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El Malcriado, Volume 3, Number 1

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Title:
El Malcriado, Volume 3, Number 1
Series Title:
El Malcriado
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United Farm Workers Organizing Committee
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Delano, CA
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United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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DELANO, CALIFORNIA
March 1, 1963
MENDOZA’S FAKE UNION EXPOSED


./F.L MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
GOVERN MENT REPORT REVEALS:
GROWERS FINANCE, CONTROL SCAB UNION
The Uhited Farm Workers have the goods oh the phoney scab ‘union’ represented by Jose Mendoza and others of his ilk, it was revealed Monday, and UFWOC spokesmen say they are prepared to go ahead with suits which would require growers and others to pay for damages to the Union's organizing drive.
Section 1122 of the California Labor Code prohibits employers from financing, dominating, controlling, or interfering in a labor organization.
Gilbert Rubio and Shirley Fetal-vero of die ‘Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association (AWFWA) filed a report on February 22 widi the U.S. Department of Labor.
In it they revealed that ‘AWFWA was an outgrowth of an untitled group led by the growers which hired Jose Mendoza and Gilbert Rubio to persuade the workers that
tiiere was (sic) two sides to the union story, don't be afraid of Chavez, be united and we will protect and support you.’
‘This group and others became AWFWA which was incorporated by Jose Mendoza, Gilbert Rubio and Shirley Fotalvero in July, 1968,’ the report said.
One of the aims of AWFWA was to, ‘try to settle grievances or dis-
putes between farm workers and the grape growers.’
Also included was a long list of strike-busting techniques to be employed, includingcounter-picketing, spying on UFWOC activities, maintaining black lists of active Union members, and a host of others.
Working with AW FWA was another front for the growers known as Mexi-can-American Democrats for Republican Action. Evidence is now available, UFW OC General Counsel Jerome Cohen said, which shows that MADRA acted as a collector of funds later turned over to AWFWA.
Among those listed as active members or associates of the organization by Rubio and Fetalvero, in addition to themselves, include some of the following:
• Wanda Hillary, a Bakersfield Bircher;
• Growers John Giumarra, Jr., Robert Sabovich, Melvin Sabovich, Eugene Nalbandian, William Mose-sian, John Kovacevich, and Jack Pandol;
• Teresa Arambides, a female merchant of labor whose picture once graced the cover of KL MAL-CR1ADO (see page 3);
• Employees of the Di Giorgio Corporation, which is forbidden to engage in Union-undermining activities by its contract with UFWOC.
Funds for activities of AWFWA and MADRA came from growers and some surprising sources such as Blake, Moffet & Town and Zel-lerback Paper Companies, each of which donated $200.
Other contributors were Kern Valley Farms, Richardson Farms, Griffin Spray Company, John Kovacevich, Central California Ice Company, Californians for Right to Work, and many other growers.
Spokesman for AWFWA was Jose Mendoza, who toured the country passing himslef off as the true farm worker, and denying that the scab organization had any connection with the growers. Rubio and Fetalvero described the situation quite differ-
ently when it came time to report to the government.
‘Several meetings involving many persons were held,' they wrote, ‘but only John Giumarra Jr., Robert
Johnny Giumarra, Jr.3 who •sponsored the illegal activities of the AWFWA.
N.Y. Times photo
Sabovich and Jack Pandol gave orders to Mendoza and AWFWA.
Mendoza was recently the recipient of an award by the National Right to Work Committee in Washington, presented by none other than Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen.
An individual named Donald Gaz-zaniga was supposed to keep the records of AWFWA. He operates a one - man show called Public Research Institute, which represents itself as part of California Editors Publishing Company.
Public Research was giving money to Mendoza and Rubio on the grounds that they did research for a pamphlet called ‘California’s Number One Industry Under Attack,’ which contained 36 pages of anti-Union smear material.
John Giumarra Jr. denied the allegations to die Los Angeles Times saying growers would'fight it in court.’ He’ll have his chance to fight in court, but it’s going to be tough. Very tough.


MALCRIADO, March 1, 1569/3
Herrera and Espinosa
Delano City Councilman Frank Herrera, and Police Captain A1 Espinosa, both labor contractors in addition to their municipal jobs, both played some part in the founding of the illegal Agricultural Workers Freedom to Work Association, UFvVOC General Counsel Jerome Cohen has announced.
Cohen said that he has information proving that Espinosa and Herrera, both of whom must make decisions regarding LTVVOC as part of their official duties, were present when founders of the organization met to discuss their illegal activities.
Cohen said that the Union would probably demand resignation of both, but did not give details as to the form of the official protest.
Herrera and Espinosa are Delano’s showcase Mexicans, who prove that anybody, can make it in our fair city.
But then labor contractors are always popular with theCity Fathers.
BED-FELLOWS
Teresa Arambides3 beautiful young labor.contractor from Wasco3 has participated in many anti-Union rallies and events. It is now repealed that she was a sponsor of AWFWA1 s illegal activities. Photo by Big Freddy
SCAB ACTIVITIES MAKE STRANGE
The Di Giorgio FruitCorporation, which has a collective bargaining agreement with the United Farm Workers Organizing Commitiee, AFL-CIO is implicated in theopera-vVorkcrs Freedom to Work Association, it was revealed this week.
Listed among those who were active in AWFWA, a growers-financcd scab ‘union’ were Robert Flores and Jess iMarquez, both supervisory personnel of the l)i Giorgio Fruit Corporation.
F'lores was listed as Di Giorgio’s personnel manager, and Jess Marquez as the manager of a l)iGiorgio labor camp.
According to a sworn statement by AvVF'vVA President Gilbert Rubio and Secretary - Treasurer Shirley Fetalvero, both were present at a May, 1968 meeting in Sambo’s Res-
Di Giorgio &. Co...
taurant in Bakersfield at which John Giumarra Jr. and others organized AWFWA.
Later, according to information furnished by I'l WCX'General Counsel Jerome Cohen, Di Giorgio gave AWFWA the use of mimeograph machines on the company's ranch to print anti-LTWOC leaflets. They also paid for paper and supplies.
Cohen said Di Giorgio's action will be proven in court to be illegal under the terms of its Union contract, which prohibits any activities to undermine the Union, as well as a violation of State laws prohibiting employer interference in an employee organization.
Suits against 1 )i Giorgio were being prepared, and would be filed shortly, Cohen said.
Robert Di Giorgio


VEL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
in this issue
Growers Finance, Control Scab Union p. 2
Safeway Sides with Struck Grape Growers p, (,
Nixon Eyes Farm Labor Legislation p. g
Automation Nears for Wine Grape Harvest - p. 9
Cops Tear Gas Colorado Strikers^______________________p. 10
EL MALCR1ADO, The Voice of the Farm Worker , is published twice monthly by the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee* AFLr CIO, Subscriptions in the United States and its possessions are $3.50 per year, and foreign, including Canada and Mexico, US $5. Subscriptions for members of UFWOC are included in monthly dues.
Editorial and business offices located at die northwest corner of Garces Highway and Mettler Avenue, Delano, California.
Address all correspondence to; EL MALCRIADO, Post Office Box 130, Delano, California 93215.
Sedorid class postage paid at Delano, California,
For advertising rates, contact Jaime' Reyes at (805) 725-3337 or the^jnaito
mmmxvkms .................
You are welcome to reprint ma-teriai from EL MALCRIADO, provided $ copy is sent to us and die, item is - credited "From EL MALCRIADO--UFWOC."
0 free tor, OArfdC Larry jtl Jong. .Asst. Dir,, UFWOC ‘Antonio Orendain^Treas., UFWOC David M- Ftshlow.i.,Managing ||
....Business Mng.
-S.... ..Associate Ed.
RICH LABOR CONTRACTOR GETS AWAY WITH MURDER
IMMOKALLE, FLORIDA—Wardell Williams, 32, a farm labor contractor, killed his common-law wife, Josephine Crawford, 35, on December 5, 1967. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter after the murder occurred, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times.
Circuit Judge Harold Smith said on February 21,
1969, that Williams was “too valuable" to send to prison and sentenced him to 20 years’ probation and ordered him to spend two months in Collier County jail each year until 1988. He must report each July 1, and spend the non-harvest months of July and August behind bars.
“He is anemployer of people," the judge said. “When farmers need fruit pickers or other workers, they deal trhough him. To put him away would, be putting people out of work."
Defense attorney Jerome Pratt said William’s payroll probably was $400,000 to $500,000 each year.
He hauls his crews by bus and truck to the crops. Farmers pay Williams and he pays the pickers.
Farm workers have learned throughout the years that farm labor contractors can get away with almost anything—this time even murder.
Picketers in East Los Angeles, protesting the murder' of a 17 year old boy by a cop, carried picket signs that read, “Gringo Justice is spelled M-O-N-E-Y”.
Isn’t it the truth!
Robert J. Sanchez Ouner
The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California
SANCHEZ=HALL MORTUARY
FRESNO
1022 “B” STREET TELEPHONE 237-3532
Services available everywhere. . ,No matter where you live, our price Is the same . . .death notices in newspapers and on the radio are Included. , . we can make arrangements for every economic situation Telephone 237-3532
EL MALCRIADO More and more people are finding out that a P.O. BOX 130 subscription to EL MALCRIADO is the best way
DELANO, CA to keep up with the farm worker struggle.
93215 Don't be left out--send in this coupon today!
FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SENT TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR.
NAME-nombre
English__ Espanol__
ADDRESS-domicilio_ CITY-ciudad
STATE-estado
ZIP
ft


