were revealed to the public. UFWOC: General CoWlsel owners that the presence or DDT in canlefeed was en dangering animals and consumers of milk. Of 80 witnesses who testified on the prOposed ban before the Arizona State Pesticide Control Board, only two opposed banning the chemical from farms in the State. The Arizona Farm Bureau also o p posed the us e of DDT, according to published reports, Meanwhile growers a nd public officials continue to clai m that there is little danger to farm workers and consumers from the use of insecticides such as p a r athion, malathion and TEPP. j e romeCohenisdemandingtherlghtmseetherecords SIGN THE PLEDGE so that the Union can take steps to protect workers it !we. the Wlderslgned su pport the srrikinggrapeworkers represents. in their non violent efforts to organize, to win recog Wall and County Counsel Ralph Jordan have tried nition, and to bargain with their employers. Because to show in the hearings that the Union has some inof the growers' consistent refusal to negotiate, grape cidiou s purpose i n wanting to inspect the records, but workers have been forced to boycott all California ca jusc wha t that ulterior plan is supposed to be remains ble grapes. Various small chain scores and food mar-unclear. Nevertheless, one crop duster said that 80 per cent of the men who mixed the chemicals for use were off the job at some time during last year because they had suffered effects from handling the sru!f. ' Thomas Griffin said he stopped applying the chemical TEPP whe n he himself became extremely ill beca us e of contact with spray m ists. Griffin operates a ground rig spr aying company in Kern County. ARIZONA BANS DDT PESTICIDE Earlier this month, the S tate of Arizona for bade farmers in that state the use of the chemical pesticide DDT, _ "?f complainfs from dairy kets are giving their s upport t o grape workers by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest chain score in the state, ha s consistently supported the growers by continuing to buy table grapes picked by strikebreakers. Therefore, we the undersigned will not shop at Safeway Stores unti l Safeway makes a public an nOWlcement they will not hand le California cable grapes for the duration of the boycott. It is our tiope that a decision by Safeway not '? handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore a ssuring a prompt end to the dispute, ' CITY ZIP

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time boycott Offices . will be opened across the nation by mid-February, accOrding to UFWOC: Director Ce sar Chavez, who has announced a major escalation of the boycott on California table grapes. In his announcement, Chavez said the new Nixon administration be unlikely to stop the flood of being imported froll'l: Mexico. •Nixon may even try to revive the bracero prog ram,.. Ghavez . warned. •we canbe sure that Nixon will attempt to help the growers recruit strikebreak-. ers and aid the growers in other ways. Our only 'remaining weapon is the boycott. "We have learned from experience that the boycott can stop the sale of California cable grapes through the use of consumer education and political and economic pressure from the local community," Chavez ..said. "Growers have sought to avoid the effects of the boycott by developing new markets, especially in the Huelga. Reuben is a srudent of biochemistry, and supports his family by working on the docks. He is' an active member of the ILWU. Pat works on the Bay Area boycott campaign almost full time. They have a two-year-old son. ' Since Reuben and Pat Chavez began working with the boycott, they've had flower pots hurled through their windows. Their house has been smeared with eggs and smashed grapes. Bags of rotting grapes have been left on their doorstep. While they participated in a march in Lamont-a marC h in support of the Di Giorgio workers who feared loss Of their Union contract when the company announced the sale of the ranch--somebody wreaked havoc with the transmission of the Chavez's car. One Of the flower pots through the window of their house while Mrs. Chavez was talking to a reporter. , On another occasion, a pot came through the window and just missed striking her mother in the head. San Leandro Mayor Jack Maltester has said the city will not tolerate such acts of violence, but so far there have been no arrests. The Mayor, Chief Rogers of the Police Department, and City Manager Wes McClure visited the Chavezes last Sarurday, after 92 people walked from their house to a local church to protest the harassment that they are suffering. Police Captain W. 0. Rosaaen told EL MALCRIADO that the cops have no information on who has been harassing the Chavezes • . He said 'close patrol' pad 1 , , f I , , . boycott efforts in the South during the next few months. 