I. MALCRIADO. March 1 1969/5
ZANINOVICH AWARDED FOR. . . LABOR POLICIES?
Delano grower Martin Zaninovich, owner of Jasmine Vineyards, has received an award for his great record in labor relations. Zaninovich’s workers walked outon strike in 1965 and have not returned. He refuses any negotiations with the United Farm Workers. He has refused to grant his workers an election. He is president of the South Central Farmers Committee, which refused to meet with UFWOC to come up with some kind of solution for the problem of protecting farm workers who handle deadly pesticides.
So, logically, the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association gave him the William Garfitt Foundation award for being a leader "in die industry’s effort to come to an agreement with the labor leaders responsible for die present boycott situation.”
In the presentation ceremony at die Association's annual convention in New Orleans, L. F. Garrett Jr. of Kansas City, Missouri, said,
Zaninovich "was faced with a situation that could have been devastating to the industry and its people.
As a result, Mr. Zaninovich was required to guide a group of people along a path through danger unlike that which any other member has faced in many years.” Zaninovich said he was accepting die award "in behalf of all the Delano grape shippers” and he complimented the members of the industry for their splendid support, the Produce News reported.
According to the Produce News, “Mr. Zaninovich has been die object of every kind of economic and personal harassment, but has successfully continued to operate his firm in the finest traditions of business and the fresh (sic) industry."
Good ol’ Zaninovich.
The finest tradition of the industry must include
Martin Zaninovich and L. F. Garret
the use of strikebreakers, refusal to allow, workers collective bargaining rights, and refusal to negotiate with a legitimate labor union.
But he’s a suffering soul. According to the Produce News, (known to its devotees as die 'Pink Sheet’--because of die color of its paper, not because it leans towards a liberal persuasion), Mr. Zaninovich has been harassed.
We’re glad tiiey admit die boycott of fresh scab table grapes from California has been successful. The workers have been harrassed by dieir working and living conditions for decades.*
Poison Ads To Be Regulated
WASHINGTON, D.C.—Pesticide advertising, aimed at getting growers to pour more chemicals on dieir crops, will have to stick closer to die facts if new Federal Tirade Commission proposals go into effect.
According to reports in the press, die new regulations would prohibit advertising which "claims diat the product is safer, less toxic, or less hazardous than indicated in the labeling.”
Advertising which said diat products were less toxic or less hazardouos dian indicated in die labeling, or "diat less care is necessary in the preparations for use” than indicated on the labels would also be prohibited, die reports said.
Scientists who testified during recent hearings in Kern County Superior Court have charged diat many pesticide compounds are used primarily because of oil and chemical company advertising campaigns, rather than for any real agricultural necessity.
CARAVAN SETS MARCH 22 TRIP
SAN FRANCISCO— Next food caravan to Delano is slated for Saturday, March 22.
Departures are from 568 47th Street, Oakland, at 7 AM, and from San Francisco Labor Temple, 2940 16tii Street, San Francisco at 8 AM.
For information on transportation or to offer a place in 'your car to odiers, call 655-3256 after 7 PM.
Bring your sleeping bag, and stay overnight in Delano.
The farm workers look forward
to greeting you.


6/EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
SAFEWAY SIDES WITH STRUCK GROWERS
"Continue in silence to sell California table grapes, and we will be forced to make you feel the pricks your conscience has somehow spared you,” Cesar Chavez told Safeway Stores, Inc., in a February 24 letter.
Addressed to Board Chairman Robert A. Magowan at Safeway’s Oakland, California offices, the letter gave California’s largest supermarket chain notice that it would be singled out for the Union's boycott campaign unless it reconsidered it’s decision to continue selling the scab fruit.
“The largest chain in the West, Safeway is also a major buyer of California table grapes; by continuing to sell grapes picked by strikebreakers, it now stands between the farm workers and the justice we seek," Chavez wrote.
“Recognizing this, consumer groups sympathetic to die farm workers’ cause are preparing to launch a massive campaign against Safeway.”
During recent weeks, thousands of consumers, mostly in California, have signed pledges to halt all purchases at
Safeway stores until the chain “makes a public announcement that they will not handle California table grapes for the duration of the boycott.”
Safeway had 2,172 stores in operation in 1967, and 2,241 stores by the end of 1968. Profits to stock-total of $55 million. Total sales were $3.7 billion during 1968.
The chain annually buys more than $1 million worth of grapes from the Giumarra companies alone, and its annual sales of grapes would fill a freight train with 250 cars.
A delegation of UFWOC representatives met with Safeway bosses Herman Weber and Malcolm Grover on February 4 in San Mateo, California. Though the delegation asked them to have their Board of Directors announce publicly that Safeway was going to stop selling scab grapes, no reply was forthcoming.
Copies of Chavez's letter also went to Safeway President Quentin Reynolds and Vice President Herman Weber, who is chief of Industrial Relations.
j SIGN THE PLEDGE ~1
We Will Not Shop At Safeway UntiLM
We, the undersigned, support the striking grape workers in their non-violent efforts to organize, to win recognition, and to bargain collectively with their employers.
Because of the growers’ consistent refusal to negotiate, grape workers have been forced to boycott all California table grapes. Various small chain stores and independent- food markets in California and elsewhere are giving their support to grape workers by refusing to handle grapes. Safeway, the largest chain store in the West, has consistently supported the growers by continuing to buy table
grapes picked by strikebreakers.
THEREFORE, WE THE UNDERSIGNED WILL NOT SHOP AT SAFEWAY STORES UNTIL SAFEWAY MAKES A PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT THAT THEY WILL NOT HANDEL CALIFORNIA TABLE GRAPES FOR THE DURATION OF THE BOYCOTT.
It is our hope that a decision by Safeway not to handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers to negotiate a just settlement with their grape workers, therefore assuring a prompt end to the dispute.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY, STATE
YOU CAN HELP US'. Tell your friends and neighbors about the grape boycott. Ask them to help. And if there is a Safeway store in your county or city, ask them to sign the pledge. GRACIAS'.
This Petition Distributed By: Return completed petition to;
NAME: _________________._______________;_____ "DON’T BUY GRAPES CAMPAIGN"
________________________________» United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO
ADDRESS:
CITY:
STATE
ZIP
P.O. Box 130, Delano, Calif. 93215 (phone 805-725-1314)
(Yes, I will pass around the petition in my neighborhood. Please send me more petitions.)


EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/7
Julian Balidoy watches as Lynn Adams signs the boycott pledge. Balidoy is one of the organizers of the pledge drive in Lop Angeles. (If you have not yet signed the pledge3 turn to page 6)._____________________'
ATTENTION WASHINGTON D.C. BOYCOTTERS:
There is a lady named Evelyn C. Backer who is a “consumer consultant" who works for Safeway stores, according to the Supermarket News.
Mrs. Backer's job is to visit junior high and senior high schools in the District of Columbia and tell people how nice Safeway is.
The gimmick is to demonstrate "food preparation, offer hints on sin-pie meal planning and variety in low cost foods, point out the savings in private versus branded products..." and so on and so on.
Safeway Pulbic Relations Director Lee Foreman says “There is no Safeway sell” involved in the program.
Safeway has sold, is selling, and plans to continue buying and selling scab grapes.
Is Safeway getting a chance to do its advertising in your child’s classroom?
Find out.
Henry 1 1.1 fafoya, Jr.
1 Life Insurance Office, 222-3727
Res., 222-7544 He »alth Insurance 1
FRESNO CALIFORNIA
NOW ALSO IN
LAMONT
11121 Main St.
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Bakeries
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Egg Bread and Pastries All Kinds of Donuts Cakes for all Occasions French Bread
We have a large Selection of Spanish Magazines, Books, and Records.
—— I LAUKEANO UFAUA,
J


8/EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
Nixon Eyes Farm Labor
WASHINGTON, D.C. February 11—President Richard | Nixon has ordered a top level study of proposed farm labor legislation. The President instructed Secretary of Labor George P. Schultz and Secretary of Agriculture Clifford Hardin to study die problems of agricultural labor disputes and strikes and suggest legislation to avoid or solve such problems.
Nixon specifically asked that they study die possi-| bility of extending the Taft-Hartley provisions of the NLRA to cover farm workers. The Taft Hartley | Act restricts the rights of unions and outlaws boycotts. It also allows the President to order striking | workers to go back to work if he feels a strike is a “national emergency."
Though the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee has for years been calling for legislation to protect die rights of farm workers, Union spokesmen warned that Nixon’s past statements indicate that he is more interested in repressing the Union and outlawing the grape boycott than in providing farm workers with legal protection to organize their union, union Attorney Jerome Cohen noted Nixon may be hoping to invoke die Taft-Hartley amendment to obtain a Federal injunction outlawing die right to strike and boycott.
The Union has always favored a fair procedure for representational elections, but such elections should be held to prevent a strike situation. It is difficult to hold a fair election after the growers have been trying to bust die Union for the last 3 1/2 years.
Union leaders have repeatedly stated that they are willing to sit down with grower representatives to work out recognition procedures.
Cesar Chavez, director of the United Farmworkers, has in every impending strike situation called for representational elections and offered to sit down and negotiate details and procedures for such an election. In die case of die general grape strike in 1965, at Schenley, Di Giorgio, and Perelli Minetti in 1966, at Giumarra in 1967, and to the Coachella, Arvin-Lamont and Lodi growers in 1968, the Union offered to hold elections or card checks. In each of these cases, the growers refused the initial offer, and die Union was forced to launch a strike and boycott. As Chavez commented after Giumarra repeatedly refused to discuss elections prior to the strike in 1967, “Once we begin the strike, we will not offer Giumarra two bites at the same apple.”
The examples of Almaden, Gallo, Franzia, Paul Masson, Christian Brothers, and Novitiate Vineyards are all cases where the management arranged for elections or similar procedures, and the Union proved that it had the overwhelming support of the workers.
In all these cases, the companies agreed to negotiate contracts, and no boycott or work stoppage occured.
Jim Drake, administrative assistant to Chavez, commented, “First priority in passing legislation to bring justice to farm workers, is to solve the green card problem."
K**SHB*H


EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/9
AUTOMATION NEARS
FOR WINE GRAPE
TULARE, February 13 — On display at the Farm Machinery Show in Tulare last month was a new mechanical grape harvester which manufactorers claim can remove up to 20 tons of wine grapes per hour and 'replace many pickers,’
At least two companies now have machines on the market. Chisholm-Ryder Co. has two types of machines and FMC Corporation has a similar machine. All sell for approximately $25,000 or more. Machines are already widely used in the New York wine grape harvest, according to Chisholm spokesmen.
The machines are self-propelled, straddles the row of grapes and as it progresses down the row, the grape berries are removed from the vines by the shaking action of shaker arms. On some models, the arms go up and down, shaking the wires to which the vines are tied. On other models, un-rigid ’tongues’ or
'fingers’ reach out from both sides of the machine into the vines, almost coming together in the middle. As the machine proceeds down the row, the ‘fingers’ flap against the vines, and berries, knocking the grapes off the vines. In both cases, the grapes fall on' to a series of inclined overlapping 'catcher plates' and then roll down into the conveyor belts, which run the length of the harvester on either side. The ‘catcher plates' come together under the vines, but give way to go around the trunk of the vine, or stakes, when the machine is passing over them.
The conveyor belts carry the fruit to two short inclined conveyors, which lift the berries and drop them through a kind of vacuum cleaner aparatus which sucks out much of the leaves and twigs and debris which also fall on to the machine as it shakes the vines. Then the fruit is raised with rubber
HARVEST
bucket elevators which discharge them into an arm which stretches out from the machine. This last swinging conveyor arm dumps the grapes into die accompanying trucks or gondolas which move along the next row to receive the grapes and take diem to the winery.
Company spokesmen are also hopeful that the machines can be adapted for harvesting raisin grapes, with the swinging conveyor arm dropping the grapes onto drying pads rather than in trucks. But the machine at present could not harvest table grapes, as most of the grapes shaken from the vine fall onto the machine singly, and many are mashed and damaged. Table grapes can’t be marketed grape by grape, and damaged fruit would ruin the whole bunch unless die fruit is to be mashed or quickly dried.
Before the machines can be used,
Continued on -page 14


Cops Tear-Gas Colorado Strikers

. BRIGHTON, COLORADO—The eight-month National Floral Workers Organization strike agaist Kitayama Brothers flower farm near Brighton ended on Saturday, February 15, with the tear-gassing of fivewomen-picketers who had chained themselves to the gates of the farm.
The five women, Mrs. Mary Padilla; Mrs. Martha del Real, Mrs. Lupe Briseno, NFWO president, Mrs. Rachel Sandoval, and Mrs. Mary Sailas, fastened loops of chain around their waists to keep scab workers from entering the fields, but scabs entered through a back road.
It was reported that at about 7;30 AM, Weld County Deputy Sheriffs advanced on the women carrying a device with a nozzle labeled “pepper fog" after a Kitayama employee had cut the chain at each post of the gate.
Sgt. D. R. Rutz of the sheriffs’ department thenturned on the machine, throwing a snow-white layer of gas on the women. Half-crawling, half walking, the picketers dragged the chain with them out onto the roadway, assisted by men in the group.
The NFWO, composed mostly of Chicana women who worked for Kitayama, began the strike and picketing for higher wages and better working conditions.
Led by Mrs. Briseno, who was fired from the company in May, they demanded $1.60 per hour, which is'a 45-cent an hour increase, and recognition of the newly formed union. Kitayama has refused to negotiate on any of the demands.
The Crusade for Justice and several other Mexican-American organizations in Denver have pledged to support the NF\VO all the way.
In another incident, Gina Gonzalez, 17 year old daughter
of Corky Gonzales, director of the Crusade for Justice, was run down by a car while on the NFWO picket line.
After the incidents, members of the NFWO gathered at the Brighton Action Center for a conference in which they decided to call off die strike temporarily.
Jim Garcia, a spokesman for the organization, said after die conference, “We are ending die strike today.
We are quitting the picket line, but we are not quitting our struggle for farm and floral workers.”
“We are changing die battleground to die state legislature. And I can almost guarantee that, come summer, there will be similar type struggles to unionize floral workers in northeastern Colorado.”
The pickets, waving the red banner with die black eagles and “Viva la Huelga” signs, drove awaypromising to “come back again, and again, as long as Kitayama oppres ses people.”
Peach Growers Hear Cohen
STOCKTON, February 20—UFWOC Attorney Jerome Cohen spoke to die California Freestone Peach Association's annual meeting here last night, and pointed out that there was no difference between farm workers bargaining with canners and processers to get a better price for their peaches. The Peach Association was organized by peach growers as a collective bargaining agent for the growers, in dealing with the canners.
The Union serves the same function for the workers,
Cohen noted.
Cohen thanked the peach growers for Inviting a representative of UFWOC to speak to them. “If the
Continued on page 14
10/F.L MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
Equality Under
The Law In Florida J -
BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA — A Florida law prohibits a farm worker who rents a house or an apartment in a labor camp from having any visitors, even his attorney, to his dwelling that the owner of the house or apartment disapproves of for any reason, it was revealed at a conference on migrant legislation here.
Another Florida law which came under discussion permits toilet facilities to be located 200 feet from the house. One toilet for every 15 women or 20 men is a permissible ration.
And that’s America in 1969.
Cop8 prepare to gas Colorado farm workers in the Kitayama floral workers strike at Brighton.


EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/11
THREE DIE IN LABOR CAMP BLAZE
FLORIDA MIGRANTS STUNNED BY TRAGEDY
HOMESTEAD, FLORIDA — Migrant farm workers, farmers, businessmen, clergymen and public officials met in Homestead, Florida, on Thursday, February 20, to discuss housing conditions for migrant workers. The meeting was called after three children burned to death in a labor camp fire in South Dade, Florida.
Rev. David Russell of the Archdiocese of Miami, one of the meeting participants, called migrant schacks "incinerators of human flesh," and said that, if no action is taken, “I suppose next year more children will burn to death."
Russell also pointed out that the $50 a month rental paid by many migrants, for bare, two room frame •shacks, is far higher than most middle class residents of South Dade pay for their homes.
“A Migrant Legal Service study of housing shows migrants pay $1.89 per square foot per year, compared to an attorney’s home, with air conditioning, plumbing and all conveniences, that costs $1.74 per square foot per year,” Frederika Smith of the Migrant Legal Service reported.
Russell also suggested the elimination of the “grandfather clause,” which exempts pre-1963 migrant housing from new regulations and said a housing code for camps must be enforced.
At the meeting, a 10-man committee was named to study the problem of migrant housing and to rec-commend improvements. Not a single farm worker was assigned to this committee.
The children who burned to death during the fire were a daughter and two grandsons of Mr. and Mrs. James Lewis. They live in a 16- by 16-foot shack at the Krome Avenue Farm Housing Center, for which they pay $12.80 a week.
Just recently, they almost had a house provided by the Homestead Housing Authority. A migrant aide found it for them, then discovered that they were
ineligeble. The house had two bed rooms, but county regulations say there are too many in the Lewis family to live in . a house that small. So they have to stay in their 16-foot-square hovel where county regulations do not apply.
Two of the surviving children of the Lewis family sleep in their one-room Homes-teady Florida shack.
DON'T WAIT UNTIL THE
rHE LAST MINUTE TO DO YOUR TAXES.
Ta£
Union members who need help in filling in their tax forms should come to the Service Center3 JOS Asti St. in Delano, or the UFWOC Office at 10913 Main Street in Lamont for assistance. Bring all available information, check stub$3 or records of income. Deadline for filing taxes is April IS.


12/EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969


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KRUEGER DEDICATED HIS LIFE.
Editor:
I direct myself to you in this manner because we have a cause for which we must fight, and we' must fight until victory is obtained. Here in the so-called Magic Valley (Valley of Tears) we have a war which must be fought whether it’s social or political.
Ed Krueger, founder of Las Colonias del Valle, an organization formed of 23 colonias or small barrios, is a man who has dedicated his life to serving humanity, and by doing so he has committed the great sin of helping farm worker s...a sin that cannot be forgiven by the the Texas Council of Churches, who, in this case, were Ed’s bosses.
And I say 'were* because he has been fired, and was given three days to clear out of the Valley Service Committee office in San Juan, Texas.
So, dear brothers, the Texas Council of Churches, who have always been preaching the right to organize for collective bargaining, and the right to help thy neighbor who has
fallen into die patron system.
And when things like this happen we dedicate ourselves more to the struggle which we must carry on forever if necessary.
Hasta la victoria, Reynaldo de la Cruz McAllen, Tbxas January 30, 1969
VIVA MACARIO..
Editor:
Congratulations for your excellent publication, EL MALCRIADO. We enjoy it very much. It is an excellent way to gain further information and understanding of the farm workers* cause.
Editor:
We recently enjoyed an evening of enlightenment with your Mr. Marcos Murioz, from Boston, who spoke on the Smith College campus.
Although many of us have joined the “Boycott Grapes" ranks for years, it does indeed help us to promote this boycott by having information of a real nature readily at hand. For this I congratulate your EL MALCRIADO--and look forward to further issues.
And may you look forward to a successful New Year.
Sincerely,
Patricia Robertson Chesterfield, Mass.
We also wish to commend the Union for having sent us Sr. Maca-rio Bustos. Because of your representatives’ sincerity and devotion to your Cause, they have inspired many people here to look beyond their own private affairs in order to make a determined effort to help all of you to fully share in the ‘good life’ of this country which is due to you as Americans.
1 Saludos y buena suerte a todosl Sincerely,
Mr. & Mrs. John McGrath Minneapolis, Minnesota February 2,1969

»
John Gregory Dunne's
DELANO
SISbMHhI
THE STORY OF THE CALIFORNIA GRAPE STRIKE
DELANO is die most complete narrative available on the history of die farm workers' struggles to build a union, and on the background to the grape strike. The book recalls the great breakthroughs of 1966, die struggle and final victory with
Di Giorgio, and the U.F.W.O.C.'s success in organizing wine grape pickers. The book carries the reader up to the summer of 1967, when U.F.W.O.C. shifted the strike emphasis to table grape growers and began its strike and boycott against
California table grapes.
DELANO is now being sold by the Union, and proceeds from the sale of the book will go the the U.F.W.O.C. strike fund.
] Please send me __copies of John Dunne's DELANO, The Story of the California j
| Crape Strike. Enclosed is $1.95 for each copy, plus 30 ’Order from: NAME<<<^—amm*
EL MALCRIADO ADDRESS ?
P. 0. BOX #130 “ _ i
DELANO, CA. 93215 CITY .—


EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/13
iHHi illllllll II llfll
Letters
EL MALCRIADO P.O. Box 130 Delano, Ca. 93215

A BALL GAME.
Editor;
Some time ago, I lived for a couple of years in one of the central California towns north of Sacramento, I still remember a warm summer afternoon when a young Mexican-American boy wandered up to watch a Little League baseball game.
He was from a county-run labor camp nearby. I could not get the thought out of my mind that that was as close as that boy would ever get to a ball game by boys his age in that ball field.
It has only been impressed on me lately how far your organization has come in improving the potentialities for a boy like that. In my shortsightedness, I never once thought anybody could do what you are doing.
Please keep sending me your fine newspaper, EL MALCRIADO. Sincerely,
Wesley D. Johnson Seattle, Washington January 25, 1969________________
KEEP IT UP...
Keep up die good work. Will try to help out here.
Just read an AP release in Sunday paper of A & P Eastern Division supporting boycott!!
Viva la Huelga,
Suzie Pelmer
P.S. We appreciate Dale & Jan Van Pelt’s organizing efforts in Seattle. They’ve done a great job-progress is being made. For a union state—the people are not very solidarity minded.
Seattle, Washington February 2, 1969
MY FAMILY ARE ALL WORKERS..
I am very much interested in your Cause. My family are all farm workers. Therefore your Cause is my Cause too. I am a college student planning to be a teacher so I can work with 'culturally deprived’ children.
From my visits to Texas I have noticed that there the percentage of Mexican-American graduates are almost 100 percent higher than ours here in.the Miami area.
It is my opinion that this is due to the lack of teacher and parent motivation. Whereas in Texas we have a large percentage of Mexican-American teachers, here in die Miami Area I still have not met one! We need people who have suffered and can understand goes, ‘It takes one to know one.
I believe we need more of our own to be in leading positions for us to see and follow the examples.
Our parents who are farm workers look forward to our 16th birthday so we, too, can join them in die fields. I am not entirely against diis. Sometimes diis is the only
I LEARN A LOT...
Editor:
I attend our Union Friday night meetings because 1 am an active member and because 1 learn a lot of good things at our get together.
I was only a seventli grade graduate when I came to this country in 1932. I only knew English and Pampango lingo then. But now thank God I have learned and speak Tagalog, Ilocano, Visayan and understand Pangasinan, and I am learning Spanish too.
Respectfully yours, Celedonio T. Gomez Delano, California February 5, 1969
way our families can keep up with things of diis sort.
But one thing our parents and we young people must realize is that without an adequate education we shall go nowhere. We, today’s young people, whould be tomorrow's leaders, and need an adequate education to help ourselves and our people get free from all the miseries and injustices society has placed upon us.
The only way t do this is to get an education to prepare ourselves for the important roles we shall play in the future.
I can not emphasize enough die role our education plays in our Cause. We also need die leadership of great men such as Cesar Chavez and others like him.
I wisli you and everybody else interested and working for our cause my very best wishes.
Viva la Causa y el Progreso, Sincerely,
(Missi Carmen Fernandez Miami, Florida February 20, 1%9
HARD TO BELIEVE-
UFWOC:
It is hard to believe that you can continue what with all die setbacks you’ve had but those of us who are vitally interested in the problems of the poor know that anyone who helps those who are’downtrodden and beaten helps all of us.
We beg you to continue with the Union and the paper—you are really the last hope of the farm worker.
Sinerely,
Viva la Causa,
Gerald E. Robinett Tucson, Arizona
\


WEL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969
PEACH GROWERS
â–  a â– 
Continued from page 10 grape growers were willing to just sit down and talk with us, tliis whole boycott thing would have probably never ahppened,” Cohen said. He accused the grape growers of forcing the Union to start the boycott, since the growers refused to hold elections or negotiate, and brought in green card workers as strike breakers, and traded labels among each other to confuse the selective boycott which was initially directed only against Glumarra Vineyards.
Another speaker at the meeting was Assemblyman William Bagley, (R-San Rafael) who warned farmers that rural areas of the state were losing political control to the more populated areas of die state. He labeled die reactionary Farm Bureau “political eunuchs.” The Farm Bureau has been a major force in convincing grape growers to refuse to negotiate with the Union, and has held out the promise that legislation will somehow be passed to destroy the Union and save grape growers from the inevitable.




A Not Very Good Book On La Huelga
DELANO, by John Gregory Dunne (Farrar, Straus S Giroux, 1967)
DELANO, by John Gregory Dunne, was written in 1967 but remains the most up-to-date book written on the farm workers' Unions and La Huelga.
Dunne, a reporter and writer for die Saturday I;veiling Post, attempts to convey an 'impartial' attitude towards die farm workers'struggle, but gives undue emphasis to growers â– statements and propaganda which simply are not true, limited amount of time in Delano, he lacks the intimate knowledge of people and events that characterize Eugene Nelson's Hl.TJ.GA. IXtnnc also seems to have a very weak
Continued from page 9
considerable preparation of die vineyards must be done. Vineyard posts cannot be over 6 feet. Fruit must Special pruning, tying, and budding must be done so that die vines grow properly. But dicre is no doubt that the machines are on dieir way.
Tlie challenge diat diese machines present to die Union is very serious. The entire crew for operating one of diese machines is die machine operator, and two drivers to operate the accompanying trucks or - gondolas. Manufactorcrs claim it can harvest 1 acre per hour, and remove up to 20 tons of grapes per hour. While it is not the policy of the Union to oppose mechanization or 'srop progress', the Union
background in labor history, and while his narrative of the key events of 1965 through mid-1%7 is adequate, his analysis, his understanding of die events before his eyes, seems shallow.
The book has its most extensive chapters dealing with die events of 1966, the Senate investigation, the March to Sacramento, the Sclien-lcy victory, the Di Giorgio strike and victory, and the unfortunate confrontation with the Teamsters union. The book ends with the summer of 1%8, die mutual assis-
must devise a policy diat will protect the job security' of workers at die ranches involved in mechanization, widi pensions or retraining for diose replaced, and widi wages for the machine operators based on die profits diat die machines will lie earning for the ranches.
Though use of machines of tiiis type may be a year, two years, or five years off, here in California, Union members and ranch committee members should be tiiinking of how the use of these machines can be regulated to provide maximum benefit for die workers. The benefits of this type of ‘economic progress' must be weighed against die possibly destructive results on society, such as unemployment, and the workers must be protected.
tract, agreements with Gallo and Paul Masson. The narrative is at its best in dealing with the Di. Giorgio campaign, though this is also the area where he makes some of his most erroneous observations.
The book provides a good innitial background to die Union's first bigl breakthroughs, widi die wine grape growers. It stops just short of the Giumarra strike, which expanded in to die confrontation with all table grape growers and the launching of the international boycott of table grapes. That history has yet to be written, as does a good, balanced, integrated history of die whole movement. But for those interested in that crucial period of die struggle when die Union won its first contracts and solid victories, Dunne's book is die only narrative available. DELANO is available from EL MALCRIADO. See page 12 for information
Viva la Causa Y
Ei-Progreso
(? a.
'Tfcexictut-
rfw&Uecut
t4#on*teq
Fresno California
tancc agreement widi die Teamsters, terms of die new Di Giorgio con-
AUTOMATION...
/


The sign that tells you people are working together to fill their needs
You do not have to be a member to shop-come in and see how economic
democracy works
GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM WORKERS FROM
The Consumer Cooperative of Berkeley
EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/15
A Snub to Selma
SAN FRANCISCO, February 27— Robert E. Gonzales of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors was scheduled to speak at a Community Progress luncheon in Selma on Saturday, March 1, but cancelled his appearance because of Selma’s opposition to the grape boycott.
"I recognize the position that this leaves the conference in. However, l have no alternative in view of the City of Selma’s position regarding (he Grape Boycott,” Gonzales wrote.
“If I were to speak at the Conference, I would have no alternative but to challenge the philosophy of your City in regards to progress of it's people. I can not see any community or city ever progressing u ntil such time as all its citizens are guaranteed living wages for a day’s work.
“At the present, 1 do not feel that the farm workers rights as employees are being protected in their dealings with their employers,” Gon-zales'cancellation letter stated.
Poison Use Rises
WASHINGTON, D.C.~The use of chemical weed killers and insecticides on America’s crops has been rising steadily during the last 15 years, according to a report of the United States Department of Agriculture.
More than three-fourths of acerage devoted to die cultivation of fruits, nuts, and potatoes were treated with insecticides.
And somebody does all diat spraying?
Farm workers.
And who protects farm workers from pesticide poisoning?
In many cases, nobody.
just published:

THE DIRT ON CALIFORNIA
agribusiness and
THE UNIVERSITY
by Anne & Hal Draper
THIS 32 PAGE BOOKLET DETAILS!
!*H0W THE UNIVERSITY OF [CALIFORNIA SERVICES THE 'CORPORATION FARMERS.
*WHO BENEFITS FROM UC.'S [ [FARM INVENTIONS.
*WHY MILLIONS ARE SPENT [TO HELP RICH GROWERS.
From EL MALCRIADO review, January 1, 1969;
“The evidence, presented in carefully documented and annotated prose by the authors, both long time friends of the United Farm Workers, shows that die University has prostituted itself time and again for the growers, issuing false and misleading reports..."
PUBLISHED BY INDEPENDENT SOCIALIST CLUBS, P.0. BOX #910, Berkeley, Cal. 9^701
Please send payment with mail orders: 1 copy, 50$; 3 copies, $1; 10 copies for $3.
pd adv
1


Discount Dept Store
918 Main st. DELANO
r, r o c
across from the Post Office
Shop for Spring Clothes AT BEES
ALL SIZES, WIDE VARIETY OF STYLES, CLOTHES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILYI
^ at lowest rices anywhen
Also giftst novelties, many other items..
Open SUNDAYS SF&
Visit BEE’S here in DELANO
918 MAIN — ACROSS FROM THE POST OFFICE
ALSO IN-’
COACHELLA STOCKTON
TRACY INDIO
f