11 Several farm worker families have already moved to the area to set up the . boycott campaign in Southern j , cities." A series of regional planning sessions andconfer-ences have been planned to the ground for confronting the first shipments of Coachella Valley grapes in early May, Strategy conferences are planned for Atlanta, South Bend, Albany, Des Moines, Seat-tle and during coming weeks • "The time has come for workers and growers to sit down and negotiate," Chavez said once again. . "But if they want to fight us again in 1969, they will find us better prepared and more determined been the house, but that only meant cruising squad cars were told to take special notice of the . Chavez house. The harassment also included threatening and obscene calls, Mrs. Chavez said. Their phone number has been changed once, and may have to be changed again. She told EL MALCRIADO she and her husband have no idea who is responsible for the acts committed against them, but she noted that the harassment began soon after they were followed home from a boycott picket line by an unidentified individual. The picket line had been marked that day by the presence of a counter-picket line from a 'neo-Nazi' organization, Chavez said, capt. Rosaaen said there was no connection between recent arrests of neo-Nazis in the Bay Area and what has been happening at the Chavez home. 'They'll have to burn us out before we'll move,' Chavez siad. had to cluitschool to stay home with my wife and baby. It's hard to remain nonviolent under these conditions, but we will not arm ourselves." (Chavez, who is 31, is notrelatedtoUFWCX:: Director Cesar Chavez, though he thinks his last name may account for his having been singled out by it is that hates boycotters enough to terrorize them.) Recently> somebody shot a pellet gun through the Window of boycott headquarters in nearby Oakland. And that's the way life is in the Bay Area these days. Viva Ia causal! I' i ; lJ I I I I I

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Brother Chavez: Recently newspapers and maga:dnes in SWeden ha ve been carry ing information about the terrible hirdship the poor farm workers in California have to face . It is for us impossibl e to be lieve that it can be necessary for a group of workers in a wealthy nation like the U.S. to be forced to living condition s hardly any bet ter than one can observe in extreme ly poor underdeveloped countries in Africa . During a v isit to !he U.S, in May I personally had the chance to learn from various trade unionists with. personal experience that the information we receive here i s no exaggeration. We are a small Union, consisting of workers occupied wtlh h eating , cleaning and repairing apartment houses. Thus we have no direct contact with farm workers in Sweden. Yet we feel compelled to make some contribution--even though it will be only a token one. But we hope to prove that your ' s truation is observed with sym pathy around the world and thus serve as a moral encouragement. Perhaps also as an inducement for other unions. Use the amowa in accordance with your judgment. Please con vey to your colleagues and to your members as well as wou l d be members our most warm hearted greetings and our sincere hope the situation shall change to the better as the power of the Uni ted Farm Worker s Union grows to the extent that exploitation and humiliation of the workers no lon ger is possible. A check for $500 is enclosed . Yours fraternally, E. Tore Nyman, Fastighetsanstalldas Forbund, Stockholm, Sweden, january 7 , 1969 ' On Non Viole 1 n c e Editor: • •• The very basis of in the spirit of love and in truth that you have foWtded your Huelga . movement must lead to small farm cooperatives. ThepracticeofAhimsa, harmlessness, is the only sal vation of humanity. Tolstory. Ghandi , Martin Luther King a _ nd others have given us a pattern of living simply, creatively and nobly. The founders of theCatholicWor ker movement are proving that the human heart wiU respond to the needs of people . Abe Zwickel , D.C. Hemet, California February 6, 1969 EL M A LCRIADO P .O. Box 130 De 1 a no,. Ca. 932 1 5 Send It To Dad Editor: This is to let you know that I have beenenjoyingreadingELMALCRIADO and I ha ve always discussed it with my father, who lives in Red Rock, Texas, and he is also inter ested in EL MALCRIADO. Since I live here in California and have the pleasure of bu"ying it in stores, I a111 ordering a sub scription for my father so he will also be informed of what is hap-. pening here in California . Red Rock is a small community close to Austin. Thank you very much. Mrs. Janie Garcia Earlimart, California • • Just. published: THE DIRT ON CALIFORNIA AGRIBUSINESS AND THE UNIVERSITY by Anne & Hal Draper Trll S 32 PAGE BOOKLET OCT AILS: *fn'l l}jE LtiiVERSITY OF CALIFORNI A SERVICES l}j E CORPORATION FARMERS, "WJ.n BENEFITS FRCM u.c:s INVENTIONS. *wHY MILLIONS ARE SPENT TO HELP R ICH GRO>IERS , From EL MALCRIADO review, january 1, 1969: •Th e evidence,.. presented in carefully documented and anno tated prose by the authors, both long time friends of the United Farm Workers, shows that !he University has prostituted itself " time and again for the growers, issuing false and misleading re ports ... • PUBLISHED BY I NDE P ENOENT SOCIAL 1 S T C LUBS, P .O. BOX #910, Ber ke ley, Cal. 9 4 701 Please send payment with mail orders: 1 copy, 50; 3 copies, _ $1; 10 copies for $3 . pd adv