Full Text

PAGE 1

MENDOZA'S FAKE UNION EXPOSED

PAGE 2

2/EL t1ALCRIAD0, Harch 1, 1 969 GOVERN ENT REPORT REVEALS: GROWERS FINANCE, CONTROL SCAB UNION The United Farm Workers have putes between farm workers and the emly when It came time to report the goods ori the phoney scab grape growers.' to the government . 'union ' represented by Jose A lso incl uded was a long list of 'Several meetings involv i ng many and others of his ilk, it was r evea led strikebusti n g techniques to be em-persons were heM; they wrote, Monday , and UFWOC spokesmen played , 'but only j ohn Giumarra jr., Robert say they are prepared to g o ahead s pyin g on UFWOC activities, m ain-with suitsw h ic hwou ldrequiregrowraining black lists of active Union crs and others to pay for damages members, and a host of others. t o the Union's o r ganizing drive. Working w ith AWFWA was another Sect ion 1122 of d1e California front for thegrowersknownas Mexi Labor Code prohibits employers can-American Democrats for Re from financ ing, dominating, control-publica n Action. Evidence is now ling , or interfering in a labOr or-ava ilable , UFWOC General Counsel ganization . jerome Cohen said, which shows that Gilbert Rub i o and Shirley Fetal -MADRA act ed asacollectoroffunds vcro o f the 'Agri,cultur a l Wor kers later rurned over to AWFWA. Fre edom to Work Assoc iati on1 Among thoseliscedasactive mem (A\VFWA) filed a report on Feb-bcrs or associates of the organi -ruary 22 with d1e Li.S, Departmen t zation by Rubio and Fetalvero, in of La bor. add ition to themselves, include some In i t they revealed that 'AWFWA of the follow i ng: was an outgrowth or an untitled • Wanda Hillary, a Bakersfield group led by the growers which hired jose Mendoza and Gilbert Rubio to pers uade the workers that Bircher; • Growers john Giumarra, jr. , Robert Sabovich, Melv in Sabo v ich, Euge ne Nalbandian, William Mosc s ian, john Kovacev ich, and Jack P:lndol ; Johnny Giumarra, Jr . ., tJho' • spon sore d the itkgaZ aotivities of the N.Y. Times photo • Teresa Aramb ides, a fema l e SabOvi ch and jack P ando ! gave merchant of labor whose picture order s to o\llendoza and AWFWA, once graced the cove r of E L MALMendoza was recentl y the CRIADO (see pa ge 3 1 : recipient of anawardbythe National • Employees of the Di Gior gio R i ght to Work Comm ittee in wash-Corporati on , which i s for b i dden to i ngton, by none other than e n gage in Union undermin ingactiviSenator E verett NJCKinley Dirksen. tics by i ts contract with UFWOC, An indi v i dual named Don ald Gaz Funds for activities of A\liFWA zan i ga was s upposed to keep the and 1VIADRA c
PAGE 3

EL M ALCR IADO, M arch I 1969/3 Herrera and Espinosa Oclano Cit)' Councilman Frank H errera, and Police Ca p ta i n Al bC General Counsel jer orne C ohen ha s announced . Cohen said thathehasinforttlation prol'in:.: that Espinosa and Herre r a , both of whom must m ak e Jeci-..ions fC).!:' tlleir actil ities . Cohen that the l 'n i on \\"O llld probabl y resignation o f both , but d i d 1101 details as to the form 01 the ofliciat prote,.t. llc•ncra anJ Espinosa an: Dclanv':-:\Je_'\icans, 11ho pru1 e that nnyi.JO<.ly can make it i n our fair city. Out then ''ay:-popular with thcCit\"lather-". SCAB ACTIVITIES MAKE STRANGE BED-FE 11Kl)i Cimf!:io l'rttit('or-po ration, which ha s a collcctiiC bnq:.aining u grccmcnt w.ilh the L initcd l'ann 1 \'orkers Org:anlzir1 g Committee, Af"'L-CJO iutplkater and supplie,.. l"ohc-n / )i 3Ciiun witt lJc pn>ICII i n court to he ilk;;al under the tC'rms u! it.<: L"niun cun tr3CI, which prohibi t.<:anyactilltit•s to unden11ine the t ;nion, ;ls well as a 1 iulation of S tate Jaws prohibitin g etllploye r interference i n an ' employee o r:-;.B nizati o n . Suit,. ao: aitt.<:! I >i Ciotgio II'CJ"C ])(inc; and 1\"0Uldbe filed shortl y , Cohen said. Robert Di

PAGE 4

11/EL MALCRIAOO, March I, 1969 CONTRACTOR in this issue Growers Finance, Control Scab U nion p. 2 SafCway Sides with Srruck Grape Growers p. 6 Nixon Eye s Farm Labor Legi s lation p. 8 Automation Nears for W ine Grape Han-est p. 9 Cops Tear Gas Colorado Str-ikp. 10 , Organizing iC(lG. . Subscriptions its year , and foreign , including Canada l'v1exico, US $5. Subscriptions for members of l}FWoC are included in monthly Editorial and business offices cated at the northwest , cor.ner Garces Highway and. all correspondence to: EL: Post Office . Box isor California 93215. 'RICH LABOR GETS AWAY WITH MURDER IMMOKALL E , FLORIDA--Wardell Williams, 32, a farm labor contractor, his common-l aw wife, josephine Crawford, 35, on December 5, 1967. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter after the murder occurred, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times. Circuit judge Harold Smith said on February 21, 1969, that Williams was " too valuable" to send to prison and s entenced him to 20 years' probation and ordered him to spend two months in Collier County jail each year untill988. must report each july I, and spend the non -harvest months of july and August behind bars. "He is an employer ofpeopk," the judge said. "When farmers need fruit pickers or other workers, they Jeal trhough him. To put him away would . be putting people out of work," Defense attorney jerome Pratt said William's pay roll probably was $400 ,000 to $500,000 each year. He hauls his crews by bus and truck to the crops. farmers pay Williams and he pays the pickers. Far m workers have learned throughout the years that farm labor can get away with almost anydling -dliS time even murder. Picketers in East Los Angeles, protesting the murder o f a 17 year old boy by a cop, carried picket signs that read, "Gringo justice is spelled M-0-N-E-Y", lsil't it the rruth! Rober-t J. Sanchez """''" The only completely Mexican Mortuary in northern California SANCHEZ,HALL MORTUARY FRESNO Services avai I able everywhere .. ,No mat te:where you 1 ive, our prJ"Ce Is the same , . ,death notices in newspapers and on the are Included .•. we can make arrc:mgements for every'economlc situation Telephone 23?-3532 More and more people arc finding out that a subscription to EL MAtCRIADO is the best way to keep up with the farm worker struggle, Don't be left out--send in this coupon t;oday! FILL OUT THIS CARD AND SEND IT WITH $3.50 TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. FOR A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO EL MALCRIADO, SEN:r TO YOUR HOME EVERY TWO WEEKS FOR ONE YEAR. NAMEnombre ___________ Eng lish _ Espanol_ ADDRESS-domicilio _______________ _ CITY-ciudad STATE-estado zrr __

PAGE 5

ZANINOVICH AWARDED FOR. Deiano grower Martin Zaninov ich, owner of Jasmine Vineyards , has recei ved an a ward for his great record in labor relations. Zanino v i ch ' s workers walked out on strik e in 1965 and h ave not returned. He refuses any negotiations with the United Farm Workers. He has refused to grant h i s workers an election. He is dent of the South Central Farmers Committee, which refused to meet witl1 UFWOC to come up with some kind of solution for the problem of protecting farm workers who handle deadly pesticides. So, logically , the United F resh Fruit and Vegetable Association gave him the William Gartin Foundation award for being a leader -•in the industry's effort to come to an agreement with the labor leaders responsible for the present bOycott situation." In the presentation ceremony at the ASsociation's annual convention in New Orleans, L. r-. Garrett jr. of Kansas C i ty, Missouri , said, Zaninovich "wa s faced with a situation that could have been devastating to the industry and its peop le, E L MALCRI ADO, March 1, 1969/5 LABOR POLICIES? As a result, Mr. Zaninovich was required to guide a group of people along a path through danger unlike that which any other member has faced in many Mat'tin Zaninovic h and L . F . GarY'et Zanino v ich sai d he was acceptin g the award beha l f of all the Delano grape and he complimented the members of the industry for their splendid support, the P roduce News repor ted. the use of strikebreakers, refusal to allow . workers collecti ve barga inin g righ ts , and refusal to negotiate with a legitimate labOr union. According to the Produce News , "Mr. Z anino v lch has been the object o f every kind of economic and personal harassment, but has successfullycominue d w operate h i s firm in the finest tradit ion s of bus iness and the fresh (sic) Industry. " But he's a suffering soul. According to the Produce News, (known to its devotees as the 'Pink Sheet'-because of d1e color of its paper, not because i t lean s towards a liberal persuasion), .\Jr. Zanino\ic h has be en harassed. Good ol' Zanino v lch. We're glad they admit the boycon of fresh scab table grapes from Ca lifornia has been successful. 11H:! workers h ave ]Jeen twrrassed by their workin g The finest tradition of the industry m ust include and living for decades. Poison Ads To Be Regulated WASHI NGTON, D.C.--Pcsticidc advertising, aimed ar getti ng growers to pour more chemicals on their crops, will have ro stick c loser to the fac t s H new Federal Trade Commission proposal s go into effec t. Accordin g to r eports in the press , the new r egu lations would prohibit advertis ing which "claims that the product is safer , Jes s toxic, or less hazardous than indicated in the labelin g." Advertising which said that products were less toxic or less hazardouo s than indicated i n the labe lin g , or "that less care is necessary in the preparations for usc" than indicated on the la be l s would also be pro-hibited, the reports sai d . Scientists who resc ifiedduringrecentheari ngs in Kern County Superior Court have charged that many pesticide compound s arc used primarily because o f oil and chem ical company advertising campaigns, rather than for any real agricultural necessirv. ... CARAVAN SETS MARCH 22 TRIP SA.t\1 FRANCISCO-Next food caravan to is slated for S arnrday, iUlrdt 22 . Departures are from 568 47th Street, Oakland , at 7 AM, and from San Francisco J....'lbor Temple, 2940 16th Street, San Francisco at 8 AM. For in formation on transportation or to offer a place. Your car to others, call 65 5-3256 after 7 PM . Bring your Sleeping bag , and stay overnight in Del ano. The farm worke r s look forward to greeting you . / I (

PAGE 6

6/El MALCRIADO, March I , 1 969 SAFEWAY SIDES WITH STRUCK GROWERS "Continue in silence to sell Californ i a ta b le grapes, and we will be forced to make you feel the pricks your conscience has somehow spared you," Cesar Chavez told Safeway Stores, Inc . , in a Feb:fuaty 24 letter. Addressed to Board Cha irman Robert A. Magowan at Safeway's Oakland, California offices, the letter gave California's largest supermarket chain notice that it would be singled out for the Union's boycott campaign unless it reconsidered it's decision to con-tinu e selling the seal; fruit. "The largest chain in the West, Safeway i s also a major buyer of California table grapes; by continu i ng to sell g•apes picked by Str'ikebreakers, it now stands between the fa•m wo•kers and the justice we seek," Chavez Wr'Ote. •Recognizing this, consumer g•oups sympathetic to the farm workers' cause a•e prepadng to launch a massive campaign against Safeway ." During recent weeks, thousands of consumer'S, mostly i n California, have s igned pledges to halt all purchases at SIGN THE PLEDGE Safeway stores until the chain "makes a public announcement that they will not handle California table grapes for the duration of the Safeway had 2,172 stores in operation in 1967, and 2,241 stores by the end o f 1 968. Profits to stock total of $55 million . Total sales were $3.7 billi on during 1968. The chain annually buys more than $1 mill i on worth of grapes from the Giuma rra companies a l one , and its annua l sales of grapes would fill a freight train with 250 cars. A delegation of UFWCX:: rep•esentatives met with Safeway bOsses Herman Weber and Malcolm Grover on February 4 in san Mat eo , California. Though the delegation asked them to have their Board of Directors announce publicly that sareway was goi ng to stop selling scab grapes, no reply was forthcoming. Copies of Chavez's letter also went to Safeway President Quentin Reynolds and Vice President Herman Weber, who i s chief of Industrial Relations. We Will Not Shop At Safeway Until ... We, the undersigned, support the striking g•ape grapeS picked by strikebreakers. workers in their non violent efforts to o•ganize, to win •ecognition, and to bargain collectively with thei• THEREFORE, I'VE THE UNDERSIGNED WILL NOT employer's. SHOP AT SAFE>VA Y STORES UNTIL SAFE\V A Y MAKES Because of the growe r s ' consistent •efusal w ne A PUBLIC ANNOUNCEl'v!ENT THAT T HEY W IL L NOT gotiate, g•ape WO!:'kcr'S have been fo•ced to boycott HANDEL CALIFORNIA TABL E GRAPES FO R TH E all California table grapes. various small chain DURATION OF nm BOYCOTT' . stores and independent (ood markets in California and elsewhere are g iving their suppon to grape I t is OUr' hope that a decision by Safeway not to workers by refusing to handle g•apes. S afeway, the handle table grapes will help bring table grape growers l
PAGE 7

E L MALCRIADO, 11arch 1 , .1969/7 Balidoy watches as Lynn Adams signs the boycott is one of the organizers of the pledge drive in LoF Angeles. have not yet signed the pledge_, tu:rn to page 6). Balidoy (I.f 1-!0U ATTENTION WASHING'IU'.J D.C . BOYCOIT ERS: There is a lady named Eve lyn C. sacker who i s a • co n sume r con sul tant" who work s for Safeway stores, accordin g t o the Supermarket New s . Mrs. Backer ' s job i s to visit junior h i gh and senior high schoo l s in the District o f Co lumbia and te ll CALifORNlA peo p le how nice Safeway is. Th e gimmick is to demonstrate "food prepa r ation, offer hint s on sirr pie mea l pl an ni ng and variety i n l ow cost foods , point o u t the savings in private versus b r a n ded pro ducts ..• " and so on and so on. Safeway Pulbic Relations Directo r Lee Foreman says •n1ere is no sareway sell'" irivolvcd in the pro-gram. safeway ha s so l d , i s sellin g , and plan s to con tinu e buyin g and selling scab grapes. I s 5afeway get ting a chanc e to do its advertising in yourchild'sclassroom? F in d out . M(XICANA Bakeries . /A FOUP LOCAT!Oifc; TO S ERI'E YOU IN KERN COUNTY Egg Br-ead and Pastr-ies AlZ Kinde of Donuts Cakes foro alZ Oeoaeio n e FPenoh BPead W e h ave a laPge Se leotion of Spanish f.fagaaines# Books, and ReoOPds. .............. I=

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8/EL MALeR I ADO, March • IX On Eyes Farm La:bor WASHINGTON, D.C. February 11--President Richard has ordered a top level study of proposed farm labor legislation. The President instructed Secretary of Labor George P. Schultz and Secretary of Agriculture Clifford Hardin to study the problems of agri cultuJ;al labor disputes and strikes and suggest legis lation to avoid or solve such problems. Nixon specifically asked that they study the possibility o f extending the Taft-Hartley provisions of the NLRA , to cover farm workers. TI1e Taft Hartley AC. t restricts th" e rights of unions and outlaws boy cotts. It also allows the President to order striking workers to go back to work if he feels a strike is a "national emergency." Though the United Farm Workers Organizing Com mittee has for years been calling for legislation to protect the rights of farm workers, Union spokesmen warned that Nixon's past statements indicate that he is more interested in repressing the Union and outlawing the grape boycott than in prov iding farm workers with legal protection to organize their union. Union Attorney jerome Cohen noted Nixon may be hoping ro invoke the Taft-Hartley amendment to obtain a Fede'ral injunction outlawing the right to strike and boycott . The Union has always favored a fair procedure for representational elections, but such elections should . be held to prevent a strike siruation. It is difficult to hold a fair election after the growers have been to bust the Union for the last 3 1/2 years. Union leaders have repeatedly stated that they are willing to sit down with grower representatives t o work out recognition procedures. Cesar Chavez, director of the United Farm Workers, bas in every impending strike situation called for representational elections and offered to sit down and ne gotiate details and procedures for such an election . In the case of the general grape strike in 1965, at Schenley, Di Giorgio, and Perelli Minetti in 1966, at Giumarra in 1967, and to i:he Coachella, Arvin Lamont and Lodi growers in 1968, the Union offered to hold elections or card checks . In each of these cases, the growers refused the initial offer, and the Union was forced to launch a strike and boycott. As Chavez commented after Giumarra repeatedly refused to discuss elections prior to the strike in 1967, "Once we begin the strike, we will not offer Giumarra two bites at the same The examples of Almaden, Gallo, Franzia, Paul Masson, Christian Brothers, and Novitiate Vineyards. are all cases where the management arranged for elections or similar procedures, and the Union proved that it had the overwhelming support of the workers. In all these cases, the companies agreed to negotiate contracts, and no boycott or work stoppage occured. Jim Drake, administrative assistant to Chavez, commented, "First priority in passing legislation to bring justice to farm workers, is to solve the green card . .

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FOR WINE GRAPE HARVEST WLARE, February 1 3 --On diSplay _ at the Farm Machinery Show in Th lare last month was a new mechanical grape harvester which manufactorers claim can remove up to 20 tons of wine grapes per hour and 'replace many pickers.' At least two companies now have machines on the market. Chisholm Ryder Co . has two types of machines and FMC Corporation has a similar machine. All sell for approximately $25,000 or more. Machines are already widely used in the New York wine grape harvest, accordi ng co Chisholm spokesmen . The machines are selfpropelled. straddles the row of grapes and as it progresses down the row, the grape berries are removed from the v ines by the s h aking action of shaker arms. On some mode l s , the arms go up and down, shaking the wires to which the vi nes are tied. On other models, un -rigid 'tongues' or 'fingers' reach out from both sides bucket elevators which discharge of the machine into the vines, almost coming together in the middle . As the machine proceeds down the row, the 'fingers' flap against the v ines, and berries, knocking the grapes offthevines. In both cases, the grapes fall on to a series of inclined overlapping 'catcher plates' and then roll down into the conveyo r belts, which run the length of the harvester on either side . The 'catcher plates' come togethe r under the vines , but give way tO go around the trunk of the vine, or stakes, when the machine is passing over them. The conveyor belts carry the fruit to two short inclined con veyors, which lift the berries and drop them lhrough a kind of v acuum cleaner apararus which sucks out much of lhe leaves and twigs and debris whic h also fall on to the mach i ne as it shakes the vines. Then the fruit i s raised wilh rubber them into an arm whi ch stretches out from the machine. Th i s last swinging conveyor arm dumps the grapes into the accompanying trucks o r gondolas which move along the next row to receive the .grapes and take them to the winery. Company spokesmen are also hopeful that the machines can be adapted for harvesting raisin grapes, with the swinging conveyor arm dropping the grapes onto drying pads rather than in trucks. But the machine atpresentcouldnotharvest tab l e grapes, as most of the grapes shaken from the vine fall onto the machine singly, and many are mashed and damaged . Table grapes can't be marketed grape by grape, and damaged fruit wou l d ruin the whole bunch unless the fruit i s to b e mashed or quickly dried. Before the can be used, Continued on page 14 ---,...._,..,._