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NEW FARM WASHIN'GTON, D.C., Februaryl-The federal minimum wage for farm went up to a lavish $1.30 per hour this month, though the law applies only to workers on farms which sell their produce in interstate commerce. California has no minimum wage for men, so farm workers who are employed on smaller farms do not MINI. WAGE vii Rights Act forbids the hiring of men and women to do the same job at different rates of pay. So the law says farmers covered by federal l aws must pay $1.30, and farmers who are covered by state laws must pay $1.65. Workers report that few growers pay more than $1.40 or $1.50. Only those workers covered by necessar1ly receive even that. the United Farm Workers contracts Farm workers in Texas and the can expect to earn $2 or more rest of the South, as well as in per hour on a regular basis. For other areas of the COillltry, still the others, unionization seems the Fresno California earn less than $l.30 an hour. only way to improve their condition. Though enforcement of wage laws in agriculture is notoriously lax, a worker who did earn $1.30 an hour, and who worked 40 hours every week, 52 weeks a year--a highly unlikely situation-would earn the magnificent wage of $2,704 for the year, less Social Security, disability insurance deductions, and income tax. A worker who is covered by the miminum wage can demand back wages to February 1 if he received less than $1.30 an hour since then. That is, if he can get a lawyer or get through the procedures of a Labor Commissioner's hearing on his own. Meanwhile, California growers still resist payment of the $1.65 minimum for women, which was set by the State Industrial Welfare Com mission to go into effect on Febru ary 1, 1968. Growers stalled en forcement of the $1.65 minimum in the courts for months, and it is believed many workers never managed to get their retroactive pay ments after the law finally went into effect. Many growers inC<.liforniasimp ly ignore the regulation, 14 months , after it went into effect. The CaliforniaDepartmentofEmployment notified growers recently it will no longer fill orders for adult male or female ,workers unless wages offered are higher than $1.65 an hour. Though the minimum wage rule applies only to women, the Ci-Viva la Causa! SISK ON. "HIGH" FARM WAGE DOS PALOS, February 6--Congressman Bernie Sisk of Fresno County has criticized the "high wages" that California farmers have to pay farm workers, and says that such high wages put California growers at a dis advantage when selling their goods in competition with growers from other states. In a speech to Dos Palos and West Fresno COWlty growers here last night, the Decomcatic congressman said, "We have been caught with the highest agricul rure rate in the country and we're at a competitional disadvantage." Sisk wenr on to say, 'I am certain we all agree any iarmer is willing to pay a reasonable P,rice for labor whether it be a $ 1.65, $2.00, or $2.50f if he can realize income from his product to justify the wage and still leave him someth in g at the end of the year to tak home ... EL MALCRIADO SAYS: "We" don't agree with Sisk that farmers are all willing to pay reasonable wages. The last 70 years of near-slave-labor wages and con ditions that proved the farmer w i H pay the lowest : wage that he can get away with paying. Wages have risen slightly in the last few years because of pressure from the Union and because of the end of the program, not because of any increased generosity on the part of the farmers, Only when legislation is passed giving farm workers equal rights with other workers, legislations which Bernie Sisk has opposed, and only when , the Union has signed contracts with growers which commit them in writing to "reasonable wages• and decent conditions, can workers expect a fair shake from the growers, But obviously Congressman Sisk is more concerned with the •competitive disadvantage" of the growers than with the still abysmally low wages of the workers.

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EL MALCRJADO, february 15, 1969/15. GROWER BLASTS PESTICIDES 11FRAUD" WLARE, February 13The State Board of Agriculrure today called for a thorough inve stigatio n of false and misleading labels on chemical pesticides, herbicides, and chemical fertilizer products. Or. Francisco Bravo, Los Angeles physician who owns a ranch in !he Imperial Valley and is a member of the Board, introduced the reso lution calling for lbe investig
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