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Equality Under The Law In Florida BELLE GLADE, FLORIDA --A Florida law prohibits a farm worker who rents a house or an apartment in a labor camp from having any visitors, even his attorney, co his dwelling that the owner of the house or apartment disapproves of for any reason, it was revealed at a conference on migrant legislation here. Another Florida law which came under discussion permits toilet facilities to be located 200 feet from the house. One toilet for every 15 women or 20 men is a permissible ration. And that's America in !969. Cops Tear-Gas Colorado Strikers BRIGHTON, COLORADo--The eight-month National Floral Workers Organization strike agaist Kitayama Brothers flower farm near Brighton ended on Sarur day, February IS, with the rear-gassingof five womenpicketers who had chained themselves to the gates of the farm. The five women, Mrs. Mary Padilla; Mrs. Martha del Real, 1V1rs. Lupe Briseno, NFWO president, Mrs. Rachel Sandoval, and Mrs. Mary Sailas, fastened loops of chain arOLmd their waists to keep scab workers from entering the fields, but scabs entered through a back road. It was reported that at about 7:30 AM, Weld County Deputy Sheriffs advanced on the women carrying a device ' with a nozzle labeled "pepper fog" after a Kitayama employee had cut the chain at each post of d1e gate. Sgt. D. R. Rutz of the sheriffs' departmentthenturned on the machine, throwing a snow-white layer of gas on the women. half walking, the picketers dragged the chain with them out onto the roadway, assisted by men in the group. The NFWO, composed mostly of Chicana women who worked for Kitayama, began the strik e and picketing for higher wages and better working conditions. Led by Mrs. Briseno, who was fired from the company in May, they demanded $1.60 per hour, which is a 45-cent an hour increase, and recognition of the newly formed union. Kitayama has refused to nego-tiate on any of the demands. The Crusade for justice and several other MexicanAmerican organizations in Denver have pledged to support the a llr.he way. In another incidcnt,Gina Gonzalc z,l7 year old daughter of Corky Gonzales, director of the Crusade for justice, was run down by a car while on the NFWO picket line. After the incidents, members of the NFWO gathered at the Brighron Action Center for a conference in which they decided to call off the strike temporarily. jim Garcia, a spokesman for the organization, said after the conference, •we are ending the strike today. We are quitting the picket line, but we are not quit ting our struggle for farm and floral workers." "We are changing the battleground to the state legislarure. And I can almost guarantee that, come summer, there will be similar type struggles to unionize floral workers in northeastern Cc.lorado." The pickets, waving the red banner with the black eagles and •viva la Huelga" signs, drove away promising to Mcome back again , and again, as long as Kicayama oppresses peop l e." Peach Growers Hear Cohen STOCKTON, Pebruary2U--UFWOC: AttOrney Jerome Cohen spo ke ro the California Freestone Peach Association's annual meeting here last nigh t, and pointed out that there was no difference between farm workers bargaining w ith canners and processers t o get a better price for their peaches. The Peach Association was organized by peach growers as a collective bargaining agent for the growers, in dealing with the canners. The Union serves the same function for the workers, Cohen noted. Cohen thanked the peach growers for inviting a representative of UFWCX:: _ to speak to them. •u the Continued on page 14

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E L MALCRIADO, March 1 , 1969/11 THREE DIE IN L ABOR C A:,., p BL AZE FLORIDA MIGRANTS STUNNED BY TRAGEDY HOMESTEAD , FLORIDA --Migrant farm wor kers, farmers, businessmen, clergymen and public o ffi c i a l s met in Homestead, Florida, on Thursda y , February 20, to discuss housing conditions for migrant workers. The meeting was called after three children burned to death in a labor camp fire in South Dade , Florida. Rev . David Russell of the Archdiocese o f Miam i, on e of the meeting participants, called m igrantschacks •incin e rators o f human fles h," and said that. i f no ac ti on i s ta ken , "I suppose next year mo r e c hildren will burn to death . • Russell a l so pointe d out that the $50 a month rental paid by many migrants, for bare, cwo room f rame shacks, i s far h i ghe r d1an most middle class residents of South Dade pay for t hei r home s . "A Migrant Le gal Ser vice study of housing s hows migrants pay $1. 89 pe r square foot per year. compared to an attorney's hom e , with air cond i ti o ning , plum bing a n d all conven i enc es, that costs $1. 7 4 per square foot per Frederika Smith of !he Migrant Legal Se r v i c e reported. Russell also s u gges ted !he elimi natio n o f the •grand fathe r clause," whic h exempts pre-1 963 migrant housing from new regulat i ons and said a h ousing code for camps must be enforced. At the meetin g , a lOman committee was name d co study the prob lem of migrant housing and to receommend i mpro vements . N ot a single farm wor ker was assigned to this committee. The children who b urned to death during the fire were a daughter and two g r a n dsons of Mr . and Mrs . james Lewis. 111e y li ve in a 16by 16-foot shack at the Krome Avenu e F a r m Housin g Center, for which they pa y $12 . 80 a week. ineligeble . The house had two bed rooms, but county regulations s:iy !here are to o man y in the Lewis family to live i n .a house !hac small . So !hey have to stay in their 16-foocsquare hovel where county regulations do not ap p ly . jus t recently, they almost had a house provided Two of the suroviving c hildroen of the Lew by the Homes tead Hous ing Authority. A m igrant is familu sleep in their one room Homesa ide found it for them, then discovered that they were tead, Florida shack . Union members who need help in filling in their tax foms come to the Service Center, 105 Asti St. in Delano , or the UPI.JOC Offiee at 10913 !lain Street in La;nont for assistance. Bring all available information , aheck stubs, or records of income. Deadline for filing taxes is 15.

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12/EL MALCR1ADO, 11arch 1, 1969 I t::tt:':':::t::ttttt::::ttt:ttt:::''t:t ::::,::::,:::::, ,.,::, ,,,,,,,;::;w,rr:rr:: '{{':'' :tr:r:t,::::r(:}:(i}}}M:tlfiiifi KRUEGER DEDICATED HIS LIFE ... Edltoro falle n into the patron system. VIVA MACARIQ .. • t h::: ! ':. h::':: for which we must fight, and we s1ruggle which we must carry on for your excellent [ forever if necessary. publication, E L MALCR IADO. We j (Valley of Tears) we have a war Hasta l a victoria, enjoy it ver:y much . It is an ex? which must be fought whether it's Reynaldo de la Cruz cellent way t o gain further in-McAllen, Texas formation and unde r standing of the social or political. Ed Krueger, founder of Las Colonias del Va lle, a n organization formed of 23 colonias or small barrios, is a man who has dedi cated his life to serving humanity, and by doi ng so he has committed the great sin of helping farm work -january 30, Editor: We recently enjoyed an evening of enlightenment with your Mr. Mar cos Muri.oz, from Boston , who s poke on the Smith College campus . A l though many of us have joined farm workers' cause. We also w ish to commend the Union for ha ving sent us Sr. Maca rio Bustos. Because of your representative s ' s inceri ty and devotion to you r Cause , they have inspired many people here to look beyon d their e r s ••• a sin that cannot be for g i ven by the "Boycott Grapes" ranks for years, own private affairs in order to make the the Texas Council of Churches, it does indeed he l p us to promote a determined effort ro help a ll of who, in this case, wereEd'sbosses. thi s bOycott by having information of you to fully share in the 'good life' And 1 say •were" because he has a real nature readily ar hand. For of this country whi ch is due to you been fired, and was given three thi s I congratulate your EL MAL-as Americans. days ro clear out of the Valley CRIADO--and look forward to fur-! saludos y buena suerte a todosl Se r v ice Committee office in San the r issues. S incerely, Juan, Texas. A n d may you l ook forward to a Mr . & Mrs. john McGrath So, dear brothers, the Texa s Coun-successf ul New Year. Minneapolis, Minnesota cil of Churches, who have always Sincere ly , February 2, 1969 been preachin g the right t o organize Patricia Robertson for collective bargain ing, and the Chesterfield, Mass, John Gregory Dvnne1s THE STORY OF THE C A LIFORNIA GRA PE STRI K E D ELANO i s the most complete nar rative available on the history of the farm workers' strugg les to build a union , and on the background to the grape strike. 1l1e book recalls the great breakt11roughs of 1966, the struggle and final victory with O i Gior g io, and the U.F.W.O.C.'s success in organ izing wine grape pickers. The book carries the reader up to the summer of 1967, when U . F .W.O. C. shifted the strike emphasis to table grape growers and began its strike and boycott against ?lease send me copies of John Dunne's The Stor>y o.f the nrap e Strike. Enclosed is $1.95 for each copy> plus 30 for postage Ung: Order from: E L M A LCR I ADD p . 0. BOX # 130 DELANO, CA. 93215 N A ME----------------------------------11 ADDRESS C IT Y

PAGE 13

I Letters A BALL GAME ... Editor: Some time ago, 1 lived for a couple of years i n o n e of the cen tral Ca!Hornia towns north of Sacra mento, I Still remember a warm summer afternoon whe n a young Mexican American bOy wandered u p t o watch a Littl e L eague baseball game. He was f r om a coumyrun labor camp nearby. : could not get the th ought out of m y m ind that that was as c l ose as t h a t bOy would ever get to a ball ga me by bOys his age in that ba ll H eld. It has only been i mpressed on m e l ately how f a r your organization has come in improving t h e po t e mialitles for a boy lik e that . In my short s l g lu edness, I never once thou!!:h t anybOdy could do what you arc doing. Please keep sending me your Cine new s paper-, EL MALCRIADO. Sincerely , D . johnson Seattle, Wash ington January 25, 1969 KEEP IT UP ... EL MALCP:IADO, March I, 1969/13 E L MALCR I ADO P.O. Box 130 Delano , Ca. 93215 MY FAMILY ARE ALL WORKERS ... Ednor: way our families can keep up w ith I am very.r:nuch interested in your things of this son. Cause. My family are all farm workers. Therefore your Cause is my Cause too . 1 am a college student plannin g t o be a teacher so I can wor k with 'culturally deprived' children, From m y v i sits to Texas 1 have notic ed that the r e me percentage of Mexi can-American graduates are almost 100 percent higher than ours h e r e in . the M ia mi area. It i s m y opinion that this i s due to tile Jack of teacher and parent motivation. Whereas i n Texas we have a large percentage o f 1vJexi can-American leacl1ers, here in the Miami Area I .still have not met on e ! We need people who have suffered and can u n d ersrand goe s , 'It rakes o ne to know one. I be lieve w e need more of our own to IJc in leadin g positions for us t o sec and foll o w the examples. Our parents who are far m workers look forward to our 16th birthday so we , r oo , can j o i n them in d1c fie ld s . I am not entirely against thi s . Sometimes this i s the only I LEARN A LOT ... Editor: But one thing our parents a nd we youn g peop l e muse realize is that without an adequa te educa t i on we shall go nowhere . We , roday'syoung peop le, whou ld be tomorrow's lead ers, and need an adequate education to help ourselves and our peop l e get free from a ll the miseries and injustices society has p laced upon "' The on ly way t do this i s t o ge t an educat ion to p r epare ourse lves for th e I mportant roles we Shall play in the furure. I can not emphasize enough d1e role our educa tion play s in our Cf!use. W e also need the leader sh ip of great men s uch as Cesar Ch;:wcz and others lik e hi m . I wish you and everybo dy e lse in terested and workin g for our cause m}' \cry b e s t wishes. Vh a I a Causa y cl Progreso, Sinc('rely, (/\ liss1 Carmen Ferna ndez M i a mi , Florida Februar y 20, i%9 HARD TO BELIEVE ... 1 a tten d our Union Friday night UFWOC: Keep u p the goo d work. \\'ill meetings bec ause I am a n a c ti v e It is hard to bclic\'e t h a t you can try to he l p O u t here, member and because I learn a lot continu e what with a ll the setbacks just read a n AP release in Sun of good thing s at our get together. you 've had bur thi)Se of us who are day paper of A & P Eastern D i v i s ion 1 was only a scvend1 gradegraduvitally Interested i n the problems S uPPOrtin g boycott ! I a t e when I came to this country of the poo r kno w tha t anyone w h o Viva la Huc l ga, in 1 932 . I only knew English and helps those who a r c downtro dde n SUzi e Pclmer rampa ngo lin go then. But now and beaten he lps all of us. I'.S. We apprecia[C Dale & J a n tltank God I have learned and s peak We beg you to contin ue with the Van Pelt's organizing e fforts in T agalog , Jl<>eano, V isayan and underUnion and the paper--you are really Seattle. TI1ey've done a great job--stand Pangasinan , and I am learnthe la s e hope of the farm worker. progress is being made, For a union in g S panish too. scare--the peop l e are not very soli-Respectfully yours, Sinerel y , darity minded. Celedo nio T. Gomez Viva Ia Cau sa, Seattle, Wash i ngton Del ano, Ca lifornia Gerald E . Robinett 2, 196 9 5, 1 9 69 Tucson, Arizona

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14/EL t 1ALCP.IADO, March 1, 1969 . PEACH GROWERS ... Continued from page 10 Another at the mccling: ''"' ' s Assemb l yman grape grower:; were willing to down and wlk William Bagley, (R-S.'In Hafnel; who warned farmers With us, thi s whole boycott thin g would have probably thnt rural areas of the S tnt c ,,ere losin g politic.:ll never Cohen said. He accused the grape control ro the more popul:ncd of the state. growet s of forcing the l"nion t o starr the boycon, /Je l<'lbcled the reactionary Farm Bureau "political since the growers refused to hold elec tions or negotiate, "n1c Farm Bureau has been a major force and brought in green card worker s as s 1rike breakers, in conv incin g grape growers to refuse to negotiate and traded l:tlx'. l s among each o ther tO confuse lhe with the Union, and has held out the promise that selective bO}'<.'ott \\'hich inil i a ll y dit•ected on l y leg islation will somehow be passed to destroy the against G iurnarra \'ineyards. Union and save grape g:rowc ts from t he inevitable. 'I-?-'<.:.J\ A Not Very Good Book On La Huelga :>00 DELANO, by John Gregor y D u nne (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1967) DELANO, by Johnl: rC'p:oryi)UilnC, background in labor hiStory, ami tract, agreements with Gallo and was written in !'>67 hu t remains while his narrative of tllc key events l'aul : \Iasson. n1 e narrative i s at the most upwto date book writte n of 1%5 through mid l%7 i s adcits best in deali ng w idl the D i on the fnnn workc 1 . < [ nion s a.nJ quare, his analysis, h i s underG i o r g i o campaign , thou g h thi s i s Lu 1-lur:lg:n. swndin g of the events before h i s a lso Ounnc , a reporter and writer for eyes, seems shnll ow . of hi s most erroneOus observat i o ns. the S..1tllrday I :\cnin!! l'ost, attc:npts 111e h ook has its most extensive The book provides a good innitial to convty an ani tude ch;1pwrs dealing with d1e events background to the Union's first bigl toward ..... tlK• f;wm \\"Otkcr•:' of 1966, the Senate investigation, breakd1roughs, with d1e wine grape but g ives to ::-;tower." the March ro Sacramento, the Schen growers. I t stops just short of the statcnlents and prop:l:::o:anda which Icy victory, the DiGiorgio strik e Giumarra srrike, which expanded simpl y :rr c not true. and victory, and the unfortunate in to the confrontation with all table li m ited amount of ti rue in I.Jclano , c onfrontati on with the Teamster s grape growers and d1e launching he the in tirua tc knowled g e of union. 1l1e boo k ends w h h d 1 e of the international boycott of table JX'Oplc :md C\ent<., that summer of 1()68, the murual assis-grapes. 11lat hiStory has yet to be Eugene HCF r .<:A. Dunne 1ancc a greement witll the Teamsters, written, as does a good, balanced, also seems lO ha\e a very weak terms of the new l)i Giorgio con integrated llistory of dJC whole AUTOMATION ... Continued from page 9 considerable prep .. 1 rationofthe vitwyards must b< done' . \ ' in cy.:trd cannot be u\er 6 feet. Fn1it lliU S t .Spcdal pruning, rying , and IJuddin g must done s o that the vine!> grow properly. 13ut there i s no dou b t that d1e machines :rre on their w:1y. ' nte Cl1allenge that these rnachines present to the Union i s very serio us. 111e entire crew for operating one of these machines is d1e operator, and two drivers to operate the accompanyin g trucks or. gondolas. l'vlanufactorcrs claim it can harvest I acre per hour, and re move up to 20 tons of grapes per hour. While it i s not the policy of the Union to oppose mechan1 zation or ' s top progress'. the Uni on must dev ise a pol icy that w ill protect the job se-curity o f workers at the ranches irl\'o l ve J i n mcchani zalion, with pensions o r retraining for those replaced, and w it h wages for rhc m.:lchine operators based on the profits dlat the machines will be earning for tJ1e ranches. 1110ugh usc of machines of thi s type may b e a year, two years, or five years off, here i n Califor nia, Uni o n members and ranch committee member s shoul d be tllinking o f how d1e usc or these machines can be regulated to pro vide maximum benefit for tJ1e work e r s . TI1c benefits of this type o f 'economic progress' must be we ighed against tl1e possibly de strucrhe results on society, such as unemployment, and d1e workers must l>e protccteg. movement. But for those interested i n that crucial period of the struggle when the Union won its first con tracts and solid victories, Dunne's book i s the on i y narrative available. DELANO is available from EL MALCRIADO, See page 12 for' information Vivo Ia Causa . y El Progreso eD'tte4f! al 4 'ilteuut#eFresno California

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The sign that tells you people are working together to fill their needs You do not have to be a member to shop-come i n and see how economic democracy works GREETINGS TO THE UNITED FARM WORKERS FROM The Consumer Cooperative of Berkeley EL MALCRIADO, March 1, 1969/15 ------A Snub to Selma SAN FRANCISCO, February 27-R Robert E. Gonzales of the san Francisco 13oard of was scheduled to speak a t a C ommunity Progress l uncheon in Se l ma on 53[Urday, March 1, but cancelled hiS appearance beCause of Sclrn::.'s opposition to the g rape boycott. "I recognize the position that thi s leaves the conference in, However, I have no alternative in view of the City of Selma' s positi on regarding the Grape Boyco tt , " Gonzales wrote. "If 1 were ro speak at the Con ference, I would have no alternati ve but to challenge the philosophy of your City in regards to progres s o f it's people. 1 can not see any commun ity or city ever p rogressing u ntil such time as all its citizens are guaranteed livlng wages for a day's work. A t !he present, I do not feel that the farm workers rights as em p l oyees a r e be i ng p r oteCted in their dea li ngs w ith their Gon zales' c.-mcellati on letter stated. Poison Use Rises \\ ASHINGTQ.'\J, D. C.--The usc of chemical weed killers and insecti cides o n America's crops has been rising steadily during the last 15 years, according to a report of the United States Department of Agriculrurc . More than threefourths of acerage de v oted to the cultiv .ltion of fruils , nuts, and potatoe s wer e tteated with insecticides. And somebod y does all that s p raying? Farm workers. And w h o protects f a r m workers from jXO'Sticide poisoning? In !llany cases, nobody . g . ' Just published: THE DIRT ON CALIFORNIA AGRIBUSINESS AND THE UNIVERSITY by Anne & Hal Draper THIS 32 PAGE BOOKLET DETA IL S: *tO>! THE UNIVERSITY O F CALIFORNI A S ERVICES THE CORPORATION F AMRS , "I>MO BENE FITS F Ra'l uc:s FARM INVENTIONS, *wHY tuLLIONS ARE SPENT T O HELP RICH GRO>IERS, .............. From EL MALCRIADO revi ew , January l, 1 969 : "The ev idence,. presented in carefully documen ted and anno tated prose by the authors, both long time friends of the United Farm Workers, shows tha t the University has prostiruted itself " time and again for the growers, issuing false a nd misleading reports ••• • PUBLl SHED BY INDE P E NDEN T SOCI ALIST CLUBS , P.O. BOX #910, B e rkeley , Cal. 9470 1 Please send paymen t w ith mail orders: 1 copy, 50; 3 copies, $1: 10 copies for $3.

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Discount Dept. Store 918 Main st. DELANO acros s from the I : .,, I(, . .,;:% <.. ... c. ; _ (,) 1(. l..:: c e Post Office Shop for Spring Clothes AT BEES All SIZES, WIDE VARIETY OF STYLES , CLOTHES FOR THE W HOLE F A MILY ! many other items ... Open SUNDAYS Visit BEE'S here in DELANO 918 MAIN -ACRO S S FROM THE POST OFFICE ALSO COACHELLA TRACY IN: STOCKTON INDIO